Meet Tess LeSue

Anne here, and today I'm introducing a new writer, Tess LeSue, whose first book, Bound for Eden, was released in the US yesterday, May 1st.  BoundForEden

I first met Tess when I was conducting a one-day writing workshop in Adelaide (capital city of South Australia), and I was impressed by the writing she did in that class. A few years later Mary Jo and I jointly conducted a one-day writing workshop for RWAustralia in Brisbane, at the end of which Mary Jo and her husband chose Tess's piece, out of a group of more than 250 writers, as the best piece written that day.  So I was delighted when I heard that Tess had been contracted by Berkley.

Romantic Times gave Bound For Eden four stars and said this: Readers looking for a traditional, serious, gritty western won’t find it in LeSue’s Frontiers of the Heart series starter. What they will find is a delightful, roller-coaster ride complete with its laugh-out-loud take on mistaken identity. Three siblings on the run, ruthless bad guys, quirky characters, nail-biting tension and steamy sensuality add up to a non-stop read that will make you smile and perhaps shed a tear. Western aficionados will welcome a refreshing new voice in the sub-genre.

Anne: Tess, welcome to the Word Wenches. As Kathe Robin said above, Bound For Eden was a rollicking ride, and it has a delicious flavour of the western romances I used to devour — and still love. What made you choose a western setting for this series?  

TessLeSueTess:  Thanks so much for having me! I’ve been reading this blog for years and am beyond excited to be invited along. I love historical romance in all its forms and read voraciously in most sub-genres, but I adore the American West (in books, film and television). I love everything from Seven Brides for Seven Brothers to Deadwood. I think there’s a genuine sense of optimism and possibility and freedom in westerns (even in the gritty ones). I also think the reason I gravitated towards writing westerns was the fact, as an Australian, the American West feels so familiar to me. My ancestors were frontier people too and I think the Australian voice is quite close to the voice of the American West. I adore the big country, the wide-open skies, the rough and ready characters, and the looseness of the social mores. I love the fact that western heroines get down in the dirt with the guys; they do everything the boys do (and more). Heroines can be virgins or whores, widows or outlaws. There’s so much fun in that for a writer. 

Anne: Your heroine, Alex, is a feisty one. Tell us about Alex.

Tess: She’s so much fun. What I love about Alex is that she’s indomitable. It doesn’t matter what life throws at her (and it throws a lot: orphan-hood twice over with the loss of her birth parents and her foster parents; sexual harassment and assault; responsibility for her siblings; villains and varmints and all sorts of mad adventures) she faces it head on. With no small amount of sass. When I was writing she made me laugh out loud – I never knew what she was going to say! Alex has a temper too. She’s irritated by everything. And irritation is so funny – it gives you so much scope for comedy.

James_Drury_The_VirginianAnne: And there’s plenty of comedy in this book. Your hero, Luke, is a classic — the quintessential talk, dark and yummy. Who is Luke, and what makes him tick? (And no, that's not Luke in the photo)

Tess: When you first meet him Luke seems like a womanizer, but he has a heart of gold. His parents died when he was young and he single-handedly raised his two younger brothers. He can’t help but step in and take responsibility when things go wrong (just like Alex does). Both of them are used to shouldering burdens alone. It’s a shock to both of them to find someone else who will help carry the load. Of course, Luke only lets Alex help him because he thinks she’s a boy. The only experience he’s had with women is in a romantic/sexual capacity – and he can’t help but seduce every woman he meets. He thinks Alex is a scruffy runt of a boy; as a result Alex is the first woman in his life to get to know him as a person, and not just as a heart-stoppingly gorgeous lover.

Anne: And then there are the truly awful villains — tell us about them.

Tess: The Grady brothers don’t have an ounce of charm between the four of them. Silas Grady decides he wants to marry Alex, with or without her consent. With his brothers’ help he tries to harass her into saying yes. After a long winter of abuse and theft, starvation and fear, Alex fights back, and finds herself fleeing Mississippi for the west, with the Grady’s ill-gotten gold in hand, and her brother and sister in tow. The Gradys are out to hunt her down; Silas vows to have Alex’s body and soul, while his murderous brother Gideon wants the gold… and vengeance. And Gideon Grady’s vengeance promises to be bloody. Emigrants_Crossing_the_Plains _or_The_Oregon_Trail_(Albert_Bierstadt) _1869

Anne:  You bring the setting of the old west and the Oregon Trail to life wonderfully. How did you go about researching it?

Tess: Research is one of my favorite things – I could lose myself in history books all day. Having said that, my books are a fantastic Technicolor-musical version of history, so I’m constantly striking the balance between the stark gritty history of the west and the romping-fun tone of the book. I have a vast collection of history books and I constantly have books out on loan from the library. I also found there’s a treasure trove of material online, especially about the Oregon Trail – there are so many family histories, diaries, old maps, and photos. And resources like Ken Burns’s documentary The West are invaluable; his work is particularly wonderful for its focus on the First Nations people and of women’s experiences of the west. I also love how many women wrote about their experiences on the trail; it was a brutal journey and navigating it with children was a feat of endurance and resilience. I find reading first person accounts really hits home the scale of the journey. It wasn’t for the faint hearted.

Anne: What was your favorite part of writing this book?  (And again, no that's not Luke in the photo.)

Robert-fuller-r11.0Tess: This book was such a gift. It was as much fun to write as I hope it is to read. The characters just took over. You can’t always say that – some books are a real slog – but this one was a romp to write. Alex just leapt to life and I loved writing the dialogue. I genuinely never knew what the characters were going to say and they were far funnier than I am. But I have a couple of favorite moments: one is at the beginning of the book, where Luke thinks Alex is a boy and makes her give him a bath (oh, poor Alex!), and the second is the final scene (which I won’t spoil by describing!). I ended the book smiling and I hope readers do too.

Anne: Can you give us a little taste of BOUND FOR EDEN please? 

Tess: This excerpt from the book is when Luke thinks Alex is a boy. Much to her horror, she finds himself drawing him a bath…

Luke finished shaving, without asking another question.

In silence, she fetched the warm water and waited as he soaped his thick, dark hair. When he closed his eyes and tilted his head back, she poured, watching the fall of water shimmer pale gold in the lamplight as it rinsed the soap free and left him clean and shining, like a newly carved marble statue.

She spun on her heel when he began to rise from the tub, and scrabbled for a towel. She thrust it at him and busied herself dampening the stove.

“You know, you ought to have a bath too,” he said speculatively, and she was conscious of his bulk blocking her exit. “You’re filthier than I was.”

