Meet Sulari Gentill

Anne here, and today I'm interviewing Sulari Gentill, an Australian writer who writes excellent historical crime novels, set in the 1930's, with absolutely gorgeous covers, similar to travel posters of the times. AFewRightThinkingMen

Some of you might remember that I recommended Sulari's books back in April. Now she and a small group of other Australian crime writers are about to tour the USA and I thought I'd ask Sulari a few questions about her series.

Anne: Sulari, where did the original inspiration for a crime series set in the 1930's come from?

Sulari:  Writing can be quite an isolating obsession.  I spend a great deal of time in my own head, and while that’s fine for me, it is awkward for those who live with me… or rather, live with my body while my mind is wandering.  For me, great part of the challenge in being a writer is making my imaginary world work with the real world in which I actually live.  And so I made a pragmatic decision to build a bridge towards the poor man who had married a lawyer and then found himself financially and otherwise tied to someone who refused to do much else but write.  

SulariGentill

I looked for a story to which my husband could relate, so that I could bring him into my head… and perhaps not have to come out so often, myself.  Michael’s particular area of expertise is in the extreme right-wing movements of the early 1930s in Australia and the world, and so, conveniently, it is this context in which the Rowland Sinclair Series is set.  

By basing my books in this period, I rather cleverly ensured Michael would keep editing my novels—he cares far too much about the genuine history of the time to let me play with it unsupervised!  I also procured for myself an invaluable source of information.  It is one thing to read about a time, and another to have the opportunity to discuss it with someone who is an expert in the era.  For me, a dialogue with an historian affords a richer understanding and fuels the kind of creative excitement that is fundamental to bringing history to life.

Anne: I really enjoy Rowly and his friends, and also the contrast with his upper crust family. Tell us about Rowly.

MilesOffCourseSulari:   Rowland Sinclair first introduced himself when I started poking about in the 1930s.  I’m not really sure where exactly he came from—he just seemed to step out from between the pages of history.  He is a young man born of the rural establishment, and raised in conservative privilege, but who naturally gravitates to the left wing Bohemian set of Sydney.  Rowland opens the family mansion to the all manner of destitute artists, poets and writers, three of whom become his constant and loyal companions.  At the beginning of the series, Rowland has no interest in politics—he just wants to paint—but as the 30s progress, and the clouds of war gather over Europe he finds, he too, is called upon to make a stand.

Anne:  The first book in the series is set almost entirely in and around Sydney, and the political divide, one aspect of which resulted in the infamous de Groot incident. De Groot was a right-wing military man who disrupted the grand opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge by galloping through the crowds on his horse and slashing the ceremonial ribbon with his sword — all to prevent the Labor Party State Premier from opening it, as planned.  There's a video here of his infamous action. DeGroot
Are all the books set in Australia?  

Sulari:  No—not at all.  In fact, they first book closes with Rowland and his friends boarding a ship to leave Australia.  To date different books of The Rowland Sinclair Mysteries have been set in Nazi Germany, London, New York, Shanghai and Boston.  One of the challenges in writing an international series like The Rowland Sinclair Mysteries is that in the 30s travel was painstakingly slow, and Australia is a long way from just about everywhere.  I have to allow weeks in my timelines for Rowland to cross the seas!

PavingNewRoadAnne: The books are fiction, but well grounded in history. What kind of research do you do for the books?

Sulari: I suppose my primary research technique was to marry an historian… though, to be honest, I was a lawyer when I married Michael and had no idea he would prove to be so useful!

Aside from that, the only “method” I follow is to research as I write, rather than in a block before I begin.  That way I avoid “writing my research” and also ensure my research is targeted.  Of course, I’m still not immune to going down the occasional rabbit hole, only to emerge with a detailed but largely useless knowledge of subjects like “plumbing in the 1930s” or “cooking with liver” or “the history of men’s undergarments”…  

Anne: Such absorbing subjects. LOL. I particularly enjoy the historical "bon-bons" you include in every book, where a real, usually well-known historical figure appears in passing. And for those who don't recognize them, there are notes at the end of each book. Are they fun to find? 

Sulari:  They are a delight to find!  Generally speaking wherever there appears in space in the narrative for a peripheral character of some sort, I will try to fill that role with a real historical figure.  I think it gives both the figure and story context.  And I shamelessly use Rowly to meet the people of that era who I find interesting, to shine light on figures who seem to have been forgotten by popular history.

Anne: And of course, his coming from such a privileged background helps enormously with making those contacts. Can you give us a little taste of Roly? 

Sulari:  From A Prodigal Son the prequel novella which was written as gift for fans who were a little irate when the publication of Book 7 was delayed The full text of A Prodigal Son may be downloaded for free at http://www.rowlandsinclairnovella.com  (Anne adds that you can also click on any of the titles or covers and read the opening of each book on amazon.)

Rowland Sinclair stood at the bay window, staring out at the precise, manicured gardens of Woodlands House. Not that he could see much of note in the darkness. But he knew well what was there. The gardens had not changed in his lifetime, any new or spontaneous growth clipped back into straight lines and obedient shapes. The house, too, was unaltered. After eight years abroad, Rowland had returned to find the Sydney residence of the Sinclairs exactly as it had been when he was shipped off to school in England. Grand, elegant, unyielding—a grim gothic artefact that seemed to glower at the optimism and celebration of the 20s. Rowland hated this house. 

The portrait hanging above the mantle reflected its surrounds, a sombre depiction of a man in the prime of his power, if not his life. An almost colourless image but for the dark blue eyes that marked all the Sinclair men. As Henry Sinclair’s likeness glared down at his youngest son, Rowland felt an old defiance rising. The painting was too true to life. He turned away, shaking his head slowly. It had been eight years since his father had died and yet, Woodlands remained Henry Sinclair’s house. 

Not for the first time, Rowland wondered what he was doing here.

Anne: You're traveling to the USA in a few weeks. What are you looking forward to?(Below is Sulari's tour schedule.) SulariSchedule2

 

Sulari:  In late October and early November this year, I will be touring America with three fellow Australian writers (Jock Serong, Robert Gott and Emma Viskic).  It sounds like the beginning of a joke—Four writers walk into the US… We’ll be visiting New York, Dallas, Phoenix, Santa Cruz and San Francisco and I am looking forward to everything – meeting Americans, talking to readers and writers, writing in a New York coffee shops, driving across the desert, appearing at Bouchercon and in bookshops along the West Coast,  meeting my US publishers, crossing the Golden Gate Bridge, and even just travelling with colleagues.  We’ve been thinking about little else for months and have tried to anticipate everything. Of course, inevitably, something will go awry, and I am even looking forward to that… because when things don’t go to plan, stories begin.

Anne: They sure do. All the very best for your US tour, Sulari, and thanks so much for joining us here on Word Wenches.

Sulari will be giving away a book to someone who leaves a comment, or identifies this person who appears in one of Sulari's books as a historical walk-on "bon-bon" character.  While in New York, on the way back from Europe, Rowly's friend, the sculptress Edna, goes dancing with a young Englishman, Archie Leach, who is hoping to break into the US acting world. 

340 thoughts on “Meet Sulari Gentill”

  1. Hi Ladies
    Great interview I have heard a lot of good things about these books but have not read any, although I think I might enjoy them
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  2. Hi Ladies
    Great interview I have heard a lot of good things about these books but have not read any, although I think I might enjoy them
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  3. Hi Ladies
    Great interview I have heard a lot of good things about these books but have not read any, although I think I might enjoy them
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  4. Hi Ladies
    Great interview I have heard a lot of good things about these books but have not read any, although I think I might enjoy them
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  5. Hi Ladies
    Great interview I have heard a lot of good things about these books but have not read any, although I think I might enjoy them
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  6. Thanks, Helen. As a sydneysider yourself, I think you’d really find the first book an eye-opener, as well as a cracking good read. So many things I didn’t know about that period in NSW.

    Reply
  7. Thanks, Helen. As a sydneysider yourself, I think you’d really find the first book an eye-opener, as well as a cracking good read. So many things I didn’t know about that period in NSW.

    Reply
  8. Thanks, Helen. As a sydneysider yourself, I think you’d really find the first book an eye-opener, as well as a cracking good read. So many things I didn’t know about that period in NSW.

