Meet Jennifer Kloester – Georgette Heyer expert

AccWeddBookmark Anne here, introducing my friend and fellow writer, Dr. Jennifer Kloester. Jennifer is the author of the wonderful Georgette Heyer's Regency World, which was first launched in Melbourne (my home city). Of course, being a lifelong Heyer addict, I had to go to the launch, and the rest is… history. Jenkloester

Her book was released in the US in August 2010 and  I'm delighted to present Jennifer Kloester here as a Word Wench guest.  

I should add that if any wenchly reader hasn't read Georgette  Heyer, they're missing something wonderful. I'm asking readers to share their first and favorite Heyer, so there will be a list in the comments to help guide you.

Jen, tell us how you first came to Georgette Heyer's books. What was your first?

I was living with my husband (an engineer) in a small mining town in the remote Star Mountains in Papua New Guinea and the YWCA had a little library in one of the houses which had several Georgette Heyer novels. My first book was Friday’s Child which has been a favourite ever since. I was delighted when I discovered that it was Georgette’s own personal favourite among her Regencies. Friday'sChild

What made you decide to study the world Heyer created for your doctoral dissertation?

We had moved to the Middle East in the mid-1990s and I had begun reading Georgette Heyer again. At the time I was studying for my Bachelor of Arts in history and literature as an off-campus student. I had done some study while living in PNG and had taken it up again in Bahrain (it took me thirteen years to eventually get that degree – at the rate of one subject a semester). Anyway, I was having a lovely time re-reading Georgette’s novels and discovering some I hadn’t read and introducing her to friends who didn’t know her work. In 1996 I had the idea of writing a kind of ‘handbook’ to her novels. You know, explaining all the things that might not be familiar to a modern reader – what a barouche looked like and a pelisse, and all about etiquette and dancing and coaches. Things like that.

When I returned home, I finally finished my BA and began working on the handbook. I didn’t really know how to set about it but I made lots of alphabetical lists and a large card index file and slowly worked my way through her historical novels, marking them up as I went. One day I told one of my former lecturers about my project and he sat back in his chair and said ‘that’d make a fantastic PhD’. It was an epiphanic moment and it sent me off to do an Honours degree so that I could apply to do a doctorate.The year I finished the PhD was the year Random House offered me the contract for what became Georgette Heyer’s Regency World. RegencyWorld

Your book, Georgette Heyer's Regency World, arose from your thesis. It's now become a popular reference on the Regency era. Has that surprised you?

In a way, although when I wrote the book I did it as a brand new project. It’s true that it is based on a chapter in my thesis (with the same title as it happens) but of course that chapter is a lot shorter than the book and I did almost another thesis’ worth of research for Regency World.

I think that the fact that all the history in my book is inspired by the history in Georgette Heyer’s novels counts for a lot. She was such a meticulous researcher and her ability to weave the historical Regency with her fictional stories is second to none. In that way I’m not so surprised that Regency World has proved to be popular because it has so much Heyer-inspired material in it and I think that comes through. And, of course, the Regency era is enduringly popular.

It's a fascinating read, as well.
For the last five years, you've been working on Georgette Heyer's official biography. It's to be launched next year in London on 6th October. Tell us about it.

Heyer1 I am so excited about the biography. It’s taken ten years of research and five years of writing and I could never have imagined how rewarding it would be. My aim was to bring Georgette to life for her readers and to really show how significant she is in the writing world. She was a fascinating person and someone who internalized much of her life – her outlet was her writing and it’s astonishing just how much she revealed of herself in her books and letters and short stories. 

Writing the biography has been a marvellous journey of discovery, full of twists and turns and unexpected revelations. One of the things I especially loved about writing it was being able to let Georgette tell quite a bit of her own story in her own words. I really hope that readers will enjoy that as much as I did! Heyer&son

I’ve also had the most wonderful support from Georgette’s family. Her son, Sir Richard Rougier,(pictured here as a child with his mother) and her former daughter-in-law, Susannah, Lady Rougier, have been tremendous and as well as giving me all sorts of material they have enabled me to meet most of the people who knew Georgette. I was also really fortunate to get to know Jane Aiken Hodge, Georgette’s first biographer, and she has been the most wonderful friend and counselor. It was really important to me that she was able to read and approve the biography manuscript before she died. 

 You've had unprecedented access to the Heyer family papers, including the fabled notebooks (an example of which is pictured here below). What else have you discovered?

That’s been an incredible part of the writing journey and part of my excitement is due to the discovery of so much new material. Over the past ten years I have discovered several new, untapped archives of Georgette’s personal letters – the earliest of which was written when she was eighteen and had just received the contract for The Black Moth. There are over a thousand pages of letters detailing so much of her writing life, her thoughts, experiences and feelings, it’s been an extraordinary journey of discovery and I really feel that I have come to know Georgette Heyer.
HeyerNotebook
And it’s not only the letters. I’ve also had access to her baby book, written by her mother during the first few years of Georgette’s life. I’ve discovered nine previously unknown short stories, I’ve been able to view and photograph all of the family photo albums. I’ve spent time among the remnants of her library and at the places she used to stay such as Greywalls in Scotland. I’ve followed her research footsteps at the London Library and had access to all the Heyer files at the Random House Archives in Northamptonshire.  I’ve been to her homes in Wimbledon and to her chambers in Albany and her homes in Sussex and so much more. I’ve had so many extraordinary moments of discovery and I feel really lucky and privileged to have taken this journey.

Did anything surprise you?

So many things. For instance, I had never realised just how important Georgette’s early years were to her later writing. She knew so many aspects of Regency life first hand because they still existed when she was a child. I was also surprised by the number of family legends that were actually wrong. Having so many of her early letters has shed new light on a number of things and altered her story considerably. 
It was also fun to discover that she really had lived in a grass hut in Africa. When I was writing my doctorate my supervisor (who was South African) pulled me up on a quotation from Ronald saying that he and Georgette had lived in a grass hut in Tanganyika in the 1920s. My supervisor told me that no English person living in Colonial East Africa had ever really lived in a grass hut and that I had been watching too many Hollywood movies. You can imagine my surprise (and delight) when I was given the family photo albums to study and photograph and found among them the Rougiers’ African album. In it were several photos of Georgette and Ronald in their compound outside their very own GRASS HUT! I loved that in true Georgette style she nicknamed it ‘The Manor House’. 

(Anne here — having seen some of Jen's wonderful Heyer photos I can vouch for the grass hut. It's fabulous!) 

You're a woman of parts; as well as studying the life of Heyer, you study karate. Tell us about Jennifer Kloester and karate.

I’ve found that being a writer is not exactly ideal for my body. Long hours at the computer writing or sitting reading and researching make me feel like the tin man! So four and a half years ago I took up karate. It proved to be the ideal outlet after a day of writing and I got hooked. I began teaching a couple of years ago and have a children’s class which I love. It’s wonderful watching them start out knowing nothing and then week by week seeing them improve and grow in confidence and skill. One of my students (a 13 year old girl) just got her 1st kyu last week and that means her next belt will be her black belt. I am currently a first kyu myself and am hoping to grade to my black belt next year. It means a lot of intense training but it’s good for my brain and my body and it really does help me to write.

Thanks, so much for this interview, Jen, and for sharing with us a little of your encyclopedic knowledge of a brilliant and fascinating author.  
I plan to interview Jennifer again just before the Heyer biography comes out. Last week I spent a blissful day at Jen's  house, where she showed me some her collected material on Heyer —simply superb! I cannot wait for the biography to come out. But in the meantime, there is the delicious GEORGETTE HEYER'S REGENCY WORLD awaiting you.

If you have any questions, I'm sure Jennifer would be glad to answer them.
And I'll ask one question of readers: which was your first Heyer? And which is your favorite?
One lucky commenter will receive a copy of Jennifer Kloester's GEORGETTE HEYER'S REGENCY WORLD

285 thoughts on “Meet Jennifer Kloester – Georgette Heyer expert”

  1. Hello, ladies! What a delightful post : ) “The Nonesuch” was my first, and still favorite, Georgette Heyer book. The combination of Georgette Heyer and Jane Aiken Hodge is a heady one, indeed! Jennifer, adding you to the mix makes a terrifc trio of talent which reaffirms the right to the crown of Regency Romance. Fairy tales were the earliest contact that many of us had with the romance and adventure of earlier times. Beautifully illustrated books with wondrous fables of a fair maiden swept away into happiness by a handsome prince! The fairy godmothers were later replaced by Georgette Heyer, Jane Aiken Hodge, Barbara Cartland and Jane Austen. Childhood whimsy turned into a young womans’s fancy!

    Reply
  2. Hello, ladies! What a delightful post : ) “The Nonesuch” was my first, and still favorite, Georgette Heyer book. The combination of Georgette Heyer and Jane Aiken Hodge is a heady one, indeed! Jennifer, adding you to the mix makes a terrifc trio of talent which reaffirms the right to the crown of Regency Romance. Fairy tales were the earliest contact that many of us had with the romance and adventure of earlier times. Beautifully illustrated books with wondrous fables of a fair maiden swept away into happiness by a handsome prince! The fairy godmothers were later replaced by Georgette Heyer, Jane Aiken Hodge, Barbara Cartland and Jane Austen. Childhood whimsy turned into a young womans’s fancy!

    Reply
  3. Hello, ladies! What a delightful post : ) “The Nonesuch” was my first, and still favorite, Georgette Heyer book. The combination of Georgette Heyer and Jane Aiken Hodge is a heady one, indeed! Jennifer, adding you to the mix makes a terrifc trio of talent which reaffirms the right to the crown of Regency Romance. Fairy tales were the earliest contact that many of us had with the romance and adventure of earlier times. Beautifully illustrated books with wondrous fables of a fair maiden swept away into happiness by a handsome prince! The fairy godmothers were later replaced by Georgette Heyer, Jane Aiken Hodge, Barbara Cartland and Jane Austen. Childhood whimsy turned into a young womans’s fancy!

    Reply
  4. Hello, ladies! What a delightful post : ) “The Nonesuch” was my first, and still favorite, Georgette Heyer book. The combination of Georgette Heyer and Jane Aiken Hodge is a heady one, indeed! Jennifer, adding you to the mix makes a terrifc trio of talent which reaffirms the right to the crown of Regency Romance. Fairy tales were the earliest contact that many of us had with the romance and adventure of earlier times. Beautifully illustrated books with wondrous fables of a fair maiden swept away into happiness by a handsome prince! The fairy godmothers were later replaced by Georgette Heyer, Jane Aiken Hodge, Barbara Cartland and Jane Austen. Childhood whimsy turned into a young womans’s fancy!

    Reply
  5. Hello, ladies! What a delightful post : ) “The Nonesuch” was my first, and still favorite, Georgette Heyer book. The combination of Georgette Heyer and Jane Aiken Hodge is a heady one, indeed! Jennifer, adding you to the mix makes a terrifc trio of talent which reaffirms the right to the crown of Regency Romance. Fairy tales were the earliest contact that many of us had with the romance and adventure of earlier times. Beautifully illustrated books with wondrous fables of a fair maiden swept away into happiness by a handsome prince! The fairy godmothers were later replaced by Georgette Heyer, Jane Aiken Hodge, Barbara Cartland and Jane Austen. Childhood whimsy turned into a young womans’s fancy!

    Reply
  6. My first was Venetia in an online read-along over at Risky Regencies this past year. I don’t know how I had missed out on Heyer before then. I am currently reading more of her works and so can’t pick a favorite yet!

    Reply
  7. My first was Venetia in an online read-along over at Risky Regencies this past year. I don’t know how I had missed out on Heyer before then. I am currently reading more of her works and so can’t pick a favorite yet!

    Reply
  8. My first was Venetia in an online read-along over at Risky Regencies this past year. I don’t know how I had missed out on Heyer before then. I am currently reading more of her works and so can’t pick a favorite yet!

    Reply
  9. My first was Venetia in an online read-along over at Risky Regencies this past year. I don’t know how I had missed out on Heyer before then. I am currently reading more of her works and so can’t pick a favorite yet!

    Reply
  10. My first was Venetia in an online read-along over at Risky Regencies this past year. I don’t know how I had missed out on Heyer before then. I am currently reading more of her works and so can’t pick a favorite yet!

    Reply
  11. My first Heyer was “The Corinthian” (which I think was first published under a different title?) and I was hooked. I can’t believe I didn’t discover Heyer until I was in my late 20’s! But to pick a favorite? I don’t think I can do it! The Reluctant Widow is certainly among my favorites, as is Powder and Patch.
    I look forward to reading “Georgette Heyer’s Regency World.” It just might make a great gift for my sister, who is a fellow Regency junky.
    Thanks for a great interview, ladies!

    Reply
  12. My first Heyer was “The Corinthian” (which I think was first published under a different title?) and I was hooked. I can’t believe I didn’t discover Heyer until I was in my late 20’s! But to pick a favorite? I don’t think I can do it! The Reluctant Widow is certainly among my favorites, as is Powder and Patch.
    I look forward to reading “Georgette Heyer’s Regency World.” It just might make a great gift for my sister, who is a fellow Regency junky.
    Thanks for a great interview, ladies!

    Reply
  13. My first Heyer was “The Corinthian” (which I think was first published under a different title?) and I was hooked. I can’t believe I didn’t discover Heyer until I was in my late 20’s! But to pick a favorite? I don’t think I can do it! The Reluctant Widow is certainly among my favorites, as is Powder and Patch.
    I look forward to reading “Georgette Heyer’s Regency World.” It just might make a great gift for my sister, who is a fellow Regency junky.
    Thanks for a great interview, ladies!

    Reply
  14. My first Heyer was “The Corinthian” (which I think was first published under a different title?) and I was hooked. I can’t believe I didn’t discover Heyer until I was in my late 20’s! But to pick a favorite? I don’t think I can do it! The Reluctant Widow is certainly among my favorites, as is Powder and Patch.
    I look forward to reading “Georgette Heyer’s Regency World.” It just might make a great gift for my sister, who is a fellow Regency junky.
    Thanks for a great interview, ladies!

    Reply
  15. My first Heyer was “The Corinthian” (which I think was first published under a different title?) and I was hooked. I can’t believe I didn’t discover Heyer until I was in my late 20’s! But to pick a favorite? I don’t think I can do it! The Reluctant Widow is certainly among my favorites, as is Powder and Patch.
    I look forward to reading “Georgette Heyer’s Regency World.” It just might make a great gift for my sister, who is a fellow Regency junky.
    Thanks for a great interview, ladies!

    Reply
  16. My first Heyer was GRAND SOPHY, many years ago, and it’s remained one of my favorites (the other is FREDERICA). I had a roommate who was re-reading it, and when she learned I’d never heard of the author or the genre she insisted I take hers. I was instantly hooked!
    I’ve read Ms. Hodge’s book and am looking forward to reading yours, Ms. Kloester. As a matter of fact, I’m about to request a copy for the library where I work!
    Thanks for bringing it to my attention, Anne!

    Reply
  17. My first Heyer was GRAND SOPHY, many years ago, and it’s remained one of my favorites (the other is FREDERICA). I had a roommate who was re-reading it, and when she learned I’d never heard of the author or the genre she insisted I take hers. I was instantly hooked!
    I’ve read Ms. Hodge’s book and am looking forward to reading yours, Ms. Kloester. As a matter of fact, I’m about to request a copy for the library where I work!
    Thanks for bringing it to my attention, Anne!

    Reply
  18. My first Heyer was GRAND SOPHY, many years ago, and it’s remained one of my favorites (the other is FREDERICA). I had a roommate who was re-reading it, and when she learned I’d never heard of the author or the genre she insisted I take hers. I was instantly hooked!
    I’ve read Ms. Hodge’s book and am looking forward to reading yours, Ms. Kloester. As a matter of fact, I’m about to request a copy for the library where I work!
    Thanks for bringing it to my attention, Anne!

    Reply
  19. My first Heyer was GRAND SOPHY, many years ago, and it’s remained one of my favorites (the other is FREDERICA). I had a roommate who was re-reading it, and when she learned I’d never heard of the author or the genre she insisted I take hers. I was instantly hooked!
    I’ve read Ms. Hodge’s book and am looking forward to reading yours, Ms. Kloester. As a matter of fact, I’m about to request a copy for the library where I work!
    Thanks for bringing it to my attention, Anne!