Alex felt a wave of horror splash over her like a bucket of icy water. She shrank inside the baggy overalls and shook her head vehemently. 

“I can’t see your skin for the muck,” he continued. 

Oh heavens, what had she got herself into?

More of Tess's writing here:  

BoundForSin
Anne:
  Thanks so much for joining us on the Word Wenches, Tess, and all the very best of luck with this book. I'll be waiting to grab the next in the series, Bound For Sin, coming in September.

Tess: Thanks for inviting me, Anne.

 

Tess will give a copy of BOUND FOR EDEN to someone who leaves a comment or a response to this question: Which western hero (book/film/television show) makes you swoon? And to jump-start the memories, I've posted photos of two of my favorites from old TV shows.)

 

 

 

 

195 thoughts on “Meet Tess LeSue”

  1. As a youngster I greatly enjoyed the TV series with Cheyenne Bodie, a physical giant with a gentle spirit searching for justice in the wild and dangerous American West.
    Shane was a favorite movie along with all of the John Wayne films!
    I also enjoy Western novels, especially those with a romantic thread eg Jodi Thomas’s whispering mountain series. My favorite Western author would be Roseanne Bittner. I particularly like the way that she highlights the plight of the native American Indians.
    Tess, will you consider publishing audio versions if your books sell well? In the mean time, a recommendation from Anne is good enough for me to try ‘Bound for Eden’ 😊

    Reply
  2. As a youngster I greatly enjoyed the TV series with Cheyenne Bodie, a physical giant with a gentle spirit searching for justice in the wild and dangerous American West.
    Shane was a favorite movie along with all of the John Wayne films!
    I also enjoy Western novels, especially those with a romantic thread eg Jodi Thomas’s whispering mountain series. My favorite Western author would be Roseanne Bittner. I particularly like the way that she highlights the plight of the native American Indians.
    Tess, will you consider publishing audio versions if your books sell well? In the mean time, a recommendation from Anne is good enough for me to try ‘Bound for Eden’ 😊

    Reply
  3. As a youngster I greatly enjoyed the TV series with Cheyenne Bodie, a physical giant with a gentle spirit searching for justice in the wild and dangerous American West.
    Shane was a favorite movie along with all of the John Wayne films!
    I also enjoy Western novels, especially those with a romantic thread eg Jodi Thomas’s whispering mountain series. My favorite Western author would be Roseanne Bittner. I particularly like the way that she highlights the plight of the native American Indians.
    Tess, will you consider publishing audio versions if your books sell well? In the mean time, a recommendation from Anne is good enough for me to try ‘Bound for Eden’ 😊

    Reply
  4. As a youngster I greatly enjoyed the TV series with Cheyenne Bodie, a physical giant with a gentle spirit searching for justice in the wild and dangerous American West.
    Shane was a favorite movie along with all of the John Wayne films!
    I also enjoy Western novels, especially those with a romantic thread eg Jodi Thomas’s whispering mountain series. My favorite Western author would be Roseanne Bittner. I particularly like the way that she highlights the plight of the native American Indians.
    Tess, will you consider publishing audio versions if your books sell well? In the mean time, a recommendation from Anne is good enough for me to try ‘Bound for Eden’ 😊

    Reply
  5. As a youngster I greatly enjoyed the TV series with Cheyenne Bodie, a physical giant with a gentle spirit searching for justice in the wild and dangerous American West.
    Shane was a favorite movie along with all of the John Wayne films!
    I also enjoy Western novels, especially those with a romantic thread eg Jodi Thomas’s whispering mountain series. My favorite Western author would be Roseanne Bittner. I particularly like the way that she highlights the plight of the native American Indians.
    Tess, will you consider publishing audio versions if your books sell well? In the mean time, a recommendation from Anne is good enough for me to try ‘Bound for Eden’ 😊

    Reply
  6. Thanks, Quantum, I’m a bit of a John Wayne fan, too. I’m going to jump in here and answer the question about audio for Tess. For authors published with traditional publishers (like Tess and I are) the decision about audio is made by the publisher, not the author. I would have loved my earlier books to go into audio (and am still asking my publisher about it) but Autumn Bride was the first of mine to go into audio. I’m sure Tess would love her book to go into audio, too. Let’s hope they do.

    Reply
  7. Thanks, Quantum, I’m a bit of a John Wayne fan, too. I’m going to jump in here and answer the question about audio for Tess. For authors published with traditional publishers (like Tess and I are) the decision about audio is made by the publisher, not the author. I would have loved my earlier books to go into audio (and am still asking my publisher about it) but Autumn Bride was the first of mine to go into audio. I’m sure Tess would love her book to go into audio, too. Let’s hope they do.

    Reply
  8. Thanks, Quantum, I’m a bit of a John Wayne fan, too. I’m going to jump in here and answer the question about audio for Tess. For authors published with traditional publishers (like Tess and I are) the decision about audio is made by the publisher, not the author. I would have loved my earlier books to go into audio (and am still asking my publisher about it) but Autumn Bride was the first of mine to go into audio. I’m sure Tess would love her book to go into audio, too. Let’s hope they do.

    Reply
  9. Thanks, Quantum, I’m a bit of a John Wayne fan, too. I’m going to jump in here and answer the question about audio for Tess. For authors published with traditional publishers (like Tess and I are) the decision about audio is made by the publisher, not the author. I would have loved my earlier books to go into audio (and am still asking my publisher about it) but Autumn Bride was the first of mine to go into audio. I’m sure Tess would love her book to go into audio, too. Let’s hope they do.

    Reply
  10. Thanks, Quantum, I’m a bit of a John Wayne fan, too. I’m going to jump in here and answer the question about audio for Tess. For authors published with traditional publishers (like Tess and I are) the decision about audio is made by the publisher, not the author. I would have loved my earlier books to go into audio (and am still asking my publisher about it) but Autumn Bride was the first of mine to go into audio. I’m sure Tess would love her book to go into audio, too. Let’s hope they do.

