Meet Bronwyn Parry

Anne here, and today I'm interviewing Bronwyn Parry. Clothier'sDaughter
Bronwyn is best known for her romantic suspense novels, published in Australia by Hachette. She's received a swag of awards; she won RWAmerica's Golden Heart, and in 2008 that became her first published novel As Darkness Falls. She's a two time RITA finalist, for Dark Country and Dead Heat, which were also listed in the Daphne du Maurier award for romantic suspense. And three of her novels (Dark Country, Dead Heat, and Storm Clouds) have won an Australian Romance Readers’ award for best Australian romantic suspense novel.

She lives with her husband in rural NSW, and regularly posts photos of costumes, kangaroos and dogs on her FaceBook page.  
BronQuillWRitingNow, Bron has moved into the Regency-era with The Clothier's Daughter, a move that's not a huge surprise to those of us who know about her passion for history and for historical costume — not just how it looks, but how it was made and how it was worn. She volunteers in a small local museum and has conducted several workshops on historical textiles at national RWA conferences in Australia. Bron has also taught herself to pen letters using a quill and will dress up in costume to do so. 

Anne: Welcome to the Word Wenches, Bronwyn. Tell us a little about your passion for costume and what you do at your local museum.

Bronwyn: Thanks, Anne. It’s a thrilling honor to be invited to visit the Wenches. I’ve been a fan of you all for a long time. BronStairs

I’ve always loved historic costume and in my late teens and early twenties I did costume design and making for amateur theatre, while I fantasized about a career in theatre/film costuming in the UK. But alas, I realized that I really don’t have the design flair to create stunning original designs, and that my interest is more in historic cut and construction. There were few resources around in those days, and I strayed into spinning and weaving for some years, where the historic textiles fascinated me. My Honors thesis is on late 18th century British worsted (wool) textiles, and I travelled to the UK to study the scraps of original textiles pasted into clothier’s sample books, and later recreated some samples with my handspun, handwoven yarn.

Fast forward to 2014, and I heard about the Jane Austen Festival in Australia, which was the perfect excuse to get back into costume making and sew myself a wardrobe of Regency gowns. There is so much information available now and it inspired me and hooked me right back in to the costuming passion. I’ve been to JAFA every year since, and have ventured into other eras of fashion as well.

BrideDresstrainAbout two years ago, the opportunity arose to begin documenting the sadly neglected clothing collection at the local Folk Museum, and that’s been a wonderful experience, discovering, documenting, and studying treasures. We don’t have much from the Regency era, but we do have a huge Paisley shawl and some beautiful chemisettes from about the 1830s, and also a gorgeous morning jacket with an inked laundry mark of 1837. You can imagine me squealing when that was discovered in a box of men’s shirts! We’ve put on several displays, including one showing the dramatic changes in fashion during WW1, and our most recent, showcasing three gowns from the 1880s. I’ve presented talks for both of those.

Anne: What brought about the change in your writing focus from contemporary romantic thrillers to Regency romance.

Bronwyn: My contemporary books are set in two small fictional towns, and after three quite gritty books in each with multiple murders and dark times, I found myself reluctant to inflict more pain on the towns’ residents. Yes, I do know they’re entirely fictional, however, it seemed time to give them, and me, a break and some time for them to enjoy their happy endings! 

Historical romance has long been one of my favorite genres and my inner historian has been dreaming up character and plot ideas for a while, so it seemed a natural direction to take. And I love writing it.

Anne: This is from one of the Amazon reviews of The Clothier's Daughter. "Lovely, thoughtful romance with wonderful characters. Great evocation of the period in a way we don’t often see in Regencies – and a tight, suspenseful plot. Excellent HEA, too!" As has been pointed out, your Regency-era novel, is not the usual kind of Regency novel. Bron, would you tell us about The Clothier's Daughter, please?

Bronwyn: Well, I confess there are no dukes or rakes. The Clothier’s Daughter is set in the West Riding of Yorkshire, in 1816. It’s a time of major change, with the Napoleonic wars over, the Industrial Revolution well underway, factories spreading, and social structures in a process of being radically reshaped. 

It’s against this backdrop that Adam Caldwell, brother to the Earl of Rengarth, returns home after eight years of war and comes face-to-face with the woman he once loved and lost. Emma Braithwaite is struggling to keep her family’s worsted manufacturing business afloat after the death of her father and her brother’s disappearance. She narrowly escapes a fire at her warehouse with Adam’s assistance, but as the threats escalate, they discover that someone wants control of Emma's family company and is prepared to murder anyone in the way of getting it – including Emma.

It’s a second-chance romance with a wounded war hero but I guess Emma is unconventional – for her time and for the genre – in that she’s engaged in business, and active in campaigning on social concerns. I did aim to give a good sense of the particular point of history, without (I hope) getting bogged down in historical detail. Although it does rain rather a lot. 1816 was the Year Without a Summer, after all.

Anne: I think many wenchly readers will enjoy this departure. What kind of research did you do for this book? What did you find most interesting? Calamanco

Bronwyn: My inner historian is a alive and well and I love research! As I mentioned, my honors thesis was on British worsted textiles, and I was fascinated by the variety and beauty of these practical fabrics and the skills of the hand-spinners and weavers who made them. But sadly, few people these days know what a calamanco, or camblet, or lasting even looks like. (Anne interjects to say that she thinks a calamanco is a rowdy dance, a camblet is a very small camb, and lasting never goes away. Smack! Ouch! <g> ) PS that pic on the right is of calamanco and came from this site. Now back to Bron. 

Bronwyn: I argued in my thesis that these fabrics were so fine that they couldn’t be replicated by the new machinery of the Industrial Revolution, and that’s why they disappeared completely by the 1840s or so. So there was my inspiration for Emma, the heroine in The Clothier’s Daughter, trying to keep a proud but dying family business alive in a time of great change. 

However, I do hasten to assure readers that the book is not full of textile detail – I know not everyone is a textile geek 

In other research, I spent many, many hours reading newspapers from 1816, researching women in business, Luddites, coach routes and times, and shipping from Quebec among other topics I also pored over maps of Yorkshire and Canada. Oh, and the professor who supervised my honors thesis is incredibly knowledgeable and passionate about British social history in this era, and I was fortunate to attend two of his fascinating lectures, both of which gave me some nuggets of research gold. 

BronCropGeorgianUpstairs (1)
Attending the Jane Austen Festival in Canberra for several years was not only fun, but a wonderfully immersive experience. Dressing for and attending day events and evening balls, watching the dancers, seeing masculine men dancing with grace and attending to their partners with courtesy, and feeling the exhaustion of three nights in a row of balls, all gave me insights into Regency life. Plus there was syllabub.   

Anne: Do your characters spring fully formed from your imagination or do they slowly emerge in the writing? Who’s your favorite character in the book?

Bronwyn: I do usually get a very strong sense of a character quite quickly. I can’t really describe it in words, it’s just a sense of who they are inside, their temperament, values, strengths, fears. Sometimes the details of why they are that kind of person only emerge in the writing, and I love discovering those layers. 

I enjoyed writing Adam and Emma; they’d both matured a lot from the (relative!) innocence of their youthful relationship and I knew that, despite the harshness of his war experiences, Adam’s core of gentleness had held fast, even if he didn’t know it himself. And although Emma is in some ways quiet and conventional, she also takes practical actions on the things that matter to her, so she’s no shrinking violet. 

I’m not sure I could name a favourite character – I like them all. Well, except for the villains! There are quite a few secondary characters in The Clothier’s Daughter, particularly since Adam is one of a family of ten, and there are assorted returned soldiers and other characters returning home. Most of them announced themselves on the page quite vividly, and several will eventually have their own stories. One in particular strolled on to the stage, pretending to be someone he wasn’t, and I had to rein him in a little so that he wouldn’t take over. But he was rather a lot of fun to write.

Anne: Oh, I know about those characters who want to take over! Could you please give us a small taste of The Clothier's Daughter.

Bronwyn: A taste in more ways than one. To set the scene for this moment, it’s the Countess of Rengarth’s ball, on the day Adam has returned home to Rengarth Castle for the first time in years.  After a dramatic afternoon, Emma accepts Adam’s offer to escort her to supper as a gesture of his family’s support…

    Adam was attentive to her, passing her the tastiest dishes, but he mostly listened to the discussion rather than contributing to it. It wasn’t that he disagreed with them—when asked for his opinion, he agreed whole-heartedly with their concerns—but he seemed distracted by his own thoughts. 

    She could no longer read him. If, indeed, she ever had been able to. Perhaps that had just been a young girl’s foolish dream, thinking that she understood him. He was perfectly polite and gentlemanly, but his formal courtesy emphasized the distance between them that those years had created.

    Perhaps there was, in London or Europe or somewhere, a woman who held his heart. But when he presented her with a crystal glass containing a syllabub, the rich, creamy dessert she could never resist, for an instant his smile lit his eyes with the memories of a long ago ball, a shared syllabub, and a first kiss.         

    She felt her cheeks flush again, as if she was still seventeen.

Anne: Lovely. What are you working on now? Bron&Dogs

Bronwyn: In writing, I’m working on the next book in the Hartdale Brides loosely-linked series, in which two of the secondary characters from The Clothier’s Daughter find themselves in the small colony of New South Wales in 1817, attempting to disrupt a traitorous scheme. It’s an unusual setting for a Regency, I know, so there’s additional research to be done and I need to make sure I include in the story some of those elements that readers of Regencies love and expect, even though I’ll be pushing some boundaries of the genre. 

While staring at the screen trying to write, I’m currently also hand-stitching an outfit for a working woman in about 1817 – the kind of petticoat and over-dress a down-on-her-luck gentlewoman might wear in the colonies. Unfortunately, with the coronavirus, there are no balls in my immediate future and no need for ball gowns, so a working outfit is a nice way to connect with my current heroine. But I will give her pretty dresses later in the book!

Anne: Thanks again for visiting us on Word Wenches, Bron. 

Bronwyn: Thank you so much for having me! And if I may leave a small thank you to my gracious hostesses, I’ve included below my recipe for syllabub. Syllabub

Syllabub recipe

½ cup fine sugar
½ cup sherry or other sweet wine
Lemon zest from ½ lemon
Juice from ½ lemon
300ml (10oz/1.5 cups) pure cream (whipping cream)
Fresh strawberries or other fresh fruit

Mix the sugar, sherry, lemon zest and juice together and stir until the sugar is dissolved. It’s best, but not absolutely necessary, to leave it for a few hours or overnight.
Add in the cream, and beat with a handmixer or in a stand mixer until the mix is whipped enough to softly hold some shape, but not firm.
Slice the strawberries or fruit, and in nice glasses layer some of the cream mix, some berries, some cream mix, and top with sliced berries.
Makes 6 serves.

Anne: Ooh, lovely, thank you. I'm sure it's delicious.
Bronwyn will be giving away a copy of The Clothier's Daughter (e-book or paperback) to someone who leaves a comment, asks Bron a question about this interview, or answers this question: What’s your favourite historical era for fashion? Do you like the high-waisted Regency styles, or do you prefer another era?

360 thoughts on “Meet Bronwyn Parry”

  1. I love the high-waisted line of Decency gowns. That is a “forgiving” style for many figure flaws. My grandmother was a seamstress who made most of my dresses, and she often used a Simplicity pattern that resulted in a similar style. I had dozens of dresses in all sorts of colors, with a bit if lace here and there to make each one unique. She even used the pattern for a prom dress!

    Reply
  2. I love the high-waisted line of Decency gowns. That is a “forgiving” style for many figure flaws. My grandmother was a seamstress who made most of my dresses, and she often used a Simplicity pattern that resulted in a similar style. I had dozens of dresses in all sorts of colors, with a bit if lace here and there to make each one unique. She even used the pattern for a prom dress!

    Reply
  3. I love the high-waisted line of Decency gowns. That is a “forgiving” style for many figure flaws. My grandmother was a seamstress who made most of my dresses, and she often used a Simplicity pattern that resulted in a similar style. I had dozens of dresses in all sorts of colors, with a bit if lace here and there to make each one unique. She even used the pattern for a prom dress!

    Reply
  4. I love the high-waisted line of Decency gowns. That is a “forgiving” style for many figure flaws. My grandmother was a seamstress who made most of my dresses, and she often used a Simplicity pattern that resulted in a similar style. I had dozens of dresses in all sorts of colors, with a bit if lace here and there to make each one unique. She even used the pattern for a prom dress!

    Reply
  5. I love the high-waisted line of Decency gowns. That is a “forgiving” style for many figure flaws. My grandmother was a seamstress who made most of my dresses, and she often used a Simplicity pattern that resulted in a similar style. I had dozens of dresses in all sorts of colors, with a bit if lace here and there to make each one unique. She even used the pattern for a prom dress!

    Reply
  6. Edea, I do think the high-waist can suit most figures! I confess I wear my Regency dresses with stays that gently provide some shaping, but I have some high-waisted jackets for everyday wear and they are flattering. How lucky you were to have your grandmother making dresses for you. And a touch of lace is always lovely.

    Reply
  7. Edea, I do think the high-waist can suit most figures! I confess I wear my Regency dresses with stays that gently provide some shaping, but I have some high-waisted jackets for everyday wear and they are flattering. How lucky you were to have your grandmother making dresses for you. And a touch of lace is always lovely.

    Reply
  8. Edea, I do think the high-waist can suit most figures! I confess I wear my Regency dresses with stays that gently provide some shaping, but I have some high-waisted jackets for everyday wear and they are flattering. How lucky you were to have your grandmother making dresses for you. And a touch of lace is always lovely.

    Reply
  9. Edea, I do think the high-waist can suit most figures! I confess I wear my Regency dresses with stays that gently provide some shaping, but I have some high-waisted jackets for everyday wear and they are flattering. How lucky you were to have your grandmother making dresses for you. And a touch of lace is always lovely.

    Reply
  10. Edea, I do think the high-waist can suit most figures! I confess I wear my Regency dresses with stays that gently provide some shaping, but I have some high-waisted jackets for everyday wear and they are flattering. How lucky you were to have your grandmother making dresses for you. And a touch of lace is always lovely.

    Reply
  11. The fashion side of history always draws my attention. I wish I could remember what museum I was at that had a special exhibit at the time about WWII wedding dresses, including at least one reusing parachute fabric.
    Regency dresses always strike me as lovely, and maybe more wearable than the hooped or bustled skirt eras.

    Reply
  12. The fashion side of history always draws my attention. I wish I could remember what museum I was at that had a special exhibit at the time about WWII wedding dresses, including at least one reusing parachute fabric.
    Regency dresses always strike me as lovely, and maybe more wearable than the hooped or bustled skirt eras.

    Reply
  13. The fashion side of history always draws my attention. I wish I could remember what museum I was at that had a special exhibit at the time about WWII wedding dresses, including at least one reusing parachute fabric.
    Regency dresses always strike me as lovely, and maybe more wearable than the hooped or bustled skirt eras.

    Reply
  14. The fashion side of history always draws my attention. I wish I could remember what museum I was at that had a special exhibit at the time about WWII wedding dresses, including at least one reusing parachute fabric.
    Regency dresses always strike me as lovely, and maybe more wearable than the hooped or bustled skirt eras.

    Reply
  15. The fashion side of history always draws my attention. I wish I could remember what museum I was at that had a special exhibit at the time about WWII wedding dresses, including at least one reusing parachute fabric.
    Regency dresses always strike me as lovely, and maybe more wearable than the hooped or bustled skirt eras.

    Reply
  16. Amy, fashion – or at least, dress – is such a huge part of social history on many levels. I would have love to have seen the WW2 wedding dress exhibit. We have dresses from the 1930s in our museum collection, and the 1950s, but I don’t recall any from the war years. I’d like to fill that gap sometime, because there were limitations in fabrics (they were rationed in Australia) and therefore a great deal of ingenuity! And yes, Regency dresses are simpler to wear, with little body shaping or cages or padding. Much easier to drive in than a crinoline, too!

    Reply
  17. Amy, fashion – or at least, dress – is such a huge part of social history on many levels. I would have love to have seen the WW2 wedding dress exhibit. We have dresses from the 1930s in our museum collection, and the 1950s, but I don’t recall any from the war years. I’d like to fill that gap sometime, because there were limitations in fabrics (they were rationed in Australia) and therefore a great deal of ingenuity! And yes, Regency dresses are simpler to wear, with little body shaping or cages or padding. Much easier to drive in than a crinoline, too!

    Reply
  18. Amy, fashion – or at least, dress – is such a huge part of social history on many levels. I would have love to have seen the WW2 wedding dress exhibit. We have dresses from the 1930s in our museum collection, and the 1950s, but I don’t recall any from the war years. I’d like to fill that gap sometime, because there were limitations in fabrics (they were rationed in Australia) and therefore a great deal of ingenuity! And yes, Regency dresses are simpler to wear, with little body shaping or cages or padding. Much easier to drive in than a crinoline, too!

    Reply
  19. Amy, fashion – or at least, dress – is such a huge part of social history on many levels. I would have love to have seen the WW2 wedding dress exhibit. We have dresses from the 1930s in our museum collection, and the 1950s, but I don’t recall any from the war years. I’d like to fill that gap sometime, because there were limitations in fabrics (they were rationed in Australia) and therefore a great deal of ingenuity! And yes, Regency dresses are simpler to wear, with little body shaping or cages or padding. Much easier to drive in than a crinoline, too!