    Reply
  9. Thanks, Helen. As a sydneysider yourself, I think you’d really find the first book an eye-opener, as well as a cracking good read. So many things I didn’t know about that period in NSW.

    Reply
  10. Thanks, Helen. As a sydneysider yourself, I think you’d really find the first book an eye-opener, as well as a cracking good read. So many things I didn’t know about that period in NSW.

    Reply
  11. Ha ha – that would be Cary Grant!
    Loved your first book, Sulari.
    I am deadly envious of your trip – Bouchercon has been on my ‘ wish I could’ list for years and years. And the Poisoned Pen book shop in Scottsdale looks fab. The owner does videod interviews with Dana Stabenow, Deborah Crombie and many others to promote their latest book. There is also a good mystery book store in Santa Cruz.
    I hope you gain lots of new readers in the US. All good wishes.

    Reply
  12. Ha ha – that would be Cary Grant!
    Loved your first book, Sulari.
    I am deadly envious of your trip – Bouchercon has been on my ‘ wish I could’ list for years and years. And the Poisoned Pen book shop in Scottsdale looks fab. The owner does videod interviews with Dana Stabenow, Deborah Crombie and many others to promote their latest book. There is also a good mystery book store in Santa Cruz.
    I hope you gain lots of new readers in the US. All good wishes.

    Reply
  13. Ha ha – that would be Cary Grant!
    Loved your first book, Sulari.
    I am deadly envious of your trip – Bouchercon has been on my ‘ wish I could’ list for years and years. And the Poisoned Pen book shop in Scottsdale looks fab. The owner does videod interviews with Dana Stabenow, Deborah Crombie and many others to promote their latest book. There is also a good mystery book store in Santa Cruz.
    I hope you gain lots of new readers in the US. All good wishes.

    Reply
  14. Ha ha – that would be Cary Grant!
    Loved your first book, Sulari.
    I am deadly envious of your trip – Bouchercon has been on my ‘ wish I could’ list for years and years. And the Poisoned Pen book shop in Scottsdale looks fab. The owner does videod interviews with Dana Stabenow, Deborah Crombie and many others to promote their latest book. There is also a good mystery book store in Santa Cruz.
    I hope you gain lots of new readers in the US. All good wishes.

    Reply
  15. Ha ha – that would be Cary Grant!
    Loved your first book, Sulari.
    I am deadly envious of your trip – Bouchercon has been on my ‘ wish I could’ list for years and years. And the Poisoned Pen book shop in Scottsdale looks fab. The owner does videod interviews with Dana Stabenow, Deborah Crombie and many others to promote their latest book. There is also a good mystery book store in Santa Cruz.
    I hope you gain lots of new readers in the US. All good wishes.

    Reply
  16. Thank you Jan. I’m so excited about the US tour you’d think I was 14 years old! Bouchercon will be a massive introduction to US mystery writers. We’ll be appearing at the Poisoned Pen Bookshop and I think they plan to video the interview. The owner, Barbara Peters, is actually also my US editor and publisher and just brilliant as well as lovely.
    Now your bon bon identification… I probably shouldn’t give anything away yet…

    Reply
  17. Thank you Jan. I’m so excited about the US tour you’d think I was 14 years old! Bouchercon will be a massive introduction to US mystery writers. We’ll be appearing at the Poisoned Pen Bookshop and I think they plan to video the interview. The owner, Barbara Peters, is actually also my US editor and publisher and just brilliant as well as lovely.
    Now your bon bon identification… I probably shouldn’t give anything away yet…

    Reply
  18. Thank you Jan. I’m so excited about the US tour you’d think I was 14 years old! Bouchercon will be a massive introduction to US mystery writers. We’ll be appearing at the Poisoned Pen Bookshop and I think they plan to video the interview. The owner, Barbara Peters, is actually also my US editor and publisher and just brilliant as well as lovely.
    Now your bon bon identification… I probably shouldn’t give anything away yet…

    Reply
  19. Thank you Jan. I’m so excited about the US tour you’d think I was 14 years old! Bouchercon will be a massive introduction to US mystery writers. We’ll be appearing at the Poisoned Pen Bookshop and I think they plan to video the interview. The owner, Barbara Peters, is actually also my US editor and publisher and just brilliant as well as lovely.
    Now your bon bon identification… I probably shouldn’t give anything away yet…

    Reply
  20. Thank you Jan. I’m so excited about the US tour you’d think I was 14 years old! Bouchercon will be a massive introduction to US mystery writers. We’ll be appearing at the Poisoned Pen Bookshop and I think they plan to video the interview. The owner, Barbara Peters, is actually also my US editor and publisher and just brilliant as well as lovely.
    Now your bon bon identification… I probably shouldn’t give anything away yet…

    Reply
  21. I’ve been meaning to read Sulari for ages and now i’m in a reading slump so she’s just the thing! I’ve also read Jock Serong and Em Viskic who are both terrific!

    Reply
  22. I’ve been meaning to read Sulari for ages and now i’m in a reading slump so she’s just the thing! I’ve also read Jock Serong and Em Viskic who are both terrific!

    Reply
  23. I’ve been meaning to read Sulari for ages and now i’m in a reading slump so she’s just the thing! I’ve also read Jock Serong and Em Viskic who are both terrific!

    Reply
  24. I’ve been meaning to read Sulari for ages and now i’m in a reading slump so she’s just the thing! I’ve also read Jock Serong and Em Viskic who are both terrific!

    Reply
  25. I’ve been meaning to read Sulari for ages and now i’m in a reading slump so she’s just the thing! I’ve also read Jock Serong and Em Viskic who are both terrific!

    Reply
  26. Hello JanThank you! Im so excited about the US tour youd think I was 14 years old! Bouchercon will be a massive introduction to the US mystery scene. We are appearing at the Poisoned Pen and I think the interview will be videoed. Barbara Peters who is the owner also happens to be my US editor and publisher and she is as brilliant as she is lovely.As for your bon bon identification I probably shouldnt confirm or deny at this stage! WarmlySulari

    Reply
  27. Hello JanThank you! Im so excited about the US tour youd think I was 14 years old! Bouchercon will be a massive introduction to the US mystery scene. We are appearing at the Poisoned Pen and I think the interview will be videoed. Barbara Peters who is the owner also happens to be my US editor and publisher and she is as brilliant as she is lovely.As for your bon bon identification I probably shouldnt confirm or deny at this stage! WarmlySulari

    Reply
  28. Hello JanThank you! Im so excited about the US tour youd think I was 14 years old! Bouchercon will be a massive introduction to the US mystery scene. We are appearing at the Poisoned Pen and I think the interview will be videoed. Barbara Peters who is the owner also happens to be my US editor and publisher and she is as brilliant as she is lovely.As for your bon bon identification I probably shouldnt confirm or deny at this stage! WarmlySulari

    Reply
  29. Hello JanThank you! Im so excited about the US tour youd think I was 14 years old! Bouchercon will be a massive introduction to the US mystery scene. We are appearing at the Poisoned Pen and I think the interview will be videoed. Barbara Peters who is the owner also happens to be my US editor and publisher and she is as brilliant as she is lovely.As for your bon bon identification I probably shouldnt confirm or deny at this stage! WarmlySulari

    Reply
  30. Hello JanThank you! Im so excited about the US tour youd think I was 14 years old! Bouchercon will be a massive introduction to the US mystery scene. We are appearing at the Poisoned Pen and I think the interview will be videoed. Barbara Peters who is the owner also happens to be my US editor and publisher and she is as brilliant as she is lovely.As for your bon bon identification I probably shouldnt confirm or deny at this stage! WarmlySulari

    Reply
  31. Lovely interview. She is a new writer for me as I have not been reading that genre of books lately. I look forward to reading them. Sulari Gentill I hope your American tour is all you are anticipating. Don’t let the national news overwhelm you, just do your thing while here and get to know the people and enjoy the countryside.
    My to be read list is getting longer.

    Reply
  32. Lovely interview. She is a new writer for me as I have not been reading that genre of books lately. I look forward to reading them. Sulari Gentill I hope your American tour is all you are anticipating. Don’t let the national news overwhelm you, just do your thing while here and get to know the people and enjoy the countryside.
    My to be read list is getting longer.