    Reply
  11. I watched a lot of Westerns on TV when I was young (50s ad 60s). A lot of them are now re-runs on TV, but most of them don’t interest me as much as they did back in the day. The one that seems to hold up best is GUMSMOKE. I never thought of James Arness as a sex symbol. But he does appeal to me more now that I am older.
    I admit that I have not read a lot of western themed romance. The last one I read was Carla Kelly’s HER HESITANT HEART. Loved it. Can’t recall the name of he H/h off the top of my head, but it was a very interesting story. Keep a box of Kleenex handy. …smile

    Reply
  12. I watched a lot of Westerns on TV when I was young (50s ad 60s). A lot of them are now re-runs on TV, but most of them don’t interest me as much as they did back in the day. The one that seems to hold up best is GUMSMOKE. I never thought of James Arness as a sex symbol. But he does appeal to me more now that I am older.
    I admit that I have not read a lot of western themed romance. The last one I read was Carla Kelly’s HER HESITANT HEART. Loved it. Can’t recall the name of he H/h off the top of my head, but it was a very interesting story. Keep a box of Kleenex handy. …smile

    Reply
  13. I watched a lot of Westerns on TV when I was young (50s ad 60s). A lot of them are now re-runs on TV, but most of them don’t interest me as much as they did back in the day. The one that seems to hold up best is GUMSMOKE. I never thought of James Arness as a sex symbol. But he does appeal to me more now that I am older.
    I admit that I have not read a lot of western themed romance. The last one I read was Carla Kelly’s HER HESITANT HEART. Loved it. Can’t recall the name of he H/h off the top of my head, but it was a very interesting story. Keep a box of Kleenex handy. …smile

    Reply
  14. I watched a lot of Westerns on TV when I was young (50s ad 60s). A lot of them are now re-runs on TV, but most of them don’t interest me as much as they did back in the day. The one that seems to hold up best is GUMSMOKE. I never thought of James Arness as a sex symbol. But he does appeal to me more now that I am older.
    I admit that I have not read a lot of western themed romance. The last one I read was Carla Kelly’s HER HESITANT HEART. Loved it. Can’t recall the name of he H/h off the top of my head, but it was a very interesting story. Keep a box of Kleenex handy. …smile

    Reply
  15. I watched a lot of Westerns on TV when I was young (50s ad 60s). A lot of them are now re-runs on TV, but most of them don’t interest me as much as they did back in the day. The one that seems to hold up best is GUMSMOKE. I never thought of James Arness as a sex symbol. But he does appeal to me more now that I am older.
    I admit that I have not read a lot of western themed romance. The last one I read was Carla Kelly’s HER HESITANT HEART. Loved it. Can’t recall the name of he H/h off the top of my head, but it was a very interesting story. Keep a box of Kleenex handy. …smile

    Reply
  16. Tess, welcome to the Word Wenches! I’m delighted to see that you’ve reached your richly deserved goal of publication. To me, it makes great sense that an Australian grows up with the same pioneer spirit that Americans have, so a Western series by an Australian writer makes perfect sense. May these books be a great success, and lead to more!

    Reply
  17. Tess, welcome to the Word Wenches! I’m delighted to see that you’ve reached your richly deserved goal of publication. To me, it makes great sense that an Australian grows up with the same pioneer spirit that Americans have, so a Western series by an Australian writer makes perfect sense. May these books be a great success, and lead to more!

    Reply
  18. Tess, welcome to the Word Wenches! I’m delighted to see that you’ve reached your richly deserved goal of publication. To me, it makes great sense that an Australian grows up with the same pioneer spirit that Americans have, so a Western series by an Australian writer makes perfect sense. May these books be a great success, and lead to more!

    Reply
  19. Tess, welcome to the Word Wenches! I’m delighted to see that you’ve reached your richly deserved goal of publication. To me, it makes great sense that an Australian grows up with the same pioneer spirit that Americans have, so a Western series by an Australian writer makes perfect sense. May these books be a great success, and lead to more!

    Reply
  20. Tess, welcome to the Word Wenches! I’m delighted to see that you’ve reached your richly deserved goal of publication. To me, it makes great sense that an Australian grows up with the same pioneer spirit that Americans have, so a Western series by an Australian writer makes perfect sense. May these books be a great success, and lead to more!

    Reply
  21. I looooved western movies growing up I especially love the silver screen oldies. My all time favorite would be The Good The Bad and The Ugly with Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cliff as far as movies go and books well I love Patricia Rice’s Rogues and Desperados series, one of my ultimate favourite! I love to read all about the tough men and the women that had the power to capture their hearts! I’ve never read Tess Lesue her books sound amazing definitely will look them up!

    Reply
  22. I looooved western movies growing up I especially love the silver screen oldies. My all time favorite would be The Good The Bad and The Ugly with Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cliff as far as movies go and books well I love Patricia Rice’s Rogues and Desperados series, one of my ultimate favourite! I love to read all about the tough men and the women that had the power to capture their hearts! I’ve never read Tess Lesue her books sound amazing definitely will look them up!

    Reply
  23. I looooved western movies growing up I especially love the silver screen oldies. My all time favorite would be The Good The Bad and The Ugly with Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cliff as far as movies go and books well I love Patricia Rice’s Rogues and Desperados series, one of my ultimate favourite! I love to read all about the tough men and the women that had the power to capture their hearts! I’ve never read Tess Lesue her books sound amazing definitely will look them up!

    Reply
  24. I looooved western movies growing up I especially love the silver screen oldies. My all time favorite would be The Good The Bad and The Ugly with Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cliff as far as movies go and books well I love Patricia Rice’s Rogues and Desperados series, one of my ultimate favourite! I love to read all about the tough men and the women that had the power to capture their hearts! I’ve never read Tess Lesue her books sound amazing definitely will look them up!

    Reply
  25. I looooved western movies growing up I especially love the silver screen oldies. My all time favorite would be The Good The Bad and The Ugly with Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cliff as far as movies go and books well I love Patricia Rice’s Rogues and Desperados series, one of my ultimate favourite! I love to read all about the tough men and the women that had the power to capture their hearts! I’ve never read Tess Lesue her books sound amazing definitely will look them up!

    Reply
  26. In the 1940s the “Saturday Evening Post” frequently had short stories that were accompanied by “western” art. One of the series was set if Medicine Hat, Canada (Saskatchewan? — my geography skills are very limited). It mad sense to me that it looked just like the U. S. west, since it’s just north of our border.
    But another series was set on a station in the outback. So I looked that up,to verify that the illustrations were accurate as opposed to being lazy
    These illustrations came to mind immediately when I read Tess’s statement of identification with “our” west — which thanks to Hollywood is also the world’s west.
    And I am grateful to the Saturday Evening Post for expanding my concepts to our neighbor to the north and to the other parts of the world.

    Reply
  27. In the 1940s the “Saturday Evening Post” frequently had short stories that were accompanied by “western” art. One of the series was set if Medicine Hat, Canada (Saskatchewan? — my geography skills are very limited). It mad sense to me that it looked just like the U. S. west, since it’s just north of our border.
    But another series was set on a station in the outback. So I looked that up,to verify that the illustrations were accurate as opposed to being lazy
    These illustrations came to mind immediately when I read Tess’s statement of identification with “our” west — which thanks to Hollywood is also the world’s west.
    And I am grateful to the Saturday Evening Post for expanding my concepts to our neighbor to the north and to the other parts of the world.