    Reply
  20. Amy, fashion – or at least, dress – is such a huge part of social history on many levels. I would have love to have seen the WW2 wedding dress exhibit. We have dresses from the 1930s in our museum collection, and the 1950s, but I don’t recall any from the war years. I’d like to fill that gap sometime, because there were limitations in fabrics (they were rationed in Australia) and therefore a great deal of ingenuity! And yes, Regency dresses are simpler to wear, with little body shaping or cages or padding. Much easier to drive in than a crinoline, too!

    Reply
  21. What a fascinating interview! You are so lucky to be allowed to handle old gowns and other clothing items and your book sounds very intriguing. By sheer coincidence I was just doing some genealogy yesterday where a couple of ancestors seem to have been living in Australia in the early 1830s (not as convicts but immigrants). I’ll be very interested to read your second book too as I’m sure you’ll describe that era beautifully and then I’ll be able to picture them there. And by another coincidence, I live in a tiny village closely associated with Queen Elizabeth I’s attendant Blanche Parry – perhaps you are related?

    Reply
  22. What a fascinating interview! You are so lucky to be allowed to handle old gowns and other clothing items and your book sounds very intriguing. By sheer coincidence I was just doing some genealogy yesterday where a couple of ancestors seem to have been living in Australia in the early 1830s (not as convicts but immigrants). I’ll be very interested to read your second book too as I’m sure you’ll describe that era beautifully and then I’ll be able to picture them there. And by another coincidence, I live in a tiny village closely associated with Queen Elizabeth I’s attendant Blanche Parry – perhaps you are related?

    Reply
  23. What a fascinating interview! You are so lucky to be allowed to handle old gowns and other clothing items and your book sounds very intriguing. By sheer coincidence I was just doing some genealogy yesterday where a couple of ancestors seem to have been living in Australia in the early 1830s (not as convicts but immigrants). I’ll be very interested to read your second book too as I’m sure you’ll describe that era beautifully and then I’ll be able to picture them there. And by another coincidence, I live in a tiny village closely associated with Queen Elizabeth I’s attendant Blanche Parry – perhaps you are related?

    Reply
  24. What a fascinating interview! You are so lucky to be allowed to handle old gowns and other clothing items and your book sounds very intriguing. By sheer coincidence I was just doing some genealogy yesterday where a couple of ancestors seem to have been living in Australia in the early 1830s (not as convicts but immigrants). I’ll be very interested to read your second book too as I’m sure you’ll describe that era beautifully and then I’ll be able to picture them there. And by another coincidence, I live in a tiny village closely associated with Queen Elizabeth I’s attendant Blanche Parry – perhaps you are related?

    Reply
  25. What a fascinating interview! You are so lucky to be allowed to handle old gowns and other clothing items and your book sounds very intriguing. By sheer coincidence I was just doing some genealogy yesterday where a couple of ancestors seem to have been living in Australia in the early 1830s (not as convicts but immigrants). I’ll be very interested to read your second book too as I’m sure you’ll describe that era beautifully and then I’ll be able to picture them there. And by another coincidence, I live in a tiny village closely associated with Queen Elizabeth I’s attendant Blanche Parry – perhaps you are related?

    Reply
  26. Hi Christina! Yes, I love being able to work in the museum with the clothing. Every piece is fascinating, and of course my imagination kicks in to ponder who wore it, and when. How wonderful that your ancestors were here relatively early! Do you know about Trove, our National Library’s online newspaper collection? There were well-established newspapers in Sydney and Hobart by that time, and they’re in Trove, which is free to access. So you can search to see if your ancestors made the news. Parry is an old family name that we have traced back to the 1700s in Ruabon in Wales, but unfortunately not further than that (yet). ‘Parry’ being about as common in Wales as Smith elsewhere, I’m not sure I ever will get further back. But it’s fun to imagine a possible ancestor attending to Queen Elizabeth 1!

    Reply
  27. Hi Christina! Yes, I love being able to work in the museum with the clothing. Every piece is fascinating, and of course my imagination kicks in to ponder who wore it, and when. How wonderful that your ancestors were here relatively early! Do you know about Trove, our National Library’s online newspaper collection? There were well-established newspapers in Sydney and Hobart by that time, and they’re in Trove, which is free to access. So you can search to see if your ancestors made the news. Parry is an old family name that we have traced back to the 1700s in Ruabon in Wales, but unfortunately not further than that (yet). ‘Parry’ being about as common in Wales as Smith elsewhere, I’m not sure I ever will get further back. But it’s fun to imagine a possible ancestor attending to Queen Elizabeth 1!

    Reply
  28. Hi Christina! Yes, I love being able to work in the museum with the clothing. Every piece is fascinating, and of course my imagination kicks in to ponder who wore it, and when. How wonderful that your ancestors were here relatively early! Do you know about Trove, our National Library’s online newspaper collection? There were well-established newspapers in Sydney and Hobart by that time, and they’re in Trove, which is free to access. So you can search to see if your ancestors made the news. Parry is an old family name that we have traced back to the 1700s in Ruabon in Wales, but unfortunately not further than that (yet). ‘Parry’ being about as common in Wales as Smith elsewhere, I’m not sure I ever will get further back. But it’s fun to imagine a possible ancestor attending to Queen Elizabeth 1!

    Reply
  29. Hi Christina! Yes, I love being able to work in the museum with the clothing. Every piece is fascinating, and of course my imagination kicks in to ponder who wore it, and when. How wonderful that your ancestors were here relatively early! Do you know about Trove, our National Library’s online newspaper collection? There were well-established newspapers in Sydney and Hobart by that time, and they’re in Trove, which is free to access. So you can search to see if your ancestors made the news. Parry is an old family name that we have traced back to the 1700s in Ruabon in Wales, but unfortunately not further than that (yet). ‘Parry’ being about as common in Wales as Smith elsewhere, I’m not sure I ever will get further back. But it’s fun to imagine a possible ancestor attending to Queen Elizabeth 1!

    Reply
  30. Hi Christina! Yes, I love being able to work in the museum with the clothing. Every piece is fascinating, and of course my imagination kicks in to ponder who wore it, and when. How wonderful that your ancestors were here relatively early! Do you know about Trove, our National Library’s online newspaper collection? There were well-established newspapers in Sydney and Hobart by that time, and they’re in Trove, which is free to access. So you can search to see if your ancestors made the news. Parry is an old family name that we have traced back to the 1700s in Ruabon in Wales, but unfortunately not further than that (yet). ‘Parry’ being about as common in Wales as Smith elsewhere, I’m not sure I ever will get further back. But it’s fun to imagine a possible ancestor attending to Queen Elizabeth 1!

    Reply
  31. How exciting to have seen – or, maybe even touched – fabrics that were so fine and delicate they couldn’t be replicated by the ‘new’ machines.
    Great interview, Bronwyn.🙂

    Reply
  32. How exciting to have seen – or, maybe even touched – fabrics that were so fine and delicate they couldn’t be replicated by the ‘new’ machines.
    Great interview, Bronwyn.🙂

    Reply
  33. How exciting to have seen – or, maybe even touched – fabrics that were so fine and delicate they couldn’t be replicated by the ‘new’ machines.
    Great interview, Bronwyn.🙂

    Reply
  34. How exciting to have seen – or, maybe even touched – fabrics that were so fine and delicate they couldn’t be replicated by the ‘new’ machines.
    Great interview, Bronwyn.🙂

    Reply
  35. How exciting to have seen – or, maybe even touched – fabrics that were so fine and delicate they couldn’t be replicated by the ‘new’ machines.
    Great interview, Bronwyn.🙂

    Reply
  36. I don’t know that I have one period of clothing that I enjoy more than most- more of a combination of a few different types. I will say that while hoop skirts look fun for a bit, wearing them seems less fun. Thank you for the syllabub recipe!

    Reply
  37. I don’t know that I have one period of clothing that I enjoy more than most- more of a combination of a few different types. I will say that while hoop skirts look fun for a bit, wearing them seems less fun. Thank you for the syllabub recipe!

    Reply
  38. I don’t know that I have one period of clothing that I enjoy more than most- more of a combination of a few different types. I will say that while hoop skirts look fun for a bit, wearing them seems less fun. Thank you for the syllabub recipe!

    Reply
  39. I don’t know that I have one period of clothing that I enjoy more than most- more of a combination of a few different types. I will say that while hoop skirts look fun for a bit, wearing them seems less fun. Thank you for the syllabub recipe!

    Reply
  40. I don’t know that I have one period of clothing that I enjoy more than most- more of a combination of a few different types. I will say that while hoop skirts look fun for a bit, wearing them seems less fun. Thank you for the syllabub recipe!

    Reply
  41. Anne and Bronwyn, what a marvelous blog! Bronwyn, your research chops are AWESOME! I can only admire your amazing work with textiles and costumes–but I do have the same sense of characters that you do. I know who they are from the beginning. The -why- they are the way they are comes later. Thanks so much for visiting the Wenches today.

    Reply
  42. Anne and Bronwyn, what a marvelous blog! Bronwyn, your research chops are AWESOME! I can only admire your amazing work with textiles and costumes–but I do have the same sense of characters that you do. I know who they are from the beginning. The -why- they are the way they are comes later. Thanks so much for visiting the Wenches today.

    Reply
  43. Anne and Bronwyn, what a marvelous blog! Bronwyn, your research chops are AWESOME! I can only admire your amazing work with textiles and costumes–but I do have the same sense of characters that you do. I know who they are from the beginning. The -why- they are the way they are comes later. Thanks so much for visiting the Wenches today.

    Reply
  44. Anne and Bronwyn, what a marvelous blog! Bronwyn, your research chops are AWESOME! I can only admire your amazing work with textiles and costumes–but I do have the same sense of characters that you do. I know who they are from the beginning. The -why- they are the way they are comes later. Thanks so much for visiting the Wenches today.

    Reply
  45. Anne and Bronwyn, what a marvelous blog! Bronwyn, your research chops are AWESOME! I can only admire your amazing work with textiles and costumes–but I do have the same sense of characters that you do. I know who they are from the beginning. The -why- they are the way they are comes later. Thanks so much for visiting the Wenches today.

    Reply
  46. Welcome, Bronwyn,and thank you and Anne for a wonderful interview. Thanks for the excerpt and best wishes for the success of The Clothier’s Daughter. Your research sounds fascinating, and you look lovely in your period clothing. Here’s a question: I’m sure you read a lot of non-fiction for research purposes, but what are the last three works of fiction that you read?

    Reply
  47. Welcome, Bronwyn,and thank you and Anne for a wonderful interview. Thanks for the excerpt and best wishes for the success of The Clothier’s Daughter. Your research sounds fascinating, and you look lovely in your period clothing. Here’s a question: I’m sure you read a lot of non-fiction for research purposes, but what are the last three works of fiction that you read?

    Reply
  48. Welcome, Bronwyn,and thank you and Anne for a wonderful interview. Thanks for the excerpt and best wishes for the success of The Clothier’s Daughter. Your research sounds fascinating, and you look lovely in your period clothing. Here’s a question: I’m sure you read a lot of non-fiction for research purposes, but what are the last three works of fiction that you read?

    Reply
  49. Welcome, Bronwyn,and thank you and Anne for a wonderful interview. Thanks for the excerpt and best wishes for the success of The Clothier’s Daughter. Your research sounds fascinating, and you look lovely in your period clothing. Here’s a question: I’m sure you read a lot of non-fiction for research purposes, but what are the last three works of fiction that you read?

    Reply
  50. Welcome, Bronwyn,and thank you and Anne for a wonderful interview. Thanks for the excerpt and best wishes for the success of The Clothier’s Daughter. Your research sounds fascinating, and you look lovely in your period clothing. Here’s a question: I’m sure you read a lot of non-fiction for research purposes, but what are the last three works of fiction that you read?

    Reply
  51. I was a historical interpreter representing a Nurse during the American Civil War. Making dresses apropos to an upper-middle class woman suitable to become battered and stained in hospital work was a challenge, but the hands on work gave me insights into that lifestyle that reading alone could not infer. I’m currently writing fiction in the Georgian/American Revolution period in America. I have no intention of sewing dresses appropriate to a Merchant class widow, or the uniform of a British soldier/sailor, but I’ve created Pinterest boards with the research I’ve done. I’m amazed at all your hands on textile research!

    Reply
  52. I was a historical interpreter representing a Nurse during the American Civil War. Making dresses apropos to an upper-middle class woman suitable to become battered and stained in hospital work was a challenge, but the hands on work gave me insights into that lifestyle that reading alone could not infer. I’m currently writing fiction in the Georgian/American Revolution period in America. I have no intention of sewing dresses appropriate to a Merchant class widow, or the uniform of a British soldier/sailor, but I’ve created Pinterest boards with the research I’ve done. I’m amazed at all your hands on textile research!

    Reply
  53. I was a historical interpreter representing a Nurse during the American Civil War. Making dresses apropos to an upper-middle class woman suitable to become battered and stained in hospital work was a challenge, but the hands on work gave me insights into that lifestyle that reading alone could not infer. I’m currently writing fiction in the Georgian/American Revolution period in America. I have no intention of sewing dresses appropriate to a Merchant class widow, or the uniform of a British soldier/sailor, but I’ve created Pinterest boards with the research I’ve done. I’m amazed at all your hands on textile research!

    Reply
  54. I was a historical interpreter representing a Nurse during the American Civil War. Making dresses apropos to an upper-middle class woman suitable to become battered and stained in hospital work was a challenge, but the hands on work gave me insights into that lifestyle that reading alone could not infer. I’m currently writing fiction in the Georgian/American Revolution period in America. I have no intention of sewing dresses appropriate to a Merchant class widow, or the uniform of a British soldier/sailor, but I’ve created Pinterest boards with the research I’ve done. I’m amazed at all your hands on textile research!

    Reply
  55. I was a historical interpreter representing a Nurse during the American Civil War. Making dresses apropos to an upper-middle class woman suitable to become battered and stained in hospital work was a challenge, but the hands on work gave me insights into that lifestyle that reading alone could not infer. I’m currently writing fiction in the Georgian/American Revolution period in America. I have no intention of sewing dresses appropriate to a Merchant class widow, or the uniform of a British soldier/sailor, but I’ve created Pinterest boards with the research I’ve done. I’m amazed at all your hands on textile research!

    Reply
  56. Beverley, I was only allowed to touch while wearing gloves, and then very gently. Machines can make fabrics that fine now, but I believe that the early machines couldn’t. And the yarns used for some of the fabrics weren’t tightly twisted in the spinning, which would have made it difficult to use for machine work. Calamanco, for example, is a kind of wool satin; it’s not a delicate fabric but in some of the samples I studied, the weft yarn – the weft goes across the long warp threads on the loom – was hardly twisted at all, so it would have needed careful handling. The hand spinners, weavers and other textile trades involved in the industry were very skilled indeed. I’m glad you enjoyed the interview!

    Reply
  57. Beverley, I was only allowed to touch while wearing gloves, and then very gently. Machines can make fabrics that fine now, but I believe that the early machines couldn’t. And the yarns used for some of the fabrics weren’t tightly twisted in the spinning, which would have made it difficult to use for machine work. Calamanco, for example, is a kind of wool satin; it’s not a delicate fabric but in some of the samples I studied, the weft yarn – the weft goes across the long warp threads on the loom – was hardly twisted at all, so it would have needed careful handling. The hand spinners, weavers and other textile trades involved in the industry were very skilled indeed. I’m glad you enjoyed the interview!

    Reply
  58. Beverley, I was only allowed to touch while wearing gloves, and then very gently. Machines can make fabrics that fine now, but I believe that the early machines couldn’t. And the yarns used for some of the fabrics weren’t tightly twisted in the spinning, which would have made it difficult to use for machine work. Calamanco, for example, is a kind of wool satin; it’s not a delicate fabric but in some of the samples I studied, the weft yarn – the weft goes across the long warp threads on the loom – was hardly twisted at all, so it would have needed careful handling. The hand spinners, weavers and other textile trades involved in the industry were very skilled indeed. I’m glad you enjoyed the interview!

    Reply
  59. Beverley, I was only allowed to touch while wearing gloves, and then very gently. Machines can make fabrics that fine now, but I believe that the early machines couldn’t. And the yarns used for some of the fabrics weren’t tightly twisted in the spinning, which would have made it difficult to use for machine work. Calamanco, for example, is a kind of wool satin; it’s not a delicate fabric but in some of the samples I studied, the weft yarn – the weft goes across the long warp threads on the loom – was hardly twisted at all, so it would have needed careful handling. The hand spinners, weavers and other textile trades involved in the industry were very skilled indeed. I’m glad you enjoyed the interview!

    Reply
  60. Beverley, I was only allowed to touch while wearing gloves, and then very gently. Machines can make fabrics that fine now, but I believe that the early machines couldn’t. And the yarns used for some of the fabrics weren’t tightly twisted in the spinning, which would have made it difficult to use for machine work. Calamanco, for example, is a kind of wool satin; it’s not a delicate fabric but in some of the samples I studied, the weft yarn – the weft goes across the long warp threads on the loom – was hardly twisted at all, so it would have needed careful handling. The hand spinners, weavers and other textile trades involved in the industry were very skilled indeed. I’m glad you enjoyed the interview!