    Reply
  20. My first Heyer was GRAND SOPHY, many years ago, and it’s remained one of my favorites (the other is FREDERICA). I had a roommate who was re-reading it, and when she learned I’d never heard of the author or the genre she insisted I take hers. I was instantly hooked!
    I’ve read Ms. Hodge’s book and am looking forward to reading yours, Ms. Kloester. As a matter of fact, I’m about to request a copy for the library where I work!
    Thanks for bringing it to my attention, Anne!

    Reply
  21. Wonderful interview, Anne and Dr. Kloester! The research sounds fascinating, and I’m sure the new biography will be equally absorbing.
    These Old Shades was my first Heyer, first read more years ago than I’m willing to admit. Frederica is my #1 favorite, but I love many of Heyer’s books. I have a deep affection for Friday’s Child because it was my mother’s favorite, and “the only romance worth reading” according to an anti-romance-novel friend from grad school days. I always think of both of them when I reread Friday’s Child. And isn’t rereading Heyer a joy?

    Reply
  22. Wonderful interview, Anne and Dr. Kloester! The research sounds fascinating, and I’m sure the new biography will be equally absorbing.
    These Old Shades was my first Heyer, first read more years ago than I’m willing to admit. Frederica is my #1 favorite, but I love many of Heyer’s books. I have a deep affection for Friday’s Child because it was my mother’s favorite, and “the only romance worth reading” according to an anti-romance-novel friend from grad school days. I always think of both of them when I reread Friday’s Child. And isn’t rereading Heyer a joy?

    Reply
  23. Wonderful interview, Anne and Dr. Kloester! The research sounds fascinating, and I’m sure the new biography will be equally absorbing.
    These Old Shades was my first Heyer, first read more years ago than I’m willing to admit. Frederica is my #1 favorite, but I love many of Heyer’s books. I have a deep affection for Friday’s Child because it was my mother’s favorite, and “the only romance worth reading” according to an anti-romance-novel friend from grad school days. I always think of both of them when I reread Friday’s Child. And isn’t rereading Heyer a joy?

    Reply
  24. Wonderful interview, Anne and Dr. Kloester! The research sounds fascinating, and I’m sure the new biography will be equally absorbing.
    These Old Shades was my first Heyer, first read more years ago than I’m willing to admit. Frederica is my #1 favorite, but I love many of Heyer’s books. I have a deep affection for Friday’s Child because it was my mother’s favorite, and “the only romance worth reading” according to an anti-romance-novel friend from grad school days. I always think of both of them when I reread Friday’s Child. And isn’t rereading Heyer a joy?

    Reply
  25. Wonderful interview, Anne and Dr. Kloester! The research sounds fascinating, and I’m sure the new biography will be equally absorbing.
    These Old Shades was my first Heyer, first read more years ago than I’m willing to admit. Frederica is my #1 favorite, but I love many of Heyer’s books. I have a deep affection for Friday’s Child because it was my mother’s favorite, and “the only romance worth reading” according to an anti-romance-novel friend from grad school days. I always think of both of them when I reread Friday’s Child. And isn’t rereading Heyer a joy?

    Reply
  26. What a marvelous post! I can’t wait for this new bio — I got shivers reading about Ms Kloester’s experience with the baby journal and Heyer’s letters!
    My first Heyer was The Spanish Bride. I think I read it as a teen when on base somewhere, maybe Sicily – so Ms Kloester’s history with reading Heyer made me smile.

    Reply
  27. What a marvelous post! I can’t wait for this new bio — I got shivers reading about Ms Kloester’s experience with the baby journal and Heyer’s letters!
    My first Heyer was The Spanish Bride. I think I read it as a teen when on base somewhere, maybe Sicily – so Ms Kloester’s history with reading Heyer made me smile.

    Reply
  28. What a marvelous post! I can’t wait for this new bio — I got shivers reading about Ms Kloester’s experience with the baby journal and Heyer’s letters!
    My first Heyer was The Spanish Bride. I think I read it as a teen when on base somewhere, maybe Sicily – so Ms Kloester’s history with reading Heyer made me smile.

    Reply
  29. What a marvelous post! I can’t wait for this new bio — I got shivers reading about Ms Kloester’s experience with the baby journal and Heyer’s letters!
    My first Heyer was The Spanish Bride. I think I read it as a teen when on base somewhere, maybe Sicily – so Ms Kloester’s history with reading Heyer made me smile.

    Reply
  30. What a marvelous post! I can’t wait for this new bio — I got shivers reading about Ms Kloester’s experience with the baby journal and Heyer’s letters!
    My first Heyer was The Spanish Bride. I think I read it as a teen when on base somewhere, maybe Sicily – so Ms Kloester’s history with reading Heyer made me smile.

    Reply
  31. Jennifer, it was lovely to meet you in Brisbane last year, and I came home and promptly ordered your REGENCY WORLD. Cannot WAIT for the Georgette bio next year! I’ve read Jane Aiken Hodges’s, of course, and it will be lovely to read the new material you’ve found.
    I discovered the Grand Georgette in college, and my first book was SYLVESTER, OR, THE WICKED UNCLE. It’s still a favorite.
    Keep writing, please! And may the Heyer estate be looking a publishing an anthology of the previously unpublished short stories?

    Reply
  32. Jennifer, it was lovely to meet you in Brisbane last year, and I came home and promptly ordered your REGENCY WORLD. Cannot WAIT for the Georgette bio next year! I’ve read Jane Aiken Hodges’s, of course, and it will be lovely to read the new material you’ve found.
    I discovered the Grand Georgette in college, and my first book was SYLVESTER, OR, THE WICKED UNCLE. It’s still a favorite.
    Keep writing, please! And may the Heyer estate be looking a publishing an anthology of the previously unpublished short stories?

    Reply
  33. Jennifer, it was lovely to meet you in Brisbane last year, and I came home and promptly ordered your REGENCY WORLD. Cannot WAIT for the Georgette bio next year! I’ve read Jane Aiken Hodges’s, of course, and it will be lovely to read the new material you’ve found.
    I discovered the Grand Georgette in college, and my first book was SYLVESTER, OR, THE WICKED UNCLE. It’s still a favorite.
    Keep writing, please! And may the Heyer estate be looking a publishing an anthology of the previously unpublished short stories?

    Reply
  34. Jennifer, it was lovely to meet you in Brisbane last year, and I came home and promptly ordered your REGENCY WORLD. Cannot WAIT for the Georgette bio next year! I’ve read Jane Aiken Hodges’s, of course, and it will be lovely to read the new material you’ve found.
    I discovered the Grand Georgette in college, and my first book was SYLVESTER, OR, THE WICKED UNCLE. It’s still a favorite.
    Keep writing, please! And may the Heyer estate be looking a publishing an anthology of the previously unpublished short stories?

    Reply
  35. Jennifer, it was lovely to meet you in Brisbane last year, and I came home and promptly ordered your REGENCY WORLD. Cannot WAIT for the Georgette bio next year! I’ve read Jane Aiken Hodges’s, of course, and it will be lovely to read the new material you’ve found.
    I discovered the Grand Georgette in college, and my first book was SYLVESTER, OR, THE WICKED UNCLE. It’s still a favorite.
    Keep writing, please! And may the Heyer estate be looking a publishing an anthology of the previously unpublished short stories?

    Reply
  36. I think my first Heyer was April Lady, but my favorite is Venetia.
    Jennifer, I cannot wait for your Heyer biography (already owning your Georgette Heyer’s Regency World). I am fortunate enough to own Jane Aiken Hodge’s bio of Heyer. Can’t wait to have yours!

    Reply
  37. I think my first Heyer was April Lady, but my favorite is Venetia.
    Jennifer, I cannot wait for your Heyer biography (already owning your Georgette Heyer’s Regency World). I am fortunate enough to own Jane Aiken Hodge’s bio of Heyer. Can’t wait to have yours!

    Reply
  38. I think my first Heyer was April Lady, but my favorite is Venetia.
    Jennifer, I cannot wait for your Heyer biography (already owning your Georgette Heyer’s Regency World). I am fortunate enough to own Jane Aiken Hodge’s bio of Heyer. Can’t wait to have yours!

    Reply
  39. I think my first Heyer was April Lady, but my favorite is Venetia.
    Jennifer, I cannot wait for your Heyer biography (already owning your Georgette Heyer’s Regency World). I am fortunate enough to own Jane Aiken Hodge’s bio of Heyer. Can’t wait to have yours!

    Reply
  40. I think my first Heyer was April Lady, but my favorite is Venetia.
    Jennifer, I cannot wait for your Heyer biography (already owning your Georgette Heyer’s Regency World). I am fortunate enough to own Jane Aiken Hodge’s bio of Heyer. Can’t wait to have yours!

    Reply
  41. Thanks for the wonderful interview. My first Heyer was The Grand Sophy.
    Any possibility of the newly discovered short stories being published?

    Reply
  42. Thanks for the wonderful interview. My first Heyer was The Grand Sophy.
    Any possibility of the newly discovered short stories being published?

    Reply
  43. Thanks for the wonderful interview. My first Heyer was The Grand Sophy.
    Any possibility of the newly discovered short stories being published?

    Reply
  44. Thanks for the wonderful interview. My first Heyer was The Grand Sophy.
    Any possibility of the newly discovered short stories being published?

    Reply
  45. Thanks for the wonderful interview. My first Heyer was The Grand Sophy.
    Any possibility of the newly discovered short stories being published?

    Reply
  46. Hi Jen! Nice to ‘hear’ you again (the Heyer Day at Lucy Cavendish seems only yesterday). First, my debut Heyer was These Old Shades, which I blame for my determined single status – what man could eclipse Avon?
    It must have been so exciting to see the notebooks and be able to study GH’s own studies. Will we see something of the notebooks in the forthcoming biography?

    Reply
  47. Hi Jen! Nice to ‘hear’ you again (the Heyer Day at Lucy Cavendish seems only yesterday). First, my debut Heyer was These Old Shades, which I blame for my determined single status – what man could eclipse Avon?
    It must have been so exciting to see the notebooks and be able to study GH’s own studies. Will we see something of the notebooks in the forthcoming biography?

    Reply
  48. Hi Jen! Nice to ‘hear’ you again (the Heyer Day at Lucy Cavendish seems only yesterday). First, my debut Heyer was These Old Shades, which I blame for my determined single status – what man could eclipse Avon?
    It must have been so exciting to see the notebooks and be able to study GH’s own studies. Will we see something of the notebooks in the forthcoming biography?

    Reply
  49. Hi Jen! Nice to ‘hear’ you again (the Heyer Day at Lucy Cavendish seems only yesterday). First, my debut Heyer was These Old Shades, which I blame for my determined single status – what man could eclipse Avon?
    It must have been so exciting to see the notebooks and be able to study GH’s own studies. Will we see something of the notebooks in the forthcoming biography?

    Reply
  50. Hi Jen! Nice to ‘hear’ you again (the Heyer Day at Lucy Cavendish seems only yesterday). First, my debut Heyer was These Old Shades, which I blame for my determined single status – what man could eclipse Avon?
    It must have been so exciting to see the notebooks and be able to study GH’s own studies. Will we see something of the notebooks in the forthcoming biography?

    Reply
  51. My first Heyer was Faro’s Daughter, and it remains one of my favorites. I can still remember my teenage self giggling at the scene where Deb had Ravenscar locked in the cellar of her aunt’s gaming house.
    My favorite, if I have to choose just one? The Grand Sophy.

    Reply
  52. My first Heyer was Faro’s Daughter, and it remains one of my favorites. I can still remember my teenage self giggling at the scene where Deb had Ravenscar locked in the cellar of her aunt’s gaming house.
    My favorite, if I have to choose just one? The Grand Sophy.

    Reply
  53. My first Heyer was Faro’s Daughter, and it remains one of my favorites. I can still remember my teenage self giggling at the scene where Deb had Ravenscar locked in the cellar of her aunt’s gaming house.
    My favorite, if I have to choose just one? The Grand Sophy.

    Reply
  54. My first Heyer was Faro’s Daughter, and it remains one of my favorites. I can still remember my teenage self giggling at the scene where Deb had Ravenscar locked in the cellar of her aunt’s gaming house.
    My favorite, if I have to choose just one? The Grand Sophy.

    Reply
  55. My first Heyer was Faro’s Daughter, and it remains one of my favorites. I can still remember my teenage self giggling at the scene where Deb had Ravenscar locked in the cellar of her aunt’s gaming house.
    My favorite, if I have to choose just one? The Grand Sophy.

    Reply
  56. I love Georgette Heyer’s books. My first Heyer novel was Arabella and it is so hard to choose my favorite but I will go with The Grand Sophy.

    Reply
  57. I love Georgette Heyer’s books. My first Heyer novel was Arabella and it is so hard to choose my favorite but I will go with The Grand Sophy.

    Reply
  58. I love Georgette Heyer’s books. My first Heyer novel was Arabella and it is so hard to choose my favorite but I will go with The Grand Sophy.

    Reply
  59. I love Georgette Heyer’s books. My first Heyer novel was Arabella and it is so hard to choose my favorite but I will go with The Grand Sophy.

    Reply
  60. I love Georgette Heyer’s books. My first Heyer novel was Arabella and it is so hard to choose my favorite but I will go with The Grand Sophy.

    Reply
  61. Thanks Anne & Jen for a lovely interview – I squee every time I hear more details about the bio!
    My first, and still my favourite – is The Grand Sophy. Perhaps because I’m such a ‘managing female’ myself?!
    I’m very much looking forward to the bio release – and I’ll definitely be at the Australian launch (wherever that may be!)

    Reply
  62. Thanks Anne & Jen for a lovely interview – I squee every time I hear more details about the bio!
    My first, and still my favourite – is The Grand Sophy. Perhaps because I’m such a ‘managing female’ myself?!
    I’m very much looking forward to the bio release – and I’ll definitely be at the Australian launch (wherever that may be!)

    Reply
  63. Thanks Anne & Jen for a lovely interview – I squee every time I hear more details about the bio!
    My first, and still my favourite – is The Grand Sophy. Perhaps because I’m such a ‘managing female’ myself?!
    I’m very much looking forward to the bio release – and I’ll definitely be at the Australian launch (wherever that may be!)

    Reply
  64. Thanks Anne & Jen for a lovely interview – I squee every time I hear more details about the bio!
    My first, and still my favourite – is The Grand Sophy. Perhaps because I’m such a ‘managing female’ myself?!
    I’m very much looking forward to the bio release – and I’ll definitely be at the Australian launch (wherever that may be!)

    Reply
  65. Thanks Anne & Jen for a lovely interview – I squee every time I hear more details about the bio!
    My first, and still my favourite – is The Grand Sophy. Perhaps because I’m such a ‘managing female’ myself?!
    I’m very much looking forward to the bio release – and I’ll definitely be at the Australian launch (wherever that may be!)

    Reply
  66. Great interview. I bought Jennifer’s Regency World as an e-book first. I kept finding I needed to look up something so bought a copy recently.
    It’s a great reference source.
    My first Heyer was Faro’s Daughter and it’s my favourite too.

    Reply
  67. Great interview. I bought Jennifer’s Regency World as an e-book first. I kept finding I needed to look up something so bought a copy recently.
    It’s a great reference source.
    My first Heyer was Faro’s Daughter and it’s my favourite too.

    Reply
  68. Great interview. I bought Jennifer’s Regency World as an e-book first. I kept finding I needed to look up something so bought a copy recently.
    It’s a great reference source.
    My first Heyer was Faro’s Daughter and it’s my favourite too.

    Reply
  69. Great interview. I bought Jennifer’s Regency World as an e-book first. I kept finding I needed to look up something so bought a copy recently.
    It’s a great reference source.
    My first Heyer was Faro’s Daughter and it’s my favourite too.

    Reply
  70. Great interview. I bought Jennifer’s Regency World as an e-book first. I kept finding I needed to look up something so bought a copy recently.
    It’s a great reference source.
    My first Heyer was Faro’s Daughter and it’s my favourite too.