    Reply
  28. In the 1940s the “Saturday Evening Post” frequently had short stories that were accompanied by “western” art. One of the series was set if Medicine Hat, Canada (Saskatchewan? — my geography skills are very limited). It mad sense to me that it looked just like the U. S. west, since it’s just north of our border.
    But another series was set on a station in the outback. So I looked that up,to verify that the illustrations were accurate as opposed to being lazy
    These illustrations came to mind immediately when I read Tess’s statement of identification with “our” west — which thanks to Hollywood is also the world’s west.
    And I am grateful to the Saturday Evening Post for expanding my concepts to our neighbor to the north and to the other parts of the world.

    Reply
  29. In the 1940s the “Saturday Evening Post” frequently had short stories that were accompanied by “western” art. One of the series was set if Medicine Hat, Canada (Saskatchewan? — my geography skills are very limited). It mad sense to me that it looked just like the U. S. west, since it’s just north of our border.
    But another series was set on a station in the outback. So I looked that up,to verify that the illustrations were accurate as opposed to being lazy
    These illustrations came to mind immediately when I read Tess’s statement of identification with “our” west — which thanks to Hollywood is also the world’s west.
    And I am grateful to the Saturday Evening Post for expanding my concepts to our neighbor to the north and to the other parts of the world.

    Reply
  30. In the 1940s the “Saturday Evening Post” frequently had short stories that were accompanied by “western” art. One of the series was set if Medicine Hat, Canada (Saskatchewan? — my geography skills are very limited). It mad sense to me that it looked just like the U. S. west, since it’s just north of our border.
    But another series was set on a station in the outback. So I looked that up,to verify that the illustrations were accurate as opposed to being lazy
    These illustrations came to mind immediately when I read Tess’s statement of identification with “our” west — which thanks to Hollywood is also the world’s west.
    And I am grateful to the Saturday Evening Post for expanding my concepts to our neighbor to the north and to the other parts of the world.

    Reply
  31. P. S. Sorry about the poor proof-reading.
    Have you ever noticed that “I looked it up” is a constant statement here on the Wenches entires; the writers and we “pure” readers all seem to use it lots.

    Reply
  32. P. S. Sorry about the poor proof-reading.
    Have you ever noticed that “I looked it up” is a constant statement here on the Wenches entires; the writers and we “pure” readers all seem to use it lots.

    Reply
  33. P. S. Sorry about the poor proof-reading.
    Have you ever noticed that “I looked it up” is a constant statement here on the Wenches entires; the writers and we “pure” readers all seem to use it lots.

    Reply
  34. P. S. Sorry about the poor proof-reading.
    Have you ever noticed that “I looked it up” is a constant statement here on the Wenches entires; the writers and we “pure” readers all seem to use it lots.

    Reply
  35. P. S. Sorry about the poor proof-reading.
    Have you ever noticed that “I looked it up” is a constant statement here on the Wenches entires; the writers and we “pure” readers all seem to use it lots.

    Reply
  36. First, I must tell you that I was so disappointed that it’s not possible to download any part of your book on Amazon to sample. If you can change this to the normal downloading of a sample, I think you’d sell more books. I never, ever buy a book that I can’t read even a page!
    Second, I adore “The Big Country” and more than adore the romance between Gregory Peck and Jean Simmons. It’s a fabulous movie with a fabulous cast and a wonderful plot and character. Oh, if you haven’t seen it, boy, do you have a treat in store for you!

    Reply
  37. First, I must tell you that I was so disappointed that it’s not possible to download any part of your book on Amazon to sample. If you can change this to the normal downloading of a sample, I think you’d sell more books. I never, ever buy a book that I can’t read even a page!
    Second, I adore “The Big Country” and more than adore the romance between Gregory Peck and Jean Simmons. It’s a fabulous movie with a fabulous cast and a wonderful plot and character. Oh, if you haven’t seen it, boy, do you have a treat in store for you!

    Reply
  38. First, I must tell you that I was so disappointed that it’s not possible to download any part of your book on Amazon to sample. If you can change this to the normal downloading of a sample, I think you’d sell more books. I never, ever buy a book that I can’t read even a page!
    Second, I adore “The Big Country” and more than adore the romance between Gregory Peck and Jean Simmons. It’s a fabulous movie with a fabulous cast and a wonderful plot and character. Oh, if you haven’t seen it, boy, do you have a treat in store for you!

    Reply
  39. First, I must tell you that I was so disappointed that it’s not possible to download any part of your book on Amazon to sample. If you can change this to the normal downloading of a sample, I think you’d sell more books. I never, ever buy a book that I can’t read even a page!
    Second, I adore “The Big Country” and more than adore the romance between Gregory Peck and Jean Simmons. It’s a fabulous movie with a fabulous cast and a wonderful plot and character. Oh, if you haven’t seen it, boy, do you have a treat in store for you!

    Reply
  40. First, I must tell you that I was so disappointed that it’s not possible to download any part of your book on Amazon to sample. If you can change this to the normal downloading of a sample, I think you’d sell more books. I never, ever buy a book that I can’t read even a page!
    Second, I adore “The Big Country” and more than adore the romance between Gregory Peck and Jean Simmons. It’s a fabulous movie with a fabulous cast and a wonderful plot and character. Oh, if you haven’t seen it, boy, do you have a treat in store for you!

    Reply
  41. “Look it up” was my parents’ usual response when I was growing up — generally for the meaning of a word. Otherwise it was “what do you think it means?” And I’d make a guess from context, and then they’d say yes or no and explain.
    These days google makes it so easy to look anything up. It’s down the rabbit hole a dozen or more times a day.

    Reply
  42. “Look it up” was my parents’ usual response when I was growing up — generally for the meaning of a word. Otherwise it was “what do you think it means?” And I’d make a guess from context, and then they’d say yes or no and explain.
    These days google makes it so easy to look anything up. It’s down the rabbit hole a dozen or more times a day.

    Reply
  43. “Look it up” was my parents’ usual response when I was growing up — generally for the meaning of a word. Otherwise it was “what do you think it means?” And I’d make a guess from context, and then they’d say yes or no and explain.
    These days google makes it so easy to look anything up. It’s down the rabbit hole a dozen or more times a day.