    Reply
  61. Hi Rhonda! Enjoy the syllabub 🙂 A proper crinoline hoop skirt is on my list to make in the next couple of months – I’m doing a major project recreating underwear from various eras. I’ve worn a dress with a small crinoline of a couple of hoops back in my youth, but not the full crinoline, so it will be interesting to experience wearing it around! (I’m sure Pippin, our younger dog, who loves looking under my skirts on the rare occasion I wear one at home, will be fascinated by the crinoline!) I like elements of clothing from different eras, too. Have you heard about history bounding? It’s where people mix historically-inspired elements with their everyday clothing. I haven’t done much of it yet, as at home in the bush I’m invariably in jeans, but there’s a fun Facebook group and Instagram tags, if you’re on either of those.

    Reply
  62. Hi Rhonda! Enjoy the syllabub 🙂 A proper crinoline hoop skirt is on my list to make in the next couple of months – I’m doing a major project recreating underwear from various eras. I’ve worn a dress with a small crinoline of a couple of hoops back in my youth, but not the full crinoline, so it will be interesting to experience wearing it around! (I’m sure Pippin, our younger dog, who loves looking under my skirts on the rare occasion I wear one at home, will be fascinated by the crinoline!) I like elements of clothing from different eras, too. Have you heard about history bounding? It’s where people mix historically-inspired elements with their everyday clothing. I haven’t done much of it yet, as at home in the bush I’m invariably in jeans, but there’s a fun Facebook group and Instagram tags, if you’re on either of those.

    Reply
  63. Hi Rhonda! Enjoy the syllabub 🙂 A proper crinoline hoop skirt is on my list to make in the next couple of months – I’m doing a major project recreating underwear from various eras. I’ve worn a dress with a small crinoline of a couple of hoops back in my youth, but not the full crinoline, so it will be interesting to experience wearing it around! (I’m sure Pippin, our younger dog, who loves looking under my skirts on the rare occasion I wear one at home, will be fascinated by the crinoline!) I like elements of clothing from different eras, too. Have you heard about history bounding? It’s where people mix historically-inspired elements with their everyday clothing. I haven’t done much of it yet, as at home in the bush I’m invariably in jeans, but there’s a fun Facebook group and Instagram tags, if you’re on either of those.

    Reply
  64. Hi Rhonda! Enjoy the syllabub 🙂 A proper crinoline hoop skirt is on my list to make in the next couple of months – I’m doing a major project recreating underwear from various eras. I’ve worn a dress with a small crinoline of a couple of hoops back in my youth, but not the full crinoline, so it will be interesting to experience wearing it around! (I’m sure Pippin, our younger dog, who loves looking under my skirts on the rare occasion I wear one at home, will be fascinated by the crinoline!) I like elements of clothing from different eras, too. Have you heard about history bounding? It’s where people mix historically-inspired elements with their everyday clothing. I haven’t done much of it yet, as at home in the bush I’m invariably in jeans, but there’s a fun Facebook group and Instagram tags, if you’re on either of those.

    Reply
  65. Hi Rhonda! Enjoy the syllabub 🙂 A proper crinoline hoop skirt is on my list to make in the next couple of months – I’m doing a major project recreating underwear from various eras. I’ve worn a dress with a small crinoline of a couple of hoops back in my youth, but not the full crinoline, so it will be interesting to experience wearing it around! (I’m sure Pippin, our younger dog, who loves looking under my skirts on the rare occasion I wear one at home, will be fascinated by the crinoline!) I like elements of clothing from different eras, too. Have you heard about history bounding? It’s where people mix historically-inspired elements with their everyday clothing. I haven’t done much of it yet, as at home in the bush I’m invariably in jeans, but there’s a fun Facebook group and Instagram tags, if you’re on either of those.

    Reply
  66. Thank you for your lovely comments, Mary Jo! It’s an honour to visit the Wenches. That process of gradually discovering characters is wonderful, isn’t it? One of the joys of writing, for me, and I love reading the characters of authors who have that more ‘organic’ , intuitive approach to writing. The characters often seem more natural, more layered, more real. And such a delight to read!

    Reply
  67. Thank you for your lovely comments, Mary Jo! It’s an honour to visit the Wenches. That process of gradually discovering characters is wonderful, isn’t it? One of the joys of writing, for me, and I love reading the characters of authors who have that more ‘organic’ , intuitive approach to writing. The characters often seem more natural, more layered, more real. And such a delight to read!

    Reply
  68. Thank you for your lovely comments, Mary Jo! It’s an honour to visit the Wenches. That process of gradually discovering characters is wonderful, isn’t it? One of the joys of writing, for me, and I love reading the characters of authors who have that more ‘organic’ , intuitive approach to writing. The characters often seem more natural, more layered, more real. And such a delight to read!

    Reply
  69. Thank you for your lovely comments, Mary Jo! It’s an honour to visit the Wenches. That process of gradually discovering characters is wonderful, isn’t it? One of the joys of writing, for me, and I love reading the characters of authors who have that more ‘organic’ , intuitive approach to writing. The characters often seem more natural, more layered, more real. And such a delight to read!

    Reply
  70. Thank you for your lovely comments, Mary Jo! It’s an honour to visit the Wenches. That process of gradually discovering characters is wonderful, isn’t it? One of the joys of writing, for me, and I love reading the characters of authors who have that more ‘organic’ , intuitive approach to writing. The characters often seem more natural, more layered, more real. And such a delight to read!

    Reply
  71. Thank you for your kind words and good wishes, Kareni. I haven’t been reading as much fiction as I should over the past year or so due to pressure or work, but I’ve been really trying to rectify that lately. The most recent novels I’ve read are Elizabeth Rolls’, In Debt to the Earl; Jennifer Ashley’s The Madness of Lord Ian McKenzie (finally!); and Anna Campbell’s The Highlander’s English Bride. I also spent a happy hour or so re-reading for the upmteenth time parts of Joanna Bourne’s The Black Hawk, one of my all-time favourites. Next up is Nicola Cornick’s, The Phantom Tree. And of course I’ve pre-ordered Anne’s Marry in Scarlet, because she’s an auto-buy for me.

    Reply
  72. Thank you for your kind words and good wishes, Kareni. I haven’t been reading as much fiction as I should over the past year or so due to pressure or work, but I’ve been really trying to rectify that lately. The most recent novels I’ve read are Elizabeth Rolls’, In Debt to the Earl; Jennifer Ashley’s The Madness of Lord Ian McKenzie (finally!); and Anna Campbell’s The Highlander’s English Bride. I also spent a happy hour or so re-reading for the upmteenth time parts of Joanna Bourne’s The Black Hawk, one of my all-time favourites. Next up is Nicola Cornick’s, The Phantom Tree. And of course I’ve pre-ordered Anne’s Marry in Scarlet, because she’s an auto-buy for me.

    Reply
  73. Thank you for your kind words and good wishes, Kareni. I haven’t been reading as much fiction as I should over the past year or so due to pressure or work, but I’ve been really trying to rectify that lately. The most recent novels I’ve read are Elizabeth Rolls’, In Debt to the Earl; Jennifer Ashley’s The Madness of Lord Ian McKenzie (finally!); and Anna Campbell’s The Highlander’s English Bride. I also spent a happy hour or so re-reading for the upmteenth time parts of Joanna Bourne’s The Black Hawk, one of my all-time favourites. Next up is Nicola Cornick’s, The Phantom Tree. And of course I’ve pre-ordered Anne’s Marry in Scarlet, because she’s an auto-buy for me.

    Reply
  74. Thank you for your kind words and good wishes, Kareni. I haven’t been reading as much fiction as I should over the past year or so due to pressure or work, but I’ve been really trying to rectify that lately. The most recent novels I’ve read are Elizabeth Rolls’, In Debt to the Earl; Jennifer Ashley’s The Madness of Lord Ian McKenzie (finally!); and Anna Campbell’s The Highlander’s English Bride. I also spent a happy hour or so re-reading for the upmteenth time parts of Joanna Bourne’s The Black Hawk, one of my all-time favourites. Next up is Nicola Cornick’s, The Phantom Tree. And of course I’ve pre-ordered Anne’s Marry in Scarlet, because she’s an auto-buy for me.

    Reply
  75. Thank you for your kind words and good wishes, Kareni. I haven’t been reading as much fiction as I should over the past year or so due to pressure or work, but I’ve been really trying to rectify that lately. The most recent novels I’ve read are Elizabeth Rolls’, In Debt to the Earl; Jennifer Ashley’s The Madness of Lord Ian McKenzie (finally!); and Anna Campbell’s The Highlander’s English Bride. I also spent a happy hour or so re-reading for the upmteenth time parts of Joanna Bourne’s The Black Hawk, one of my all-time favourites. Next up is Nicola Cornick’s, The Phantom Tree. And of course I’ve pre-ordered Anne’s Marry in Scarlet, because she’s an auto-buy for me.

    Reply
  76. Hi Pamela! I confess to some envy of historical interpreters in the US as you have so many wonderful sites and opportunities to explore history hands-on. Here in Australia, with a shorter colonial history and a much smaller population we don’t have many chances to do that – although some of us do try! I agree that doing hands-on work can an incredible learning experience. I’ve always been fascinated by how people did things in history – probably since learning to sew as a young child on Grandma’s hand-crank sewing machine. Although I’ve never (yet) cooked in a camp oven, I’ve made my own natural yeast bread for years, cut quills for writing, block-printed fabric, and exploring hand-sewing techniques is another ‘how did they do that?’ question to explore. When I first began spinning it was the 1970s and everyone was spinning chunky yarn, but I knew about Shetland shawls and that hand-spun yarn could be very fine. So that’s what I learned to spin. I have yet to spin and weave enough reproduction fabric for an outfit, but that’s on my bucket list 🙂 Oh, and isn’t Pinterest wonderful – so much inspiration that often sends me down research rabbit holes!

    Reply
  77. Hi Pamela! I confess to some envy of historical interpreters in the US as you have so many wonderful sites and opportunities to explore history hands-on. Here in Australia, with a shorter colonial history and a much smaller population we don’t have many chances to do that – although some of us do try! I agree that doing hands-on work can an incredible learning experience. I’ve always been fascinated by how people did things in history – probably since learning to sew as a young child on Grandma’s hand-crank sewing machine. Although I’ve never (yet) cooked in a camp oven, I’ve made my own natural yeast bread for years, cut quills for writing, block-printed fabric, and exploring hand-sewing techniques is another ‘how did they do that?’ question to explore. When I first began spinning it was the 1970s and everyone was spinning chunky yarn, but I knew about Shetland shawls and that hand-spun yarn could be very fine. So that’s what I learned to spin. I have yet to spin and weave enough reproduction fabric for an outfit, but that’s on my bucket list 🙂 Oh, and isn’t Pinterest wonderful – so much inspiration that often sends me down research rabbit holes!

    Reply
  78. Hi Pamela! I confess to some envy of historical interpreters in the US as you have so many wonderful sites and opportunities to explore history hands-on. Here in Australia, with a shorter colonial history and a much smaller population we don’t have many chances to do that – although some of us do try! I agree that doing hands-on work can an incredible learning experience. I’ve always been fascinated by how people did things in history – probably since learning to sew as a young child on Grandma’s hand-crank sewing machine. Although I’ve never (yet) cooked in a camp oven, I’ve made my own natural yeast bread for years, cut quills for writing, block-printed fabric, and exploring hand-sewing techniques is another ‘how did they do that?’ question to explore. When I first began spinning it was the 1970s and everyone was spinning chunky yarn, but I knew about Shetland shawls and that hand-spun yarn could be very fine. So that’s what I learned to spin. I have yet to spin and weave enough reproduction fabric for an outfit, but that’s on my bucket list 🙂 Oh, and isn’t Pinterest wonderful – so much inspiration that often sends me down research rabbit holes!

    Reply
  79. Hi Pamela! I confess to some envy of historical interpreters in the US as you have so many wonderful sites and opportunities to explore history hands-on. Here in Australia, with a shorter colonial history and a much smaller population we don’t have many chances to do that – although some of us do try! I agree that doing hands-on work can an incredible learning experience. I’ve always been fascinated by how people did things in history – probably since learning to sew as a young child on Grandma’s hand-crank sewing machine. Although I’ve never (yet) cooked in a camp oven, I’ve made my own natural yeast bread for years, cut quills for writing, block-printed fabric, and exploring hand-sewing techniques is another ‘how did they do that?’ question to explore. When I first began spinning it was the 1970s and everyone was spinning chunky yarn, but I knew about Shetland shawls and that hand-spun yarn could be very fine. So that’s what I learned to spin. I have yet to spin and weave enough reproduction fabric for an outfit, but that’s on my bucket list 🙂 Oh, and isn’t Pinterest wonderful – so much inspiration that often sends me down research rabbit holes!

    Reply
  80. Hi Pamela! I confess to some envy of historical interpreters in the US as you have so many wonderful sites and opportunities to explore history hands-on. Here in Australia, with a shorter colonial history and a much smaller population we don’t have many chances to do that – although some of us do try! I agree that doing hands-on work can an incredible learning experience. I’ve always been fascinated by how people did things in history – probably since learning to sew as a young child on Grandma’s hand-crank sewing machine. Although I’ve never (yet) cooked in a camp oven, I’ve made my own natural yeast bread for years, cut quills for writing, block-printed fabric, and exploring hand-sewing techniques is another ‘how did they do that?’ question to explore. When I first began spinning it was the 1970s and everyone was spinning chunky yarn, but I knew about Shetland shawls and that hand-spun yarn could be very fine. So that’s what I learned to spin. I have yet to spin and weave enough reproduction fabric for an outfit, but that’s on my bucket list 🙂 Oh, and isn’t Pinterest wonderful – so much inspiration that often sends me down research rabbit holes!

    Reply
  81. That sounds like a great collection of fiction, Bronwyn! I could happily join you and reread The Black Hawk and the Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie as they are among my favorite books.
    All the best to you.

    Reply
  82. That sounds like a great collection of fiction, Bronwyn! I could happily join you and reread The Black Hawk and the Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie as they are among my favorite books.
    All the best to you.

    Reply
  83. That sounds like a great collection of fiction, Bronwyn! I could happily join you and reread The Black Hawk and the Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie as they are among my favorite books.
    All the best to you.

    Reply
  84. That sounds like a great collection of fiction, Bronwyn! I could happily join you and reread The Black Hawk and the Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie as they are among my favorite books.
    All the best to you.

    Reply
  85. That sounds like a great collection of fiction, Bronwyn! I could happily join you and reread The Black Hawk and the Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie as they are among my favorite books.
    All the best to you.

    Reply
  86. Loved hearing about all your different interests and how they have influenced your writing. It sounds like you go down some wonderful rabbit holes research wise.
    As to what era clothes I most like…Regency is my most favorite but for WOWness Georgian is something else. Victorian era not so much. The big bustle (actually any kind of bustle) I don’t really like either but there were some interesting outfits.
    The change from Victorian to Edwardian to Flapper is quite amazing as well.
    Your book sounds very intriguing! I’ll keep my eye out for it.

    Reply
  87. Loved hearing about all your different interests and how they have influenced your writing. It sounds like you go down some wonderful rabbit holes research wise.
    As to what era clothes I most like…Regency is my most favorite but for WOWness Georgian is something else. Victorian era not so much. The big bustle (actually any kind of bustle) I don’t really like either but there were some interesting outfits.
    The change from Victorian to Edwardian to Flapper is quite amazing as well.
    Your book sounds very intriguing! I’ll keep my eye out for it.

    Reply
  88. Loved hearing about all your different interests and how they have influenced your writing. It sounds like you go down some wonderful rabbit holes research wise.
    As to what era clothes I most like…Regency is my most favorite but for WOWness Georgian is something else. Victorian era not so much. The big bustle (actually any kind of bustle) I don’t really like either but there were some interesting outfits.
    The change from Victorian to Edwardian to Flapper is quite amazing as well.
    Your book sounds very intriguing! I’ll keep my eye out for it.

    Reply
  89. Loved hearing about all your different interests and how they have influenced your writing. It sounds like you go down some wonderful rabbit holes research wise.
    As to what era clothes I most like…Regency is my most favorite but for WOWness Georgian is something else. Victorian era not so much. The big bustle (actually any kind of bustle) I don’t really like either but there were some interesting outfits.
    The change from Victorian to Edwardian to Flapper is quite amazing as well.
    Your book sounds very intriguing! I’ll keep my eye out for it.

    Reply
  90. Loved hearing about all your different interests and how they have influenced your writing. It sounds like you go down some wonderful rabbit holes research wise.
    As to what era clothes I most like…Regency is my most favorite but for WOWness Georgian is something else. Victorian era not so much. The big bustle (actually any kind of bustle) I don’t really like either but there were some interesting outfits.
    The change from Victorian to Edwardian to Flapper is quite amazing as well.
    Your book sounds very intriguing! I’ll keep my eye out for it.

    Reply
  91. I like the Regency Empire styles – when seen in motion they are graceful and flowing – the raised waistline makes the wearer look taller and slimmer. I like the cute little spencer jackets worn with the day gowns too.
    I don’t care much for the rest of the Regency look – the satin sandals, the drapey shawls, the glued in place hairstyles, the kewpie doll makeup, the long evening gloves – as someone in a long forgotten Suth’n novel said, all this onnin’ and offin’ – it makes no sense! But the feather-light muslin gowns are wonderful.