    Reply
  71. What a fasinating interview Ladies I have to be honest and say that I have not read a Georgette Heyer story although I know my Mum loved them.
    I really need to recify this I know I am missing out some some fantastic stories.
    Hangs head in shame
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  72. What a fasinating interview Ladies I have to be honest and say that I have not read a Georgette Heyer story although I know my Mum loved them.
    I really need to recify this I know I am missing out some some fantastic stories.
    Hangs head in shame
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  73. What a fasinating interview Ladies I have to be honest and say that I have not read a Georgette Heyer story although I know my Mum loved them.
    I really need to recify this I know I am missing out some some fantastic stories.
    Hangs head in shame
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  74. What a fasinating interview Ladies I have to be honest and say that I have not read a Georgette Heyer story although I know my Mum loved them.
    I really need to recify this I know I am missing out some some fantastic stories.
    Hangs head in shame
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  75. What a fasinating interview Ladies I have to be honest and say that I have not read a Georgette Heyer story although I know my Mum loved them.
    I really need to recify this I know I am missing out some some fantastic stories.
    Hangs head in shame
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  76. I am loving all these first Heyer stories – mine was These Old Shades, and it’s still beloved for that reason. And I could not pick a favorite to save my life! But I might be able to pick six or seven.
    The Unknown Ajax, Venetia, The Grand Sophy, Frederica, The Nonesuch, Friday’s Child, Faro’s Daughter, The Convenient Marriage, Black Sheep, The Masqueraders, False Colours … maybe I should try to pick a dozen. LOL I probably couldn’t, even then — most of her books are like old friends, and I read and reread them.
    Amy and Helen, what a wonderful prospect you have before you, catching up with most of Heyer. If you follow the suggestions here, you’ll be hooked, I’m sure. She did write some books that aren’t my cup of tea, but they’re still good. My Lord John is the only one I can’t bear.
    The day I spent with Jennifer, being shown various Heyer things was simply magical. She’s a walking encyclopedia on Heyer’s life and times, and full of fascinating anecdotes and snippets. I could have stayed a week and we wouldn’t have run out of Heyer topics to talk about. Utter bliss.

    Reply
  77. I am loving all these first Heyer stories – mine was These Old Shades, and it’s still beloved for that reason. And I could not pick a favorite to save my life! But I might be able to pick six or seven.
    The Unknown Ajax, Venetia, The Grand Sophy, Frederica, The Nonesuch, Friday’s Child, Faro’s Daughter, The Convenient Marriage, Black Sheep, The Masqueraders, False Colours … maybe I should try to pick a dozen. LOL I probably couldn’t, even then — most of her books are like old friends, and I read and reread them.
    Amy and Helen, what a wonderful prospect you have before you, catching up with most of Heyer. If you follow the suggestions here, you’ll be hooked, I’m sure. She did write some books that aren’t my cup of tea, but they’re still good. My Lord John is the only one I can’t bear.
    The day I spent with Jennifer, being shown various Heyer things was simply magical. She’s a walking encyclopedia on Heyer’s life and times, and full of fascinating anecdotes and snippets. I could have stayed a week and we wouldn’t have run out of Heyer topics to talk about. Utter bliss.

    Reply
  78. I am loving all these first Heyer stories – mine was These Old Shades, and it’s still beloved for that reason. And I could not pick a favorite to save my life! But I might be able to pick six or seven.
    The Unknown Ajax, Venetia, The Grand Sophy, Frederica, The Nonesuch, Friday’s Child, Faro’s Daughter, The Convenient Marriage, Black Sheep, The Masqueraders, False Colours … maybe I should try to pick a dozen. LOL I probably couldn’t, even then — most of her books are like old friends, and I read and reread them.
    Amy and Helen, what a wonderful prospect you have before you, catching up with most of Heyer. If you follow the suggestions here, you’ll be hooked, I’m sure. She did write some books that aren’t my cup of tea, but they’re still good. My Lord John is the only one I can’t bear.
    The day I spent with Jennifer, being shown various Heyer things was simply magical. She’s a walking encyclopedia on Heyer’s life and times, and full of fascinating anecdotes and snippets. I could have stayed a week and we wouldn’t have run out of Heyer topics to talk about. Utter bliss.

    Reply
  79. I am loving all these first Heyer stories – mine was These Old Shades, and it’s still beloved for that reason. And I could not pick a favorite to save my life! But I might be able to pick six or seven.
    The Unknown Ajax, Venetia, The Grand Sophy, Frederica, The Nonesuch, Friday’s Child, Faro’s Daughter, The Convenient Marriage, Black Sheep, The Masqueraders, False Colours … maybe I should try to pick a dozen. LOL I probably couldn’t, even then — most of her books are like old friends, and I read and reread them.
    Amy and Helen, what a wonderful prospect you have before you, catching up with most of Heyer. If you follow the suggestions here, you’ll be hooked, I’m sure. She did write some books that aren’t my cup of tea, but they’re still good. My Lord John is the only one I can’t bear.
    The day I spent with Jennifer, being shown various Heyer things was simply magical. She’s a walking encyclopedia on Heyer’s life and times, and full of fascinating anecdotes and snippets. I could have stayed a week and we wouldn’t have run out of Heyer topics to talk about. Utter bliss.

    Reply
  80. I am loving all these first Heyer stories – mine was These Old Shades, and it’s still beloved for that reason. And I could not pick a favorite to save my life! But I might be able to pick six or seven.
    The Unknown Ajax, Venetia, The Grand Sophy, Frederica, The Nonesuch, Friday’s Child, Faro’s Daughter, The Convenient Marriage, Black Sheep, The Masqueraders, False Colours … maybe I should try to pick a dozen. LOL I probably couldn’t, even then — most of her books are like old friends, and I read and reread them.
    Amy and Helen, what a wonderful prospect you have before you, catching up with most of Heyer. If you follow the suggestions here, you’ll be hooked, I’m sure. She did write some books that aren’t my cup of tea, but they’re still good. My Lord John is the only one I can’t bear.
    The day I spent with Jennifer, being shown various Heyer things was simply magical. She’s a walking encyclopedia on Heyer’s life and times, and full of fascinating anecdotes and snippets. I could have stayed a week and we wouldn’t have run out of Heyer topics to talk about. Utter bliss.

    Reply
  81. I’m all about “The Grand Sophy” that was my first, but I really like them all for Heyer’s wit,characters and language.Thank you for a fine interview.Ellen

    Reply
  82. I’m all about “The Grand Sophy” that was my first, but I really like them all for Heyer’s wit,characters and language.Thank you for a fine interview.Ellen

    Reply
  83. I’m all about “The Grand Sophy” that was my first, but I really like them all for Heyer’s wit,characters and language.Thank you for a fine interview.Ellen

    Reply
  84. I’m all about “The Grand Sophy” that was my first, but I really like them all for Heyer’s wit,characters and language.Thank you for a fine interview.Ellen

    Reply
  85. I’m all about “The Grand Sophy” that was my first, but I really like them all for Heyer’s wit,characters and language.Thank you for a fine interview.Ellen

    Reply
  86. My first Georgette Heyer was “The Grand Sophy” in a hardback edition printed in 1951 and given to my mother by a friend a few years after that. Sophy was a great influence on me [and I still have that copy, battered and with yellowed pages.] I like almost all Georgette Heyer’s novels but if I had to choose just one to take to a desert island, it would be “Cotillion”.
    I look forward to Jennifer Kloester’s book on Georgette Heyer. I wonder what she would have made of our continuing interest in her.

    Reply
  87. My first Georgette Heyer was “The Grand Sophy” in a hardback edition printed in 1951 and given to my mother by a friend a few years after that. Sophy was a great influence on me [and I still have that copy, battered and with yellowed pages.] I like almost all Georgette Heyer’s novels but if I had to choose just one to take to a desert island, it would be “Cotillion”.
    I look forward to Jennifer Kloester’s book on Georgette Heyer. I wonder what she would have made of our continuing interest in her.

    Reply
  88. My first Georgette Heyer was “The Grand Sophy” in a hardback edition printed in 1951 and given to my mother by a friend a few years after that. Sophy was a great influence on me [and I still have that copy, battered and with yellowed pages.] I like almost all Georgette Heyer’s novels but if I had to choose just one to take to a desert island, it would be “Cotillion”.
    I look forward to Jennifer Kloester’s book on Georgette Heyer. I wonder what she would have made of our continuing interest in her.

    Reply
  89. My first Georgette Heyer was “The Grand Sophy” in a hardback edition printed in 1951 and given to my mother by a friend a few years after that. Sophy was a great influence on me [and I still have that copy, battered and with yellowed pages.] I like almost all Georgette Heyer’s novels but if I had to choose just one to take to a desert island, it would be “Cotillion”.
    I look forward to Jennifer Kloester’s book on Georgette Heyer. I wonder what she would have made of our continuing interest in her.

    Reply
  90. My first Georgette Heyer was “The Grand Sophy” in a hardback edition printed in 1951 and given to my mother by a friend a few years after that. Sophy was a great influence on me [and I still have that copy, battered and with yellowed pages.] I like almost all Georgette Heyer’s novels but if I had to choose just one to take to a desert island, it would be “Cotillion”.
    I look forward to Jennifer Kloester’s book on Georgette Heyer. I wonder what she would have made of our continuing interest in her.

    Reply
  91. I think “Regency Buck” was the first Georgette Heyer I read – I discovered her books in the library at my school and sneak-read them when I should have been studying. My favourite is “Cotillion”, however, because it always makes me laugh. Her wonderful sense of humour really shines through in that novel! “The Reluctant Widow” comes a close second.
    I’m very much looking forward to the biography!

    Reply
  92. I think “Regency Buck” was the first Georgette Heyer I read – I discovered her books in the library at my school and sneak-read them when I should have been studying. My favourite is “Cotillion”, however, because it always makes me laugh. Her wonderful sense of humour really shines through in that novel! “The Reluctant Widow” comes a close second.
    I’m very much looking forward to the biography!

    Reply
  93. I think “Regency Buck” was the first Georgette Heyer I read – I discovered her books in the library at my school and sneak-read them when I should have been studying. My favourite is “Cotillion”, however, because it always makes me laugh. Her wonderful sense of humour really shines through in that novel! “The Reluctant Widow” comes a close second.
    I’m very much looking forward to the biography!

    Reply
  94. I think “Regency Buck” was the first Georgette Heyer I read – I discovered her books in the library at my school and sneak-read them when I should have been studying. My favourite is “Cotillion”, however, because it always makes me laugh. Her wonderful sense of humour really shines through in that novel! “The Reluctant Widow” comes a close second.
    I’m very much looking forward to the biography!

    Reply
  95. I think “Regency Buck” was the first Georgette Heyer I read – I discovered her books in the library at my school and sneak-read them when I should have been studying. My favourite is “Cotillion”, however, because it always makes me laugh. Her wonderful sense of humour really shines through in that novel! “The Reluctant Widow” comes a close second.
    I’m very much looking forward to the biography!

    Reply
  96. Fabulous interview! And I am absolutely PEA GREEN with envy at the access you had, Jennifer, to all of the Georgette Heyer material!
    My first Georgette Heyer was Venetia. I was nine years old and living in the village of Kelsale in Suffolk. The ladies next door were sisters, retired librarians and they had two things that a nine-year-old American girl could not resist – a library IN THEIR HOME and horses – two hunter jumpers and a handsome Welsh pony.
    I offered to help with the horses and in exchange I got riding lessons AND access to the library. They had all of these lovely leather-bound volumes of Jane Austen, the Bronte sisters and Georgette Heyer!
    They made sure I read them all. Venetia was my first and for all of those reasons and more it continues to be my favorite.
    The funny thing is, I try to read them all once a year and every year a different one comes out in second place, after Venetia. Every year I find something new in each book.
    This year my favorite is Devil’s Cub followed by The Quiet Gentleman.
    I’m in the process of collecting hardbound copies, earliest editions possible of every book.
    I am really excited about BOTH of your books, Jennifer!

    Reply
  97. Fabulous interview! And I am absolutely PEA GREEN with envy at the access you had, Jennifer, to all of the Georgette Heyer material!
    My first Georgette Heyer was Venetia. I was nine years old and living in the village of Kelsale in Suffolk. The ladies next door were sisters, retired librarians and they had two things that a nine-year-old American girl could not resist – a library IN THEIR HOME and horses – two hunter jumpers and a handsome Welsh pony.
    I offered to help with the horses and in exchange I got riding lessons AND access to the library. They had all of these lovely leather-bound volumes of Jane Austen, the Bronte sisters and Georgette Heyer!
    They made sure I read them all. Venetia was my first and for all of those reasons and more it continues to be my favorite.
    The funny thing is, I try to read them all once a year and every year a different one comes out in second place, after Venetia. Every year I find something new in each book.
    This year my favorite is Devil’s Cub followed by The Quiet Gentleman.
    I’m in the process of collecting hardbound copies, earliest editions possible of every book.
    I am really excited about BOTH of your books, Jennifer!

    Reply
  98. Fabulous interview! And I am absolutely PEA GREEN with envy at the access you had, Jennifer, to all of the Georgette Heyer material!
    My first Georgette Heyer was Venetia. I was nine years old and living in the village of Kelsale in Suffolk. The ladies next door were sisters, retired librarians and they had two things that a nine-year-old American girl could not resist – a library IN THEIR HOME and horses – two hunter jumpers and a handsome Welsh pony.
    I offered to help with the horses and in exchange I got riding lessons AND access to the library. They had all of these lovely leather-bound volumes of Jane Austen, the Bronte sisters and Georgette Heyer!
    They made sure I read them all. Venetia was my first and for all of those reasons and more it continues to be my favorite.
    The funny thing is, I try to read them all once a year and every year a different one comes out in second place, after Venetia. Every year I find something new in each book.
    This year my favorite is Devil’s Cub followed by The Quiet Gentleman.
    I’m in the process of collecting hardbound copies, earliest editions possible of every book.
    I am really excited about BOTH of your books, Jennifer!

    Reply
  99. Fabulous interview! And I am absolutely PEA GREEN with envy at the access you had, Jennifer, to all of the Georgette Heyer material!
    My first Georgette Heyer was Venetia. I was nine years old and living in the village of Kelsale in Suffolk. The ladies next door were sisters, retired librarians and they had two things that a nine-year-old American girl could not resist – a library IN THEIR HOME and horses – two hunter jumpers and a handsome Welsh pony.
    I offered to help with the horses and in exchange I got riding lessons AND access to the library. They had all of these lovely leather-bound volumes of Jane Austen, the Bronte sisters and Georgette Heyer!
    They made sure I read them all. Venetia was my first and for all of those reasons and more it continues to be my favorite.
    The funny thing is, I try to read them all once a year and every year a different one comes out in second place, after Venetia. Every year I find something new in each book.
    This year my favorite is Devil’s Cub followed by The Quiet Gentleman.
    I’m in the process of collecting hardbound copies, earliest editions possible of every book.
    I am really excited about BOTH of your books, Jennifer!

    Reply
  100. Fabulous interview! And I am absolutely PEA GREEN with envy at the access you had, Jennifer, to all of the Georgette Heyer material!
    My first Georgette Heyer was Venetia. I was nine years old and living in the village of Kelsale in Suffolk. The ladies next door were sisters, retired librarians and they had two things that a nine-year-old American girl could not resist – a library IN THEIR HOME and horses – two hunter jumpers and a handsome Welsh pony.
    I offered to help with the horses and in exchange I got riding lessons AND access to the library. They had all of these lovely leather-bound volumes of Jane Austen, the Bronte sisters and Georgette Heyer!
    They made sure I read them all. Venetia was my first and for all of those reasons and more it continues to be my favorite.
    The funny thing is, I try to read them all once a year and every year a different one comes out in second place, after Venetia. Every year I find something new in each book.
    This year my favorite is Devil’s Cub followed by The Quiet Gentleman.
    I’m in the process of collecting hardbound copies, earliest editions possible of every book.
    I am really excited about BOTH of your books, Jennifer!

    Reply
  101. My first Heyer was Regency Buck and I still recall my amazement and delight. But a favourite is sooo hard! The Grand Sophy, or Venetia? On the other hand, I have real soft spots for Sylvester and The Talisman Ring. The latter was confiscated by a teacher when I got caught reading it under the desk in assembly and I never did get it back. I’m convinced the rotten woman kept it for herself, the sneak. Huh!

    Reply
  102. My first Heyer was Regency Buck and I still recall my amazement and delight. But a favourite is sooo hard! The Grand Sophy, or Venetia? On the other hand, I have real soft spots for Sylvester and The Talisman Ring. The latter was confiscated by a teacher when I got caught reading it under the desk in assembly and I never did get it back. I’m convinced the rotten woman kept it for herself, the sneak. Huh!