    Reply
  44. “Look it up” was my parents’ usual response when I was growing up — generally for the meaning of a word. Otherwise it was “what do you think it means?” And I’d make a guess from context, and then they’d say yes or no and explain.
    These days google makes it so easy to look anything up. It’s down the rabbit hole a dozen or more times a day.

    Reply
  45. “Look it up” was my parents’ usual response when I was growing up — generally for the meaning of a word. Otherwise it was “what do you think it means?” And I’d make a guess from context, and then they’d say yes or no and explain.
    These days google makes it so easy to look anything up. It’s down the rabbit hole a dozen or more times a day.

    Reply
  46. Hi Tess and Anne
    WOW I haven’t read a good western for years and they used to a must on mine and my Mum’s reading pile many years a go and one of my favourite westerns was High Chaperal and The Barkley family I can’t think of the name of it and one of my favourite western movies is The Sons of Katie Elder and Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid 🙂
    I need to get this book woohoo
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  47. Hi Tess and Anne
    WOW I haven’t read a good western for years and they used to a must on mine and my Mum’s reading pile many years a go and one of my favourite westerns was High Chaperal and The Barkley family I can’t think of the name of it and one of my favourite western movies is The Sons of Katie Elder and Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid 🙂
    I need to get this book woohoo
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  48. Hi Tess and Anne
    WOW I haven’t read a good western for years and they used to a must on mine and my Mum’s reading pile many years a go and one of my favourite westerns was High Chaperal and The Barkley family I can’t think of the name of it and one of my favourite western movies is The Sons of Katie Elder and Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid 🙂
    I need to get this book woohoo
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  49. Hi Tess and Anne
    WOW I haven’t read a good western for years and they used to a must on mine and my Mum’s reading pile many years a go and one of my favourite westerns was High Chaperal and The Barkley family I can’t think of the name of it and one of my favourite western movies is The Sons of Katie Elder and Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid 🙂
    I need to get this book woohoo
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  50. Hi Tess and Anne
    WOW I haven’t read a good western for years and they used to a must on mine and my Mum’s reading pile many years a go and one of my favourite westerns was High Chaperal and The Barkley family I can’t think of the name of it and one of my favourite western movies is The Sons of Katie Elder and Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid 🙂
    I need to get this book woohoo
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  51. I couldn’t choose so I’m naming two of my favourites: Houston Leigh (Texas Destiny by Lorraine Heath) and Buck Scott (Come Spring by Jill Marie Landis). Those two started my love of beta heroes.

    Reply
  52. I couldn’t choose so I’m naming two of my favourites: Houston Leigh (Texas Destiny by Lorraine Heath) and Buck Scott (Come Spring by Jill Marie Landis). Those two started my love of beta heroes.

    Reply
  53. I couldn’t choose so I’m naming two of my favourites: Houston Leigh (Texas Destiny by Lorraine Heath) and Buck Scott (Come Spring by Jill Marie Landis). Those two started my love of beta heroes.

    Reply
  54. I couldn’t choose so I’m naming two of my favourites: Houston Leigh (Texas Destiny by Lorraine Heath) and Buck Scott (Come Spring by Jill Marie Landis). Those two started my love of beta heroes.

    Reply
  55. I couldn’t choose so I’m naming two of my favourites: Houston Leigh (Texas Destiny by Lorraine Heath) and Buck Scott (Come Spring by Jill Marie Landis). Those two started my love of beta heroes.

    Reply
  56. I love Jodi Thomas! I really loved Jude Deveraux’s few westerns too and LaVyrle Spencer’s. At the moment I’m binging on Beverly Jenkins. I think you’re so right about the need to represent the traumatic history and the experience of the First Nations. I’m hoping to explore the complexity of the history more in the next few books.
    And yes I’d love to have ‘Bound for Eden’ in audiobook one day.

    Reply
  57. I love Jodi Thomas! I really loved Jude Deveraux’s few westerns too and LaVyrle Spencer’s. At the moment I’m binging on Beverly Jenkins. I think you’re so right about the need to represent the traumatic history and the experience of the First Nations. I’m hoping to explore the complexity of the history more in the next few books.
    And yes I’d love to have ‘Bound for Eden’ in audiobook one day.

    Reply
  58. I love Jodi Thomas! I really loved Jude Deveraux’s few westerns too and LaVyrle Spencer’s. At the moment I’m binging on Beverly Jenkins. I think you’re so right about the need to represent the traumatic history and the experience of the First Nations. I’m hoping to explore the complexity of the history more in the next few books.
    And yes I’d love to have ‘Bound for Eden’ in audiobook one day.

    Reply
  59. I love Jodi Thomas! I really loved Jude Deveraux’s few westerns too and LaVyrle Spencer’s. At the moment I’m binging on Beverly Jenkins. I think you’re so right about the need to represent the traumatic history and the experience of the First Nations. I’m hoping to explore the complexity of the history more in the next few books.
    And yes I’d love to have ‘Bound for Eden’ in audiobook one day.

    Reply
  60. I love Jodi Thomas! I really loved Jude Deveraux’s few westerns too and LaVyrle Spencer’s. At the moment I’m binging on Beverly Jenkins. I think you’re so right about the need to represent the traumatic history and the experience of the First Nations. I’m hoping to explore the complexity of the history more in the next few books.
    And yes I’d love to have ‘Bound for Eden’ in audiobook one day.

    Reply
  61. How gorgeous was Clint Eastwood when he was young? I love High Plains Drifter and Pale Rider. Although I’d be curious to re-watch them now and see if I still love them!

    Reply
  62. How gorgeous was Clint Eastwood when he was young? I love High Plains Drifter and Pale Rider. Although I’d be curious to re-watch them now and see if I still love them!

    Reply
  63. How gorgeous was Clint Eastwood when he was young? I love High Plains Drifter and Pale Rider. Although I’d be curious to re-watch them now and see if I still love them!

    Reply
  64. How gorgeous was Clint Eastwood when he was young? I love High Plains Drifter and Pale Rider. Although I’d be curious to re-watch them now and see if I still love them!

    Reply
  65. How gorgeous was Clint Eastwood when he was young? I love High Plains Drifter and Pale Rider. Although I’d be curious to re-watch them now and see if I still love them!

    Reply
  66. I haven’t read many stories set in Canada but would love to see some. I think North Americans and Australians have so much in common. And our ‘cowboys’ seem pretty popular over there too 😉 Hello, Chris Hemsworth and Hugh Jackman!

    Reply
  67. I haven’t read many stories set in Canada but would love to see some. I think North Americans and Australians have so much in common. And our ‘cowboys’ seem pretty popular over there too 😉 Hello, Chris Hemsworth and Hugh Jackman!