    Reply
  92. I like the Regency Empire styles – when seen in motion they are graceful and flowing – the raised waistline makes the wearer look taller and slimmer. I like the cute little spencer jackets worn with the day gowns too.
    I don’t care much for the rest of the Regency look – the satin sandals, the drapey shawls, the glued in place hairstyles, the kewpie doll makeup, the long evening gloves – as someone in a long forgotten Suth’n novel said, all this onnin’ and offin’ – it makes no sense! But the feather-light muslin gowns are wonderful.

    Reply
  93. I like the Regency Empire styles – when seen in motion they are graceful and flowing – the raised waistline makes the wearer look taller and slimmer. I like the cute little spencer jackets worn with the day gowns too.
    I don’t care much for the rest of the Regency look – the satin sandals, the drapey shawls, the glued in place hairstyles, the kewpie doll makeup, the long evening gloves – as someone in a long forgotten Suth’n novel said, all this onnin’ and offin’ – it makes no sense! But the feather-light muslin gowns are wonderful.

    Reply
  94. I like the Regency Empire styles – when seen in motion they are graceful and flowing – the raised waistline makes the wearer look taller and slimmer. I like the cute little spencer jackets worn with the day gowns too.
    I don’t care much for the rest of the Regency look – the satin sandals, the drapey shawls, the glued in place hairstyles, the kewpie doll makeup, the long evening gloves – as someone in a long forgotten Suth’n novel said, all this onnin’ and offin’ – it makes no sense! But the feather-light muslin gowns are wonderful.

    Reply
  95. I like the Regency Empire styles – when seen in motion they are graceful and flowing – the raised waistline makes the wearer look taller and slimmer. I like the cute little spencer jackets worn with the day gowns too.
    I don’t care much for the rest of the Regency look – the satin sandals, the drapey shawls, the glued in place hairstyles, the kewpie doll makeup, the long evening gloves – as someone in a long forgotten Suth’n novel said, all this onnin’ and offin’ – it makes no sense! But the feather-light muslin gowns are wonderful.

    Reply
  96. Hi Bronwyn
    Love your books and have not read your new one yet but will. As you know its my genre. Can I get it it at Big W like I did with your other books?
    Joanne

    Reply
  97. Hi Bronwyn
    Love your books and have not read your new one yet but will. As you know its my genre. Can I get it it at Big W like I did with your other books?
    Joanne

    Reply
  98. Hi Bronwyn
    Love your books and have not read your new one yet but will. As you know its my genre. Can I get it it at Big W like I did with your other books?
    Joanne

    Reply
  99. Hi Bronwyn
    Love your books and have not read your new one yet but will. As you know its my genre. Can I get it it at Big W like I did with your other books?
    Joanne

    Reply
  100. Hi Bronwyn
    Love your books and have not read your new one yet but will. As you know its my genre. Can I get it it at Big W like I did with your other books?
    Joanne

    Reply
  101. Hi Vicki, Georgian era fashion definitely does have a WOW factor – all those gorgeous silks, and the drapery of skirts over court hoops is stunning. The late Victorian 1880s bustle is kind of growing on me; I made a couple of bustle-era petticoats and a bustle to go under dresses in our museum for display, and I’m planning to make a replica of one dress (in a rather larger size!) for me, so that will be interesting. I agree about the transition from Edwardian to Flapper – i really love the 1917-1920 fashions, as they’re so wearable, with much less emphasis on body shaping. I think of them as very feminist, in a way. And they had pockets!!

    Reply
  102. Hi Vicki, Georgian era fashion definitely does have a WOW factor – all those gorgeous silks, and the drapery of skirts over court hoops is stunning. The late Victorian 1880s bustle is kind of growing on me; I made a couple of bustle-era petticoats and a bustle to go under dresses in our museum for display, and I’m planning to make a replica of one dress (in a rather larger size!) for me, so that will be interesting. I agree about the transition from Edwardian to Flapper – i really love the 1917-1920 fashions, as they’re so wearable, with much less emphasis on body shaping. I think of them as very feminist, in a way. And they had pockets!!

    Reply
  103. Hi Vicki, Georgian era fashion definitely does have a WOW factor – all those gorgeous silks, and the drapery of skirts over court hoops is stunning. The late Victorian 1880s bustle is kind of growing on me; I made a couple of bustle-era petticoats and a bustle to go under dresses in our museum for display, and I’m planning to make a replica of one dress (in a rather larger size!) for me, so that will be interesting. I agree about the transition from Edwardian to Flapper – i really love the 1917-1920 fashions, as they’re so wearable, with much less emphasis on body shaping. I think of them as very feminist, in a way. And they had pockets!!

    Reply
  104. Hi Vicki, Georgian era fashion definitely does have a WOW factor – all those gorgeous silks, and the drapery of skirts over court hoops is stunning. The late Victorian 1880s bustle is kind of growing on me; I made a couple of bustle-era petticoats and a bustle to go under dresses in our museum for display, and I’m planning to make a replica of one dress (in a rather larger size!) for me, so that will be interesting. I agree about the transition from Edwardian to Flapper – i really love the 1917-1920 fashions, as they’re so wearable, with much less emphasis on body shaping. I think of them as very feminist, in a way. And they had pockets!!

    Reply
  105. Hi Vicki, Georgian era fashion definitely does have a WOW factor – all those gorgeous silks, and the drapery of skirts over court hoops is stunning. The late Victorian 1880s bustle is kind of growing on me; I made a couple of bustle-era petticoats and a bustle to go under dresses in our museum for display, and I’m planning to make a replica of one dress (in a rather larger size!) for me, so that will be interesting. I agree about the transition from Edwardian to Flapper – i really love the 1917-1920 fashions, as they’re so wearable, with much less emphasis on body shaping. I think of them as very feminist, in a way. And they had pockets!!

    Reply
  106. Janice, I like the Regency high waist too – so forgiving for those of us who don’t have a waist, and yes, the long slim lines and soft fabrics are graceful. When I made my first Regency muslin dress I thought I might look silly as a plump middle-aged woman in white, but honestly it’s my favourite dress, and lovely to wear. I’ve never yet managed to get a proper Regency hair style with my hair, but I haven’t tried too hard, either! In Regency times some of those glued-in-place curls were, if not glued, actually hair pieces pinned in place, so Regency women sometimes resorted to artificial means to get the ‘look’. But I’ve never been entirely fashionable in any era, so I’m happy to be the comfortable, practical, aunt 🙂

    Reply
  107. Janice, I like the Regency high waist too – so forgiving for those of us who don’t have a waist, and yes, the long slim lines and soft fabrics are graceful. When I made my first Regency muslin dress I thought I might look silly as a plump middle-aged woman in white, but honestly it’s my favourite dress, and lovely to wear. I’ve never yet managed to get a proper Regency hair style with my hair, but I haven’t tried too hard, either! In Regency times some of those glued-in-place curls were, if not glued, actually hair pieces pinned in place, so Regency women sometimes resorted to artificial means to get the ‘look’. But I’ve never been entirely fashionable in any era, so I’m happy to be the comfortable, practical, aunt 🙂

    Reply
  108. Janice, I like the Regency high waist too – so forgiving for those of us who don’t have a waist, and yes, the long slim lines and soft fabrics are graceful. When I made my first Regency muslin dress I thought I might look silly as a plump middle-aged woman in white, but honestly it’s my favourite dress, and lovely to wear. I’ve never yet managed to get a proper Regency hair style with my hair, but I haven’t tried too hard, either! In Regency times some of those glued-in-place curls were, if not glued, actually hair pieces pinned in place, so Regency women sometimes resorted to artificial means to get the ‘look’. But I’ve never been entirely fashionable in any era, so I’m happy to be the comfortable, practical, aunt 🙂

    Reply
  109. Janice, I like the Regency high waist too – so forgiving for those of us who don’t have a waist, and yes, the long slim lines and soft fabrics are graceful. When I made my first Regency muslin dress I thought I might look silly as a plump middle-aged woman in white, but honestly it’s my favourite dress, and lovely to wear. I’ve never yet managed to get a proper Regency hair style with my hair, but I haven’t tried too hard, either! In Regency times some of those glued-in-place curls were, if not glued, actually hair pieces pinned in place, so Regency women sometimes resorted to artificial means to get the ‘look’. But I’ve never been entirely fashionable in any era, so I’m happy to be the comfortable, practical, aunt 🙂

    Reply
  110. Janice, I like the Regency high waist too – so forgiving for those of us who don’t have a waist, and yes, the long slim lines and soft fabrics are graceful. When I made my first Regency muslin dress I thought I might look silly as a plump middle-aged woman in white, but honestly it’s my favourite dress, and lovely to wear. I’ve never yet managed to get a proper Regency hair style with my hair, but I haven’t tried too hard, either! In Regency times some of those glued-in-place curls were, if not glued, actually hair pieces pinned in place, so Regency women sometimes resorted to artificial means to get the ‘look’. But I’ve never been entirely fashionable in any era, so I’m happy to be the comfortable, practical, aunt 🙂

    Reply
  111. Hi Joanne, unfortunately it’s not available at Big W as I self-published it. You can order a paperback through your local bookshop, Booktopia or Book Depository, or you can purchase a signed copy directly from me through my website, You can also ask your local library to order it in, although that might take a little while. It is available as an ebook through all the main platforms, too.

    Reply
  112. Hi Joanne, unfortunately it’s not available at Big W as I self-published it. You can order a paperback through your local bookshop, Booktopia or Book Depository, or you can purchase a signed copy directly from me through my website, You can also ask your local library to order it in, although that might take a little while. It is available as an ebook through all the main platforms, too.

    Reply
  113. Hi Joanne, unfortunately it’s not available at Big W as I self-published it. You can order a paperback through your local bookshop, Booktopia or Book Depository, or you can purchase a signed copy directly from me through my website, You can also ask your local library to order it in, although that might take a little while. It is available as an ebook through all the main platforms, too.

    Reply
  114. Hi Joanne, unfortunately it’s not available at Big W as I self-published it. You can order a paperback through your local bookshop, Booktopia or Book Depository, or you can purchase a signed copy directly from me through my website, You can also ask your local library to order it in, although that might take a little while. It is available as an ebook through all the main platforms, too.

    Reply
  115. Hi Joanne, unfortunately it’s not available at Big W as I self-published it. You can order a paperback through your local bookshop, Booktopia or Book Depository, or you can purchase a signed copy directly from me through my website, You can also ask your local library to order it in, although that might take a little while. It is available as an ebook through all the main platforms, too.

    Reply
  116. It’s been quite a while since I sat in on one of Bronwyn’s sessions but what I’ve seen I loved. Keep those books and outfits coming, Bronwyn.

    Reply
  117. It’s been quite a while since I sat in on one of Bronwyn’s sessions but what I’ve seen I loved. Keep those books and outfits coming, Bronwyn.

    Reply
  118. It’s been quite a while since I sat in on one of Bronwyn’s sessions but what I’ve seen I loved. Keep those books and outfits coming, Bronwyn.

    Reply
  119. It’s been quite a while since I sat in on one of Bronwyn’s sessions but what I’ve seen I loved. Keep those books and outfits coming, Bronwyn.

    Reply
  120. It’s been quite a while since I sat in on one of Bronwyn’s sessions but what I’ve seen I loved. Keep those books and outfits coming, Bronwyn.

    Reply
  121. What an interesting interview. Thank you Bronwyn and Anne. I’ve read The Clothier’s Daughter and the background information just adds to my understanding and enjoyment. I love the high waisted Regency style. It’s very flattering to all figures, I think.

    Reply
  122. What an interesting interview. Thank you Bronwyn and Anne. I’ve read The Clothier’s Daughter and the background information just adds to my understanding and enjoyment. I love the high waisted Regency style. It’s very flattering to all figures, I think.

    Reply
  123. What an interesting interview. Thank you Bronwyn and Anne. I’ve read The Clothier’s Daughter and the background information just adds to my understanding and enjoyment. I love the high waisted Regency style. It’s very flattering to all figures, I think.

    Reply
  124. What an interesting interview. Thank you Bronwyn and Anne. I’ve read The Clothier’s Daughter and the background information just adds to my understanding and enjoyment. I love the high waisted Regency style. It’s very flattering to all figures, I think.

    Reply
  125. What an interesting interview. Thank you Bronwyn and Anne. I’ve read The Clothier’s Daughter and the background information just adds to my understanding and enjoyment. I love the high waisted Regency style. It’s very flattering to all figures, I think.

    Reply
  126. There are two eras of fashions I enjoy. I like the Regency style of high-waisted flowing dresses and the Roaring 20s relaxed style of no corsets, chemises, and lightweight clothing of beautiful designs.
    The clothing you’re wearing is beautiful, Bronwyn. To be able to make the Regency style is astounding in its skill.

    Reply
  127. There are two eras of fashions I enjoy. I like the Regency style of high-waisted flowing dresses and the Roaring 20s relaxed style of no corsets, chemises, and lightweight clothing of beautiful designs.
    The clothing you’re wearing is beautiful, Bronwyn. To be able to make the Regency style is astounding in its skill.

    Reply
  128. There are two eras of fashions I enjoy. I like the Regency style of high-waisted flowing dresses and the Roaring 20s relaxed style of no corsets, chemises, and lightweight clothing of beautiful designs.
    The clothing you’re wearing is beautiful, Bronwyn. To be able to make the Regency style is astounding in its skill.

    Reply
  129. There are two eras of fashions I enjoy. I like the Regency style of high-waisted flowing dresses and the Roaring 20s relaxed style of no corsets, chemises, and lightweight clothing of beautiful designs.
    The clothing you’re wearing is beautiful, Bronwyn. To be able to make the Regency style is astounding in its skill.

    Reply
  130. There are two eras of fashions I enjoy. I like the Regency style of high-waisted flowing dresses and the Roaring 20s relaxed style of no corsets, chemises, and lightweight clothing of beautiful designs.
    The clothing you’re wearing is beautiful, Bronwyn. To be able to make the Regency style is astounding in its skill.

    Reply
  131. Hi Bronwyn
    What a fascinating interview and The Clothier’s Daughter sounds like a wonderful read. Congratulations. I adore Regency fashion but I think it would have been hard living through the winter in some of the fashions of the day. Have you made much in the way of Regency winter wear and do you have the secret to how the ladies of the day kept warm?

    Reply
  132. Hi Bronwyn
    What a fascinating interview and The Clothier’s Daughter sounds like a wonderful read. Congratulations. I adore Regency fashion but I think it would have been hard living through the winter in some of the fashions of the day. Have you made much in the way of Regency winter wear and do you have the secret to how the ladies of the day kept warm?

    Reply
  133. Hi Bronwyn
    What a fascinating interview and The Clothier’s Daughter sounds like a wonderful read. Congratulations. I adore Regency fashion but I think it would have been hard living through the winter in some of the fashions of the day. Have you made much in the way of Regency winter wear and do you have the secret to how the ladies of the day kept warm?

    Reply
  134. Hi Bronwyn
    What a fascinating interview and The Clothier’s Daughter sounds like a wonderful read. Congratulations. I adore Regency fashion but I think it would have been hard living through the winter in some of the fashions of the day. Have you made much in the way of Regency winter wear and do you have the secret to how the ladies of the day kept warm?

    Reply
  135. Hi Bronwyn
    What a fascinating interview and The Clothier’s Daughter sounds like a wonderful read. Congratulations. I adore Regency fashion but I think it would have been hard living through the winter in some of the fashions of the day. Have you made much in the way of Regency winter wear and do you have the secret to how the ladies of the day kept warm?