    Reply
  103. My first Heyer was Regency Buck and I still recall my amazement and delight. But a favourite is sooo hard! The Grand Sophy, or Venetia? On the other hand, I have real soft spots for Sylvester and The Talisman Ring. The latter was confiscated by a teacher when I got caught reading it under the desk in assembly and I never did get it back. I’m convinced the rotten woman kept it for herself, the sneak. Huh!

    Reply
  104. My first Heyer was Regency Buck and I still recall my amazement and delight. But a favourite is sooo hard! The Grand Sophy, or Venetia? On the other hand, I have real soft spots for Sylvester and The Talisman Ring. The latter was confiscated by a teacher when I got caught reading it under the desk in assembly and I never did get it back. I’m convinced the rotten woman kept it for herself, the sneak. Huh!

    Reply
  105. My first Heyer was Regency Buck and I still recall my amazement and delight. But a favourite is sooo hard! The Grand Sophy, or Venetia? On the other hand, I have real soft spots for Sylvester and The Talisman Ring. The latter was confiscated by a teacher when I got caught reading it under the desk in assembly and I never did get it back. I’m convinced the rotten woman kept it for herself, the sneak. Huh!

    Reply
  106. Louisa, you should see Jennifer’s collection of different editions of Heyer. Stunning. I have all Heyer’s books, including one signed copy (a gift from a friend) and a number of duplicates, but Jen has several sets, including glorious first editions with the original dustcovers.
    Denise, I’m appalled at the teacher pinching your book. I confiscated many an item in my days as a teacher, but I always gave them back at the end of the day, or the lesson, depending on the item. Anything else is theft, IMO.
    And I lovve Sylvester — left it off my list earlier. And the Talisman Ring is a ripper, too — can’t believe she was so young when she wrote it. See, that’s the trouble with favorites — can’t pick any with Heyer. There’s one for every occasion.

    Reply
  107. Louisa, you should see Jennifer’s collection of different editions of Heyer. Stunning. I have all Heyer’s books, including one signed copy (a gift from a friend) and a number of duplicates, but Jen has several sets, including glorious first editions with the original dustcovers.
    Denise, I’m appalled at the teacher pinching your book. I confiscated many an item in my days as a teacher, but I always gave them back at the end of the day, or the lesson, depending on the item. Anything else is theft, IMO.
    And I lovve Sylvester — left it off my list earlier. And the Talisman Ring is a ripper, too — can’t believe she was so young when she wrote it. See, that’s the trouble with favorites — can’t pick any with Heyer. There’s one for every occasion.

    Reply
  108. Louisa, you should see Jennifer’s collection of different editions of Heyer. Stunning. I have all Heyer’s books, including one signed copy (a gift from a friend) and a number of duplicates, but Jen has several sets, including glorious first editions with the original dustcovers.
    Denise, I’m appalled at the teacher pinching your book. I confiscated many an item in my days as a teacher, but I always gave them back at the end of the day, or the lesson, depending on the item. Anything else is theft, IMO.
    And I lovve Sylvester — left it off my list earlier. And the Talisman Ring is a ripper, too — can’t believe she was so young when she wrote it. See, that’s the trouble with favorites — can’t pick any with Heyer. There’s one for every occasion.

    Reply
  109. Louisa, you should see Jennifer’s collection of different editions of Heyer. Stunning. I have all Heyer’s books, including one signed copy (a gift from a friend) and a number of duplicates, but Jen has several sets, including glorious first editions with the original dustcovers.
    Denise, I’m appalled at the teacher pinching your book. I confiscated many an item in my days as a teacher, but I always gave them back at the end of the day, or the lesson, depending on the item. Anything else is theft, IMO.
    And I lovve Sylvester — left it off my list earlier. And the Talisman Ring is a ripper, too — can’t believe she was so young when she wrote it. See, that’s the trouble with favorites — can’t pick any with Heyer. There’s one for every occasion.

    Reply
  110. Louisa, you should see Jennifer’s collection of different editions of Heyer. Stunning. I have all Heyer’s books, including one signed copy (a gift from a friend) and a number of duplicates, but Jen has several sets, including glorious first editions with the original dustcovers.
    Denise, I’m appalled at the teacher pinching your book. I confiscated many an item in my days as a teacher, but I always gave them back at the end of the day, or the lesson, depending on the item. Anything else is theft, IMO.
    And I lovve Sylvester — left it off my list earlier. And the Talisman Ring is a ripper, too — can’t believe she was so young when she wrote it. See, that’s the trouble with favorites — can’t pick any with Heyer. There’s one for every occasion.

    Reply
  111. And Louisa, I for got to say I am so envious of your childhood experience — I think my childhood dream would have been to have uninterrupted access to horses and books. Utter bliss.
    Like a story out of Enid Blyton.

    Reply
  112. And Louisa, I for got to say I am so envious of your childhood experience — I think my childhood dream would have been to have uninterrupted access to horses and books. Utter bliss.
    Like a story out of Enid Blyton.

    Reply
  113. And Louisa, I for got to say I am so envious of your childhood experience — I think my childhood dream would have been to have uninterrupted access to horses and books. Utter bliss.
    Like a story out of Enid Blyton.

    Reply
  114. And Louisa, I for got to say I am so envious of your childhood experience — I think my childhood dream would have been to have uninterrupted access to horses and books. Utter bliss.
    Like a story out of Enid Blyton.

    Reply
  115. And Louisa, I for got to say I am so envious of your childhood experience — I think my childhood dream would have been to have uninterrupted access to horses and books. Utter bliss.
    Like a story out of Enid Blyton.

    Reply
  116. Hi Anne! Thanks so much for the wonderful interview. Hi Jennifer! It was lovely to meet you at the Brisbane Romance Writers’ conference last year.
    I’m a confirmed Heyer addict and have been since I was about 11. Just purchased Sylvester and Venetia on Audible, read by Richard Armitage. Sigh! Unfortunately both are abridged and I noticed some great bits are missing (I mean, seriously, how *can* you abridge Heyer??) But it’s all worth it to have Richard murmur “I love you to the edge of madness” in my ear!
    Anyway, enough frivolity. Jennifer I am green with envy over the access you’ve had to all of Heyer’s writings and research. What a journey of discovery. I can’t wait to read this biography!
    As for my favourite Heyer, like you, Friday’s Child was my first and has a special place in my heart. I have many favourites, but perhaps Devil’s Cub might win by the very slightest margin. Then again, there’s The Grand Sophy and Venetia, Sylvester and Frederica… Really, it’s impossible to pick one!

    Reply
  117. Hi Anne! Thanks so much for the wonderful interview. Hi Jennifer! It was lovely to meet you at the Brisbane Romance Writers’ conference last year.
    I’m a confirmed Heyer addict and have been since I was about 11. Just purchased Sylvester and Venetia on Audible, read by Richard Armitage. Sigh! Unfortunately both are abridged and I noticed some great bits are missing (I mean, seriously, how *can* you abridge Heyer??) But it’s all worth it to have Richard murmur “I love you to the edge of madness” in my ear!
    Anyway, enough frivolity. Jennifer I am green with envy over the access you’ve had to all of Heyer’s writings and research. What a journey of discovery. I can’t wait to read this biography!
    As for my favourite Heyer, like you, Friday’s Child was my first and has a special place in my heart. I have many favourites, but perhaps Devil’s Cub might win by the very slightest margin. Then again, there’s The Grand Sophy and Venetia, Sylvester and Frederica… Really, it’s impossible to pick one!

    Reply
  118. Hi Anne! Thanks so much for the wonderful interview. Hi Jennifer! It was lovely to meet you at the Brisbane Romance Writers’ conference last year.
    I’m a confirmed Heyer addict and have been since I was about 11. Just purchased Sylvester and Venetia on Audible, read by Richard Armitage. Sigh! Unfortunately both are abridged and I noticed some great bits are missing (I mean, seriously, how *can* you abridge Heyer??) But it’s all worth it to have Richard murmur “I love you to the edge of madness” in my ear!
    Anyway, enough frivolity. Jennifer I am green with envy over the access you’ve had to all of Heyer’s writings and research. What a journey of discovery. I can’t wait to read this biography!
    As for my favourite Heyer, like you, Friday’s Child was my first and has a special place in my heart. I have many favourites, but perhaps Devil’s Cub might win by the very slightest margin. Then again, there’s The Grand Sophy and Venetia, Sylvester and Frederica… Really, it’s impossible to pick one!

    Reply
  119. Hi Anne! Thanks so much for the wonderful interview. Hi Jennifer! It was lovely to meet you at the Brisbane Romance Writers’ conference last year.
    I’m a confirmed Heyer addict and have been since I was about 11. Just purchased Sylvester and Venetia on Audible, read by Richard Armitage. Sigh! Unfortunately both are abridged and I noticed some great bits are missing (I mean, seriously, how *can* you abridge Heyer??) But it’s all worth it to have Richard murmur “I love you to the edge of madness” in my ear!
    Anyway, enough frivolity. Jennifer I am green with envy over the access you’ve had to all of Heyer’s writings and research. What a journey of discovery. I can’t wait to read this biography!
    As for my favourite Heyer, like you, Friday’s Child was my first and has a special place in my heart. I have many favourites, but perhaps Devil’s Cub might win by the very slightest margin. Then again, there’s The Grand Sophy and Venetia, Sylvester and Frederica… Really, it’s impossible to pick one!

    Reply
  120. Hi Anne! Thanks so much for the wonderful interview. Hi Jennifer! It was lovely to meet you at the Brisbane Romance Writers’ conference last year.
    I’m a confirmed Heyer addict and have been since I was about 11. Just purchased Sylvester and Venetia on Audible, read by Richard Armitage. Sigh! Unfortunately both are abridged and I noticed some great bits are missing (I mean, seriously, how *can* you abridge Heyer??) But it’s all worth it to have Richard murmur “I love you to the edge of madness” in my ear!
    Anyway, enough frivolity. Jennifer I am green with envy over the access you’ve had to all of Heyer’s writings and research. What a journey of discovery. I can’t wait to read this biography!
    As for my favourite Heyer, like you, Friday’s Child was my first and has a special place in my heart. I have many favourites, but perhaps Devil’s Cub might win by the very slightest margin. Then again, there’s The Grand Sophy and Venetia, Sylvester and Frederica… Really, it’s impossible to pick one!

    Reply
  121. I LOVE this interview! Thanks Anne and Jennifer!
    I don’t remember which Heyer was my first, but The Grand Sophy is one of my all-time favs. At one time I owned almost every paperback Heyer had written. Those puppies were beaten up but beloved.
    I now have a bookstore coupon that I’ve been waiting for, and it’s earmarked to buy your book, Jennifer!
    Light,
    Nancy Haddock
    http://www.nancyhaddock.com

    Reply
  122. I LOVE this interview! Thanks Anne and Jennifer!
    I don’t remember which Heyer was my first, but The Grand Sophy is one of my all-time favs. At one time I owned almost every paperback Heyer had written. Those puppies were beaten up but beloved.
    I now have a bookstore coupon that I’ve been waiting for, and it’s earmarked to buy your book, Jennifer!
    Light,
    Nancy Haddock
    http://www.nancyhaddock.com

    Reply
  123. I LOVE this interview! Thanks Anne and Jennifer!
    I don’t remember which Heyer was my first, but The Grand Sophy is one of my all-time favs. At one time I owned almost every paperback Heyer had written. Those puppies were beaten up but beloved.
    I now have a bookstore coupon that I’ve been waiting for, and it’s earmarked to buy your book, Jennifer!
    Light,
    Nancy Haddock
    http://www.nancyhaddock.com

    Reply
  124. I LOVE this interview! Thanks Anne and Jennifer!
    I don’t remember which Heyer was my first, but The Grand Sophy is one of my all-time favs. At one time I owned almost every paperback Heyer had written. Those puppies were beaten up but beloved.
    I now have a bookstore coupon that I’ve been waiting for, and it’s earmarked to buy your book, Jennifer!
    Light,
    Nancy Haddock
    http://www.nancyhaddock.com

    Reply
  125. I LOVE this interview! Thanks Anne and Jennifer!
    I don’t remember which Heyer was my first, but The Grand Sophy is one of my all-time favs. At one time I owned almost every paperback Heyer had written. Those puppies were beaten up but beloved.
    I now have a bookstore coupon that I’ve been waiting for, and it’s earmarked to buy your book, Jennifer!
    Light,
    Nancy Haddock
    http://www.nancyhaddock.com

    Reply
  126. Hi everyone, Jennifer here, just wanting to say thank you for so many wonderful comments. And hi to Mary Jo and Christine who I was so delighted to meet at in Brisbane last year.
    I have loved reading about all the different favourite Heyers – I always have trouble with this question because I love so many of her books. Cotillion is one I have read many times because I love Freddy so much but then just thinking about The Unknown Ajax always makes me laugh! I adore Frederica, Sylvester (who can resist Sir Nugent!) and Venetia. A while back I gave Venetia to my son to read and he rang me up the next day to tell me it had kept him up until 2am because he hadn’t been able to put it down!
    One book that isn’t often mentioned as a favourite is Sprig Muslin – I love it for its beautifully depicted romance between Sir Gareth and Hester Theale. Hester is a favourite of mine. And then there’s A Civil Contract and of course Devil’s Cub. There’s quite a bit about Devil’s Cub in the new biography.
    By the way, if anyone has any questions about Georgette Heyer or the forthcoming biography i would be more than happy to answer them.

    Reply
  127. Hi everyone, Jennifer here, just wanting to say thank you for so many wonderful comments. And hi to Mary Jo and Christine who I was so delighted to meet at in Brisbane last year.
    I have loved reading about all the different favourite Heyers – I always have trouble with this question because I love so many of her books. Cotillion is one I have read many times because I love Freddy so much but then just thinking about The Unknown Ajax always makes me laugh! I adore Frederica, Sylvester (who can resist Sir Nugent!) and Venetia. A while back I gave Venetia to my son to read and he rang me up the next day to tell me it had kept him up until 2am because he hadn’t been able to put it down!
    One book that isn’t often mentioned as a favourite is Sprig Muslin – I love it for its beautifully depicted romance between Sir Gareth and Hester Theale. Hester is a favourite of mine. And then there’s A Civil Contract and of course Devil’s Cub. There’s quite a bit about Devil’s Cub in the new biography.
    By the way, if anyone has any questions about Georgette Heyer or the forthcoming biography i would be more than happy to answer them.

    Reply
  128. Hi everyone, Jennifer here, just wanting to say thank you for so many wonderful comments. And hi to Mary Jo and Christine who I was so delighted to meet at in Brisbane last year.
    I have loved reading about all the different favourite Heyers – I always have trouble with this question because I love so many of her books. Cotillion is one I have read many times because I love Freddy so much but then just thinking about The Unknown Ajax always makes me laugh! I adore Frederica, Sylvester (who can resist Sir Nugent!) and Venetia. A while back I gave Venetia to my son to read and he rang me up the next day to tell me it had kept him up until 2am because he hadn’t been able to put it down!
    One book that isn’t often mentioned as a favourite is Sprig Muslin – I love it for its beautifully depicted romance between Sir Gareth and Hester Theale. Hester is a favourite of mine. And then there’s A Civil Contract and of course Devil’s Cub. There’s quite a bit about Devil’s Cub in the new biography.
    By the way, if anyone has any questions about Georgette Heyer or the forthcoming biography i would be more than happy to answer them.

    Reply
  129. Hi everyone, Jennifer here, just wanting to say thank you for so many wonderful comments. And hi to Mary Jo and Christine who I was so delighted to meet at in Brisbane last year.
    I have loved reading about all the different favourite Heyers – I always have trouble with this question because I love so many of her books. Cotillion is one I have read many times because I love Freddy so much but then just thinking about The Unknown Ajax always makes me laugh! I adore Frederica, Sylvester (who can resist Sir Nugent!) and Venetia. A while back I gave Venetia to my son to read and he rang me up the next day to tell me it had kept him up until 2am because he hadn’t been able to put it down!
    One book that isn’t often mentioned as a favourite is Sprig Muslin – I love it for its beautifully depicted romance between Sir Gareth and Hester Theale. Hester is a favourite of mine. And then there’s A Civil Contract and of course Devil’s Cub. There’s quite a bit about Devil’s Cub in the new biography.
    By the way, if anyone has any questions about Georgette Heyer or the forthcoming biography i would be more than happy to answer them.