    Reply
  33. Lovely interview. She is a new writer for me as I have not been reading that genre of books lately. I look forward to reading them. Sulari Gentill I hope your American tour is all you are anticipating. Don’t let the national news overwhelm you, just do your thing while here and get to know the people and enjoy the countryside.
    My to be read list is getting longer.

    Reply
  34. Lovely interview. She is a new writer for me as I have not been reading that genre of books lately. I look forward to reading them. Sulari Gentill I hope your American tour is all you are anticipating. Don’t let the national news overwhelm you, just do your thing while here and get to know the people and enjoy the countryside.
    My to be read list is getting longer.

    Reply
  35. Lovely interview. She is a new writer for me as I have not been reading that genre of books lately. I look forward to reading them. Sulari Gentill I hope your American tour is all you are anticipating. Don’t let the national news overwhelm you, just do your thing while here and get to know the people and enjoy the countryside.
    My to be read list is getting longer.

    Reply
  36. I forgot to say how much I like the cover art. Our family business was art and picture framing. I always loved to frame posters in similar style for our customers. In my home I have several that were old adverts for British Railways as well as those for the South Shore Rail line here in Indiana. I like the colors and the style of these images.

    Reply
  37. I forgot to say how much I like the cover art. Our family business was art and picture framing. I always loved to frame posters in similar style for our customers. In my home I have several that were old adverts for British Railways as well as those for the South Shore Rail line here in Indiana. I like the colors and the style of these images.

    Reply
  38. I forgot to say how much I like the cover art. Our family business was art and picture framing. I always loved to frame posters in similar style for our customers. In my home I have several that were old adverts for British Railways as well as those for the South Shore Rail line here in Indiana. I like the colors and the style of these images.

    Reply
  39. I forgot to say how much I like the cover art. Our family business was art and picture framing. I always loved to frame posters in similar style for our customers. In my home I have several that were old adverts for British Railways as well as those for the South Shore Rail line here in Indiana. I like the colors and the style of these images.

    Reply
  40. I forgot to say how much I like the cover art. Our family business was art and picture framing. I always loved to frame posters in similar style for our customers. In my home I have several that were old adverts for British Railways as well as those for the South Shore Rail line here in Indiana. I like the colors and the style of these images.

    Reply
  41. Sulari, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! The time and setting for your series is wonderful, and I think it’s great that you and three other Australian writers are storming the US at conferences and bookstores and even the Australian consulate in NYC! I’ve read the intro short story, and it’s time I read book 1, so it’s off to Amazon I go. Have a great trip to the US!

    Reply
  42. Sulari, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! The time and setting for your series is wonderful, and I think it’s great that you and three other Australian writers are storming the US at conferences and bookstores and even the Australian consulate in NYC! I’ve read the intro short story, and it’s time I read book 1, so it’s off to Amazon I go. Have a great trip to the US!

    Reply
  43. Sulari, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! The time and setting for your series is wonderful, and I think it’s great that you and three other Australian writers are storming the US at conferences and bookstores and even the Australian consulate in NYC! I’ve read the intro short story, and it’s time I read book 1, so it’s off to Amazon I go. Have a great trip to the US!

    Reply
  44. Sulari, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! The time and setting for your series is wonderful, and I think it’s great that you and three other Australian writers are storming the US at conferences and bookstores and even the Australian consulate in NYC! I’ve read the intro short story, and it’s time I read book 1, so it’s off to Amazon I go. Have a great trip to the US!

    Reply
  45. Sulari, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! The time and setting for your series is wonderful, and I think it’s great that you and three other Australian writers are storming the US at conferences and bookstores and even the Australian consulate in NYC! I’ve read the intro short story, and it’s time I read book 1, so it’s off to Amazon I go. Have a great trip to the US!

    Reply
  46. Archie Leach is, of course, Cary Grant.
    I loved reading the novella and look forward to reading book number 1, Sulari.
    I live in NYC and will see if I can get to see you.

    Reply
  47. Archie Leach is, of course, Cary Grant.
    I loved reading the novella and look forward to reading book number 1, Sulari.
    I live in NYC and will see if I can get to see you.

    Reply
  48. Archie Leach is, of course, Cary Grant.
    I loved reading the novella and look forward to reading book number 1, Sulari.
    I live in NYC and will see if I can get to see you.

    Reply
  49. Archie Leach is, of course, Cary Grant.
    I loved reading the novella and look forward to reading book number 1, Sulari.
    I live in NYC and will see if I can get to see you.

    Reply
  50. Archie Leach is, of course, Cary Grant.
    I loved reading the novella and look forward to reading book number 1, Sulari.
    I live in NYC and will see if I can get to see you.

    Reply
  51. What a lovely interview, Sulari and Anne; thank you both. Have a wonderful trip, Sulari. I hope that any unexpected happenings are happy ones!
    And, yes, Cary Grant.

    Reply
  52. What a lovely interview, Sulari and Anne; thank you both. Have a wonderful trip, Sulari. I hope that any unexpected happenings are happy ones!
    And, yes, Cary Grant.

    Reply
  53. What a lovely interview, Sulari and Anne; thank you both. Have a wonderful trip, Sulari. I hope that any unexpected happenings are happy ones!
    And, yes, Cary Grant.

    Reply
  54. What a lovely interview, Sulari and Anne; thank you both. Have a wonderful trip, Sulari. I hope that any unexpected happenings are happy ones!
    And, yes, Cary Grant.

    Reply
  55. What a lovely interview, Sulari and Anne; thank you both. Have a wonderful trip, Sulari. I hope that any unexpected happenings are happy ones!
    And, yes, Cary Grant.

    Reply
  56. I listened to the sample audio for book 1. The narrator was good but seemed to be reading a newspaper clipping. Is this interesting way of setting the historical scene used extensively?
    The young English bon-bon character could be Cary Grant as he was certainly born in England (Bristol) and would be thirty-ish
    If you considered moving to contemporary political based crime the current UK Brexit situation could provide wonderful material. If I could escape detection I might be very tempted to commit murder myself! *LOL*

    Reply
  57. I listened to the sample audio for book 1. The narrator was good but seemed to be reading a newspaper clipping. Is this interesting way of setting the historical scene used extensively?
    The young English bon-bon character could be Cary Grant as he was certainly born in England (Bristol) and would be thirty-ish
    If you considered moving to contemporary political based crime the current UK Brexit situation could provide wonderful material. If I could escape detection I might be very tempted to commit murder myself! *LOL*

    Reply
  58. I listened to the sample audio for book 1. The narrator was good but seemed to be reading a newspaper clipping. Is this interesting way of setting the historical scene used extensively?
    The young English bon-bon character could be Cary Grant as he was certainly born in England (Bristol) and would be thirty-ish
    If you considered moving to contemporary political based crime the current UK Brexit situation could provide wonderful material. If I could escape detection I might be very tempted to commit murder myself! *LOL*

    Reply
  59. I listened to the sample audio for book 1. The narrator was good but seemed to be reading a newspaper clipping. Is this interesting way of setting the historical scene used extensively?
    The young English bon-bon character could be Cary Grant as he was certainly born in England (Bristol) and would be thirty-ish
    If you considered moving to contemporary political based crime the current UK Brexit situation could provide wonderful material. If I could escape detection I might be very tempted to commit murder myself! *LOL*

    Reply
  60. I listened to the sample audio for book 1. The narrator was good but seemed to be reading a newspaper clipping. Is this interesting way of setting the historical scene used extensively?
    The young English bon-bon character could be Cary Grant as he was certainly born in England (Bristol) and would be thirty-ish
    If you considered moving to contemporary political based crime the current UK Brexit situation could provide wonderful material. If I could escape detection I might be very tempted to commit murder myself! *LOL*

    Reply
  61. Of course, the debonair Cary Grant! I love the historical tidbits in each book. Herman Goering’s brother and his relationship to Herman. Hugo Boss. Who knew? See you at Bouchercon, Sulari!

    Reply
  62. Of course, the debonair Cary Grant! I love the historical tidbits in each book. Herman Goering’s brother and his relationship to Herman. Hugo Boss. Who knew? See you at Bouchercon, Sulari!