    Reply
  68. I haven’t read many stories set in Canada but would love to see some. I think North Americans and Australians have so much in common. And our ‘cowboys’ seem pretty popular over there too 😉 Hello, Chris Hemsworth and Hugh Jackman!

    Reply
  69. I haven’t read many stories set in Canada but would love to see some. I think North Americans and Australians have so much in common. And our ‘cowboys’ seem pretty popular over there too 😉 Hello, Chris Hemsworth and Hugh Jackman!

    Reply
  70. I haven’t read many stories set in Canada but would love to see some. I think North Americans and Australians have so much in common. And our ‘cowboys’ seem pretty popular over there too 😉 Hello, Chris Hemsworth and Hugh Jackman!

    Reply
  71. I haven’t started Westworld yet because I’ve been so busy and I want to really enjoy it. It’s on my list for a nice rainy weekend when I can binge it.

    Reply
  72. I haven’t started Westworld yet because I’ve been so busy and I want to really enjoy it. It’s on my list for a nice rainy weekend when I can binge it.

    Reply
  73. I haven’t started Westworld yet because I’ve been so busy and I want to really enjoy it. It’s on my list for a nice rainy weekend when I can binge it.

    Reply
  74. I haven’t started Westworld yet because I’ve been so busy and I want to really enjoy it. It’s on my list for a nice rainy weekend when I can binge it.

    Reply
  75. I haven’t started Westworld yet because I’ve been so busy and I want to really enjoy it. It’s on my list for a nice rainy weekend when I can binge it.

    Reply
  76. I always liked Alan Ladd as Shane in the film of the same name. He was the ultimate western gentleman with an innate desire to protect and defend the innocent.
    Richard Widmark in “Cheyenne Autumn” was another good guy. I think he played a soldier.

    Reply
  77. I always liked Alan Ladd as Shane in the film of the same name. He was the ultimate western gentleman with an innate desire to protect and defend the innocent.
    Richard Widmark in “Cheyenne Autumn” was another good guy. I think he played a soldier.

    Reply
  78. I always liked Alan Ladd as Shane in the film of the same name. He was the ultimate western gentleman with an innate desire to protect and defend the innocent.
    Richard Widmark in “Cheyenne Autumn” was another good guy. I think he played a soldier.

    Reply
  79. I always liked Alan Ladd as Shane in the film of the same name. He was the ultimate western gentleman with an innate desire to protect and defend the innocent.
    Richard Widmark in “Cheyenne Autumn” was another good guy. I think he played a soldier.

    Reply
  80. I always liked Alan Ladd as Shane in the film of the same name. He was the ultimate western gentleman with an innate desire to protect and defend the innocent.
    Richard Widmark in “Cheyenne Autumn” was another good guy. I think he played a soldier.

    Reply
  81. I grew up during the era of the Saturday matinee, and the cowboys who rode across the screen were my first heroes. I loved Gene Autry and Roy Rogers, but my favorite was the lesser known Lash Larue. My BFF and I sighed over him, and one of the highlights of our childhood was his appearance live at our local theater. A bit later I read my dad’s westerns right along with my mother’s romance novels. Zane Gray and Louis L’Amour were my most frequent choices. I have enjoyed many western romances, but I’d place Maggie Osborne at the top of my list. Several of her books are on my keeper shelves, but The Wives of Bowie Stone and, on a lighter note, I Do, I Do, I Do are the most tattered from rereads. I look forward to reading Bound for Eden.

    Reply
  82. I grew up during the era of the Saturday matinee, and the cowboys who rode across the screen were my first heroes. I loved Gene Autry and Roy Rogers, but my favorite was the lesser known Lash Larue. My BFF and I sighed over him, and one of the highlights of our childhood was his appearance live at our local theater. A bit later I read my dad’s westerns right along with my mother’s romance novels. Zane Gray and Louis L’Amour were my most frequent choices. I have enjoyed many western romances, but I’d place Maggie Osborne at the top of my list. Several of her books are on my keeper shelves, but The Wives of Bowie Stone and, on a lighter note, I Do, I Do, I Do are the most tattered from rereads. I look forward to reading Bound for Eden.

    Reply
  83. I grew up during the era of the Saturday matinee, and the cowboys who rode across the screen were my first heroes. I loved Gene Autry and Roy Rogers, but my favorite was the lesser known Lash Larue. My BFF and I sighed over him, and one of the highlights of our childhood was his appearance live at our local theater. A bit later I read my dad’s westerns right along with my mother’s romance novels. Zane Gray and Louis L’Amour were my most frequent choices. I have enjoyed many western romances, but I’d place Maggie Osborne at the top of my list. Several of her books are on my keeper shelves, but The Wives of Bowie Stone and, on a lighter note, I Do, I Do, I Do are the most tattered from rereads. I look forward to reading Bound for Eden.

    Reply
  84. I grew up during the era of the Saturday matinee, and the cowboys who rode across the screen were my first heroes. I loved Gene Autry and Roy Rogers, but my favorite was the lesser known Lash Larue. My BFF and I sighed over him, and one of the highlights of our childhood was his appearance live at our local theater. A bit later I read my dad’s westerns right along with my mother’s romance novels. Zane Gray and Louis L’Amour were my most frequent choices. I have enjoyed many western romances, but I’d place Maggie Osborne at the top of my list. Several of her books are on my keeper shelves, but The Wives of Bowie Stone and, on a lighter note, I Do, I Do, I Do are the most tattered from rereads. I look forward to reading Bound for Eden.

    Reply
  85. I grew up during the era of the Saturday matinee, and the cowboys who rode across the screen were my first heroes. I loved Gene Autry and Roy Rogers, but my favorite was the lesser known Lash Larue. My BFF and I sighed over him, and one of the highlights of our childhood was his appearance live at our local theater. A bit later I read my dad’s westerns right along with my mother’s romance novels. Zane Gray and Louis L’Amour were my most frequent choices. I have enjoyed many western romances, but I’d place Maggie Osborne at the top of my list. Several of her books are on my keeper shelves, but The Wives of Bowie Stone and, on a lighter note, I Do, I Do, I Do are the most tattered from rereads. I look forward to reading Bound for Eden.

    Reply
  86. Janga, I’d put Maggie Osborne at the top of my list, too. The Wives of Bowie Stone, that one about the feisty/hostile orphan girl and the tough western woman who always keeps her word — forgotten the title, but it was wonderful. I do, I do, I do, also — and others. After I discovered herI made an effort to track down all her books. Not sure if they’re in e-books yet, but it would be great if they were.