    Reply
  136. Hi Laura! I’m so glad you enjoyed The Clothier’s Daughter. I do think Regency can be quite flattering – even to those of us who are height-challenged! Perhaps next time we meet at a conference, I could bring an outfit to lend you 🙂

    Reply
  137. Hi Laura! I’m so glad you enjoyed The Clothier’s Daughter. I do think Regency can be quite flattering – even to those of us who are height-challenged! Perhaps next time we meet at a conference, I could bring an outfit to lend you 🙂

    Reply
  138. Hi Laura! I’m so glad you enjoyed The Clothier’s Daughter. I do think Regency can be quite flattering – even to those of us who are height-challenged! Perhaps next time we meet at a conference, I could bring an outfit to lend you 🙂

    Reply
  139. Hi Laura! I’m so glad you enjoyed The Clothier’s Daughter. I do think Regency can be quite flattering – even to those of us who are height-challenged! Perhaps next time we meet at a conference, I could bring an outfit to lend you 🙂

    Reply
  140. Hi Laura! I’m so glad you enjoyed The Clothier’s Daughter. I do think Regency can be quite flattering – even to those of us who are height-challenged! Perhaps next time we meet at a conference, I could bring an outfit to lend you 🙂

    Reply
  141. Patricia, than you for your kind words. Both Regency and the Roaring 20s are such fun, and there’s no need to have a waist! But even more than the 1920s, I like the late 19-teens – where one could have hips and a bust 🙂

    Reply
  142. Patricia, than you for your kind words. Both Regency and the Roaring 20s are such fun, and there’s no need to have a waist! But even more than the 1920s, I like the late 19-teens – where one could have hips and a bust 🙂

    Reply
  143. Patricia, than you for your kind words. Both Regency and the Roaring 20s are such fun, and there’s no need to have a waist! But even more than the 1920s, I like the late 19-teens – where one could have hips and a bust 🙂

    Reply
  144. Patricia, than you for your kind words. Both Regency and the Roaring 20s are such fun, and there’s no need to have a waist! But even more than the 1920s, I like the late 19-teens – where one could have hips and a bust 🙂

    Reply
  145. Patricia, than you for your kind words. Both Regency and the Roaring 20s are such fun, and there’s no need to have a waist! But even more than the 1920s, I like the late 19-teens – where one could have hips and a bust 🙂

    Reply
  146. Cathleen, I’ve made more Regency outfits than other eras because of the Jane Austen Festival, but I do love other eras as well. I’m fascinated bu social history and ordinary people’s – especially women’s – experiences. Perhaps a few of my female ancestors from different eras are floating around, whispering into my subconscious 🙂

    Reply
  147. Cathleen, I’ve made more Regency outfits than other eras because of the Jane Austen Festival, but I do love other eras as well. I’m fascinated bu social history and ordinary people’s – especially women’s – experiences. Perhaps a few of my female ancestors from different eras are floating around, whispering into my subconscious 🙂

    Reply
  148. Cathleen, I’ve made more Regency outfits than other eras because of the Jane Austen Festival, but I do love other eras as well. I’m fascinated bu social history and ordinary people’s – especially women’s – experiences. Perhaps a few of my female ancestors from different eras are floating around, whispering into my subconscious 🙂

    Reply
  149. Cathleen, I’ve made more Regency outfits than other eras because of the Jane Austen Festival, but I do love other eras as well. I’m fascinated bu social history and ordinary people’s – especially women’s – experiences. Perhaps a few of my female ancestors from different eras are floating around, whispering into my subconscious 🙂

    Reply
  150. Cathleen, I’ve made more Regency outfits than other eras because of the Jane Austen Festival, but I do love other eras as well. I’m fascinated bu social history and ordinary people’s – especially women’s – experiences. Perhaps a few of my female ancestors from different eras are floating around, whispering into my subconscious 🙂

    Reply
  151. Thanks, Jen! I think the secrets to Regency winters (and draughty mansions with high ceilings!) are wool, and layers. The fashion plates are full of delicate muslins, but in reality I think in winter at Pemberley, Mrs Darcy was most likely wearing wool stockings, several petticoats including a flannel one, and a dress of calamanco (it’s a wool satin) with a wool spencer, With a wool pelisse lined in silk when she went out for a bracing constutional! I haven’t made much winter Regency wear yet but I have a couple of projects on the sewing list. The real challenge is finding the right kinds of fabrics – and it takes too long to spin and weave it!

    Reply
  152. Thanks, Jen! I think the secrets to Regency winters (and draughty mansions with high ceilings!) are wool, and layers. The fashion plates are full of delicate muslins, but in reality I think in winter at Pemberley, Mrs Darcy was most likely wearing wool stockings, several petticoats including a flannel one, and a dress of calamanco (it’s a wool satin) with a wool spencer, With a wool pelisse lined in silk when she went out for a bracing constutional! I haven’t made much winter Regency wear yet but I have a couple of projects on the sewing list. The real challenge is finding the right kinds of fabrics – and it takes too long to spin and weave it!

    Reply
  153. Thanks, Jen! I think the secrets to Regency winters (and draughty mansions with high ceilings!) are wool, and layers. The fashion plates are full of delicate muslins, but in reality I think in winter at Pemberley, Mrs Darcy was most likely wearing wool stockings, several petticoats including a flannel one, and a dress of calamanco (it’s a wool satin) with a wool spencer, With a wool pelisse lined in silk when she went out for a bracing constutional! I haven’t made much winter Regency wear yet but I have a couple of projects on the sewing list. The real challenge is finding the right kinds of fabrics – and it takes too long to spin and weave it!

    Reply
  154. Thanks, Jen! I think the secrets to Regency winters (and draughty mansions with high ceilings!) are wool, and layers. The fashion plates are full of delicate muslins, but in reality I think in winter at Pemberley, Mrs Darcy was most likely wearing wool stockings, several petticoats including a flannel one, and a dress of calamanco (it’s a wool satin) with a wool spencer, With a wool pelisse lined in silk when she went out for a bracing constutional! I haven’t made much winter Regency wear yet but I have a couple of projects on the sewing list. The real challenge is finding the right kinds of fabrics – and it takes too long to spin and weave it!

    Reply
  155. Thanks, Jen! I think the secrets to Regency winters (and draughty mansions with high ceilings!) are wool, and layers. The fashion plates are full of delicate muslins, but in reality I think in winter at Pemberley, Mrs Darcy was most likely wearing wool stockings, several petticoats including a flannel one, and a dress of calamanco (it’s a wool satin) with a wool spencer, With a wool pelisse lined in silk when she went out for a bracing constutional! I haven’t made much winter Regency wear yet but I have a couple of projects on the sewing list. The real challenge is finding the right kinds of fabrics – and it takes too long to spin and weave it!

    Reply
  156. Hi Bronwyn, I’m sure the Regency era gowns were more comfortable to wear than the dresses of other eras, but those high waists don’t do anything for someone with an hourglass type figure like mine. I like the nipped in suit jackets of the 1940’s, and the shirtwaists of the 1950’s.
    Your new book sounds very intriguing!

    Reply
  157. Hi Bronwyn, I’m sure the Regency era gowns were more comfortable to wear than the dresses of other eras, but those high waists don’t do anything for someone with an hourglass type figure like mine. I like the nipped in suit jackets of the 1940’s, and the shirtwaists of the 1950’s.
    Your new book sounds very intriguing!

    Reply
  158. Hi Bronwyn, I’m sure the Regency era gowns were more comfortable to wear than the dresses of other eras, but those high waists don’t do anything for someone with an hourglass type figure like mine. I like the nipped in suit jackets of the 1940’s, and the shirtwaists of the 1950’s.
    Your new book sounds very intriguing!

    Reply
  159. Hi Bronwyn, I’m sure the Regency era gowns were more comfortable to wear than the dresses of other eras, but those high waists don’t do anything for someone with an hourglass type figure like mine. I like the nipped in suit jackets of the 1940’s, and the shirtwaists of the 1950’s.
    Your new book sounds very intriguing!

    Reply
  160. Hi Bronwyn, I’m sure the Regency era gowns were more comfortable to wear than the dresses of other eras, but those high waists don’t do anything for someone with an hourglass type figure like mine. I like the nipped in suit jackets of the 1940’s, and the shirtwaists of the 1950’s.
    Your new book sounds very intriguing!

    Reply
  161. Bronwyn, you’ve triggered so many thoughts! Walk down memory lane: I was a teen in the ’50s, when crinolines weren’t just a thing, they were THE thing, followed in the ’60s by the chemise dress and empire style. All felt “so fine,” compared to today’s amorphous styles. I feel your jeans-and-daydreams
    I wished here on the blog once for a novel about Australia when it was still Vandiemen’s Land, featuring a Regency miss who arrived there to escape a family threat back in England. (Still waiting, Wenches! ) What would such an immigrant’s life have been like then? Surely most arrived with not much more than the clothes on their backs, and even those would have been tattered by the time they tumbled off the ship. How did people make a life, and even thrive, back then?

    Reply
  162. Bronwyn, you’ve triggered so many thoughts! Walk down memory lane: I was a teen in the ’50s, when crinolines weren’t just a thing, they were THE thing, followed in the ’60s by the chemise dress and empire style. All felt “so fine,” compared to today’s amorphous styles. I feel your jeans-and-daydreams
    I wished here on the blog once for a novel about Australia when it was still Vandiemen’s Land, featuring a Regency miss who arrived there to escape a family threat back in England. (Still waiting, Wenches! ) What would such an immigrant’s life have been like then? Surely most arrived with not much more than the clothes on their backs, and even those would have been tattered by the time they tumbled off the ship. How did people make a life, and even thrive, back then?

    Reply
  163. Bronwyn, you’ve triggered so many thoughts! Walk down memory lane: I was a teen in the ’50s, when crinolines weren’t just a thing, they were THE thing, followed in the ’60s by the chemise dress and empire style. All felt “so fine,” compared to today’s amorphous styles. I feel your jeans-and-daydreams
    I wished here on the blog once for a novel about Australia when it was still Vandiemen’s Land, featuring a Regency miss who arrived there to escape a family threat back in England. (Still waiting, Wenches! ) What would such an immigrant’s life have been like then? Surely most arrived with not much more than the clothes on their backs, and even those would have been tattered by the time they tumbled off the ship. How did people make a life, and even thrive, back then?

    Reply
  164. Bronwyn, you’ve triggered so many thoughts! Walk down memory lane: I was a teen in the ’50s, when crinolines weren’t just a thing, they were THE thing, followed in the ’60s by the chemise dress and empire style. All felt “so fine,” compared to today’s amorphous styles. I feel your jeans-and-daydreams
    I wished here on the blog once for a novel about Australia when it was still Vandiemen’s Land, featuring a Regency miss who arrived there to escape a family threat back in England. (Still waiting, Wenches! ) What would such an immigrant’s life have been like then? Surely most arrived with not much more than the clothes on their backs, and even those would have been tattered by the time they tumbled off the ship. How did people make a life, and even thrive, back then?

    Reply
  165. Bronwyn, you’ve triggered so many thoughts! Walk down memory lane: I was a teen in the ’50s, when crinolines weren’t just a thing, they were THE thing, followed in the ’60s by the chemise dress and empire style. All felt “so fine,” compared to today’s amorphous styles. I feel your jeans-and-daydreams
    I wished here on the blog once for a novel about Australia when it was still Vandiemen’s Land, featuring a Regency miss who arrived there to escape a family threat back in England. (Still waiting, Wenches! ) What would such an immigrant’s life have been like then? Surely most arrived with not much more than the clothes on their backs, and even those would have been tattered by the time they tumbled off the ship. How did people make a life, and even thrive, back then?

    Reply
  166. Hi Karin, I do love the fashions with the nipped-in waists! I used to have one, a very long time ago 🙂 I find it interesting how at various times women used padding, not only corsets. to create the illusion of a smaller waist. And of course, there’s Victorian ‘photoshop’ – a technique used on glass photograph plates to make a woman’s waist smaller. Now, if only I could use it on my own waist 🙂

    Reply
  167. Hi Karin, I do love the fashions with the nipped-in waists! I used to have one, a very long time ago 🙂 I find it interesting how at various times women used padding, not only corsets. to create the illusion of a smaller waist. And of course, there’s Victorian ‘photoshop’ – a technique used on glass photograph plates to make a woman’s waist smaller. Now, if only I could use it on my own waist 🙂

    Reply
  168. Hi Karin, I do love the fashions with the nipped-in waists! I used to have one, a very long time ago 🙂 I find it interesting how at various times women used padding, not only corsets. to create the illusion of a smaller waist. And of course, there’s Victorian ‘photoshop’ – a technique used on glass photograph plates to make a woman’s waist smaller. Now, if only I could use it on my own waist 🙂

    Reply
  169. Hi Karin, I do love the fashions with the nipped-in waists! I used to have one, a very long time ago 🙂 I find it interesting how at various times women used padding, not only corsets. to create the illusion of a smaller waist. And of course, there’s Victorian ‘photoshop’ – a technique used on glass photograph plates to make a woman’s waist smaller. Now, if only I could use it on my own waist 🙂

    Reply
  170. Hi Karin, I do love the fashions with the nipped-in waists! I used to have one, a very long time ago 🙂 I find it interesting how at various times women used padding, not only corsets. to create the illusion of a smaller waist. And of course, there’s Victorian ‘photoshop’ – a technique used on glass photograph plates to make a woman’s waist smaller. Now, if only I could use it on my own waist 🙂

    Reply
  171. What an eye-opener.
    I adore handcrafts: I have sewn my own maternity clothes and made muultiple, distinctly different dresses from the same pattern. I embroider (mostly counted cross-stitch and needlepoint) and have tried various forms of braiding and hand weaving.
    I mention this because I have never considered the construction of clothes in novels. How could I have been so blind!
    I’m looking forward to exploring The Clothier’s daughter.

    Reply
  172. What an eye-opener.
    I adore handcrafts: I have sewn my own maternity clothes and made muultiple, distinctly different dresses from the same pattern. I embroider (mostly counted cross-stitch and needlepoint) and have tried various forms of braiding and hand weaving.
    I mention this because I have never considered the construction of clothes in novels. How could I have been so blind!
    I’m looking forward to exploring The Clothier’s daughter.

    Reply
  173. What an eye-opener.
    I adore handcrafts: I have sewn my own maternity clothes and made muultiple, distinctly different dresses from the same pattern. I embroider (mostly counted cross-stitch and needlepoint) and have tried various forms of braiding and hand weaving.
    I mention this because I have never considered the construction of clothes in novels. How could I have been so blind!
    I’m looking forward to exploring The Clothier’s daughter.

    Reply
  174. What an eye-opener.
    I adore handcrafts: I have sewn my own maternity clothes and made muultiple, distinctly different dresses from the same pattern. I embroider (mostly counted cross-stitch and needlepoint) and have tried various forms of braiding and hand weaving.
    I mention this because I have never considered the construction of clothes in novels. How could I have been so blind!
    I’m looking forward to exploring The Clothier’s daughter.

    Reply
  175. What an eye-opener.
    I adore handcrafts: I have sewn my own maternity clothes and made muultiple, distinctly different dresses from the same pattern. I embroider (mostly counted cross-stitch and needlepoint) and have tried various forms of braiding and hand weaving.
    I mention this because I have never considered the construction of clothes in novels. How could I have been so blind!
    I’m looking forward to exploring The Clothier’s daughter.

    Reply
  176. Hello Mary! We have a lovely green and white net crinoline from the 1950s in the museum – we’re not sure who owned it, but a like to imagine a young woman wearing it to some formal occasion in town, and feeling beautiful in it. I love that there’s a resurgence of vintage styles now, and many young women making and wearing them. Our historical society had it’s 60th birthday recently so I made a 1950s dress to wear to it – not an evening crinoline, though.
    Your wish for an Australian set Regency may well come true – although the one I’m writing is set in New South Wales, not Van Dieman’s Land, which is now Tasmania. I think it was a tough life for many, but after the first few years, there were opportunities and many did thrive – at least more than they might have back in the poorer areas of Britain. By 1817, New South Wales had a population of 30,000, and most of the conveniences of ‘modern’ life. But I suspect it was a tough life for women, out in the bush.

    Reply
  177. Hello Mary! We have a lovely green and white net crinoline from the 1950s in the museum – we’re not sure who owned it, but a like to imagine a young woman wearing it to some formal occasion in town, and feeling beautiful in it. I love that there’s a resurgence of vintage styles now, and many young women making and wearing them. Our historical society had it’s 60th birthday recently so I made a 1950s dress to wear to it – not an evening crinoline, though.
    Your wish for an Australian set Regency may well come true – although the one I’m writing is set in New South Wales, not Van Dieman’s Land, which is now Tasmania. I think it was a tough life for many, but after the first few years, there were opportunities and many did thrive – at least more than they might have back in the poorer areas of Britain. By 1817, New South Wales had a population of 30,000, and most of the conveniences of ‘modern’ life. But I suspect it was a tough life for women, out in the bush.

    Reply
  178. Hello Mary! We have a lovely green and white net crinoline from the 1950s in the museum – we’re not sure who owned it, but a like to imagine a young woman wearing it to some formal occasion in town, and feeling beautiful in it. I love that there’s a resurgence of vintage styles now, and many young women making and wearing them. Our historical society had it’s 60th birthday recently so I made a 1950s dress to wear to it – not an evening crinoline, though.
    Your wish for an Australian set Regency may well come true – although the one I’m writing is set in New South Wales, not Van Dieman’s Land, which is now Tasmania. I think it was a tough life for many, but after the first few years, there were opportunities and many did thrive – at least more than they might have back in the poorer areas of Britain. By 1817, New South Wales had a population of 30,000, and most of the conveniences of ‘modern’ life. But I suspect it was a tough life for women, out in the bush.

    Reply
  179. Hello Mary! We have a lovely green and white net crinoline from the 1950s in the museum – we’re not sure who owned it, but a like to imagine a young woman wearing it to some formal occasion in town, and feeling beautiful in it. I love that there’s a resurgence of vintage styles now, and many young women making and wearing them. Our historical society had it’s 60th birthday recently so I made a 1950s dress to wear to it – not an evening crinoline, though.
    Your wish for an Australian set Regency may well come true – although the one I’m writing is set in New South Wales, not Van Dieman’s Land, which is now Tasmania. I think it was a tough life for many, but after the first few years, there were opportunities and many did thrive – at least more than they might have back in the poorer areas of Britain. By 1817, New South Wales had a population of 30,000, and most of the conveniences of ‘modern’ life. But I suspect it was a tough life for women, out in the bush.

    Reply
  180. Hello Mary! We have a lovely green and white net crinoline from the 1950s in the museum – we’re not sure who owned it, but a like to imagine a young woman wearing it to some formal occasion in town, and feeling beautiful in it. I love that there’s a resurgence of vintage styles now, and many young women making and wearing them. Our historical society had it’s 60th birthday recently so I made a 1950s dress to wear to it – not an evening crinoline, though.
    Your wish for an Australian set Regency may well come true – although the one I’m writing is set in New South Wales, not Van Dieman’s Land, which is now Tasmania. I think it was a tough life for many, but after the first few years, there were opportunities and many did thrive – at least more than they might have back in the poorer areas of Britain. By 1817, New South Wales had a population of 30,000, and most of the conveniences of ‘modern’ life. But I suspect it was a tough life for women, out in the bush.