    Reply
  130. Hi everyone, Jennifer here, just wanting to say thank you for so many wonderful comments. And hi to Mary Jo and Christine who I was so delighted to meet at in Brisbane last year.
    I have loved reading about all the different favourite Heyers – I always have trouble with this question because I love so many of her books. Cotillion is one I have read many times because I love Freddy so much but then just thinking about The Unknown Ajax always makes me laugh! I adore Frederica, Sylvester (who can resist Sir Nugent!) and Venetia. A while back I gave Venetia to my son to read and he rang me up the next day to tell me it had kept him up until 2am because he hadn’t been able to put it down!
    One book that isn’t often mentioned as a favourite is Sprig Muslin – I love it for its beautifully depicted romance between Sir Gareth and Hester Theale. Hester is a favourite of mine. And then there’s A Civil Contract and of course Devil’s Cub. There’s quite a bit about Devil’s Cub in the new biography.
    By the way, if anyone has any questions about Georgette Heyer or the forthcoming biography i would be more than happy to answer them.

    Reply
  131. Loved reading this post! I have Jennifer’s Georgette Heyer Handbook and love it! Can’t wait to read the upcoming Heyer biography. My first Heyer read was The Talisman Ring….since I have not read all of her books, I know many treasures await, but some favorites so far are The Devil’s Cub and Arabella.

    Reply
  132. Loved reading this post! I have Jennifer’s Georgette Heyer Handbook and love it! Can’t wait to read the upcoming Heyer biography. My first Heyer read was The Talisman Ring….since I have not read all of her books, I know many treasures await, but some favorites so far are The Devil’s Cub and Arabella.

    Reply
  133. Loved reading this post! I have Jennifer’s Georgette Heyer Handbook and love it! Can’t wait to read the upcoming Heyer biography. My first Heyer read was The Talisman Ring….since I have not read all of her books, I know many treasures await, but some favorites so far are The Devil’s Cub and Arabella.

    Reply
  134. Loved reading this post! I have Jennifer’s Georgette Heyer Handbook and love it! Can’t wait to read the upcoming Heyer biography. My first Heyer read was The Talisman Ring….since I have not read all of her books, I know many treasures await, but some favorites so far are The Devil’s Cub and Arabella.

    Reply
  135. Loved reading this post! I have Jennifer’s Georgette Heyer Handbook and love it! Can’t wait to read the upcoming Heyer biography. My first Heyer read was The Talisman Ring….since I have not read all of her books, I know many treasures await, but some favorites so far are The Devil’s Cub and Arabella.

    Reply
  136. My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer’s books, the first was Powder and Patch. I was hooked! I’ve read and re-read them all over the years. And she has been a big influence on my writing, along with Daphne Du Maurier and Victoria Holt.

    Reply
  137. My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer’s books, the first was Powder and Patch. I was hooked! I’ve read and re-read them all over the years. And she has been a big influence on my writing, along with Daphne Du Maurier and Victoria Holt.

    Reply
  138. My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer’s books, the first was Powder and Patch. I was hooked! I’ve read and re-read them all over the years. And she has been a big influence on my writing, along with Daphne Du Maurier and Victoria Holt.

    Reply
  139. My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer’s books, the first was Powder and Patch. I was hooked! I’ve read and re-read them all over the years. And she has been a big influence on my writing, along with Daphne Du Maurier and Victoria Holt.

    Reply
  140. My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer’s books, the first was Powder and Patch. I was hooked! I’ve read and re-read them all over the years. And she has been a big influence on my writing, along with Daphne Du Maurier and Victoria Holt.

    Reply
  141. I certainly have a great choice thank you all
    Jennifer
    What year was her first book published in and how many books did she write
    Thanks
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  142. I certainly have a great choice thank you all
    Jennifer
    What year was her first book published in and how many books did she write
    Thanks
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  143. I certainly have a great choice thank you all
    Jennifer
    What year was her first book published in and how many books did she write
    Thanks
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  144. I certainly have a great choice thank you all
    Jennifer
    What year was her first book published in and how many books did she write
    Thanks
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  145. I certainly have a great choice thank you all
    Jennifer
    What year was her first book published in and how many books did she write
    Thanks
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  146. Jennifer, did you discover why Heyer wrote basically the same characters in These Old Shades and The Black Moth but changed their names in TOS? I had a feeling it might have been related to the different periods in which the books are set but I’d love to know for certain.
    Also, have you ever had a yen to write Regency historical romance yourself?

    Reply
  147. Jennifer, did you discover why Heyer wrote basically the same characters in These Old Shades and The Black Moth but changed their names in TOS? I had a feeling it might have been related to the different periods in which the books are set but I’d love to know for certain.
    Also, have you ever had a yen to write Regency historical romance yourself?

    Reply
  148. Jennifer, did you discover why Heyer wrote basically the same characters in These Old Shades and The Black Moth but changed their names in TOS? I had a feeling it might have been related to the different periods in which the books are set but I’d love to know for certain.
    Also, have you ever had a yen to write Regency historical romance yourself?

    Reply
  149. Jennifer, did you discover why Heyer wrote basically the same characters in These Old Shades and The Black Moth but changed their names in TOS? I had a feeling it might have been related to the different periods in which the books are set but I’d love to know for certain.
    Also, have you ever had a yen to write Regency historical romance yourself?

    Reply
  150. Jennifer, did you discover why Heyer wrote basically the same characters in These Old Shades and The Black Moth but changed their names in TOS? I had a feeling it might have been related to the different periods in which the books are set but I’d love to know for certain.
    Also, have you ever had a yen to write Regency historical romance yourself?

    Reply
  151. A wonderful intrview. My first Heyer book was one my mother had – Friday’s Child. My favourite is possibly Frederica, but I also like The Talisman Ring, and The reluctant Widow, and The Quiet Gentleman, and The Unknown Ajax. Actually I like all Heyer’s regencies.
    Jennifer, I read your handbook some months ago, and I am trying (going) to persuade my family to get me a copy for Christmas if they can. Its a must to have near at hand while reading Georgette Heyer. I am now looking forward to your new book.

    Reply
  152. A wonderful intrview. My first Heyer book was one my mother had – Friday’s Child. My favourite is possibly Frederica, but I also like The Talisman Ring, and The reluctant Widow, and The Quiet Gentleman, and The Unknown Ajax. Actually I like all Heyer’s regencies.
    Jennifer, I read your handbook some months ago, and I am trying (going) to persuade my family to get me a copy for Christmas if they can. Its a must to have near at hand while reading Georgette Heyer. I am now looking forward to your new book.

    Reply
  153. A wonderful intrview. My first Heyer book was one my mother had – Friday’s Child. My favourite is possibly Frederica, but I also like The Talisman Ring, and The reluctant Widow, and The Quiet Gentleman, and The Unknown Ajax. Actually I like all Heyer’s regencies.
    Jennifer, I read your handbook some months ago, and I am trying (going) to persuade my family to get me a copy for Christmas if they can. Its a must to have near at hand while reading Georgette Heyer. I am now looking forward to your new book.

    Reply
  154. A wonderful intrview. My first Heyer book was one my mother had – Friday’s Child. My favourite is possibly Frederica, but I also like The Talisman Ring, and The reluctant Widow, and The Quiet Gentleman, and The Unknown Ajax. Actually I like all Heyer’s regencies.
    Jennifer, I read your handbook some months ago, and I am trying (going) to persuade my family to get me a copy for Christmas if they can. Its a must to have near at hand while reading Georgette Heyer. I am now looking forward to your new book.

    Reply
  155. A wonderful intrview. My first Heyer book was one my mother had – Friday’s Child. My favourite is possibly Frederica, but I also like The Talisman Ring, and The reluctant Widow, and The Quiet Gentleman, and The Unknown Ajax. Actually I like all Heyer’s regencies.
    Jennifer, I read your handbook some months ago, and I am trying (going) to persuade my family to get me a copy for Christmas if they can. Its a must to have near at hand while reading Georgette Heyer. I am now looking forward to your new book.

    Reply
  156. Hi Helen Georgette published her first book in October 1921. She was just nineteen. She signed the contract when she was still eighteen and that book, The Black Moth, was published in both the UK and the USA.
    In her lifetime she wrote 55 novels and some two dozen short stories eleven of which were published as an anthology entitled Pistols for Two. After her death in 1974 her one unfinished manuscript was published as My Lord John in 1975. It is a not entirely successful medieval novel and not one of my favourites although some of her readers enjoy it.
    All but 5 of her books are still in print (in fact she has never been out of print) and these are the ones she herself suppressed.

    Reply
  157. Hi Helen Georgette published her first book in October 1921. She was just nineteen. She signed the contract when she was still eighteen and that book, The Black Moth, was published in both the UK and the USA.
    In her lifetime she wrote 55 novels and some two dozen short stories eleven of which were published as an anthology entitled Pistols for Two. After her death in 1974 her one unfinished manuscript was published as My Lord John in 1975. It is a not entirely successful medieval novel and not one of my favourites although some of her readers enjoy it.
    All but 5 of her books are still in print (in fact she has never been out of print) and these are the ones she herself suppressed.

    Reply
  158. Hi Helen Georgette published her first book in October 1921. She was just nineteen. She signed the contract when she was still eighteen and that book, The Black Moth, was published in both the UK and the USA.
    In her lifetime she wrote 55 novels and some two dozen short stories eleven of which were published as an anthology entitled Pistols for Two. After her death in 1974 her one unfinished manuscript was published as My Lord John in 1975. It is a not entirely successful medieval novel and not one of my favourites although some of her readers enjoy it.
    All but 5 of her books are still in print (in fact she has never been out of print) and these are the ones she herself suppressed.

    Reply
  159. Hi Helen Georgette published her first book in October 1921. She was just nineteen. She signed the contract when she was still eighteen and that book, The Black Moth, was published in both the UK and the USA.
    In her lifetime she wrote 55 novels and some two dozen short stories eleven of which were published as an anthology entitled Pistols for Two. After her death in 1974 her one unfinished manuscript was published as My Lord John in 1975. It is a not entirely successful medieval novel and not one of my favourites although some of her readers enjoy it.
    All but 5 of her books are still in print (in fact she has never been out of print) and these are the ones she herself suppressed.

    Reply
  160. Hi Helen Georgette published her first book in October 1921. She was just nineteen. She signed the contract when she was still eighteen and that book, The Black Moth, was published in both the UK and the USA.
    In her lifetime she wrote 55 novels and some two dozen short stories eleven of which were published as an anthology entitled Pistols for Two. After her death in 1974 her one unfinished manuscript was published as My Lord John in 1975. It is a not entirely successful medieval novel and not one of my favourites although some of her readers enjoy it.
    All but 5 of her books are still in print (in fact she has never been out of print) and these are the ones she herself suppressed.

    Reply
  161. Christine, the story of These Old Shades is a fascinating one that I deal with in full detail in the biography.
    Georgette actually wrote These Old Shades as a sequel to The Black Moth when she was nineteen but did not offer the book for publication until some years after that.
    As she herself explains it the book ‘deals with my priceless villain and ends awfully happily. Tracy becomes quite a decent person and marries a girl about half his age.’
    The setting for the book would have corresponded to her sense of her characters’ ages after The Black Moth.
    As for writing a Regency romance myself, I love reading them and sometimes wonder if I might write one. It’s certainly possible. At the moment I am writing a modern tween/teen romance which I am loving and there is no doubt that Georgette Heyer is a powerful influence – lots of clothes and social intrigue!

    Reply
  162. Christine, the story of These Old Shades is a fascinating one that I deal with in full detail in the biography.
    Georgette actually wrote These Old Shades as a sequel to The Black Moth when she was nineteen but did not offer the book for publication until some years after that.
    As she herself explains it the book ‘deals with my priceless villain and ends awfully happily. Tracy becomes quite a decent person and marries a girl about half his age.’
    The setting for the book would have corresponded to her sense of her characters’ ages after The Black Moth.
    As for writing a Regency romance myself, I love reading them and sometimes wonder if I might write one. It’s certainly possible. At the moment I am writing a modern tween/teen romance which I am loving and there is no doubt that Georgette Heyer is a powerful influence – lots of clothes and social intrigue!

    Reply
  163. Christine, the story of These Old Shades is a fascinating one that I deal with in full detail in the biography.
    Georgette actually wrote These Old Shades as a sequel to The Black Moth when she was nineteen but did not offer the book for publication until some years after that.
    As she herself explains it the book ‘deals with my priceless villain and ends awfully happily. Tracy becomes quite a decent person and marries a girl about half his age.’
    The setting for the book would have corresponded to her sense of her characters’ ages after The Black Moth.
    As for writing a Regency romance myself, I love reading them and sometimes wonder if I might write one. It’s certainly possible. At the moment I am writing a modern tween/teen romance which I am loving and there is no doubt that Georgette Heyer is a powerful influence – lots of clothes and social intrigue!

    Reply
  164. Christine, the story of These Old Shades is a fascinating one that I deal with in full detail in the biography.
    Georgette actually wrote These Old Shades as a sequel to The Black Moth when she was nineteen but did not offer the book for publication until some years after that.
    As she herself explains it the book ‘deals with my priceless villain and ends awfully happily. Tracy becomes quite a decent person and marries a girl about half his age.’
    The setting for the book would have corresponded to her sense of her characters’ ages after The Black Moth.
    As for writing a Regency romance myself, I love reading them and sometimes wonder if I might write one. It’s certainly possible. At the moment I am writing a modern tween/teen romance which I am loving and there is no doubt that Georgette Heyer is a powerful influence – lots of clothes and social intrigue!

    Reply
  165. Christine, the story of These Old Shades is a fascinating one that I deal with in full detail in the biography.
    Georgette actually wrote These Old Shades as a sequel to The Black Moth when she was nineteen but did not offer the book for publication until some years after that.
    As she herself explains it the book ‘deals with my priceless villain and ends awfully happily. Tracy becomes quite a decent person and marries a girl about half his age.’
    The setting for the book would have corresponded to her sense of her characters’ ages after The Black Moth.
    As for writing a Regency romance myself, I love reading them and sometimes wonder if I might write one. It’s certainly possible. At the moment I am writing a modern tween/teen romance which I am loving and there is no doubt that Georgette Heyer is a powerful influence – lots of clothes and social intrigue!

    Reply
  166. Wow, I actually got teary-eyed when I read this post! I am a HUGE Georgette Heyer fan. I first discovered her when I was in the seventh grade. At that time, I could buy her paperbacks from the drugstore for 75 cents. Yes, I’m that old. My first Heyer? Powder and Patch. But I LOVE These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub, Frederica, Lady of Quality, and The Unknown Ajax. Oh! And The Masqueraders, and Cotillion, and The Reluctant Widow, and The Grand Sophy and . . .

    Reply
  167. Wow, I actually got teary-eyed when I read this post! I am a HUGE Georgette Heyer fan. I first discovered her when I was in the seventh grade. At that time, I could buy her paperbacks from the drugstore for 75 cents. Yes, I’m that old. My first Heyer? Powder and Patch. But I LOVE These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub, Frederica, Lady of Quality, and The Unknown Ajax. Oh! And The Masqueraders, and Cotillion, and The Reluctant Widow, and The Grand Sophy and . . .

    Reply
  168. Wow, I actually got teary-eyed when I read this post! I am a HUGE Georgette Heyer fan. I first discovered her when I was in the seventh grade. At that time, I could buy her paperbacks from the drugstore for 75 cents. Yes, I’m that old. My first Heyer? Powder and Patch. But I LOVE These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub, Frederica, Lady of Quality, and The Unknown Ajax. Oh! And The Masqueraders, and Cotillion, and The Reluctant Widow, and The Grand Sophy and . . .

    Reply
  169. Wow, I actually got teary-eyed when I read this post! I am a HUGE Georgette Heyer fan. I first discovered her when I was in the seventh grade. At that time, I could buy her paperbacks from the drugstore for 75 cents. Yes, I’m that old. My first Heyer? Powder and Patch. But I LOVE These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub, Frederica, Lady of Quality, and The Unknown Ajax. Oh! And The Masqueraders, and Cotillion, and The Reluctant Widow, and The Grand Sophy and . . .