    Reply
  63. Of course, the debonair Cary Grant! I love the historical tidbits in each book. Herman Goering’s brother and his relationship to Herman. Hugo Boss. Who knew? See you at Bouchercon, Sulari!

    Reply
  64. Of course, the debonair Cary Grant! I love the historical tidbits in each book. Herman Goering’s brother and his relationship to Herman. Hugo Boss. Who knew? See you at Bouchercon, Sulari!

    Reply
  65. Of course, the debonair Cary Grant! I love the historical tidbits in each book. Herman Goering’s brother and his relationship to Herman. Hugo Boss. Who knew? See you at Bouchercon, Sulari!

    Reply
  66. Quantum, yes, each of the chapters in Sulari’s books begins with a short clipping from the news or a magazine or something from the time, so I’m guessing that’s what you heard. Not quite the flavour of the story you were after, I guess.
    As for the current political climate — US, UK or Australia — it’s very depressing.

    Reply
  67. Quantum, yes, each of the chapters in Sulari’s books begins with a short clipping from the news or a magazine or something from the time, so I’m guessing that’s what you heard. Not quite the flavour of the story you were after, I guess.
    As for the current political climate — US, UK or Australia — it’s very depressing.

    Reply
  68. Quantum, yes, each of the chapters in Sulari’s books begins with a short clipping from the news or a magazine or something from the time, so I’m guessing that’s what you heard. Not quite the flavour of the story you were after, I guess.
    As for the current political climate — US, UK or Australia — it’s very depressing.

    Reply
  69. Quantum, yes, each of the chapters in Sulari’s books begins with a short clipping from the news or a magazine or something from the time, so I’m guessing that’s what you heard. Not quite the flavour of the story you were after, I guess.
    As for the current political climate — US, UK or Australia — it’s very depressing.

    Reply
  70. Quantum, yes, each of the chapters in Sulari’s books begins with a short clipping from the news or a magazine or something from the time, so I’m guessing that’s what you heard. Not quite the flavour of the story you were after, I guess.
    As for the current political climate — US, UK or Australia — it’s very depressing.

    Reply
  71. Hi Margot
    Thank you! I am really looking forward to meeting Americans – my personal experience is that they are some of the warmest people in the world. National news is a little crazy all over the planet at the moment. The cover art is amazing – I have a wonderful Russian-born designer who draws my covers. These are the 3rd editions in Australia and the first editions in the US and I think the most lovely, and you’re right – they’re based on the travel posters of the 1930s.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  72. Hi Margot
    Thank you! I am really looking forward to meeting Americans – my personal experience is that they are some of the warmest people in the world. National news is a little crazy all over the planet at the moment. The cover art is amazing – I have a wonderful Russian-born designer who draws my covers. These are the 3rd editions in Australia and the first editions in the US and I think the most lovely, and you’re right – they’re based on the travel posters of the 1930s.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  73. Hi Margot
    Thank you! I am really looking forward to meeting Americans – my personal experience is that they are some of the warmest people in the world. National news is a little crazy all over the planet at the moment. The cover art is amazing – I have a wonderful Russian-born designer who draws my covers. These are the 3rd editions in Australia and the first editions in the US and I think the most lovely, and you’re right – they’re based on the travel posters of the 1930s.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  74. Hi Margot
    Thank you! I am really looking forward to meeting Americans – my personal experience is that they are some of the warmest people in the world. National news is a little crazy all over the planet at the moment. The cover art is amazing – I have a wonderful Russian-born designer who draws my covers. These are the 3rd editions in Australia and the first editions in the US and I think the most lovely, and you’re right – they’re based on the travel posters of the 1930s.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  75. Hi Margot
    Thank you! I am really looking forward to meeting Americans – my personal experience is that they are some of the warmest people in the world. National news is a little crazy all over the planet at the moment. The cover art is amazing – I have a wonderful Russian-born designer who draws my covers. These are the 3rd editions in Australia and the first editions in the US and I think the most lovely, and you’re right – they’re based on the travel posters of the 1930s.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  76. Thank you Mary Jo. It’s a pleasure to visit with you all! The tour is a bit of a mad idea but I think it will be such an adventure – even if no one turns up to our events. I anticipate we will have many stories to bring home.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  77. Thank you Mary Jo. It’s a pleasure to visit with you all! The tour is a bit of a mad idea but I think it will be such an adventure – even if no one turns up to our events. I anticipate we will have many stories to bring home.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  78. Thank you Mary Jo. It’s a pleasure to visit with you all! The tour is a bit of a mad idea but I think it will be such an adventure – even if no one turns up to our events. I anticipate we will have many stories to bring home.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  79. Thank you Mary Jo. It’s a pleasure to visit with you all! The tour is a bit of a mad idea but I think it will be such an adventure – even if no one turns up to our events. I anticipate we will have many stories to bring home.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  80. Thank you Mary Jo. It’s a pleasure to visit with you all! The tour is a bit of a mad idea but I think it will be such an adventure – even if no one turns up to our events. I anticipate we will have many stories to bring home.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  81. Thank you Patricia.
    Aside from the Consulate General we don’t have any official events in NYC but how could we not include NYC on the tour. Our plan is to set up in a NY coffee-shop/café and put out and open invitation to NY writers to join us to write and chat, if they have the time. And if no-one comes then we’ll be writing in NY and that’s pretty special anyway. We’ll let everyone know via social media when we find a coffee shop that will tolerate an influx of writers.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  82. Thank you Patricia.
    Aside from the Consulate General we don’t have any official events in NYC but how could we not include NYC on the tour. Our plan is to set up in a NY coffee-shop/café and put out and open invitation to NY writers to join us to write and chat, if they have the time. And if no-one comes then we’ll be writing in NY and that’s pretty special anyway. We’ll let everyone know via social media when we find a coffee shop that will tolerate an influx of writers.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  83. Thank you Patricia.
    Aside from the Consulate General we don’t have any official events in NYC but how could we not include NYC on the tour. Our plan is to set up in a NY coffee-shop/café and put out and open invitation to NY writers to join us to write and chat, if they have the time. And if no-one comes then we’ll be writing in NY and that’s pretty special anyway. We’ll let everyone know via social media when we find a coffee shop that will tolerate an influx of writers.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  84. Thank you Patricia.
    Aside from the Consulate General we don’t have any official events in NYC but how could we not include NYC on the tour. Our plan is to set up in a NY coffee-shop/café and put out and open invitation to NY writers to join us to write and chat, if they have the time. And if no-one comes then we’ll be writing in NY and that’s pretty special anyway. We’ll let everyone know via social media when we find a coffee shop that will tolerate an influx of writers.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  85. Thank you Patricia.
    Aside from the Consulate General we don’t have any official events in NYC but how could we not include NYC on the tour. Our plan is to set up in a NY coffee-shop/café and put out and open invitation to NY writers to join us to write and chat, if they have the time. And if no-one comes then we’ll be writing in NY and that’s pretty special anyway. We’ll let everyone know via social media when we find a coffee shop that will tolerate an influx of writers.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  86. Hi Quantum
    Each chapter begins with a newspaper extract of the day… but it’s only a clipping to set the scene a little.
    Sadly contemporary political situations everywhere are beginning to look like the 1930s. Sometimes it feels very much like I am writing a story set today! It’s true that we don’t seem to learn.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  87. Hi Quantum
    Each chapter begins with a newspaper extract of the day… but it’s only a clipping to set the scene a little.
    Sadly contemporary political situations everywhere are beginning to look like the 1930s. Sometimes it feels very much like I am writing a story set today! It’s true that we don’t seem to learn.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  88. Hi Quantum
    Each chapter begins with a newspaper extract of the day… but it’s only a clipping to set the scene a little.
    Sadly contemporary political situations everywhere are beginning to look like the 1930s. Sometimes it feels very much like I am writing a story set today! It’s true that we don’t seem to learn.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  89. Hi Quantum
    Each chapter begins with a newspaper extract of the day… but it’s only a clipping to set the scene a little.
    Sadly contemporary political situations everywhere are beginning to look like the 1930s. Sometimes it feels very much like I am writing a story set today! It’s true that we don’t seem to learn.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  90. Hi Quantum
    Each chapter begins with a newspaper extract of the day… but it’s only a clipping to set the scene a little.
    Sadly contemporary political situations everywhere are beginning to look like the 1930s. Sometimes it feels very much like I am writing a story set today! It’s true that we don’t seem to learn.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  91. I knew that Archie Leach was Cary Grant. I read a lot of autobiographies including his. I love history so your books sound very interesting.