    Reply
  181. HI Sue, I think most of us don’t think about clothing details. We have a general idea of the shapes and styles, but until the internet it was hard to find the specialist information. For many years I just read and enjoyed imagining the pretty dresses and that was it. But knowing a bit more about construction and layers gives me lovely possibilities for books. Like the fact that Regency dresses were often fastened with straight pins. And a sharp pin can be a weapon 🙂

    Reply
  182. HI Sue, I think most of us don’t think about clothing details. We have a general idea of the shapes and styles, but until the internet it was hard to find the specialist information. For many years I just read and enjoyed imagining the pretty dresses and that was it. But knowing a bit more about construction and layers gives me lovely possibilities for books. Like the fact that Regency dresses were often fastened with straight pins. And a sharp pin can be a weapon 🙂

    Reply
  183. HI Sue, I think most of us don’t think about clothing details. We have a general idea of the shapes and styles, but until the internet it was hard to find the specialist information. For many years I just read and enjoyed imagining the pretty dresses and that was it. But knowing a bit more about construction and layers gives me lovely possibilities for books. Like the fact that Regency dresses were often fastened with straight pins. And a sharp pin can be a weapon 🙂

    Reply
  184. HI Sue, I think most of us don’t think about clothing details. We have a general idea of the shapes and styles, but until the internet it was hard to find the specialist information. For many years I just read and enjoyed imagining the pretty dresses and that was it. But knowing a bit more about construction and layers gives me lovely possibilities for books. Like the fact that Regency dresses were often fastened with straight pins. And a sharp pin can be a weapon 🙂

    Reply
  185. HI Sue, I think most of us don’t think about clothing details. We have a general idea of the shapes and styles, but until the internet it was hard to find the specialist information. For many years I just read and enjoyed imagining the pretty dresses and that was it. But knowing a bit more about construction and layers gives me lovely possibilities for books. Like the fact that Regency dresses were often fastened with straight pins. And a sharp pin can be a weapon 🙂

    Reply
  186. I do like the fashions of the Regency era. Certainly better than the Georgian or Victorian eras. But my favorite fashions are from pre-WWI, covering the time period from about 1890 to 1910. With the corsets that they had to wear, I’m sure they were uncomfortable but they look so elegant to me.
    Your book has gone on my TBR list. Best of luck with it!

    Reply
  187. I do like the fashions of the Regency era. Certainly better than the Georgian or Victorian eras. But my favorite fashions are from pre-WWI, covering the time period from about 1890 to 1910. With the corsets that they had to wear, I’m sure they were uncomfortable but they look so elegant to me.
    Your book has gone on my TBR list. Best of luck with it!

    Reply
  188. I do like the fashions of the Regency era. Certainly better than the Georgian or Victorian eras. But my favorite fashions are from pre-WWI, covering the time period from about 1890 to 1910. With the corsets that they had to wear, I’m sure they were uncomfortable but they look so elegant to me.
    Your book has gone on my TBR list. Best of luck with it!

    Reply
  189. I do like the fashions of the Regency era. Certainly better than the Georgian or Victorian eras. But my favorite fashions are from pre-WWI, covering the time period from about 1890 to 1910. With the corsets that they had to wear, I’m sure they were uncomfortable but they look so elegant to me.
    Your book has gone on my TBR list. Best of luck with it!

    Reply
  190. I do like the fashions of the Regency era. Certainly better than the Georgian or Victorian eras. But my favorite fashions are from pre-WWI, covering the time period from about 1890 to 1910. With the corsets that they had to wear, I’m sure they were uncomfortable but they look so elegant to me.
    Your book has gone on my TBR list. Best of luck with it!

    Reply
  191. I am really looking forward to reading The Clothier’s Daughter! I am always fascinated by period clothes in museums. What a wonderful occupation you have! I agree with many posts above saying that the high waisted gowns would definitely be more flattering to my curves!!😊 Thanks for a great blog post today!

    Reply
  192. I am really looking forward to reading The Clothier’s Daughter! I am always fascinated by period clothes in museums. What a wonderful occupation you have! I agree with many posts above saying that the high waisted gowns would definitely be more flattering to my curves!!😊 Thanks for a great blog post today!

    Reply
  193. I am really looking forward to reading The Clothier’s Daughter! I am always fascinated by period clothes in museums. What a wonderful occupation you have! I agree with many posts above saying that the high waisted gowns would definitely be more flattering to my curves!!😊 Thanks for a great blog post today!

    Reply
  194. I am really looking forward to reading The Clothier’s Daughter! I am always fascinated by period clothes in museums. What a wonderful occupation you have! I agree with many posts above saying that the high waisted gowns would definitely be more flattering to my curves!!😊 Thanks for a great blog post today!

    Reply
  195. I am really looking forward to reading The Clothier’s Daughter! I am always fascinated by period clothes in museums. What a wonderful occupation you have! I agree with many posts above saying that the high waisted gowns would definitely be more flattering to my curves!!😊 Thanks for a great blog post today!

    Reply
  196. Thanks for your good wishes, Mary, and I hope you enjoy the book!
    I do like the early Edwardian fashions – such elegance, and then there is the lovely artistic styles that came in around 1912/13. I haven’t yet tried a corset from that era, but I do have patterns for a 1905 s-bend corset, and a longer one from around 1912, and plans to make them hopefully this year. I’m defintiely not a long slim shape though so not sure I’ll get that beautiful smooth 1910 look! The main thing about corsets is having them well-fitted to one’s particular body, and not lacing too tight. And, of course, women were used to them.

    Reply
  197. Thanks for your good wishes, Mary, and I hope you enjoy the book!
    I do like the early Edwardian fashions – such elegance, and then there is the lovely artistic styles that came in around 1912/13. I haven’t yet tried a corset from that era, but I do have patterns for a 1905 s-bend corset, and a longer one from around 1912, and plans to make them hopefully this year. I’m defintiely not a long slim shape though so not sure I’ll get that beautiful smooth 1910 look! The main thing about corsets is having them well-fitted to one’s particular body, and not lacing too tight. And, of course, women were used to them.

    Reply
  198. Thanks for your good wishes, Mary, and I hope you enjoy the book!
    I do like the early Edwardian fashions – such elegance, and then there is the lovely artistic styles that came in around 1912/13. I haven’t yet tried a corset from that era, but I do have patterns for a 1905 s-bend corset, and a longer one from around 1912, and plans to make them hopefully this year. I’m defintiely not a long slim shape though so not sure I’ll get that beautiful smooth 1910 look! The main thing about corsets is having them well-fitted to one’s particular body, and not lacing too tight. And, of course, women were used to them.

    Reply
  199. Thanks for your good wishes, Mary, and I hope you enjoy the book!
    I do like the early Edwardian fashions – such elegance, and then there is the lovely artistic styles that came in around 1912/13. I haven’t yet tried a corset from that era, but I do have patterns for a 1905 s-bend corset, and a longer one from around 1912, and plans to make them hopefully this year. I’m defintiely not a long slim shape though so not sure I’ll get that beautiful smooth 1910 look! The main thing about corsets is having them well-fitted to one’s particular body, and not lacing too tight. And, of course, women were used to them.

    Reply
  200. Thanks for your good wishes, Mary, and I hope you enjoy the book!
    I do like the early Edwardian fashions – such elegance, and then there is the lovely artistic styles that came in around 1912/13. I haven’t yet tried a corset from that era, but I do have patterns for a 1905 s-bend corset, and a longer one from around 1912, and plans to make them hopefully this year. I’m defintiely not a long slim shape though so not sure I’ll get that beautiful smooth 1910 look! The main thing about corsets is having them well-fitted to one’s particular body, and not lacing too tight. And, of course, women were used to them.

    Reply
  201. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the blog post, Maryellen! Yes, I am very lucky to be able to volunteer in the museum; it’s added to my learning so much. The insides of clothes can be as revealing about history as the outsides of them.
    Regency dress can deifnitely be flattering for curvy figures- although it’s best with an uplifting bra or Regency stays – which are surprisingly comfortable.
    I hope you enjoy The Clothier’s Daughter!

    Reply
  202. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the blog post, Maryellen! Yes, I am very lucky to be able to volunteer in the museum; it’s added to my learning so much. The insides of clothes can be as revealing about history as the outsides of them.
    Regency dress can deifnitely be flattering for curvy figures- although it’s best with an uplifting bra or Regency stays – which are surprisingly comfortable.
    I hope you enjoy The Clothier’s Daughter!

    Reply
  203. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the blog post, Maryellen! Yes, I am very lucky to be able to volunteer in the museum; it’s added to my learning so much. The insides of clothes can be as revealing about history as the outsides of them.
    Regency dress can deifnitely be flattering for curvy figures- although it’s best with an uplifting bra or Regency stays – which are surprisingly comfortable.
    I hope you enjoy The Clothier’s Daughter!

    Reply
  204. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the blog post, Maryellen! Yes, I am very lucky to be able to volunteer in the museum; it’s added to my learning so much. The insides of clothes can be as revealing about history as the outsides of them.
    Regency dress can deifnitely be flattering for curvy figures- although it’s best with an uplifting bra or Regency stays – which are surprisingly comfortable.
    I hope you enjoy The Clothier’s Daughter!

    Reply
  205. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the blog post, Maryellen! Yes, I am very lucky to be able to volunteer in the museum; it’s added to my learning so much. The insides of clothes can be as revealing about history as the outsides of them.
    Regency dress can deifnitely be flattering for curvy figures- although it’s best with an uplifting bra or Regency stays – which are surprisingly comfortable.
    I hope you enjoy The Clothier’s Daughter!

    Reply
  206. The Clothier’s Daughter sounds captivating and memorable. I enjoyed your photos and the wonderful interview. The fashions from the flapper era, Edwardian era are attractive and unique.

    Reply
  207. The Clothier’s Daughter sounds captivating and memorable. I enjoyed your photos and the wonderful interview. The fashions from the flapper era, Edwardian era are attractive and unique.

    Reply
  208. The Clothier’s Daughter sounds captivating and memorable. I enjoyed your photos and the wonderful interview. The fashions from the flapper era, Edwardian era are attractive and unique.

    Reply
  209. The Clothier’s Daughter sounds captivating and memorable. I enjoyed your photos and the wonderful interview. The fashions from the flapper era, Edwardian era are attractive and unique.

    Reply
  210. The Clothier’s Daughter sounds captivating and memorable. I enjoyed your photos and the wonderful interview. The fashions from the flapper era, Edwardian era are attractive and unique.

    Reply
  211. I grew up with three brothers so was a tomboy for most of my young life. I never really got into fashion as such but being asked to choose would most definitely go for Regency. I love the high waist and think it flatters every figure.
    I also like the 1920’s style which is the complete opposite with it’s dropped waist. This style doesn’t suit everyone.
    Best of luck with the book.

    Reply
  212. I grew up with three brothers so was a tomboy for most of my young life. I never really got into fashion as such but being asked to choose would most definitely go for Regency. I love the high waist and think it flatters every figure.
    I also like the 1920’s style which is the complete opposite with it’s dropped waist. This style doesn’t suit everyone.
    Best of luck with the book.

    Reply
  213. I grew up with three brothers so was a tomboy for most of my young life. I never really got into fashion as such but being asked to choose would most definitely go for Regency. I love the high waist and think it flatters every figure.
    I also like the 1920’s style which is the complete opposite with it’s dropped waist. This style doesn’t suit everyone.
    Best of luck with the book.

    Reply
  214. I grew up with three brothers so was a tomboy for most of my young life. I never really got into fashion as such but being asked to choose would most definitely go for Regency. I love the high waist and think it flatters every figure.
    I also like the 1920’s style which is the complete opposite with it’s dropped waist. This style doesn’t suit everyone.
    Best of luck with the book.

    Reply
  215. I grew up with three brothers so was a tomboy for most of my young life. I never really got into fashion as such but being asked to choose would most definitely go for Regency. I love the high waist and think it flatters every figure.
    I also like the 1920’s style which is the complete opposite with it’s dropped waist. This style doesn’t suit everyone.
    Best of luck with the book.

    Reply
  216. Congratulations on this beautiful story. The Clothier’s Daughter would be a treasure. It was fascinating to read about your work. Growing up in the 1950’s was the best era ever. Women always dressed smartly and the cute suits with small jackets were so appealing. I love those styles, the dresses with the waistlines and the belts. They cared about styles and looked good even to go to the store.

    Reply
  217. Congratulations on this beautiful story. The Clothier’s Daughter would be a treasure. It was fascinating to read about your work. Growing up in the 1950’s was the best era ever. Women always dressed smartly and the cute suits with small jackets were so appealing. I love those styles, the dresses with the waistlines and the belts. They cared about styles and looked good even to go to the store.

    Reply
  218. Congratulations on this beautiful story. The Clothier’s Daughter would be a treasure. It was fascinating to read about your work. Growing up in the 1950’s was the best era ever. Women always dressed smartly and the cute suits with small jackets were so appealing. I love those styles, the dresses with the waistlines and the belts. They cared about styles and looked good even to go to the store.

    Reply
  219. Congratulations on this beautiful story. The Clothier’s Daughter would be a treasure. It was fascinating to read about your work. Growing up in the 1950’s was the best era ever. Women always dressed smartly and the cute suits with small jackets were so appealing. I love those styles, the dresses with the waistlines and the belts. They cared about styles and looked good even to go to the store.

    Reply
  220. Congratulations on this beautiful story. The Clothier’s Daughter would be a treasure. It was fascinating to read about your work. Growing up in the 1950’s was the best era ever. Women always dressed smartly and the cute suits with small jackets were so appealing. I love those styles, the dresses with the waistlines and the belts. They cared about styles and looked good even to go to the store.

    Reply
  221. I am fascinated with the craftmanhip of clothing made before machines were avialable. Making clothing all by hand would have been overwhelming to me. I can’t even imagine making such tiny stitches that the dresses didn’t fall apart. Then adding all of the laces, gems, petticoats and under shifts. Every time I read that a woman of the 16th nd 17th century speaks of getting cloth hand woven to make dresses or other types of clothing, I am in awe of their skills. I have read a lot about the Englsh aristocary of the 12th and 13th centuries. I like the descriptions and pictures of the clothing of that era.

    Reply
  222. I am fascinated with the craftmanhip of clothing made before machines were avialable. Making clothing all by hand would have been overwhelming to me. I can’t even imagine making such tiny stitches that the dresses didn’t fall apart. Then adding all of the laces, gems, petticoats and under shifts. Every time I read that a woman of the 16th nd 17th century speaks of getting cloth hand woven to make dresses or other types of clothing, I am in awe of their skills. I have read a lot about the Englsh aristocary of the 12th and 13th centuries. I like the descriptions and pictures of the clothing of that era.

    Reply
  223. I am fascinated with the craftmanhip of clothing made before machines were avialable. Making clothing all by hand would have been overwhelming to me. I can’t even imagine making such tiny stitches that the dresses didn’t fall apart. Then adding all of the laces, gems, petticoats and under shifts. Every time I read that a woman of the 16th nd 17th century speaks of getting cloth hand woven to make dresses or other types of clothing, I am in awe of their skills. I have read a lot about the Englsh aristocary of the 12th and 13th centuries. I like the descriptions and pictures of the clothing of that era.

    Reply
  224. I am fascinated with the craftmanhip of clothing made before machines were avialable. Making clothing all by hand would have been overwhelming to me. I can’t even imagine making such tiny stitches that the dresses didn’t fall apart. Then adding all of the laces, gems, petticoats and under shifts. Every time I read that a woman of the 16th nd 17th century speaks of getting cloth hand woven to make dresses or other types of clothing, I am in awe of their skills. I have read a lot about the Englsh aristocary of the 12th and 13th centuries. I like the descriptions and pictures of the clothing of that era.

    Reply
  225. I am fascinated with the craftmanhip of clothing made before machines were avialable. Making clothing all by hand would have been overwhelming to me. I can’t even imagine making such tiny stitches that the dresses didn’t fall apart. Then adding all of the laces, gems, petticoats and under shifts. Every time I read that a woman of the 16th nd 17th century speaks of getting cloth hand woven to make dresses or other types of clothing, I am in awe of their skills. I have read a lot about the Englsh aristocary of the 12th and 13th centuries. I like the descriptions and pictures of the clothing of that era.

    Reply
  226. Thank you so much for this introduction to a new to me author. The pictures are beautiful and the clothing is stunning. You have given me a new perspective.
    Again, thanks for this post.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  227. Thank you so much for this introduction to a new to me author. The pictures are beautiful and the clothing is stunning. You have given me a new perspective.
    Again, thanks for this post.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  228. Thank you so much for this introduction to a new to me author. The pictures are beautiful and the clothing is stunning. You have given me a new perspective.
    Again, thanks for this post.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  229. Thank you so much for this introduction to a new to me author. The pictures are beautiful and the clothing is stunning. You have given me a new perspective.
    Again, thanks for this post.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  230. Thank you so much for this introduction to a new to me author. The pictures are beautiful and the clothing is stunning. You have given me a new perspective.
    Again, thanks for this post.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  231. Fun interview, Bronwyn! Isn’t it interesting how fashion evolves and keeps coming around with little tweaks? I remember well in the mid to late 1960s the shift and the empire waist dresses. I loved them; so comfortable. I also remember my dad wasn’t as enthused. I think he liked seeing waistlines! As for me, I think the freeing fashions of the 1920s were attractive and fun.