    Reply
  170. Wow, I actually got teary-eyed when I read this post! I am a HUGE Georgette Heyer fan. I first discovered her when I was in the seventh grade. At that time, I could buy her paperbacks from the drugstore for 75 cents. Yes, I’m that old. My first Heyer? Powder and Patch. But I LOVE These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub, Frederica, Lady of Quality, and The Unknown Ajax. Oh! And The Masqueraders, and Cotillion, and The Reluctant Widow, and The Grand Sophy and . . .

    Reply
  171. Question for Jennifer: Did Heyer leave any notes for unfinished books? Even fragments might be interesting.
    My first Heyer: I really don’t remember anymore, but it would have been one of those Ace editions from the 1960s – maybe The Reluctant Widow, because it sounded like a gothic and I was reading a lot of gothics in those days. It’s still among my most favorite Heyers.

    Reply
  172. Question for Jennifer: Did Heyer leave any notes for unfinished books? Even fragments might be interesting.
    My first Heyer: I really don’t remember anymore, but it would have been one of those Ace editions from the 1960s – maybe The Reluctant Widow, because it sounded like a gothic and I was reading a lot of gothics in those days. It’s still among my most favorite Heyers.

    Reply
  173. Question for Jennifer: Did Heyer leave any notes for unfinished books? Even fragments might be interesting.
    My first Heyer: I really don’t remember anymore, but it would have been one of those Ace editions from the 1960s – maybe The Reluctant Widow, because it sounded like a gothic and I was reading a lot of gothics in those days. It’s still among my most favorite Heyers.

    Reply
  174. Question for Jennifer: Did Heyer leave any notes for unfinished books? Even fragments might be interesting.
    My first Heyer: I really don’t remember anymore, but it would have been one of those Ace editions from the 1960s – maybe The Reluctant Widow, because it sounded like a gothic and I was reading a lot of gothics in those days. It’s still among my most favorite Heyers.

    Reply
  175. Question for Jennifer: Did Heyer leave any notes for unfinished books? Even fragments might be interesting.
    My first Heyer: I really don’t remember anymore, but it would have been one of those Ace editions from the 1960s – maybe The Reluctant Widow, because it sounded like a gothic and I was reading a lot of gothics in those days. It’s still among my most favorite Heyers.

    Reply
  176. ‘These Old Shades’ was my first Georgette Heyer – We studied this novel at a catholic school – (a nun being my english teacher chose this book!! ). I have forever been grateful to her for having introduced me to Heyer’s books more than 30 years ago!! I have collected all her books. I would have to say that ‘These Old Shades’ and ‘Venetia’ have featured constantly as my favorites but they have all been re-read many many times!

    Reply
  177. ‘These Old Shades’ was my first Georgette Heyer – We studied this novel at a catholic school – (a nun being my english teacher chose this book!! ). I have forever been grateful to her for having introduced me to Heyer’s books more than 30 years ago!! I have collected all her books. I would have to say that ‘These Old Shades’ and ‘Venetia’ have featured constantly as my favorites but they have all been re-read many many times!

    Reply
  178. ‘These Old Shades’ was my first Georgette Heyer – We studied this novel at a catholic school – (a nun being my english teacher chose this book!! ). I have forever been grateful to her for having introduced me to Heyer’s books more than 30 years ago!! I have collected all her books. I would have to say that ‘These Old Shades’ and ‘Venetia’ have featured constantly as my favorites but they have all been re-read many many times!

    Reply
  179. ‘These Old Shades’ was my first Georgette Heyer – We studied this novel at a catholic school – (a nun being my english teacher chose this book!! ). I have forever been grateful to her for having introduced me to Heyer’s books more than 30 years ago!! I have collected all her books. I would have to say that ‘These Old Shades’ and ‘Venetia’ have featured constantly as my favorites but they have all been re-read many many times!

    Reply
  180. ‘These Old Shades’ was my first Georgette Heyer – We studied this novel at a catholic school – (a nun being my english teacher chose this book!! ). I have forever been grateful to her for having introduced me to Heyer’s books more than 30 years ago!! I have collected all her books. I would have to say that ‘These Old Shades’ and ‘Venetia’ have featured constantly as my favorites but they have all been re-read many many times!

    Reply
  181. Janice, the manuscripts for several of her short stories survive as well as the unfinished manuscript of what became My Lord John but sadly that’s all. Her many letters make for fascinating reading, however, and it is possible that the unpublished (in any kind of anthology) short stories may one day be compiled into a book. Her notebooks are another fascinating resource and I hope to be able to put up some of the pages from them when I have my website up and running in the new year.

    Reply
  182. Janice, the manuscripts for several of her short stories survive as well as the unfinished manuscript of what became My Lord John but sadly that’s all. Her many letters make for fascinating reading, however, and it is possible that the unpublished (in any kind of anthology) short stories may one day be compiled into a book. Her notebooks are another fascinating resource and I hope to be able to put up some of the pages from them when I have my website up and running in the new year.

    Reply
  183. Janice, the manuscripts for several of her short stories survive as well as the unfinished manuscript of what became My Lord John but sadly that’s all. Her many letters make for fascinating reading, however, and it is possible that the unpublished (in any kind of anthology) short stories may one day be compiled into a book. Her notebooks are another fascinating resource and I hope to be able to put up some of the pages from them when I have my website up and running in the new year.

    Reply
  184. Janice, the manuscripts for several of her short stories survive as well as the unfinished manuscript of what became My Lord John but sadly that’s all. Her many letters make for fascinating reading, however, and it is possible that the unpublished (in any kind of anthology) short stories may one day be compiled into a book. Her notebooks are another fascinating resource and I hope to be able to put up some of the pages from them when I have my website up and running in the new year.

    Reply
  185. Janice, the manuscripts for several of her short stories survive as well as the unfinished manuscript of what became My Lord John but sadly that’s all. Her many letters make for fascinating reading, however, and it is possible that the unpublished (in any kind of anthology) short stories may one day be compiled into a book. Her notebooks are another fascinating resource and I hope to be able to put up some of the pages from them when I have my website up and running in the new year.

    Reply
  186. The Toll gate is my absolute favourite, but I also like Faro’s daughter and Bath Tangle. Can’t wait to read your book – I devoured Jane Aiken Hodge’s book and found it fascinating.

    Reply
  187. The Toll gate is my absolute favourite, but I also like Faro’s daughter and Bath Tangle. Can’t wait to read your book – I devoured Jane Aiken Hodge’s book and found it fascinating.

    Reply
  188. The Toll gate is my absolute favourite, but I also like Faro’s daughter and Bath Tangle. Can’t wait to read your book – I devoured Jane Aiken Hodge’s book and found it fascinating.

    Reply
  189. The Toll gate is my absolute favourite, but I also like Faro’s daughter and Bath Tangle. Can’t wait to read your book – I devoured Jane Aiken Hodge’s book and found it fascinating.

    Reply
  190. The Toll gate is my absolute favourite, but I also like Faro’s daughter and Bath Tangle. Can’t wait to read your book – I devoured Jane Aiken Hodge’s book and found it fascinating.

    Reply
  191. What a fabulous interview, Jennifer! Fascinating stuff!
    I wish I had had your book last spring, when my co-teacher and I were giving a seminar on regency-set romance at Yale. We read regency Buck, and the students were so curious to know more about Heyer’s world. If we get to do it again in ’11, you’ll be on the reading list.
    My first heyer was The Toll gate. It was such fun, I immediately embarked on a binge of GH. Hard to pick a favorite, but I’ve always loved the humor of The Talisman Ring.

    Reply
  192. What a fabulous interview, Jennifer! Fascinating stuff!
    I wish I had had your book last spring, when my co-teacher and I were giving a seminar on regency-set romance at Yale. We read regency Buck, and the students were so curious to know more about Heyer’s world. If we get to do it again in ’11, you’ll be on the reading list.
    My first heyer was The Toll gate. It was such fun, I immediately embarked on a binge of GH. Hard to pick a favorite, but I’ve always loved the humor of The Talisman Ring.

    Reply
  193. What a fabulous interview, Jennifer! Fascinating stuff!
    I wish I had had your book last spring, when my co-teacher and I were giving a seminar on regency-set romance at Yale. We read regency Buck, and the students were so curious to know more about Heyer’s world. If we get to do it again in ’11, you’ll be on the reading list.
    My first heyer was The Toll gate. It was such fun, I immediately embarked on a binge of GH. Hard to pick a favorite, but I’ve always loved the humor of The Talisman Ring.

    Reply
  194. What a fabulous interview, Jennifer! Fascinating stuff!
    I wish I had had your book last spring, when my co-teacher and I were giving a seminar on regency-set romance at Yale. We read regency Buck, and the students were so curious to know more about Heyer’s world. If we get to do it again in ’11, you’ll be on the reading list.
    My first heyer was The Toll gate. It was such fun, I immediately embarked on a binge of GH. Hard to pick a favorite, but I’ve always loved the humor of The Talisman Ring.

    Reply
  195. What a fabulous interview, Jennifer! Fascinating stuff!
    I wish I had had your book last spring, when my co-teacher and I were giving a seminar on regency-set romance at Yale. We read regency Buck, and the students were so curious to know more about Heyer’s world. If we get to do it again in ’11, you’ll be on the reading list.
    My first heyer was The Toll gate. It was such fun, I immediately embarked on a binge of GH. Hard to pick a favorite, but I’ve always loved the humor of The Talisman Ring.

    Reply
  196. My first Heyer was The Convenient Marriage, and it has remained one of my favorites since then. However, my top two (couldn’t decide between these!) are Devil’s Cub and These Old Shades. I cannot resist stories about arrogant men conquered…not that they would ever admit such…by intelligent women.

    Reply
  197. My first Heyer was The Convenient Marriage, and it has remained one of my favorites since then. However, my top two (couldn’t decide between these!) are Devil’s Cub and These Old Shades. I cannot resist stories about arrogant men conquered…not that they would ever admit such…by intelligent women.

    Reply
  198. My first Heyer was The Convenient Marriage, and it has remained one of my favorites since then. However, my top two (couldn’t decide between these!) are Devil’s Cub and These Old Shades. I cannot resist stories about arrogant men conquered…not that they would ever admit such…by intelligent women.

    Reply
  199. My first Heyer was The Convenient Marriage, and it has remained one of my favorites since then. However, my top two (couldn’t decide between these!) are Devil’s Cub and These Old Shades. I cannot resist stories about arrogant men conquered…not that they would ever admit such…by intelligent women.

    Reply
  200. My first Heyer was The Convenient Marriage, and it has remained one of my favorites since then. However, my top two (couldn’t decide between these!) are Devil’s Cub and These Old Shades. I cannot resist stories about arrogant men conquered…not that they would ever admit such…by intelligent women.

    Reply
  201. I have reread and reread Heyer so much that I really do not recall which one was first — but the first one I always think of, and the one that I suppose takes pride of place is These Old Shades. Avon is the ultimate alpha — I so loved finding him again in Devil’s Cub!
    As others have said, I am jealous of your discoveries and your wonderful opportunities to learn more about Heyer! Thank you so much for sharing them with us all – I can hardly wait to read the biography!

    Reply
  202. I have reread and reread Heyer so much that I really do not recall which one was first — but the first one I always think of, and the one that I suppose takes pride of place is These Old Shades. Avon is the ultimate alpha — I so loved finding him again in Devil’s Cub!
    As others have said, I am jealous of your discoveries and your wonderful opportunities to learn more about Heyer! Thank you so much for sharing them with us all – I can hardly wait to read the biography!

    Reply
  203. I have reread and reread Heyer so much that I really do not recall which one was first — but the first one I always think of, and the one that I suppose takes pride of place is These Old Shades. Avon is the ultimate alpha — I so loved finding him again in Devil’s Cub!
    As others have said, I am jealous of your discoveries and your wonderful opportunities to learn more about Heyer! Thank you so much for sharing them with us all – I can hardly wait to read the biography!

    Reply
  204. I have reread and reread Heyer so much that I really do not recall which one was first — but the first one I always think of, and the one that I suppose takes pride of place is These Old Shades. Avon is the ultimate alpha — I so loved finding him again in Devil’s Cub!
    As others have said, I am jealous of your discoveries and your wonderful opportunities to learn more about Heyer! Thank you so much for sharing them with us all – I can hardly wait to read the biography!

    Reply
  205. I have reread and reread Heyer so much that I really do not recall which one was first — but the first one I always think of, and the one that I suppose takes pride of place is These Old Shades. Avon is the ultimate alpha — I so loved finding him again in Devil’s Cub!
    As others have said, I am jealous of your discoveries and your wonderful opportunities to learn more about Heyer! Thank you so much for sharing them with us all – I can hardly wait to read the biography!

    Reply
  206. My mother introduced me to Heyer and to Jane Aiken Hodge (and her sister Joan, somewhat earlier) when I was 12 or 13, and I think my first Heyer was The Corinthian. I wrote to Mrs. Hodge about ten years ago to tell her how much I enjoyed her books and received a lovely response, with an autographed copy of her Heyer bio (I already owned a copy but of course cherish this one). I was very sad to learn of her death recently. Jennifer, I would love to hear more about her and if you met any of her family.

    Reply
  207. My mother introduced me to Heyer and to Jane Aiken Hodge (and her sister Joan, somewhat earlier) when I was 12 or 13, and I think my first Heyer was The Corinthian. I wrote to Mrs. Hodge about ten years ago to tell her how much I enjoyed her books and received a lovely response, with an autographed copy of her Heyer bio (I already owned a copy but of course cherish this one). I was very sad to learn of her death recently. Jennifer, I would love to hear more about her and if you met any of her family.

    Reply
  208. My mother introduced me to Heyer and to Jane Aiken Hodge (and her sister Joan, somewhat earlier) when I was 12 or 13, and I think my first Heyer was The Corinthian. I wrote to Mrs. Hodge about ten years ago to tell her how much I enjoyed her books and received a lovely response, with an autographed copy of her Heyer bio (I already owned a copy but of course cherish this one). I was very sad to learn of her death recently. Jennifer, I would love to hear more about her and if you met any of her family.

    Reply
  209. My mother introduced me to Heyer and to Jane Aiken Hodge (and her sister Joan, somewhat earlier) when I was 12 or 13, and I think my first Heyer was The Corinthian. I wrote to Mrs. Hodge about ten years ago to tell her how much I enjoyed her books and received a lovely response, with an autographed copy of her Heyer bio (I already owned a copy but of course cherish this one). I was very sad to learn of her death recently. Jennifer, I would love to hear more about her and if you met any of her family.

    Reply
  210. My mother introduced me to Heyer and to Jane Aiken Hodge (and her sister Joan, somewhat earlier) when I was 12 or 13, and I think my first Heyer was The Corinthian. I wrote to Mrs. Hodge about ten years ago to tell her how much I enjoyed her books and received a lovely response, with an autographed copy of her Heyer bio (I already owned a copy but of course cherish this one). I was very sad to learn of her death recently. Jennifer, I would love to hear more about her and if you met any of her family.

    Reply
  211. Jennifer, it’s lovely to see you here. (This is Jo Beverley, BTW. We sat together at a meal at RWA a few years back.)
    Sorry to be late commenting. I’ve been in London for a few days, which was fun in parts, but very cold! Cold everywhere in the UK at the moment.
    My first Heyer was Powder and Patch, which tends to be forgotten, but I loved the over-the-top Georgian flavor.
    Jo

    Reply
  212. Jennifer, it’s lovely to see you here. (This is Jo Beverley, BTW. We sat together at a meal at RWA a few years back.)
    Sorry to be late commenting. I’ve been in London for a few days, which was fun in parts, but very cold! Cold everywhere in the UK at the moment.
    My first Heyer was Powder and Patch, which tends to be forgotten, but I loved the over-the-top Georgian flavor.
    Jo

    Reply
  213. Jennifer, it’s lovely to see you here. (This is Jo Beverley, BTW. We sat together at a meal at RWA a few years back.)
    Sorry to be late commenting. I’ve been in London for a few days, which was fun in parts, but very cold! Cold everywhere in the UK at the moment.
    My first Heyer was Powder and Patch, which tends to be forgotten, but I loved the over-the-top Georgian flavor.
    Jo

    Reply
  214. Jennifer, it’s lovely to see you here. (This is Jo Beverley, BTW. We sat together at a meal at RWA a few years back.)
    Sorry to be late commenting. I’ve been in London for a few days, which was fun in parts, but very cold! Cold everywhere in the UK at the moment.
    My first Heyer was Powder and Patch, which tends to be forgotten, but I loved the over-the-top Georgian flavor.
    Jo

    Reply
  215. Jennifer, it’s lovely to see you here. (This is Jo Beverley, BTW. We sat together at a meal at RWA a few years back.)
    Sorry to be late commenting. I’ve been in London for a few days, which was fun in parts, but very cold! Cold everywhere in the UK at the moment.
    My first Heyer was Powder and Patch, which tends to be forgotten, but I loved the over-the-top Georgian flavor.
    Jo

    Reply
  216. Terrific post, thank you. I’m particularly excited to see a couple of books mentioned more than once in the comments that I’ve yet to read (Talisman Ring, The Reluctant Widow). So I have those treats in store. I’m not sure what my first was though it might have been Friday’s child. The Black Sheep is a particular favorite of mine (along with Venetia, Devil’s Cub, These Old Shades…the list goes on).