    Reply
  87. Janga, I’d put Maggie Osborne at the top of my list, too. The Wives of Bowie Stone, that one about the feisty/hostile orphan girl and the tough western woman who always keeps her word — forgotten the title, but it was wonderful. I do, I do, I do, also — and others. After I discovered herI made an effort to track down all her books. Not sure if they’re in e-books yet, but it would be great if they were.

    Reply
  88. Janga, I’d put Maggie Osborne at the top of my list, too. The Wives of Bowie Stone, that one about the feisty/hostile orphan girl and the tough western woman who always keeps her word — forgotten the title, but it was wonderful. I do, I do, I do, also — and others. After I discovered herI made an effort to track down all her books. Not sure if they’re in e-books yet, but it would be great if they were.

    Reply
  89. Janga, I’d put Maggie Osborne at the top of my list, too. The Wives of Bowie Stone, that one about the feisty/hostile orphan girl and the tough western woman who always keeps her word — forgotten the title, but it was wonderful. I do, I do, I do, also — and others. After I discovered herI made an effort to track down all her books. Not sure if they’re in e-books yet, but it would be great if they were.

    Reply
  90. Janga, I’d put Maggie Osborne at the top of my list, too. The Wives of Bowie Stone, that one about the feisty/hostile orphan girl and the tough western woman who always keeps her word — forgotten the title, but it was wonderful. I do, I do, I do, also — and others. After I discovered herI made an effort to track down all her books. Not sure if they’re in e-books yet, but it would be great if they were.

    Reply
  91. Oooh they ARE in kindle. And there are a few I haven’t read. I’m going shopping . . . . Anne (who is in Sydney waiting to get into her hotel room)

    Reply
  92. Oooh they ARE in kindle. And there are a few I haven’t read. I’m going shopping . . . . Anne (who is in Sydney waiting to get into her hotel room)

    Reply
  93. Oooh they ARE in kindle. And there are a few I haven’t read. I’m going shopping . . . . Anne (who is in Sydney waiting to get into her hotel room)

    Reply
  94. Oooh they ARE in kindle. And there are a few I haven’t read. I’m going shopping . . . . Anne (who is in Sydney waiting to get into her hotel room)

    Reply
  95. Oooh they ARE in kindle. And there are a few I haven’t read. I’m going shopping . . . . Anne (who is in Sydney waiting to get into her hotel room)

    Reply
  96. The Western about the Barkley family, I believe was alled “The Big Valley”? Barbara Stanwyck played the family matriarch. And at the time I thought one of the sons, I think his name was Heath, was a real hottie!

    Reply
  97. The Western about the Barkley family, I believe was alled “The Big Valley”? Barbara Stanwyck played the family matriarch. And at the time I thought one of the sons, I think his name was Heath, was a real hottie!

    Reply
  98. The Western about the Barkley family, I believe was alled “The Big Valley”? Barbara Stanwyck played the family matriarch. And at the time I thought one of the sons, I think his name was Heath, was a real hottie!

    Reply
  99. The Western about the Barkley family, I believe was alled “The Big Valley”? Barbara Stanwyck played the family matriarch. And at the time I thought one of the sons, I think his name was Heath, was a real hottie!

    Reply
  100. The Western about the Barkley family, I believe was alled “The Big Valley”? Barbara Stanwyck played the family matriarch. And at the time I thought one of the sons, I think his name was Heath, was a real hottie!

    Reply
  101. I had crushes on any number of cowboys from the old Western TV shows of my childhood. Clint Eastwood on “Rawhide”, the eldest brother on “Bonanza”, and as mentioned above, the Heath character on “The Big Valley”.
    And although “The Virginian” by Owen Wister is not a romance, it had a love story in it. That’s the first Western novel I ever remember reading.

    Reply
  102. I had crushes on any number of cowboys from the old Western TV shows of my childhood. Clint Eastwood on “Rawhide”, the eldest brother on “Bonanza”, and as mentioned above, the Heath character on “The Big Valley”.
    And although “The Virginian” by Owen Wister is not a romance, it had a love story in it. That’s the first Western novel I ever remember reading.

    Reply
  103. I had crushes on any number of cowboys from the old Western TV shows of my childhood. Clint Eastwood on “Rawhide”, the eldest brother on “Bonanza”, and as mentioned above, the Heath character on “The Big Valley”.
    And although “The Virginian” by Owen Wister is not a romance, it had a love story in it. That’s the first Western novel I ever remember reading.

    Reply
  104. I had crushes on any number of cowboys from the old Western TV shows of my childhood. Clint Eastwood on “Rawhide”, the eldest brother on “Bonanza”, and as mentioned above, the Heath character on “The Big Valley”.
    And although “The Virginian” by Owen Wister is not a romance, it had a love story in it. That’s the first Western novel I ever remember reading.

    Reply
  105. I had crushes on any number of cowboys from the old Western TV shows of my childhood. Clint Eastwood on “Rawhide”, the eldest brother on “Bonanza”, and as mentioned above, the Heath character on “The Big Valley”.
    And although “The Virginian” by Owen Wister is not a romance, it had a love story in it. That’s the first Western novel I ever remember reading.

    Reply
  106. I have loved getting to know Ms LeSue and the book does sound like a fun read. I have been a fan of westerns forever. I am a fanatic for finding old, old movies and watching them. John Wayne – of course – have to love McClintock. Joel McCrae – such a cute man – he did Buffalo Bill – I know it was not one iota of true, but it was a fun film to watch. Robert Fuller —just cause. Clint Eastwood – in anything. Steve McQueen in the Magnificent Seven. In fact nearly everyone in the Magnificent Seven. Kevin Kline in Silverado.
    OK, as you can see, I could go on and on. I think it all is about the Wranglers.

    Reply
  107. I have loved getting to know Ms LeSue and the book does sound like a fun read. I have been a fan of westerns forever. I am a fanatic for finding old, old movies and watching them. John Wayne – of course – have to love McClintock. Joel McCrae – such a cute man – he did Buffalo Bill – I know it was not one iota of true, but it was a fun film to watch. Robert Fuller —just cause. Clint Eastwood – in anything. Steve McQueen in the Magnificent Seven. In fact nearly everyone in the Magnificent Seven. Kevin Kline in Silverado.
    OK, as you can see, I could go on and on. I think it all is about the Wranglers.