    Reply
  232. Fun interview, Bronwyn! Isn’t it interesting how fashion evolves and keeps coming around with little tweaks? I remember well in the mid to late 1960s the shift and the empire waist dresses. I loved them; so comfortable. I also remember my dad wasn’t as enthused. I think he liked seeing waistlines! As for me, I think the freeing fashions of the 1920s were attractive and fun.

    Reply
  233. Fun interview, Bronwyn! Isn’t it interesting how fashion evolves and keeps coming around with little tweaks? I remember well in the mid to late 1960s the shift and the empire waist dresses. I loved them; so comfortable. I also remember my dad wasn’t as enthused. I think he liked seeing waistlines! As for me, I think the freeing fashions of the 1920s were attractive and fun.

    Reply
  234. Fun interview, Bronwyn! Isn’t it interesting how fashion evolves and keeps coming around with little tweaks? I remember well in the mid to late 1960s the shift and the empire waist dresses. I loved them; so comfortable. I also remember my dad wasn’t as enthused. I think he liked seeing waistlines! As for me, I think the freeing fashions of the 1920s were attractive and fun.

    Reply
  235. Fun interview, Bronwyn! Isn’t it interesting how fashion evolves and keeps coming around with little tweaks? I remember well in the mid to late 1960s the shift and the empire waist dresses. I loved them; so comfortable. I also remember my dad wasn’t as enthused. I think he liked seeing waistlines! As for me, I think the freeing fashions of the 1920s were attractive and fun.

    Reply
  236. What a fabulous post Ladies so very interesting and can highly recommend this new book from Bronwyn and I am eagerly awaiting the next one 🙂
    I do love the regency and the fashions from that ere
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  237. What a fabulous post Ladies so very interesting and can highly recommend this new book from Bronwyn and I am eagerly awaiting the next one 🙂
    I do love the regency and the fashions from that ere
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  238. What a fabulous post Ladies so very interesting and can highly recommend this new book from Bronwyn and I am eagerly awaiting the next one 🙂
    I do love the regency and the fashions from that ere
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  239. What a fabulous post Ladies so very interesting and can highly recommend this new book from Bronwyn and I am eagerly awaiting the next one 🙂
    I do love the regency and the fashions from that ere
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  240. What a fabulous post Ladies so very interesting and can highly recommend this new book from Bronwyn and I am eagerly awaiting the next one 🙂
    I do love the regency and the fashions from that ere
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  241. I love anything pre-industrial period because everything was unique, especially the clothing. I am in awe at the materials that survive for us to see the detail that went in to making a single garment. Then I read my regencies and see them ordering an entire wardrobe and wanting it within days!

    Reply
  242. I love anything pre-industrial period because everything was unique, especially the clothing. I am in awe at the materials that survive for us to see the detail that went in to making a single garment. Then I read my regencies and see them ordering an entire wardrobe and wanting it within days!

    Reply
  243. I love anything pre-industrial period because everything was unique, especially the clothing. I am in awe at the materials that survive for us to see the detail that went in to making a single garment. Then I read my regencies and see them ordering an entire wardrobe and wanting it within days!

    Reply
  244. I love anything pre-industrial period because everything was unique, especially the clothing. I am in awe at the materials that survive for us to see the detail that went in to making a single garment. Then I read my regencies and see them ordering an entire wardrobe and wanting it within days!

    Reply
  245. I love anything pre-industrial period because everything was unique, especially the clothing. I am in awe at the materials that survive for us to see the detail that went in to making a single garment. Then I read my regencies and see them ordering an entire wardrobe and wanting it within days!

    Reply
  246. A subject which interests me very much. The Clothier’s Daughter is fascinating. Since vintage, and fashion from the 50’s had a definite style that was classic and perfect. The dresses, bathing suits, and evening clothes were extraordinary. Best wishes and much success.

    Reply
  247. A subject which interests me very much. The Clothier’s Daughter is fascinating. Since vintage, and fashion from the 50’s had a definite style that was classic and perfect. The dresses, bathing suits, and evening clothes were extraordinary. Best wishes and much success.

    Reply
  248. A subject which interests me very much. The Clothier’s Daughter is fascinating. Since vintage, and fashion from the 50’s had a definite style that was classic and perfect. The dresses, bathing suits, and evening clothes were extraordinary. Best wishes and much success.

    Reply
  249. A subject which interests me very much. The Clothier’s Daughter is fascinating. Since vintage, and fashion from the 50’s had a definite style that was classic and perfect. The dresses, bathing suits, and evening clothes were extraordinary. Best wishes and much success.

    Reply
  250. A subject which interests me very much. The Clothier’s Daughter is fascinating. Since vintage, and fashion from the 50’s had a definite style that was classic and perfect. The dresses, bathing suits, and evening clothes were extraordinary. Best wishes and much success.

    Reply
  251. Thanks so much Anne and Bronwyn! Wow, so much Regency gorgeousness between you two, I love it. I confess I am fascinated by textiles, although know little about them. I remember stumbling into a clothing section in an art gallery in Edinburgh, and everyone was oohing and aahing about the art, and I got excited about a fragment of a rich red Elizabethan gown! (And about the art too, but, wow…) Because I crossstitch, and it takes months to do one small project, I totally appreciate how immense a project it is to sew anything by hand, let alone the beautiful gowns, shirts and underclothing you’re talking about Bronwyn. Such detail! Fabulous post, and I also thoroughly enjoyed your book. Thankyou both.

    Reply
  252. Thanks so much Anne and Bronwyn! Wow, so much Regency gorgeousness between you two, I love it. I confess I am fascinated by textiles, although know little about them. I remember stumbling into a clothing section in an art gallery in Edinburgh, and everyone was oohing and aahing about the art, and I got excited about a fragment of a rich red Elizabethan gown! (And about the art too, but, wow…) Because I crossstitch, and it takes months to do one small project, I totally appreciate how immense a project it is to sew anything by hand, let alone the beautiful gowns, shirts and underclothing you’re talking about Bronwyn. Such detail! Fabulous post, and I also thoroughly enjoyed your book. Thankyou both.

    Reply
  253. Thanks so much Anne and Bronwyn! Wow, so much Regency gorgeousness between you two, I love it. I confess I am fascinated by textiles, although know little about them. I remember stumbling into a clothing section in an art gallery in Edinburgh, and everyone was oohing and aahing about the art, and I got excited about a fragment of a rich red Elizabethan gown! (And about the art too, but, wow…) Because I crossstitch, and it takes months to do one small project, I totally appreciate how immense a project it is to sew anything by hand, let alone the beautiful gowns, shirts and underclothing you’re talking about Bronwyn. Such detail! Fabulous post, and I also thoroughly enjoyed your book. Thankyou both.

    Reply
  254. Thanks so much Anne and Bronwyn! Wow, so much Regency gorgeousness between you two, I love it. I confess I am fascinated by textiles, although know little about them. I remember stumbling into a clothing section in an art gallery in Edinburgh, and everyone was oohing and aahing about the art, and I got excited about a fragment of a rich red Elizabethan gown! (And about the art too, but, wow…) Because I crossstitch, and it takes months to do one small project, I totally appreciate how immense a project it is to sew anything by hand, let alone the beautiful gowns, shirts and underclothing you’re talking about Bronwyn. Such detail! Fabulous post, and I also thoroughly enjoyed your book. Thankyou both.

    Reply
  255. Thanks so much Anne and Bronwyn! Wow, so much Regency gorgeousness between you two, I love it. I confess I am fascinated by textiles, although know little about them. I remember stumbling into a clothing section in an art gallery in Edinburgh, and everyone was oohing and aahing about the art, and I got excited about a fragment of a rich red Elizabethan gown! (And about the art too, but, wow…) Because I crossstitch, and it takes months to do one small project, I totally appreciate how immense a project it is to sew anything by hand, let alone the beautiful gowns, shirts and underclothing you’re talking about Bronwyn. Such detail! Fabulous post, and I also thoroughly enjoyed your book. Thankyou both.

    Reply
  256. Oooh! I cannot wait to read this, it sounds absolutely fascinating. I really do enjoy books that push the boundaries and gently teach us more about the era in which they are set.

    Reply
  257. Oooh! I cannot wait to read this, it sounds absolutely fascinating. I really do enjoy books that push the boundaries and gently teach us more about the era in which they are set.

    Reply
  258. Oooh! I cannot wait to read this, it sounds absolutely fascinating. I really do enjoy books that push the boundaries and gently teach us more about the era in which they are set.

    Reply
  259. Oooh! I cannot wait to read this, it sounds absolutely fascinating. I really do enjoy books that push the boundaries and gently teach us more about the era in which they are set.

    Reply
  260. Oooh! I cannot wait to read this, it sounds absolutely fascinating. I really do enjoy books that push the boundaries and gently teach us more about the era in which they are set.

    Reply
  261. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the interview, April. The flapper era fashions are such fun, and Edwardian so graceful. I have photos of my grandmother (born 1890) in both – I often wonder what she thought of changing fashion!

    Reply
  262. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the interview, April. The flapper era fashions are such fun, and Edwardian so graceful. I have photos of my grandmother (born 1890) in both – I often wonder what she thought of changing fashion!

    Reply
  263. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the interview, April. The flapper era fashions are such fun, and Edwardian so graceful. I have photos of my grandmother (born 1890) in both – I often wonder what she thought of changing fashion!

    Reply
  264. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the interview, April. The flapper era fashions are such fun, and Edwardian so graceful. I have photos of my grandmother (born 1890) in both – I often wonder what she thought of changing fashion!

    Reply
  265. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the interview, April. The flapper era fashions are such fun, and Edwardian so graceful. I have photos of my grandmother (born 1890) in both – I often wonder what she thought of changing fashion!

    Reply
  266. Teresa, I’ve never been much into current fashions – I know far more about the fashions for 1820 and 1920 than I do about 2020! I’m mostly oblivious to modern fashions and only tend to notice trends about 2 years after they’ve happened 🙂 The Regency high waist is flattering and comfortable to wear. The 1920s dropped waist is a tad more challenging for some figures, but as I’ve been experimenting with it I’m discovering that there seem to be some fitting approaches that make it better for plumper figures, and there are certainly some great photos of the era of ‘mature’ figures looking lovely in 1920s. So there are possibilities!

    Reply
  267. Teresa, I’ve never been much into current fashions – I know far more about the fashions for 1820 and 1920 than I do about 2020! I’m mostly oblivious to modern fashions and only tend to notice trends about 2 years after they’ve happened 🙂 The Regency high waist is flattering and comfortable to wear. The 1920s dropped waist is a tad more challenging for some figures, but as I’ve been experimenting with it I’m discovering that there seem to be some fitting approaches that make it better for plumper figures, and there are certainly some great photos of the era of ‘mature’ figures looking lovely in 1920s. So there are possibilities!

    Reply
  268. Teresa, I’ve never been much into current fashions – I know far more about the fashions for 1820 and 1920 than I do about 2020! I’m mostly oblivious to modern fashions and only tend to notice trends about 2 years after they’ve happened 🙂 The Regency high waist is flattering and comfortable to wear. The 1920s dropped waist is a tad more challenging for some figures, but as I’ve been experimenting with it I’m discovering that there seem to be some fitting approaches that make it better for plumper figures, and there are certainly some great photos of the era of ‘mature’ figures looking lovely in 1920s. So there are possibilities!

    Reply
  269. Teresa, I’ve never been much into current fashions – I know far more about the fashions for 1820 and 1920 than I do about 2020! I’m mostly oblivious to modern fashions and only tend to notice trends about 2 years after they’ve happened 🙂 The Regency high waist is flattering and comfortable to wear. The 1920s dropped waist is a tad more challenging for some figures, but as I’ve been experimenting with it I’m discovering that there seem to be some fitting approaches that make it better for plumper figures, and there are certainly some great photos of the era of ‘mature’ figures looking lovely in 1920s. So there are possibilities!

    Reply
  270. Teresa, I’ve never been much into current fashions – I know far more about the fashions for 1820 and 1920 than I do about 2020! I’m mostly oblivious to modern fashions and only tend to notice trends about 2 years after they’ve happened 🙂 The Regency high waist is flattering and comfortable to wear. The 1920s dropped waist is a tad more challenging for some figures, but as I’ve been experimenting with it I’m discovering that there seem to be some fitting approaches that make it better for plumper figures, and there are certainly some great photos of the era of ‘mature’ figures looking lovely in 1920s. So there are possibilities!

    Reply
  271. I do love the 1950s, Sharon! I’ve made a couple of 1950s-inspired dresses for my ‘modern’ wardrobe. I love that there’s a strong vintage sewing movement now and many young women are sewing and wearing 1940s and 1950s dresses, so there are patterns and inspiration aplenty. I had a lovely treat last year – one of the ladies who volunteers at the museum, who had just celebrated her 60th wedding anniversary, showed me her trousseau, most of which she had kept in perfect condition. She was a very stylish young lady and the dresses and nightdresses were just so gorgeous. (And she still dresses beautifully, even for our museum work days!)

    Reply
  272. I do love the 1950s, Sharon! I’ve made a couple of 1950s-inspired dresses for my ‘modern’ wardrobe. I love that there’s a strong vintage sewing movement now and many young women are sewing and wearing 1940s and 1950s dresses, so there are patterns and inspiration aplenty. I had a lovely treat last year – one of the ladies who volunteers at the museum, who had just celebrated her 60th wedding anniversary, showed me her trousseau, most of which she had kept in perfect condition. She was a very stylish young lady and the dresses and nightdresses were just so gorgeous. (And she still dresses beautifully, even for our museum work days!)

    Reply
  273. I do love the 1950s, Sharon! I’ve made a couple of 1950s-inspired dresses for my ‘modern’ wardrobe. I love that there’s a strong vintage sewing movement now and many young women are sewing and wearing 1940s and 1950s dresses, so there are patterns and inspiration aplenty. I had a lovely treat last year – one of the ladies who volunteers at the museum, who had just celebrated her 60th wedding anniversary, showed me her trousseau, most of which she had kept in perfect condition. She was a very stylish young lady and the dresses and nightdresses were just so gorgeous. (And she still dresses beautifully, even for our museum work days!)

    Reply
  274. I do love the 1950s, Sharon! I’ve made a couple of 1950s-inspired dresses for my ‘modern’ wardrobe. I love that there’s a strong vintage sewing movement now and many young women are sewing and wearing 1940s and 1950s dresses, so there are patterns and inspiration aplenty. I had a lovely treat last year – one of the ladies who volunteers at the museum, who had just celebrated her 60th wedding anniversary, showed me her trousseau, most of which she had kept in perfect condition. She was a very stylish young lady and the dresses and nightdresses were just so gorgeous. (And she still dresses beautifully, even for our museum work days!)

    Reply
  275. I do love the 1950s, Sharon! I’ve made a couple of 1950s-inspired dresses for my ‘modern’ wardrobe. I love that there’s a strong vintage sewing movement now and many young women are sewing and wearing 1940s and 1950s dresses, so there are patterns and inspiration aplenty. I had a lovely treat last year – one of the ladies who volunteers at the museum, who had just celebrated her 60th wedding anniversary, showed me her trousseau, most of which she had kept in perfect condition. She was a very stylish young lady and the dresses and nightdresses were just so gorgeous. (And she still dresses beautifully, even for our museum work days!)

    Reply
  276. MaryJane, one of the things I’ve found fascinating is that there are many approaches to hand-sewing in the pre-machine era that are actually quite quick – like a technique to sew an enclosed seam with no raw edges, with just one row of stitching. I’ve also learned that stitches weren’t always teenty-tiny, and that they can be just as strong as machine-sewing. I’ve been wearing my hand-stitched linen chemises to bed for the last 12 months or more. I’m a restless sleeper and they’re frequently washed, and they hold of perfectly fine!
    The fashions of 12th and 13th centuries are just lovely, and fascinating in fabric and cut. Another era on my list to explore in more detail, someday!

    Reply
  277. MaryJane, one of the things I’ve found fascinating is that there are many approaches to hand-sewing in the pre-machine era that are actually quite quick – like a technique to sew an enclosed seam with no raw edges, with just one row of stitching. I’ve also learned that stitches weren’t always teenty-tiny, and that they can be just as strong as machine-sewing. I’ve been wearing my hand-stitched linen chemises to bed for the last 12 months or more. I’m a restless sleeper and they’re frequently washed, and they hold of perfectly fine!
    The fashions of 12th and 13th centuries are just lovely, and fascinating in fabric and cut. Another era on my list to explore in more detail, someday!

    Reply
  278. MaryJane, one of the things I’ve found fascinating is that there are many approaches to hand-sewing in the pre-machine era that are actually quite quick – like a technique to sew an enclosed seam with no raw edges, with just one row of stitching. I’ve also learned that stitches weren’t always teenty-tiny, and that they can be just as strong as machine-sewing. I’ve been wearing my hand-stitched linen chemises to bed for the last 12 months or more. I’m a restless sleeper and they’re frequently washed, and they hold of perfectly fine!
    The fashions of 12th and 13th centuries are just lovely, and fascinating in fabric and cut. Another era on my list to explore in more detail, someday!

    Reply
  279. MaryJane, one of the things I’ve found fascinating is that there are many approaches to hand-sewing in the pre-machine era that are actually quite quick – like a technique to sew an enclosed seam with no raw edges, with just one row of stitching. I’ve also learned that stitches weren’t always teenty-tiny, and that they can be just as strong as machine-sewing. I’ve been wearing my hand-stitched linen chemises to bed for the last 12 months or more. I’m a restless sleeper and they’re frequently washed, and they hold of perfectly fine!
    The fashions of 12th and 13th centuries are just lovely, and fascinating in fabric and cut. Another era on my list to explore in more detail, someday!