    Reply
  217. Terrific post, thank you. I’m particularly excited to see a couple of books mentioned more than once in the comments that I’ve yet to read (Talisman Ring, The Reluctant Widow). So I have those treats in store. I’m not sure what my first was though it might have been Friday’s child. The Black Sheep is a particular favorite of mine (along with Venetia, Devil’s Cub, These Old Shades…the list goes on).

    Reply
  218. Terrific post, thank you. I’m particularly excited to see a couple of books mentioned more than once in the comments that I’ve yet to read (Talisman Ring, The Reluctant Widow). So I have those treats in store. I’m not sure what my first was though it might have been Friday’s child. The Black Sheep is a particular favorite of mine (along with Venetia, Devil’s Cub, These Old Shades…the list goes on).

    Reply
  219. Terrific post, thank you. I’m particularly excited to see a couple of books mentioned more than once in the comments that I’ve yet to read (Talisman Ring, The Reluctant Widow). So I have those treats in store. I’m not sure what my first was though it might have been Friday’s child. The Black Sheep is a particular favorite of mine (along with Venetia, Devil’s Cub, These Old Shades…the list goes on).

    Reply
  220. Terrific post, thank you. I’m particularly excited to see a couple of books mentioned more than once in the comments that I’ve yet to read (Talisman Ring, The Reluctant Widow). So I have those treats in store. I’m not sure what my first was though it might have been Friday’s child. The Black Sheep is a particular favorite of mine (along with Venetia, Devil’s Cub, These Old Shades…the list goes on).

    Reply
  221. My first Heyer was Arabella, which still has a very special place in my list of favorites, but my current favorite is The Unknown Ajax. It’s really hard to pick only one favorite, though!

    Reply
  222. My first Heyer was Arabella, which still has a very special place in my list of favorites, but my current favorite is The Unknown Ajax. It’s really hard to pick only one favorite, though!

    Reply
  223. My first Heyer was Arabella, which still has a very special place in my list of favorites, but my current favorite is The Unknown Ajax. It’s really hard to pick only one favorite, though!

    Reply
  224. My first Heyer was Arabella, which still has a very special place in my list of favorites, but my current favorite is The Unknown Ajax. It’s really hard to pick only one favorite, though!

    Reply
  225. My first Heyer was Arabella, which still has a very special place in my list of favorites, but my current favorite is The Unknown Ajax. It’s really hard to pick only one favorite, though!

    Reply
  226. thanks for the interview ladies! Loved the pictures and other details of GH’s life!
    My first Heyer was Lady of Quality and (surprisingly or not, depending on your opinion of that book though still a Heyer!) I loved it and devoured all that my library had afterwards! My mother had just checked out LOQ to re-read as she’d last read it in high school in Hong Kong. There were only ~10 GH’s at my library, so you can imagine my incredible delight at going to college and finding the wealth of books there! I fondly remember staying up until 2AM on my bed polishing off her books!
    I think my favorites would have to be Sylvester, Cotillion, or Friday’s Child.

    Reply
  227. thanks for the interview ladies! Loved the pictures and other details of GH’s life!
    My first Heyer was Lady of Quality and (surprisingly or not, depending on your opinion of that book though still a Heyer!) I loved it and devoured all that my library had afterwards! My mother had just checked out LOQ to re-read as she’d last read it in high school in Hong Kong. There were only ~10 GH’s at my library, so you can imagine my incredible delight at going to college and finding the wealth of books there! I fondly remember staying up until 2AM on my bed polishing off her books!
    I think my favorites would have to be Sylvester, Cotillion, or Friday’s Child.

    Reply
  228. thanks for the interview ladies! Loved the pictures and other details of GH’s life!
    My first Heyer was Lady of Quality and (surprisingly or not, depending on your opinion of that book though still a Heyer!) I loved it and devoured all that my library had afterwards! My mother had just checked out LOQ to re-read as she’d last read it in high school in Hong Kong. There were only ~10 GH’s at my library, so you can imagine my incredible delight at going to college and finding the wealth of books there! I fondly remember staying up until 2AM on my bed polishing off her books!
    I think my favorites would have to be Sylvester, Cotillion, or Friday’s Child.

    Reply
  229. thanks for the interview ladies! Loved the pictures and other details of GH’s life!
    My first Heyer was Lady of Quality and (surprisingly or not, depending on your opinion of that book though still a Heyer!) I loved it and devoured all that my library had afterwards! My mother had just checked out LOQ to re-read as she’d last read it in high school in Hong Kong. There were only ~10 GH’s at my library, so you can imagine my incredible delight at going to college and finding the wealth of books there! I fondly remember staying up until 2AM on my bed polishing off her books!
    I think my favorites would have to be Sylvester, Cotillion, or Friday’s Child.

    Reply
  230. thanks for the interview ladies! Loved the pictures and other details of GH’s life!
    My first Heyer was Lady of Quality and (surprisingly or not, depending on your opinion of that book though still a Heyer!) I loved it and devoured all that my library had afterwards! My mother had just checked out LOQ to re-read as she’d last read it in high school in Hong Kong. There were only ~10 GH’s at my library, so you can imagine my incredible delight at going to college and finding the wealth of books there! I fondly remember staying up until 2AM on my bed polishing off her books!
    I think my favorites would have to be Sylvester, Cotillion, or Friday’s Child.

    Reply
  231. Jo, I remember that dinner where you met Jennifer — it was in Melbourne, and we had Barbara Samuel and Margie Lawson and a whole pile of aussie authors at the table as well. And it was amazingly loud, for some reason …
    Powder and Patch is often overlooked, but I think there’s some wonderfully OTT nonsensical dialogue in it and some is pure delight.
    I’m so enjoying all these recollections of first Heyers.

    Reply
  232. Jo, I remember that dinner where you met Jennifer — it was in Melbourne, and we had Barbara Samuel and Margie Lawson and a whole pile of aussie authors at the table as well. And it was amazingly loud, for some reason …
    Powder and Patch is often overlooked, but I think there’s some wonderfully OTT nonsensical dialogue in it and some is pure delight.
    I’m so enjoying all these recollections of first Heyers.

    Reply
  233. Jo, I remember that dinner where you met Jennifer — it was in Melbourne, and we had Barbara Samuel and Margie Lawson and a whole pile of aussie authors at the table as well. And it was amazingly loud, for some reason …
    Powder and Patch is often overlooked, but I think there’s some wonderfully OTT nonsensical dialogue in it and some is pure delight.
    I’m so enjoying all these recollections of first Heyers.

    Reply
  234. Jo, I remember that dinner where you met Jennifer — it was in Melbourne, and we had Barbara Samuel and Margie Lawson and a whole pile of aussie authors at the table as well. And it was amazingly loud, for some reason …
    Powder and Patch is often overlooked, but I think there’s some wonderfully OTT nonsensical dialogue in it and some is pure delight.
    I’m so enjoying all these recollections of first Heyers.

    Reply
  235. Jo, I remember that dinner where you met Jennifer — it was in Melbourne, and we had Barbara Samuel and Margie Lawson and a whole pile of aussie authors at the table as well. And it was amazingly loud, for some reason …
    Powder and Patch is often overlooked, but I think there’s some wonderfully OTT nonsensical dialogue in it and some is pure delight.
    I’m so enjoying all these recollections of first Heyers.

    Reply
  236. It is such fun reading so many posts and hearing so many wonderful Heyer stories. Jo, lovely to hear from you, and I am so glad you mentioned Powder and Patch – Georgette’s shortest novel and one she wrote in ‘under three weeks’ (as she said).
    I just cannot imagine writing anything so quickly but she was so good at knowing her characters and once she had devised a plot it seems that her books often just flowed out of her head and onto the page!
    The first time I met Jane Aiken Hodge we talked about Georgette’s extraordinary ability to bring her characters to life and Jane always said she felt Georgette was a genius in this way. I can only agree.
    Jane Aiken Hodge became a wonderful friend and mentor to me after our first lunch in 2002. I always visited her on my research trips to England and on one occasion my husband and I took her out to lunch at Pelhams, a wonderful restaurant in her home town of Lewes in Sussex. Jane read regular drafts of the biography manuscript and was a rigorous critic and a wonderful counsellor.
    On my very first trip to England she gave me her entire research archive (12 folders) of Heyer material which she had collected during her two years of research and writing for the Heyer biography in 1983/84. That archive was a treasure trove of original Heyer letters, interview notes with the people who had known her best (many of whom were no longer alive when I began my work) and countless other priceless pieces of information – all of which have helped me to write the new book.
    Jane’s death last year was a terrible blow and the new biography is dedicated to her and to Georgette’s son Richard.

    Reply
  237. It is such fun reading so many posts and hearing so many wonderful Heyer stories. Jo, lovely to hear from you, and I am so glad you mentioned Powder and Patch – Georgette’s shortest novel and one she wrote in ‘under three weeks’ (as she said).
    I just cannot imagine writing anything so quickly but she was so good at knowing her characters and once she had devised a plot it seems that her books often just flowed out of her head and onto the page!
    The first time I met Jane Aiken Hodge we talked about Georgette’s extraordinary ability to bring her characters to life and Jane always said she felt Georgette was a genius in this way. I can only agree.
    Jane Aiken Hodge became a wonderful friend and mentor to me after our first lunch in 2002. I always visited her on my research trips to England and on one occasion my husband and I took her out to lunch at Pelhams, a wonderful restaurant in her home town of Lewes in Sussex. Jane read regular drafts of the biography manuscript and was a rigorous critic and a wonderful counsellor.
    On my very first trip to England she gave me her entire research archive (12 folders) of Heyer material which she had collected during her two years of research and writing for the Heyer biography in 1983/84. That archive was a treasure trove of original Heyer letters, interview notes with the people who had known her best (many of whom were no longer alive when I began my work) and countless other priceless pieces of information – all of which have helped me to write the new book.
    Jane’s death last year was a terrible blow and the new biography is dedicated to her and to Georgette’s son Richard.

    Reply
  238. It is such fun reading so many posts and hearing so many wonderful Heyer stories. Jo, lovely to hear from you, and I am so glad you mentioned Powder and Patch – Georgette’s shortest novel and one she wrote in ‘under three weeks’ (as she said).
    I just cannot imagine writing anything so quickly but she was so good at knowing her characters and once she had devised a plot it seems that her books often just flowed out of her head and onto the page!
    The first time I met Jane Aiken Hodge we talked about Georgette’s extraordinary ability to bring her characters to life and Jane always said she felt Georgette was a genius in this way. I can only agree.
    Jane Aiken Hodge became a wonderful friend and mentor to me after our first lunch in 2002. I always visited her on my research trips to England and on one occasion my husband and I took her out to lunch at Pelhams, a wonderful restaurant in her home town of Lewes in Sussex. Jane read regular drafts of the biography manuscript and was a rigorous critic and a wonderful counsellor.
    On my very first trip to England she gave me her entire research archive (12 folders) of Heyer material which she had collected during her two years of research and writing for the Heyer biography in 1983/84. That archive was a treasure trove of original Heyer letters, interview notes with the people who had known her best (many of whom were no longer alive when I began my work) and countless other priceless pieces of information – all of which have helped me to write the new book.
    Jane’s death last year was a terrible blow and the new biography is dedicated to her and to Georgette’s son Richard.

    Reply
  239. It is such fun reading so many posts and hearing so many wonderful Heyer stories. Jo, lovely to hear from you, and I am so glad you mentioned Powder and Patch – Georgette’s shortest novel and one she wrote in ‘under three weeks’ (as she said).
    I just cannot imagine writing anything so quickly but she was so good at knowing her characters and once she had devised a plot it seems that her books often just flowed out of her head and onto the page!
    The first time I met Jane Aiken Hodge we talked about Georgette’s extraordinary ability to bring her characters to life and Jane always said she felt Georgette was a genius in this way. I can only agree.
    Jane Aiken Hodge became a wonderful friend and mentor to me after our first lunch in 2002. I always visited her on my research trips to England and on one occasion my husband and I took her out to lunch at Pelhams, a wonderful restaurant in her home town of Lewes in Sussex. Jane read regular drafts of the biography manuscript and was a rigorous critic and a wonderful counsellor.
    On my very first trip to England she gave me her entire research archive (12 folders) of Heyer material which she had collected during her two years of research and writing for the Heyer biography in 1983/84. That archive was a treasure trove of original Heyer letters, interview notes with the people who had known her best (many of whom were no longer alive when I began my work) and countless other priceless pieces of information – all of which have helped me to write the new book.
    Jane’s death last year was a terrible blow and the new biography is dedicated to her and to Georgette’s son Richard.

    Reply
  240. It is such fun reading so many posts and hearing so many wonderful Heyer stories. Jo, lovely to hear from you, and I am so glad you mentioned Powder and Patch – Georgette’s shortest novel and one she wrote in ‘under three weeks’ (as she said).
    I just cannot imagine writing anything so quickly but she was so good at knowing her characters and once she had devised a plot it seems that her books often just flowed out of her head and onto the page!
    The first time I met Jane Aiken Hodge we talked about Georgette’s extraordinary ability to bring her characters to life and Jane always said she felt Georgette was a genius in this way. I can only agree.
    Jane Aiken Hodge became a wonderful friend and mentor to me after our first lunch in 2002. I always visited her on my research trips to England and on one occasion my husband and I took her out to lunch at Pelhams, a wonderful restaurant in her home town of Lewes in Sussex. Jane read regular drafts of the biography manuscript and was a rigorous critic and a wonderful counsellor.
    On my very first trip to England she gave me her entire research archive (12 folders) of Heyer material which she had collected during her two years of research and writing for the Heyer biography in 1983/84. That archive was a treasure trove of original Heyer letters, interview notes with the people who had known her best (many of whom were no longer alive when I began my work) and countless other priceless pieces of information – all of which have helped me to write the new book.
    Jane’s death last year was a terrible blow and the new biography is dedicated to her and to Georgette’s son Richard.

    Reply
  241. Fascinating post, Jennifer. Thank you for bring back so many happy Heyer memories and adding new insights.
    The Spanish Bride is probably my favourite: it has adventure, a dynamic hero, an enchanting heroine – and it’s all true! I first read it as a teenager and it got me into 19th century military history.
    Coincidentally, I’ve just been on a Peninsular War tour looking at various battlefields, the lines of Torres Vedras and so on. It was led by Colonel Peter Knox, ex Royal Welch Fusiliers, who was brilliant at explaining Wellington’s tactics.
    On November 22nd, I put up rather a gruesome blog about the killing fields of Albuera (1811) and Badajoz (1812).
    http://www.historicalromanceuk.blogspot.com
    I owe Georgette Heyer a lot.

    Reply
  242. Fascinating post, Jennifer. Thank you for bring back so many happy Heyer memories and adding new insights.
    The Spanish Bride is probably my favourite: it has adventure, a dynamic hero, an enchanting heroine – and it’s all true! I first read it as a teenager and it got me into 19th century military history.
    Coincidentally, I’ve just been on a Peninsular War tour looking at various battlefields, the lines of Torres Vedras and so on. It was led by Colonel Peter Knox, ex Royal Welch Fusiliers, who was brilliant at explaining Wellington’s tactics.
    On November 22nd, I put up rather a gruesome blog about the killing fields of Albuera (1811) and Badajoz (1812).
    http://www.historicalromanceuk.blogspot.com
    I owe Georgette Heyer a lot.