    Reply
  92. I knew that Archie Leach was Cary Grant. I read a lot of autobiographies including his. I love history so your books sound very interesting.

    Reply
  93. I knew that Archie Leach was Cary Grant. I read a lot of autobiographies including his. I love history so your books sound very interesting.

    Reply
  94. I knew that Archie Leach was Cary Grant. I read a lot of autobiographies including his. I love history so your books sound very interesting.

    Reply
  95. I knew that Archie Leach was Cary Grant. I read a lot of autobiographies including his. I love history so your books sound very interesting.

    Reply
  96. Archibald Leach is Cary Grant. Your novels sounds captivating, intriguing and extremely enjoyable. Have a wonderful tour. I enjoyed your interview.

    Reply
  97. Archibald Leach is Cary Grant. Your novels sounds captivating, intriguing and extremely enjoyable. Have a wonderful tour. I enjoyed your interview.

    Reply
  98. Archibald Leach is Cary Grant. Your novels sounds captivating, intriguing and extremely enjoyable. Have a wonderful tour. I enjoyed your interview.

    Reply
  99. Archibald Leach is Cary Grant. Your novels sounds captivating, intriguing and extremely enjoyable. Have a wonderful tour. I enjoyed your interview.

    Reply
  100. Archibald Leach is Cary Grant. Your novels sounds captivating, intriguing and extremely enjoyable. Have a wonderful tour. I enjoyed your interview.

    Reply
  101. I am entranced with your fascinating series, this extraordinary introduction to your writing and the most interesting interview. Best wishes on your tour. I will obtain your books which sound memorable.

    Reply
  102. I am entranced with your fascinating series, this extraordinary introduction to your writing and the most interesting interview. Best wishes on your tour. I will obtain your books which sound memorable.

    Reply
  103. I am entranced with your fascinating series, this extraordinary introduction to your writing and the most interesting interview. Best wishes on your tour. I will obtain your books which sound memorable.

    Reply
  104. I am entranced with your fascinating series, this extraordinary introduction to your writing and the most interesting interview. Best wishes on your tour. I will obtain your books which sound memorable.

    Reply
  105. I am entranced with your fascinating series, this extraordinary introduction to your writing and the most interesting interview. Best wishes on your tour. I will obtain your books which sound memorable.

    Reply
  106. I am looking forward to reading my first Rowland Sinclair Mystery. And I wish you and your fellow mystery authors a fun and interesting experience (also safe journey)!!

    Reply
  107. I am looking forward to reading my first Rowland Sinclair Mystery. And I wish you and your fellow mystery authors a fun and interesting experience (also safe journey)!!

    Reply
  108. I am looking forward to reading my first Rowland Sinclair Mystery. And I wish you and your fellow mystery authors a fun and interesting experience (also safe journey)!!

    Reply
  109. I am looking forward to reading my first Rowland Sinclair Mystery. And I wish you and your fellow mystery authors a fun and interesting experience (also safe journey)!!

    Reply
  110. I am looking forward to reading my first Rowland Sinclair Mystery. And I wish you and your fellow mystery authors a fun and interesting experience (also safe journey)!!

    Reply
  111. Great interview!
    Sulari is a new author for me. Her Rowland Sinclair mysteries sound very good – I love well-researched, well-written historical mysteries – and the covers are gorgeous. I’ve downloaded the free novella and will look for the first book in the series.
    Archie Leach became Cary Grant.

    Reply
  112. Great interview!
    Sulari is a new author for me. Her Rowland Sinclair mysteries sound very good – I love well-researched, well-written historical mysteries – and the covers are gorgeous. I’ve downloaded the free novella and will look for the first book in the series.
    Archie Leach became Cary Grant.

    Reply
  113. Great interview!
    Sulari is a new author for me. Her Rowland Sinclair mysteries sound very good – I love well-researched, well-written historical mysteries – and the covers are gorgeous. I’ve downloaded the free novella and will look for the first book in the series.
    Archie Leach became Cary Grant.

    Reply
  114. Great interview!
    Sulari is a new author for me. Her Rowland Sinclair mysteries sound very good – I love well-researched, well-written historical mysteries – and the covers are gorgeous. I’ve downloaded the free novella and will look for the first book in the series.
    Archie Leach became Cary Grant.

    Reply
  115. Great interview!
    Sulari is a new author for me. Her Rowland Sinclair mysteries sound very good – I love well-researched, well-written historical mysteries – and the covers are gorgeous. I’ve downloaded the free novella and will look for the first book in the series.
    Archie Leach became Cary Grant.

    Reply
  116. I adored this interview and like many of the others here, have acquired a new “must read” author. Mysteries are the first genre I folllowed, so historical mysteries will be right up my alley!
    And the 30s are my childhood years — so I guess I’m historical now!

    Reply
  117. I adored this interview and like many of the others here, have acquired a new “must read” author. Mysteries are the first genre I folllowed, so historical mysteries will be right up my alley!
    And the 30s are my childhood years — so I guess I’m historical now!

    Reply
  118. I adored this interview and like many of the others here, have acquired a new “must read” author. Mysteries are the first genre I folllowed, so historical mysteries will be right up my alley!
    And the 30s are my childhood years — so I guess I’m historical now!

    Reply
  119. I adored this interview and like many of the others here, have acquired a new “must read” author. Mysteries are the first genre I folllowed, so historical mysteries will be right up my alley!
    And the 30s are my childhood years — so I guess I’m historical now!

    Reply
  120. I adored this interview and like many of the others here, have acquired a new “must read” author. Mysteries are the first genre I folllowed, so historical mysteries will be right up my alley!
    And the 30s are my childhood years — so I guess I’m historical now!

    Reply
  121. Archie Leach is Cary Grant! Enjoy your visit to the United States, but please realize that there is a whole lot of our country that you will not get to see and please come back to visit again.

    Reply
  122. Archie Leach is Cary Grant! Enjoy your visit to the United States, but please realize that there is a whole lot of our country that you will not get to see and please come back to visit again.

    Reply
  123. Archie Leach is Cary Grant! Enjoy your visit to the United States, but please realize that there is a whole lot of our country that you will not get to see and please come back to visit again.

    Reply
  124. Archie Leach is Cary Grant! Enjoy your visit to the United States, but please realize that there is a whole lot of our country that you will not get to see and please come back to visit again.

    Reply
  125. Archie Leach is Cary Grant! Enjoy your visit to the United States, but please realize that there is a whole lot of our country that you will not get to see and please come back to visit again.

    Reply
  126. So glad to have discovered you, Sulari! So anxious to try to see you in NYC. I left another comment on Word Wenches facebook where I got the message to go to Word Wenches for the full interview. Anne always provides great intel on Aussie authors, as well as her own great work. Thank you, Anne!
    Love both of you but have recently spent time researching the history of pre-WWII and its effects down under more extensively while reading all of Sulari’s books I can find. Your books have made me question how self-centered our historical education can be in this country and how important it is to learn about the experiences of others.
    Keep up your great work, please. The tidbits like Eva and Archie and all the rest of the cameos are so GREAT. Not to mention the side characters who are all well developed.

    Reply
  127. So glad to have discovered you, Sulari! So anxious to try to see you in NYC. I left another comment on Word Wenches facebook where I got the message to go to Word Wenches for the full interview. Anne always provides great intel on Aussie authors, as well as her own great work. Thank you, Anne!
    Love both of you but have recently spent time researching the history of pre-WWII and its effects down under more extensively while reading all of Sulari’s books I can find. Your books have made me question how self-centered our historical education can be in this country and how important it is to learn about the experiences of others.
    Keep up your great work, please. The tidbits like Eva and Archie and all the rest of the cameos are so GREAT. Not to mention the side characters who are all well developed.