    Reply
  108. I have loved getting to know Ms LeSue and the book does sound like a fun read. I have been a fan of westerns forever. I am a fanatic for finding old, old movies and watching them. John Wayne – of course – have to love McClintock. Joel McCrae – such a cute man – he did Buffalo Bill – I know it was not one iota of true, but it was a fun film to watch. Robert Fuller —just cause. Clint Eastwood – in anything. Steve McQueen in the Magnificent Seven. In fact nearly everyone in the Magnificent Seven. Kevin Kline in Silverado.
    OK, as you can see, I could go on and on. I think it all is about the Wranglers.

    Reply
  109. I have loved getting to know Ms LeSue and the book does sound like a fun read. I have been a fan of westerns forever. I am a fanatic for finding old, old movies and watching them. John Wayne – of course – have to love McClintock. Joel McCrae – such a cute man – he did Buffalo Bill – I know it was not one iota of true, but it was a fun film to watch. Robert Fuller —just cause. Clint Eastwood – in anything. Steve McQueen in the Magnificent Seven. In fact nearly everyone in the Magnificent Seven. Kevin Kline in Silverado.
    OK, as you can see, I could go on and on. I think it all is about the Wranglers.

    Reply
  110. I have loved getting to know Ms LeSue and the book does sound like a fun read. I have been a fan of westerns forever. I am a fanatic for finding old, old movies and watching them. John Wayne – of course – have to love McClintock. Joel McCrae – such a cute man – he did Buffalo Bill – I know it was not one iota of true, but it was a fun film to watch. Robert Fuller —just cause. Clint Eastwood – in anything. Steve McQueen in the Magnificent Seven. In fact nearly everyone in the Magnificent Seven. Kevin Kline in Silverado.
    OK, as you can see, I could go on and on. I think it all is about the Wranglers.

    Reply
  111. Karin, I never knew The Virginian was a novel — I’ll have to track it down and read it. We got the TV show over here, and my mum particularly liked James Drury, who played The Virginian. I thought of her when I popped his photo in the blog.
    She was a big reader of Zane Grey in her youth, and years later I read some of those books and could see why she loved them.

    Reply
  112. Karin, I never knew The Virginian was a novel — I’ll have to track it down and read it. We got the TV show over here, and my mum particularly liked James Drury, who played The Virginian. I thought of her when I popped his photo in the blog.
    She was a big reader of Zane Grey in her youth, and years later I read some of those books and could see why she loved them.

    Reply
  113. Karin, I never knew The Virginian was a novel — I’ll have to track it down and read it. We got the TV show over here, and my mum particularly liked James Drury, who played The Virginian. I thought of her when I popped his photo in the blog.
    She was a big reader of Zane Grey in her youth, and years later I read some of those books and could see why she loved them.

    Reply
  114. Karin, I never knew The Virginian was a novel — I’ll have to track it down and read it. We got the TV show over here, and my mum particularly liked James Drury, who played The Virginian. I thought of her when I popped his photo in the blog.
    She was a big reader of Zane Grey in her youth, and years later I read some of those books and could see why she loved them.

    Reply
  115. Karin, I never knew The Virginian was a novel — I’ll have to track it down and read it. We got the TV show over here, and my mum particularly liked James Drury, who played The Virginian. I thought of her when I popped his photo in the blog.
    She was a big reader of Zane Grey in her youth, and years later I read some of those books and could see why she loved them.

    Reply
  116. Thanks for an enjoyable interview and an entertaining excerpt. Best wishes, Tess, for the success of your new book.
    I’ve enjoyed some westerns by Jo Goodman and Carla Kelly. One of my favorite heroes is Cole Monroe from Jo Goodman’s Marry Me (admittedly, he’s an import from back East).

    Reply
  117. Thanks for an enjoyable interview and an entertaining excerpt. Best wishes, Tess, for the success of your new book.
    I’ve enjoyed some westerns by Jo Goodman and Carla Kelly. One of my favorite heroes is Cole Monroe from Jo Goodman’s Marry Me (admittedly, he’s an import from back East).

    Reply
  118. Thanks for an enjoyable interview and an entertaining excerpt. Best wishes, Tess, for the success of your new book.
    I’ve enjoyed some westerns by Jo Goodman and Carla Kelly. One of my favorite heroes is Cole Monroe from Jo Goodman’s Marry Me (admittedly, he’s an import from back East).

    Reply
  119. Thanks for an enjoyable interview and an entertaining excerpt. Best wishes, Tess, for the success of your new book.
    I’ve enjoyed some westerns by Jo Goodman and Carla Kelly. One of my favorite heroes is Cole Monroe from Jo Goodman’s Marry Me (admittedly, he’s an import from back East).

    Reply
  120. Thanks for an enjoyable interview and an entertaining excerpt. Best wishes, Tess, for the success of your new book.
    I’ve enjoyed some westerns by Jo Goodman and Carla Kelly. One of my favorite heroes is Cole Monroe from Jo Goodman’s Marry Me (admittedly, he’s an import from back East).

    Reply
  121. I’d never heard of Lash Larue – I went and looked him up. He has that old school Humphrey Bogart quality. I’m going to have to see if I can see any of those films!

    Reply
  122. I’d never heard of Lash Larue – I went and looked him up. He has that old school Humphrey Bogart quality. I’m going to have to see if I can see any of those films!

    Reply
  123. I’d never heard of Lash Larue – I went and looked him up. He has that old school Humphrey Bogart quality. I’m going to have to see if I can see any of those films!

    Reply
  124. I’d never heard of Lash Larue – I went and looked him up. He has that old school Humphrey Bogart quality. I’m going to have to see if I can see any of those films!

    Reply
  125. I’d never heard of Lash Larue – I went and looked him up. He has that old school Humphrey Bogart quality. I’m going to have to see if I can see any of those films!

    Reply
  126. Thank you!
    I love Jo Goodman’s books and I just read Marry Me recently. I think the most fun thing about westerns is that there are characters from all different backgrounds thrown together!

    Reply
  127. Thank you!
    I love Jo Goodman’s books and I just read Marry Me recently. I think the most fun thing about westerns is that there are characters from all different backgrounds thrown together!

    Reply
  128. Thank you!
    I love Jo Goodman’s books and I just read Marry Me recently. I think the most fun thing about westerns is that there are characters from all different backgrounds thrown together!

    Reply
  129. Thank you!
    I love Jo Goodman’s books and I just read Marry Me recently. I think the most fun thing about westerns is that there are characters from all different backgrounds thrown together!

    Reply
  130. Thank you!
    I love Jo Goodman’s books and I just read Marry Me recently. I think the most fun thing about westerns is that there are characters from all different backgrounds thrown together!

    Reply

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