    Reply
  243. Fascinating post, Jennifer. Thank you for bring back so many happy Heyer memories and adding new insights.
    The Spanish Bride is probably my favourite: it has adventure, a dynamic hero, an enchanting heroine – and it’s all true! I first read it as a teenager and it got me into 19th century military history.
    Coincidentally, I’ve just been on a Peninsular War tour looking at various battlefields, the lines of Torres Vedras and so on. It was led by Colonel Peter Knox, ex Royal Welch Fusiliers, who was brilliant at explaining Wellington’s tactics.
    On November 22nd, I put up rather a gruesome blog about the killing fields of Albuera (1811) and Badajoz (1812).
    http://www.historicalromanceuk.blogspot.com
    I owe Georgette Heyer a lot.

    Reply
  244. Fascinating post, Jennifer. Thank you for bring back so many happy Heyer memories and adding new insights.
    The Spanish Bride is probably my favourite: it has adventure, a dynamic hero, an enchanting heroine – and it’s all true! I first read it as a teenager and it got me into 19th century military history.
    Coincidentally, I’ve just been on a Peninsular War tour looking at various battlefields, the lines of Torres Vedras and so on. It was led by Colonel Peter Knox, ex Royal Welch Fusiliers, who was brilliant at explaining Wellington’s tactics.
    On November 22nd, I put up rather a gruesome blog about the killing fields of Albuera (1811) and Badajoz (1812).
    http://www.historicalromanceuk.blogspot.com
    I owe Georgette Heyer a lot.

    Reply
  245. Fascinating post, Jennifer. Thank you for bring back so many happy Heyer memories and adding new insights.
    The Spanish Bride is probably my favourite: it has adventure, a dynamic hero, an enchanting heroine – and it’s all true! I first read it as a teenager and it got me into 19th century military history.
    Coincidentally, I’ve just been on a Peninsular War tour looking at various battlefields, the lines of Torres Vedras and so on. It was led by Colonel Peter Knox, ex Royal Welch Fusiliers, who was brilliant at explaining Wellington’s tactics.
    On November 22nd, I put up rather a gruesome blog about the killing fields of Albuera (1811) and Badajoz (1812).
    http://www.historicalromanceuk.blogspot.com
    I owe Georgette Heyer a lot.

    Reply
  246. What a wonderful interview! I can’t wait to read the Biography when it comes out!
    My first Heyer was These Old Shades (and is stillamong my favorites!) My older sister introduced me and I still read Heyer avidly and have both paperback and Hardcover copies pf her books.

    Reply
  247. What a wonderful interview! I can’t wait to read the Biography when it comes out!
    My first Heyer was These Old Shades (and is stillamong my favorites!) My older sister introduced me and I still read Heyer avidly and have both paperback and Hardcover copies pf her books.

    Reply
  248. What a wonderful interview! I can’t wait to read the Biography when it comes out!
    My first Heyer was These Old Shades (and is stillamong my favorites!) My older sister introduced me and I still read Heyer avidly and have both paperback and Hardcover copies pf her books.

    Reply
  249. What a wonderful interview! I can’t wait to read the Biography when it comes out!
    My first Heyer was These Old Shades (and is stillamong my favorites!) My older sister introduced me and I still read Heyer avidly and have both paperback and Hardcover copies pf her books.

    Reply
  250. What a wonderful interview! I can’t wait to read the Biography when it comes out!
    My first Heyer was These Old Shades (and is stillamong my favorites!) My older sister introduced me and I still read Heyer avidly and have both paperback and Hardcover copies pf her books.

    Reply
  251. My first Heyer was The Black Moth, which led me to These Old Shades, which remains my very favourite Heyer novel. I must admit that I gave up on reading one of her novels – Sprig Muslin I think it was – because there was such an exceedingly silly girl in the story that it stopped being funny and began to grate on my nerves. Therefore I find her to be very uneven.
    The detective novels I enjoy more for the characters and dialogue than for the plots, which tend to be too contrived.

    Reply
  252. My first Heyer was The Black Moth, which led me to These Old Shades, which remains my very favourite Heyer novel. I must admit that I gave up on reading one of her novels – Sprig Muslin I think it was – because there was such an exceedingly silly girl in the story that it stopped being funny and began to grate on my nerves. Therefore I find her to be very uneven.
    The detective novels I enjoy more for the characters and dialogue than for the plots, which tend to be too contrived.

    Reply
  253. My first Heyer was The Black Moth, which led me to These Old Shades, which remains my very favourite Heyer novel. I must admit that I gave up on reading one of her novels – Sprig Muslin I think it was – because there was such an exceedingly silly girl in the story that it stopped being funny and began to grate on my nerves. Therefore I find her to be very uneven.
    The detective novels I enjoy more for the characters and dialogue than for the plots, which tend to be too contrived.

    Reply
  254. My first Heyer was The Black Moth, which led me to These Old Shades, which remains my very favourite Heyer novel. I must admit that I gave up on reading one of her novels – Sprig Muslin I think it was – because there was such an exceedingly silly girl in the story that it stopped being funny and began to grate on my nerves. Therefore I find her to be very uneven.
    The detective novels I enjoy more for the characters and dialogue than for the plots, which tend to be too contrived.

    Reply
  255. My first Heyer was The Black Moth, which led me to These Old Shades, which remains my very favourite Heyer novel. I must admit that I gave up on reading one of her novels – Sprig Muslin I think it was – because there was such an exceedingly silly girl in the story that it stopped being funny and began to grate on my nerves. Therefore I find her to be very uneven.
    The detective novels I enjoy more for the characters and dialogue than for the plots, which tend to be too contrived.

    Reply
  256. I can’t remember my first Heyer; it was so many years ago, but I have read and reread most of her regencies over the years. I remember the thrill of buying her latest regencies as they were published when in my teens. My favourites are False Colours, The Nonesuch, Black Sheep, Cousin Kate, The Talisman Ring and The Masqueraders. In fact The Masqueraders is such a favorite, that if I was on a desert island with only one book, that would be it.
    A question for Jo. I have read The Toll Gate many times and there seems to be a day missing in the chronology of the story. He meets Nell on a Sunday and it ends on the next Sunday, but I can’t fill in the days between with the story.

    Reply
  257. I can’t remember my first Heyer; it was so many years ago, but I have read and reread most of her regencies over the years. I remember the thrill of buying her latest regencies as they were published when in my teens. My favourites are False Colours, The Nonesuch, Black Sheep, Cousin Kate, The Talisman Ring and The Masqueraders. In fact The Masqueraders is such a favorite, that if I was on a desert island with only one book, that would be it.
    A question for Jo. I have read The Toll Gate many times and there seems to be a day missing in the chronology of the story. He meets Nell on a Sunday and it ends on the next Sunday, but I can’t fill in the days between with the story.

    Reply
  258. I can’t remember my first Heyer; it was so many years ago, but I have read and reread most of her regencies over the years. I remember the thrill of buying her latest regencies as they were published when in my teens. My favourites are False Colours, The Nonesuch, Black Sheep, Cousin Kate, The Talisman Ring and The Masqueraders. In fact The Masqueraders is such a favorite, that if I was on a desert island with only one book, that would be it.
    A question for Jo. I have read The Toll Gate many times and there seems to be a day missing in the chronology of the story. He meets Nell on a Sunday and it ends on the next Sunday, but I can’t fill in the days between with the story.

    Reply
  259. I can’t remember my first Heyer; it was so many years ago, but I have read and reread most of her regencies over the years. I remember the thrill of buying her latest regencies as they were published when in my teens. My favourites are False Colours, The Nonesuch, Black Sheep, Cousin Kate, The Talisman Ring and The Masqueraders. In fact The Masqueraders is such a favorite, that if I was on a desert island with only one book, that would be it.
    A question for Jo. I have read The Toll Gate many times and there seems to be a day missing in the chronology of the story. He meets Nell on a Sunday and it ends on the next Sunday, but I can’t fill in the days between with the story.

    Reply
  260. I can’t remember my first Heyer; it was so many years ago, but I have read and reread most of her regencies over the years. I remember the thrill of buying her latest regencies as they were published when in my teens. My favourites are False Colours, The Nonesuch, Black Sheep, Cousin Kate, The Talisman Ring and The Masqueraders. In fact The Masqueraders is such a favorite, that if I was on a desert island with only one book, that would be it.
    A question for Jo. I have read The Toll Gate many times and there seems to be a day missing in the chronology of the story. He meets Nell on a Sunday and it ends on the next Sunday, but I can’t fill in the days between with the story.

    Reply
  261. My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer when I was in my early teens, so many years ago that I have no memory of which was first. As for favorites, that is much easier: Black Sheep (the scene where Miles and Abby meet is one of the best “meet cute” scenes ever), Venetia, The Talisman Ring, Frederica, Sylvester. When young I did not differentiate among the books by type, but now that I’m older I tend to prefer the books with somewhat older heroines. Perhaps my own children used up all my patience with teenage melodrama, or perhaps it’s more of a fairy tale ending when the 25 y.o. on-the-shelf governess finds true love with a handsome lord than when the heroine is 17. Also, her older heroines tend to be wittier and more perceptive, while her younger ones are sweet and innocent, and I find the former more appealing than the latter. Doesn’t mean I don’t still love the other books, just that they don’t get reread the way my favorites do. Even in “The Talisman Ring”, Eustacie drives me crazy but I love Sarah and Sir Tristram.

    Reply
  262. My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer when I was in my early teens, so many years ago that I have no memory of which was first. As for favorites, that is much easier: Black Sheep (the scene where Miles and Abby meet is one of the best “meet cute” scenes ever), Venetia, The Talisman Ring, Frederica, Sylvester. When young I did not differentiate among the books by type, but now that I’m older I tend to prefer the books with somewhat older heroines. Perhaps my own children used up all my patience with teenage melodrama, or perhaps it’s more of a fairy tale ending when the 25 y.o. on-the-shelf governess finds true love with a handsome lord than when the heroine is 17. Also, her older heroines tend to be wittier and more perceptive, while her younger ones are sweet and innocent, and I find the former more appealing than the latter. Doesn’t mean I don’t still love the other books, just that they don’t get reread the way my favorites do. Even in “The Talisman Ring”, Eustacie drives me crazy but I love Sarah and Sir Tristram.

    Reply
  263. My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer when I was in my early teens, so many years ago that I have no memory of which was first. As for favorites, that is much easier: Black Sheep (the scene where Miles and Abby meet is one of the best “meet cute” scenes ever), Venetia, The Talisman Ring, Frederica, Sylvester. When young I did not differentiate among the books by type, but now that I’m older I tend to prefer the books with somewhat older heroines. Perhaps my own children used up all my patience with teenage melodrama, or perhaps it’s more of a fairy tale ending when the 25 y.o. on-the-shelf governess finds true love with a handsome lord than when the heroine is 17. Also, her older heroines tend to be wittier and more perceptive, while her younger ones are sweet and innocent, and I find the former more appealing than the latter. Doesn’t mean I don’t still love the other books, just that they don’t get reread the way my favorites do. Even in “The Talisman Ring”, Eustacie drives me crazy but I love Sarah and Sir Tristram.

    Reply
  264. My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer when I was in my early teens, so many years ago that I have no memory of which was first. As for favorites, that is much easier: Black Sheep (the scene where Miles and Abby meet is one of the best “meet cute” scenes ever), Venetia, The Talisman Ring, Frederica, Sylvester. When young I did not differentiate among the books by type, but now that I’m older I tend to prefer the books with somewhat older heroines. Perhaps my own children used up all my patience with teenage melodrama, or perhaps it’s more of a fairy tale ending when the 25 y.o. on-the-shelf governess finds true love with a handsome lord than when the heroine is 17. Also, her older heroines tend to be wittier and more perceptive, while her younger ones are sweet and innocent, and I find the former more appealing than the latter. Doesn’t mean I don’t still love the other books, just that they don’t get reread the way my favorites do. Even in “The Talisman Ring”, Eustacie drives me crazy but I love Sarah and Sir Tristram.

    Reply
  265. My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer when I was in my early teens, so many years ago that I have no memory of which was first. As for favorites, that is much easier: Black Sheep (the scene where Miles and Abby meet is one of the best “meet cute” scenes ever), Venetia, The Talisman Ring, Frederica, Sylvester. When young I did not differentiate among the books by type, but now that I’m older I tend to prefer the books with somewhat older heroines. Perhaps my own children used up all my patience with teenage melodrama, or perhaps it’s more of a fairy tale ending when the 25 y.o. on-the-shelf governess finds true love with a handsome lord than when the heroine is 17. Also, her older heroines tend to be wittier and more perceptive, while her younger ones are sweet and innocent, and I find the former more appealing than the latter. Doesn’t mean I don’t still love the other books, just that they don’t get reread the way my favorites do. Even in “The Talisman Ring”, Eustacie drives me crazy but I love Sarah and Sir Tristram.

    Reply
  266. My favorite has been The Quiet Gentleman. I read Black Sheep aloud to my mother when she was in hospital, and I think I turned on a few medical people to Heyer. My pprbacks are yellowed and falling to pieces; I have to replace them someday…with larger print! Some are Penguins bought in Canada. My first boss turned me on to Heyer and to Dorothy Sayers.

    Reply
  267. My favorite has been The Quiet Gentleman. I read Black Sheep aloud to my mother when she was in hospital, and I think I turned on a few medical people to Heyer. My pprbacks are yellowed and falling to pieces; I have to replace them someday…with larger print! Some are Penguins bought in Canada. My first boss turned me on to Heyer and to Dorothy Sayers.

    Reply
  268. My favorite has been The Quiet Gentleman. I read Black Sheep aloud to my mother when she was in hospital, and I think I turned on a few medical people to Heyer. My pprbacks are yellowed and falling to pieces; I have to replace them someday…with larger print! Some are Penguins bought in Canada. My first boss turned me on to Heyer and to Dorothy Sayers.

    Reply
  269. My favorite has been The Quiet Gentleman. I read Black Sheep aloud to my mother when she was in hospital, and I think I turned on a few medical people to Heyer. My pprbacks are yellowed and falling to pieces; I have to replace them someday…with larger print! Some are Penguins bought in Canada. My first boss turned me on to Heyer and to Dorothy Sayers.

    Reply
  270. My favorite has been The Quiet Gentleman. I read Black Sheep aloud to my mother when she was in hospital, and I think I turned on a few medical people to Heyer. My pprbacks are yellowed and falling to pieces; I have to replace them someday…with larger print! Some are Penguins bought in Canada. My first boss turned me on to Heyer and to Dorothy Sayers.

    Reply
  271. Very late to the party here — have to spend more time on my own interests rather than business and children.
    I would like to mention ‘Simon the Coldheart’ because I really enjoyed that one. The preface notes mentioned that it was not a favorite, but GH’s son thought it was good.
    I think I have read all of her books and have recommended ‘Grand Sophy’ to kids.
    Thank you so much — look forward to your book when it comes out.

    Reply
  272. Very late to the party here — have to spend more time on my own interests rather than business and children.
    I would like to mention ‘Simon the Coldheart’ because I really enjoyed that one. The preface notes mentioned that it was not a favorite, but GH’s son thought it was good.
    I think I have read all of her books and have recommended ‘Grand Sophy’ to kids.
    Thank you so much — look forward to your book when it comes out.

    Reply
  273. Very late to the party here — have to spend more time on my own interests rather than business and children.
    I would like to mention ‘Simon the Coldheart’ because I really enjoyed that one. The preface notes mentioned that it was not a favorite, but GH’s son thought it was good.
    I think I have read all of her books and have recommended ‘Grand Sophy’ to kids.
    Thank you so much — look forward to your book when it comes out.

    Reply
  274. Very late to the party here — have to spend more time on my own interests rather than business and children.
    I would like to mention ‘Simon the Coldheart’ because I really enjoyed that one. The preface notes mentioned that it was not a favorite, but GH’s son thought it was good.
    I think I have read all of her books and have recommended ‘Grand Sophy’ to kids.
    Thank you so much — look forward to your book when it comes out.

    Reply
  275. Very late to the party here — have to spend more time on my own interests rather than business and children.
    I would like to mention ‘Simon the Coldheart’ because I really enjoyed that one. The preface notes mentioned that it was not a favorite, but GH’s son thought it was good.
    I think I have read all of her books and have recommended ‘Grand Sophy’ to kids.
    Thank you so much — look forward to your book when it comes out.

    Reply

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