    Reply
  128. So glad to have discovered you, Sulari! So anxious to try to see you in NYC. I left another comment on Word Wenches facebook where I got the message to go to Word Wenches for the full interview. Anne always provides great intel on Aussie authors, as well as her own great work. Thank you, Anne!
    Love both of you but have recently spent time researching the history of pre-WWII and its effects down under more extensively while reading all of Sulari’s books I can find. Your books have made me question how self-centered our historical education can be in this country and how important it is to learn about the experiences of others.
    Keep up your great work, please. The tidbits like Eva and Archie and all the rest of the cameos are so GREAT. Not to mention the side characters who are all well developed.

    Reply
  129. So glad to have discovered you, Sulari! So anxious to try to see you in NYC. I left another comment on Word Wenches facebook where I got the message to go to Word Wenches for the full interview. Anne always provides great intel on Aussie authors, as well as her own great work. Thank you, Anne!
    Love both of you but have recently spent time researching the history of pre-WWII and its effects down under more extensively while reading all of Sulari’s books I can find. Your books have made me question how self-centered our historical education can be in this country and how important it is to learn about the experiences of others.
    Keep up your great work, please. The tidbits like Eva and Archie and all the rest of the cameos are so GREAT. Not to mention the side characters who are all well developed.

    Reply
  130. So glad to have discovered you, Sulari! So anxious to try to see you in NYC. I left another comment on Word Wenches facebook where I got the message to go to Word Wenches for the full interview. Anne always provides great intel on Aussie authors, as well as her own great work. Thank you, Anne!
    Love both of you but have recently spent time researching the history of pre-WWII and its effects down under more extensively while reading all of Sulari’s books I can find. Your books have made me question how self-centered our historical education can be in this country and how important it is to learn about the experiences of others.
    Keep up your great work, please. The tidbits like Eva and Archie and all the rest of the cameos are so GREAT. Not to mention the side characters who are all well developed.

    Reply
  131. Yes, Archie Leach is Cary Grant. The book covers are gorgeous. I did download the free novella after Anne’s recommendation a while back, but it somehow fell to the bottom of my TBR. So now I am newly motivated to read one of these books!
    The 1930s era and rise of fascism are particular interests of mine also, although I am not a historian. But I heard so much about it from my parents and other family members who were growing up in Germany and Austria during that time. Sulari, have you considered sending Rowland to Spain or Italy during the 1930’s? Lots happening there, too!

    Reply
  132. Yes, Archie Leach is Cary Grant. The book covers are gorgeous. I did download the free novella after Anne’s recommendation a while back, but it somehow fell to the bottom of my TBR. So now I am newly motivated to read one of these books!
    The 1930s era and rise of fascism are particular interests of mine also, although I am not a historian. But I heard so much about it from my parents and other family members who were growing up in Germany and Austria during that time. Sulari, have you considered sending Rowland to Spain or Italy during the 1930’s? Lots happening there, too!

    Reply
  133. Yes, Archie Leach is Cary Grant. The book covers are gorgeous. I did download the free novella after Anne’s recommendation a while back, but it somehow fell to the bottom of my TBR. So now I am newly motivated to read one of these books!
    The 1930s era and rise of fascism are particular interests of mine also, although I am not a historian. But I heard so much about it from my parents and other family members who were growing up in Germany and Austria during that time. Sulari, have you considered sending Rowland to Spain or Italy during the 1930’s? Lots happening there, too!

    Reply
  134. Yes, Archie Leach is Cary Grant. The book covers are gorgeous. I did download the free novella after Anne’s recommendation a while back, but it somehow fell to the bottom of my TBR. So now I am newly motivated to read one of these books!
    The 1930s era and rise of fascism are particular interests of mine also, although I am not a historian. But I heard so much about it from my parents and other family members who were growing up in Germany and Austria during that time. Sulari, have you considered sending Rowland to Spain or Italy during the 1930’s? Lots happening there, too!

    Reply
  135. Yes, Archie Leach is Cary Grant. The book covers are gorgeous. I did download the free novella after Anne’s recommendation a while back, but it somehow fell to the bottom of my TBR. So now I am newly motivated to read one of these books!
    The 1930s era and rise of fascism are particular interests of mine also, although I am not a historian. But I heard so much about it from my parents and other family members who were growing up in Germany and Austria during that time. Sulari, have you considered sending Rowland to Spain or Italy during the 1930’s? Lots happening there, too!

    Reply
  136. Archie Leach was a British acrobat. After leaving Britain, I believe he came to the US and found work as something other than an acrobat. I will have to check on that.
    I hope your trip to this country is filled with adventure for all of you. I hope that each of you will take away good memories and want to return sometime in the future.
    I have downloaded The Prodigal Son. I love history. and I am very glad you found a good “use” for Michael’s expertise.
    Most of all, I believe you picked the perfect era. It is all because of Art Deco that I love that era. The fonts alone are beautiful. The illustrations…oh Yes! And the fashion is wonderful. Well actually the fashions were not for me….I am too short and not straight up and down. But, I bet I could pass as one of the sofas from that period.
    Thanks a lot for this post and the introduction to a new series for me.
    I hope the terrible dust storm is not anywhere near either of you.

    Reply
  137. Archie Leach was a British acrobat. After leaving Britain, I believe he came to the US and found work as something other than an acrobat. I will have to check on that.
    I hope your trip to this country is filled with adventure for all of you. I hope that each of you will take away good memories and want to return sometime in the future.
    I have downloaded The Prodigal Son. I love history. and I am very glad you found a good “use” for Michael’s expertise.
    Most of all, I believe you picked the perfect era. It is all because of Art Deco that I love that era. The fonts alone are beautiful. The illustrations…oh Yes! And the fashion is wonderful. Well actually the fashions were not for me….I am too short and not straight up and down. But, I bet I could pass as one of the sofas from that period.
    Thanks a lot for this post and the introduction to a new series for me.
    I hope the terrible dust storm is not anywhere near either of you.

    Reply
  138. Archie Leach was a British acrobat. After leaving Britain, I believe he came to the US and found work as something other than an acrobat. I will have to check on that.
    I hope your trip to this country is filled with adventure for all of you. I hope that each of you will take away good memories and want to return sometime in the future.
    I have downloaded The Prodigal Son. I love history. and I am very glad you found a good “use” for Michael’s expertise.
    Most of all, I believe you picked the perfect era. It is all because of Art Deco that I love that era. The fonts alone are beautiful. The illustrations…oh Yes! And the fashion is wonderful. Well actually the fashions were not for me….I am too short and not straight up and down. But, I bet I could pass as one of the sofas from that period.
    Thanks a lot for this post and the introduction to a new series for me.
    I hope the terrible dust storm is not anywhere near either of you.

    Reply
  139. Archie Leach was a British acrobat. After leaving Britain, I believe he came to the US and found work as something other than an acrobat. I will have to check on that.
    I hope your trip to this country is filled with adventure for all of you. I hope that each of you will take away good memories and want to return sometime in the future.
    I have downloaded The Prodigal Son. I love history. and I am very glad you found a good “use” for Michael’s expertise.
    Most of all, I believe you picked the perfect era. It is all because of Art Deco that I love that era. The fonts alone are beautiful. The illustrations…oh Yes! And the fashion is wonderful. Well actually the fashions were not for me….I am too short and not straight up and down. But, I bet I could pass as one of the sofas from that period.
    Thanks a lot for this post and the introduction to a new series for me.
    I hope the terrible dust storm is not anywhere near either of you.

    Reply
  140. Archie Leach was a British acrobat. After leaving Britain, I believe he came to the US and found work as something other than an acrobat. I will have to check on that.
    I hope your trip to this country is filled with adventure for all of you. I hope that each of you will take away good memories and want to return sometime in the future.
    I have downloaded The Prodigal Son. I love history. and I am very glad you found a good “use” for Michael’s expertise.
    Most of all, I believe you picked the perfect era. It is all because of Art Deco that I love that era. The fonts alone are beautiful. The illustrations…oh Yes! And the fashion is wonderful. Well actually the fashions were not for me….I am too short and not straight up and down. But, I bet I could pass as one of the sofas from that period.
    Thanks a lot for this post and the introduction to a new series for me.
    I hope the terrible dust storm is not anywhere near either of you.

    Reply
  141. Gosh, thank you Sue! One of the most lovely things about writing in this era is the letters I’ve received and the friendships I’ve made with people who’ve lived it. As the result of the books, I correspond with a number of people in their 90s who remember what I’m trying to imagine.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  142. Gosh, thank you Sue! One of the most lovely things about writing in this era is the letters I’ve received and the friendships I’ve made with people who’ve lived it. As the result of the books, I correspond with a number of people in their 90s who remember what I’m trying to imagine.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  143. Gosh, thank you Sue! One of the most lovely things about writing in this era is the letters I’ve received and the friendships I’ve made with people who’ve lived it. As the result of the books, I correspond with a number of people in their 90s who remember what I’m trying to imagine.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  144. Gosh, thank you Sue! One of the most lovely things about writing in this era is the letters I’ve received and the friendships I’ve made with people who’ve lived it. As the result of the books, I correspond with a number of people in their 90s who remember what I’m trying to imagine.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  145. Gosh, thank you Sue! One of the most lovely things about writing in this era is the letters I’ve received and the friendships I’ve made with people who’ve lived it. As the result of the books, I correspond with a number of people in their 90s who remember what I’m trying to imagine.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  146. Thank you Joan. I do know that – I could happily travel the US for years and I’m already thinking about the next visit. The most recent Rowland Sinclair Mystery (not yet published) is set in the US – Boston mainly. I wasn’t able to include Boston on this tour, though I would dearly have loved to do so. And there are so many other places in America that I would like to visit. So return trips are already on the drawing board!
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  147. Thank you Joan. I do know that – I could happily travel the US for years and I’m already thinking about the next visit. The most recent Rowland Sinclair Mystery (not yet published) is set in the US – Boston mainly. I wasn’t able to include Boston on this tour, though I would dearly have loved to do so. And there are so many other places in America that I would like to visit. So return trips are already on the drawing board!
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  148. Thank you Joan. I do know that – I could happily travel the US for years and I’m already thinking about the next visit. The most recent Rowland Sinclair Mystery (not yet published) is set in the US – Boston mainly. I wasn’t able to include Boston on this tour, though I would dearly have loved to do so. And there are so many other places in America that I would like to visit. So return trips are already on the drawing board!
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  149. Thank you Joan. I do know that – I could happily travel the US for years and I’m already thinking about the next visit. The most recent Rowland Sinclair Mystery (not yet published) is set in the US – Boston mainly. I wasn’t able to include Boston on this tour, though I would dearly have loved to do so. And there are so many other places in America that I would like to visit. So return trips are already on the drawing board!
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  150. Thank you Joan. I do know that – I could happily travel the US for years and I’m already thinking about the next visit. The most recent Rowland Sinclair Mystery (not yet published) is set in the US – Boston mainly. I wasn’t able to include Boston on this tour, though I would dearly have loved to do so. And there are so many other places in America that I would like to visit. So return trips are already on the drawing board!
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  151. Hello Janet – Thank you! The history of that period in Australia was a revelation to me as well. I knew little about it until I began writing the Rowland Sinclair Mysteries. For a long time I think Australia preferred to ignore the fact that it flirted with Fascism. We don’t have any bookshop events in NY unfortunately, but we couldn’t resist starting there anyway. We plan to find a coffee shop which will tolerate us writing there, and put out an invitation on social media, to New Yorkers to come out to meet, talk or write with us if they’d like to. We’ll put out an invitation on Instagram (@mysterywritersontherun) and FB and if you are available, I would love to meet you.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  152. Hello Janet – Thank you! The history of that period in Australia was a revelation to me as well. I knew little about it until I began writing the Rowland Sinclair Mysteries. For a long time I think Australia preferred to ignore the fact that it flirted with Fascism. We don’t have any bookshop events in NY unfortunately, but we couldn’t resist starting there anyway. We plan to find a coffee shop which will tolerate us writing there, and put out an invitation on social media, to New Yorkers to come out to meet, talk or write with us if they’d like to. We’ll put out an invitation on Instagram (@mysterywritersontherun) and FB and if you are available, I would love to meet you.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  153. Hello Janet – Thank you! The history of that period in Australia was a revelation to me as well. I knew little about it until I began writing the Rowland Sinclair Mysteries. For a long time I think Australia preferred to ignore the fact that it flirted with Fascism. We don’t have any bookshop events in NY unfortunately, but we couldn’t resist starting there anyway. We plan to find a coffee shop which will tolerate us writing there, and put out an invitation on social media, to New Yorkers to come out to meet, talk or write with us if they’d like to. We’ll put out an invitation on Instagram (@mysterywritersontherun) and FB and if you are available, I would love to meet you.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  154. Hello Janet – Thank you! The history of that period in Australia was a revelation to me as well. I knew little about it until I began writing the Rowland Sinclair Mysteries. For a long time I think Australia preferred to ignore the fact that it flirted with Fascism. We don’t have any bookshop events in NY unfortunately, but we couldn’t resist starting there anyway. We plan to find a coffee shop which will tolerate us writing there, and put out an invitation on social media, to New Yorkers to come out to meet, talk or write with us if they’d like to. We’ll put out an invitation on Instagram (@mysterywritersontherun) and FB and if you are available, I would love to meet you.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  155. Hello Janet – Thank you! The history of that period in Australia was a revelation to me as well. I knew little about it until I began writing the Rowland Sinclair Mysteries. For a long time I think Australia preferred to ignore the fact that it flirted with Fascism. We don’t have any bookshop events in NY unfortunately, but we couldn’t resist starting there anyway. We plan to find a coffee shop which will tolerate us writing there, and put out an invitation on social media, to New Yorkers to come out to meet, talk or write with us if they’d like to. We’ll put out an invitation on Instagram (@mysterywritersontherun) and FB and if you are available, I would love to meet you.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  156. Hi Fiona. It’s funny – Archie is becoming popular again as a boy’s name in Australia. Though I suspect that’s something to do with the Riverdale Series on Netflix rather than Archie Leach!
    Cheers
    Sulari

    Reply
  157. Hi Fiona. It’s funny – Archie is becoming popular again as a boy’s name in Australia. Though I suspect that’s something to do with the Riverdale Series on Netflix rather than Archie Leach!
    Cheers
    Sulari

    Reply
  158. Hi Fiona. It’s funny – Archie is becoming popular again as a boy’s name in Australia. Though I suspect that’s something to do with the Riverdale Series on Netflix rather than Archie Leach!
    Cheers
    Sulari

    Reply
  159. Hi Fiona. It’s funny – Archie is becoming popular again as a boy’s name in Australia. Though I suspect that’s something to do with the Riverdale Series on Netflix rather than Archie Leach!
    Cheers
    Sulari

    Reply
  160. Hi Fiona. It’s funny – Archie is becoming popular again as a boy’s name in Australia. Though I suspect that’s something to do with the Riverdale Series on Netflix rather than Archie Leach!
    Cheers
    Sulari

    Reply
  161. I couldn’t not send him to Spain at least! The Spanish Civil War is just too tempting a setting, with Orwell and Hemingway swaggering about the place and time! The series has reached 1935 now – I originally thought there would be one book for each year between 1932 and 1945 but 10 books in I’ve only got to the end of ’35! Rowly’s just left the US at the end of book 10 and I am now looking to Europe again.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  162. I couldn’t not send him to Spain at least! The Spanish Civil War is just too tempting a setting, with Orwell and Hemingway swaggering about the place and time! The series has reached 1935 now – I originally thought there would be one book for each year between 1932 and 1945 but 10 books in I’ve only got to the end of ’35! Rowly’s just left the US at the end of book 10 and I am now looking to Europe again.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  163. I couldn’t not send him to Spain at least! The Spanish Civil War is just too tempting a setting, with Orwell and Hemingway swaggering about the place and time! The series has reached 1935 now – I originally thought there would be one book for each year between 1932 and 1945 but 10 books in I’ve only got to the end of ’35! Rowly’s just left the US at the end of book 10 and I am now looking to Europe again.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  164. I couldn’t not send him to Spain at least! The Spanish Civil War is just too tempting a setting, with Orwell and Hemingway swaggering about the place and time! The series has reached 1935 now – I originally thought there would be one book for each year between 1932 and 1945 but 10 books in I’ve only got to the end of ’35! Rowly’s just left the US at the end of book 10 and I am now looking to Europe again.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  165. I couldn’t not send him to Spain at least! The Spanish Civil War is just too tempting a setting, with Orwell and Hemingway swaggering about the place and time! The series has reached 1935 now – I originally thought there would be one book for each year between 1932 and 1945 but 10 books in I’ve only got to the end of ’35! Rowly’s just left the US at the end of book 10 and I am now looking to Europe again.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  166. Hello Annette – I love that answer!
    I agree – the 1930s is an era that keeps on giving!
    I live in the mountains in New South Wales which are comparatively cool and still green though I did drive into the middle of one storm taking my son to his soccer game. (In the country we often have to drive a couple of hundred km on Saturdays for things like kids’ soccer games) The sky was red. Dust storms have a strangely apocalyptic feeling to them and of course they’re particularly terrible for farmers who are not only struggling with drought but losing their topsoil to the winds. But there’s not a lot you can do but hope for rain.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  167. Hello Annette – I love that answer!
    I agree – the 1930s is an era that keeps on giving!
    I live in the mountains in New South Wales which are comparatively cool and still green though I did drive into the middle of one storm taking my son to his soccer game. (In the country we often have to drive a couple of hundred km on Saturdays for things like kids’ soccer games) The sky was red. Dust storms have a strangely apocalyptic feeling to them and of course they’re particularly terrible for farmers who are not only struggling with drought but losing their topsoil to the winds. But there’s not a lot you can do but hope for rain.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  168. Hello Annette – I love that answer!
    I agree – the 1930s is an era that keeps on giving!
    I live in the mountains in New South Wales which are comparatively cool and still green though I did drive into the middle of one storm taking my son to his soccer game. (In the country we often have to drive a couple of hundred km on Saturdays for things like kids’ soccer games) The sky was red. Dust storms have a strangely apocalyptic feeling to them and of course they’re particularly terrible for farmers who are not only struggling with drought but losing their topsoil to the winds. But there’s not a lot you can do but hope for rain.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  169. Hello Annette – I love that answer!
    I agree – the 1930s is an era that keeps on giving!
    I live in the mountains in New South Wales which are comparatively cool and still green though I did drive into the middle of one storm taking my son to his soccer game. (In the country we often have to drive a couple of hundred km on Saturdays for things like kids’ soccer games) The sky was red. Dust storms have a strangely apocalyptic feeling to them and of course they’re particularly terrible for farmers who are not only struggling with drought but losing their topsoil to the winds. But there’s not a lot you can do but hope for rain.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  170. Hello Annette – I love that answer!
    I agree – the 1930s is an era that keeps on giving!
    I live in the mountains in New South Wales which are comparatively cool and still green though I did drive into the middle of one storm taking my son to his soccer game. (In the country we often have to drive a couple of hundred km on Saturdays for things like kids’ soccer games) The sky was red. Dust storms have a strangely apocalyptic feeling to them and of course they’re particularly terrible for farmers who are not only struggling with drought but losing their topsoil to the winds. But there’s not a lot you can do but hope for rain.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  171. Hi Julia. They are beautiful. There’s an art gallery in Victoria who has bought the rights to produce the covers as art prints for walls. I’m looking forward to getting a couple myself!
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  172. Hi Julia. They are beautiful. There’s an art gallery in Victoria who has bought the rights to produce the covers as art prints for walls. I’m looking forward to getting a couple myself!
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  173. Hi Julia. They are beautiful. There’s an art gallery in Victoria who has bought the rights to produce the covers as art prints for walls. I’m looking forward to getting a couple myself!
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  174. Hi Julia. They are beautiful. There’s an art gallery in Victoria who has bought the rights to produce the covers as art prints for walls. I’m looking forward to getting a couple myself!
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  175. Hi Julia. They are beautiful. There’s an art gallery in Victoria who has bought the rights to produce the covers as art prints for walls. I’m looking forward to getting a couple myself!
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  176. Janet, when I discover a writer whose books I love I can’t help but try to share the recommendations around, so it’s my pleasure to share. As for historical education — most of my formal Australian history studies ended at Australian Federation (1901). But all my life I’ve been a reader, and I never made any distinction between historical stories, fantasy lands and contemporary stories, and so through reading fiction I’ve picked up a lot of history. When I read A Few Right Thinking Men, it was an eye-opener. I knew very little about that period and Sulari made it come alive for me.

    Reply
  177. Janet, when I discover a writer whose books I love I can’t help but try to share the recommendations around, so it’s my pleasure to share. As for historical education — most of my formal Australian history studies ended at Australian Federation (1901). But all my life I’ve been a reader, and I never made any distinction between historical stories, fantasy lands and contemporary stories, and so through reading fiction I’ve picked up a lot of history. When I read A Few Right Thinking Men, it was an eye-opener. I knew very little about that period and Sulari made it come alive for me.

    Reply
  178. Janet, when I discover a writer whose books I love I can’t help but try to share the recommendations around, so it’s my pleasure to share. As for historical education — most of my formal Australian history studies ended at Australian Federation (1901). But all my life I’ve been a reader, and I never made any distinction between historical stories, fantasy lands and contemporary stories, and so through reading fiction I’ve picked up a lot of history. When I read A Few Right Thinking Men, it was an eye-opener. I knew very little about that period and Sulari made it come alive for me.

    Reply
  179. Janet, when I discover a writer whose books I love I can’t help but try to share the recommendations around, so it’s my pleasure to share. As for historical education — most of my formal Australian history studies ended at Australian Federation (1901). But all my life I’ve been a reader, and I never made any distinction between historical stories, fantasy lands and contemporary stories, and so through reading fiction I’ve picked up a lot of history. When I read A Few Right Thinking Men, it was an eye-opener. I knew very little about that period and Sulari made it come alive for me.

    Reply
  180. Janet, when I discover a writer whose books I love I can’t help but try to share the recommendations around, so it’s my pleasure to share. As for historical education — most of my formal Australian history studies ended at Australian Federation (1901). But all my life I’ve been a reader, and I never made any distinction between historical stories, fantasy lands and contemporary stories, and so through reading fiction I’ve picked up a lot of history. When I read A Few Right Thinking Men, it was an eye-opener. I knew very little about that period and Sulari made it come alive for me.

    Reply
  181. I haven’t read any of your books yet, Sulari, but I am looking forward to it. And I do love historical novels that give real people walk-on parts. The answer, of course, is Cary Grant.

    Reply
  182. I haven’t read any of your books yet, Sulari, but I am looking forward to it. And I do love historical novels that give real people walk-on parts. The answer, of course, is Cary Grant.

    Reply
  183. I haven’t read any of your books yet, Sulari, but I am looking forward to it. And I do love historical novels that give real people walk-on parts. The answer, of course, is Cary Grant.

    Reply
  184. I haven’t read any of your books yet, Sulari, but I am looking forward to it. And I do love historical novels that give real people walk-on parts. The answer, of course, is Cary Grant.

    Reply
  185. I haven’t read any of your books yet, Sulari, but I am looking forward to it. And I do love historical novels that give real people walk-on parts. The answer, of course, is Cary Grant.

    Reply
  186. Hello Janet. My books were only picked up in the US relatively recently – after the 6th book had been published in Australia, which is why there’s a bit of a lag. The 7th book is coming out in the US in Jan so it won’t be too long before they’ve caught up completely.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  187. Hello Janet. My books were only picked up in the US relatively recently – after the 6th book had been published in Australia, which is why there’s a bit of a lag. The 7th book is coming out in the US in Jan so it won’t be too long before they’ve caught up completely.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  188. Hello Janet. My books were only picked up in the US relatively recently – after the 6th book had been published in Australia, which is why there’s a bit of a lag. The 7th book is coming out in the US in Jan so it won’t be too long before they’ve caught up completely.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  189. Hello Janet. My books were only picked up in the US relatively recently – after the 6th book had been published in Australia, which is why there’s a bit of a lag. The 7th book is coming out in the US in Jan so it won’t be too long before they’ve caught up completely.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply
  190. Hello Janet. My books were only picked up in the US relatively recently – after the 6th book had been published in Australia, which is why there’s a bit of a lag. The 7th book is coming out in the US in Jan so it won’t be too long before they’ve caught up completely.
    Warmly
    Sulari

    Reply

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