    Reply
  280. MaryJane, one of the things I’ve found fascinating is that there are many approaches to hand-sewing in the pre-machine era that are actually quite quick – like a technique to sew an enclosed seam with no raw edges, with just one row of stitching. I’ve also learned that stitches weren’t always teenty-tiny, and that they can be just as strong as machine-sewing. I’ve been wearing my hand-stitched linen chemises to bed for the last 12 months or more. I’m a restless sleeper and they’re frequently washed, and they hold of perfectly fine!
    The fashions of 12th and 13th centuries are just lovely, and fascinating in fabric and cut. Another era on my list to explore in more detail, someday!

    Reply
  281. Hi Pat, the cycles of fashion are fascinating! I did love the Laura Ashley styles of the 1970s, and the fabrics. They were so romantic and perfect for my dreamy soul. Even more than the 1920s for freeing fashion I like the 19-teens, from 1915-1920. No need for the slim androgynous later 1920s figure; the fashions of the WW1 war years were very practical and comfortable, with limited body-shaping corsetry. And they had pockets!! But the later 1920s fashions were definitely fun 🙂

    Reply
  282. Hi Pat, the cycles of fashion are fascinating! I did love the Laura Ashley styles of the 1970s, and the fabrics. They were so romantic and perfect for my dreamy soul. Even more than the 1920s for freeing fashion I like the 19-teens, from 1915-1920. No need for the slim androgynous later 1920s figure; the fashions of the WW1 war years were very practical and comfortable, with limited body-shaping corsetry. And they had pockets!! But the later 1920s fashions were definitely fun 🙂

    Reply
  283. Hi Pat, the cycles of fashion are fascinating! I did love the Laura Ashley styles of the 1970s, and the fabrics. They were so romantic and perfect for my dreamy soul. Even more than the 1920s for freeing fashion I like the 19-teens, from 1915-1920. No need for the slim androgynous later 1920s figure; the fashions of the WW1 war years were very practical and comfortable, with limited body-shaping corsetry. And they had pockets!! But the later 1920s fashions were definitely fun 🙂

    Reply
  284. Hi Pat, the cycles of fashion are fascinating! I did love the Laura Ashley styles of the 1970s, and the fabrics. They were so romantic and perfect for my dreamy soul. Even more than the 1920s for freeing fashion I like the 19-teens, from 1915-1920. No need for the slim androgynous later 1920s figure; the fashions of the WW1 war years were very practical and comfortable, with limited body-shaping corsetry. And they had pockets!! But the later 1920s fashions were definitely fun 🙂

    Reply
  285. Hi Pat, the cycles of fashion are fascinating! I did love the Laura Ashley styles of the 1970s, and the fabrics. They were so romantic and perfect for my dreamy soul. Even more than the 1920s for freeing fashion I like the 19-teens, from 1915-1920. No need for the slim androgynous later 1920s figure; the fashions of the WW1 war years were very practical and comfortable, with limited body-shaping corsetry. And they had pockets!! But the later 1920s fashions were definitely fun 🙂

    Reply
  286. It is fascinating to see the details of pre-industrial fashion, and I’m so lucky to be able to examine surviving clothes. They’re not always neat inside! And I agree about the speed of sewing, although it’s the trimmings that take the most time. I think a skilled seamstress, working solidly from dawn into the night, could make a basic Regency dress in a day, if she has to then add 15 yards of gathered frills, she’ll be stitching for at least another very long day. And then there’s undergarments, petticoats, spencers… I’m glad I’m not a Regency seamstress trying to make a living!

    Reply
  287. It is fascinating to see the details of pre-industrial fashion, and I’m so lucky to be able to examine surviving clothes. They’re not always neat inside! And I agree about the speed of sewing, although it’s the trimmings that take the most time. I think a skilled seamstress, working solidly from dawn into the night, could make a basic Regency dress in a day, if she has to then add 15 yards of gathered frills, she’ll be stitching for at least another very long day. And then there’s undergarments, petticoats, spencers… I’m glad I’m not a Regency seamstress trying to make a living!

    Reply
  288. It is fascinating to see the details of pre-industrial fashion, and I’m so lucky to be able to examine surviving clothes. They’re not always neat inside! And I agree about the speed of sewing, although it’s the trimmings that take the most time. I think a skilled seamstress, working solidly from dawn into the night, could make a basic Regency dress in a day, if she has to then add 15 yards of gathered frills, she’ll be stitching for at least another very long day. And then there’s undergarments, petticoats, spencers… I’m glad I’m not a Regency seamstress trying to make a living!

    Reply
  289. It is fascinating to see the details of pre-industrial fashion, and I’m so lucky to be able to examine surviving clothes. They’re not always neat inside! And I agree about the speed of sewing, although it’s the trimmings that take the most time. I think a skilled seamstress, working solidly from dawn into the night, could make a basic Regency dress in a day, if she has to then add 15 yards of gathered frills, she’ll be stitching for at least another very long day. And then there’s undergarments, petticoats, spencers… I’m glad I’m not a Regency seamstress trying to make a living!

    Reply
  290. It is fascinating to see the details of pre-industrial fashion, and I’m so lucky to be able to examine surviving clothes. They’re not always neat inside! And I agree about the speed of sewing, although it’s the trimmings that take the most time. I think a skilled seamstress, working solidly from dawn into the night, could make a basic Regency dress in a day, if she has to then add 15 yards of gathered frills, she’ll be stitching for at least another very long day. And then there’s undergarments, petticoats, spencers… I’m glad I’m not a Regency seamstress trying to make a living!

    Reply
  291. Hi Laini, Thank you for your good wishes. 1950s fashion is gorgeous, and looked wonderful on so many women. I like the 1940s, too. I have a couple of items of my mother’s from the late 1940s – a patchwork skirt that she bought with her very first pay cheque when she started work. She was still wearing that skirt in the 1970s, so I always associate it with happy memories. I also have an olive green suit that her mother made for her in the late 40s; it’s a beautiful quality, and again Mum wore it for several decades – my mother not being a person who paid any attention to being ‘fashionable’. Her clothes lasted ages!

    Reply
  292. Hi Laini, Thank you for your good wishes. 1950s fashion is gorgeous, and looked wonderful on so many women. I like the 1940s, too. I have a couple of items of my mother’s from the late 1940s – a patchwork skirt that she bought with her very first pay cheque when she started work. She was still wearing that skirt in the 1970s, so I always associate it with happy memories. I also have an olive green suit that her mother made for her in the late 40s; it’s a beautiful quality, and again Mum wore it for several decades – my mother not being a person who paid any attention to being ‘fashionable’. Her clothes lasted ages!

    Reply
  293. Hi Laini, Thank you for your good wishes. 1950s fashion is gorgeous, and looked wonderful on so many women. I like the 1940s, too. I have a couple of items of my mother’s from the late 1940s – a patchwork skirt that she bought with her very first pay cheque when she started work. She was still wearing that skirt in the 1970s, so I always associate it with happy memories. I also have an olive green suit that her mother made for her in the late 40s; it’s a beautiful quality, and again Mum wore it for several decades – my mother not being a person who paid any attention to being ‘fashionable’. Her clothes lasted ages!

    Reply
  294. Hi Laini, Thank you for your good wishes. 1950s fashion is gorgeous, and looked wonderful on so many women. I like the 1940s, too. I have a couple of items of my mother’s from the late 1940s – a patchwork skirt that she bought with her very first pay cheque when she started work. She was still wearing that skirt in the 1970s, so I always associate it with happy memories. I also have an olive green suit that her mother made for her in the late 40s; it’s a beautiful quality, and again Mum wore it for several decades – my mother not being a person who paid any attention to being ‘fashionable’. Her clothes lasted ages!

    Reply
  295. Hi Laini, Thank you for your good wishes. 1950s fashion is gorgeous, and looked wonderful on so many women. I like the 1940s, too. I have a couple of items of my mother’s from the late 1940s – a patchwork skirt that she bought with her very first pay cheque when she started work. She was still wearing that skirt in the 1970s, so I always associate it with happy memories. I also have an olive green suit that her mother made for her in the late 40s; it’s a beautiful quality, and again Mum wore it for several decades – my mother not being a person who paid any attention to being ‘fashionable’. Her clothes lasted ages!

    Reply
  296. Hi Malvina, that’s me in art galleries – zooming straight to the textiles! Although I do love good portraits with clothing details.
    Cross-stitch is so lovely, but yes it does take time. I’ve done a reasonable amount over the years but I confess to a fair number of unfinished projects; if I didn’t have to sleep I could do more things! Hand-stitching clothes takes time, too, but as a lot of it is simple stitching and long seams it doesn’t take as much concentration and close-work as embroidery. It’s the trimmings, with narrow hems and gathers that take the most time. I’m lucky though that I do it for fun, and usually don’t have deadlines. Every time I see an extant gown with heaps of frills or flounces I feel for the seamstresses!

    Reply
  297. Hi Malvina, that’s me in art galleries – zooming straight to the textiles! Although I do love good portraits with clothing details.
    Cross-stitch is so lovely, but yes it does take time. I’ve done a reasonable amount over the years but I confess to a fair number of unfinished projects; if I didn’t have to sleep I could do more things! Hand-stitching clothes takes time, too, but as a lot of it is simple stitching and long seams it doesn’t take as much concentration and close-work as embroidery. It’s the trimmings, with narrow hems and gathers that take the most time. I’m lucky though that I do it for fun, and usually don’t have deadlines. Every time I see an extant gown with heaps of frills or flounces I feel for the seamstresses!

    Reply
  298. Hi Malvina, that’s me in art galleries – zooming straight to the textiles! Although I do love good portraits with clothing details.
    Cross-stitch is so lovely, but yes it does take time. I’ve done a reasonable amount over the years but I confess to a fair number of unfinished projects; if I didn’t have to sleep I could do more things! Hand-stitching clothes takes time, too, but as a lot of it is simple stitching and long seams it doesn’t take as much concentration and close-work as embroidery. It’s the trimmings, with narrow hems and gathers that take the most time. I’m lucky though that I do it for fun, and usually don’t have deadlines. Every time I see an extant gown with heaps of frills or flounces I feel for the seamstresses!

    Reply
  299. Hi Malvina, that’s me in art galleries – zooming straight to the textiles! Although I do love good portraits with clothing details.
    Cross-stitch is so lovely, but yes it does take time. I’ve done a reasonable amount over the years but I confess to a fair number of unfinished projects; if I didn’t have to sleep I could do more things! Hand-stitching clothes takes time, too, but as a lot of it is simple stitching and long seams it doesn’t take as much concentration and close-work as embroidery. It’s the trimmings, with narrow hems and gathers that take the most time. I’m lucky though that I do it for fun, and usually don’t have deadlines. Every time I see an extant gown with heaps of frills or flounces I feel for the seamstresses!

    Reply
  300. Hi Malvina, that’s me in art galleries – zooming straight to the textiles! Although I do love good portraits with clothing details.
    Cross-stitch is so lovely, but yes it does take time. I’ve done a reasonable amount over the years but I confess to a fair number of unfinished projects; if I didn’t have to sleep I could do more things! Hand-stitching clothes takes time, too, but as a lot of it is simple stitching and long seams it doesn’t take as much concentration and close-work as embroidery. It’s the trimmings, with narrow hems and gathers that take the most time. I’m lucky though that I do it for fun, and usually don’t have deadlines. Every time I see an extant gown with heaps of frills or flounces I feel for the seamstresses!

    Reply
  301. I was rewatching the Sense and Sensibility BBC version from 2008, the one with David Morrissey as Col. Brandon the other night. There’s a marvelous example of the glued down hairstyle I dislike in it – Claire Skinner as the wealthy and greedy Fanny Dashwood is stuck with it. It looks like it would take hours to do and wouldn’t move in a hurricane. I much prefer the more natural hairstyles that Charity Wakefield (Marianne) and Hattie Morahan (Elinor) wore.

    Reply
  302. I was rewatching the Sense and Sensibility BBC version from 2008, the one with David Morrissey as Col. Brandon the other night. There’s a marvelous example of the glued down hairstyle I dislike in it – Claire Skinner as the wealthy and greedy Fanny Dashwood is stuck with it. It looks like it would take hours to do and wouldn’t move in a hurricane. I much prefer the more natural hairstyles that Charity Wakefield (Marianne) and Hattie Morahan (Elinor) wore.

    Reply
  303. I was rewatching the Sense and Sensibility BBC version from 2008, the one with David Morrissey as Col. Brandon the other night. There’s a marvelous example of the glued down hairstyle I dislike in it – Claire Skinner as the wealthy and greedy Fanny Dashwood is stuck with it. It looks like it would take hours to do and wouldn’t move in a hurricane. I much prefer the more natural hairstyles that Charity Wakefield (Marianne) and Hattie Morahan (Elinor) wore.

    Reply
  304. I was rewatching the Sense and Sensibility BBC version from 2008, the one with David Morrissey as Col. Brandon the other night. There’s a marvelous example of the glued down hairstyle I dislike in it – Claire Skinner as the wealthy and greedy Fanny Dashwood is stuck with it. It looks like it would take hours to do and wouldn’t move in a hurricane. I much prefer the more natural hairstyles that Charity Wakefield (Marianne) and Hattie Morahan (Elinor) wore.

    Reply
  305. I was rewatching the Sense and Sensibility BBC version from 2008, the one with David Morrissey as Col. Brandon the other night. There’s a marvelous example of the glued down hairstyle I dislike in it – Claire Skinner as the wealthy and greedy Fanny Dashwood is stuck with it. It looks like it would take hours to do and wouldn’t move in a hurricane. I much prefer the more natural hairstyles that Charity Wakefield (Marianne) and Hattie Morahan (Elinor) wore.

    Reply
  306. Very interesting interview and an introduction to a new author for me. In all the books of this era that I have read, I am always amazed at the dressmakers who are asked to put together a wardrobe in a short time. I never liked sewing clothes or getting dressed up. All the material needed for just one ball gown seems too much and too costly. But then the wealthy needed to show their worth in clothes. I enjoy reading about the clothes and all the layers they wore back then. Here I sit in isolation with my sweat suit on (as it is chilly out there still) and I feel great that I do not have to dress like the characters in the books I am getting to read with all this time.
    I also enjoyed all the comments, questions and answers. I am not much into fashion but this was interesting.
    Thank you – stay healthy everyone.

    Reply
  307. Very interesting interview and an introduction to a new author for me. In all the books of this era that I have read, I am always amazed at the dressmakers who are asked to put together a wardrobe in a short time. I never liked sewing clothes or getting dressed up. All the material needed for just one ball gown seems too much and too costly. But then the wealthy needed to show their worth in clothes. I enjoy reading about the clothes and all the layers they wore back then. Here I sit in isolation with my sweat suit on (as it is chilly out there still) and I feel great that I do not have to dress like the characters in the books I am getting to read with all this time.
    I also enjoyed all the comments, questions and answers. I am not much into fashion but this was interesting.
    Thank you – stay healthy everyone.

    Reply
  308. Very interesting interview and an introduction to a new author for me. In all the books of this era that I have read, I am always amazed at the dressmakers who are asked to put together a wardrobe in a short time. I never liked sewing clothes or getting dressed up. All the material needed for just one ball gown seems too much and too costly. But then the wealthy needed to show their worth in clothes. I enjoy reading about the clothes and all the layers they wore back then. Here I sit in isolation with my sweat suit on (as it is chilly out there still) and I feel great that I do not have to dress like the characters in the books I am getting to read with all this time.
    I also enjoyed all the comments, questions and answers. I am not much into fashion but this was interesting.
    Thank you – stay healthy everyone.

    Reply
  309. Very interesting interview and an introduction to a new author for me. In all the books of this era that I have read, I am always amazed at the dressmakers who are asked to put together a wardrobe in a short time. I never liked sewing clothes or getting dressed up. All the material needed for just one ball gown seems too much and too costly. But then the wealthy needed to show their worth in clothes. I enjoy reading about the clothes and all the layers they wore back then. Here I sit in isolation with my sweat suit on (as it is chilly out there still) and I feel great that I do not have to dress like the characters in the books I am getting to read with all this time.
    I also enjoyed all the comments, questions and answers. I am not much into fashion but this was interesting.
    Thank you – stay healthy everyone.

    Reply
  310. Very interesting interview and an introduction to a new author for me. In all the books of this era that I have read, I am always amazed at the dressmakers who are asked to put together a wardrobe in a short time. I never liked sewing clothes or getting dressed up. All the material needed for just one ball gown seems too much and too costly. But then the wealthy needed to show their worth in clothes. I enjoy reading about the clothes and all the layers they wore back then. Here I sit in isolation with my sweat suit on (as it is chilly out there still) and I feel great that I do not have to dress like the characters in the books I am getting to read with all this time.
    I also enjoyed all the comments, questions and answers. I am not much into fashion but this was interesting.
    Thank you – stay healthy everyone.

    Reply
  311. Hi Margot, dressmakers did work hard and had seamstresses to help, but yes, a whole wardrobe in a short time always makes me feel for the seamstresses, working by candlelight well into the night! As I mentioned above, it’s the trimmings that take the most time; the main seams are relatively straight forward. I suspect that many dresses were made over or re-decorated, even those belonging to the wealthy. The fabrics were very expensive, although once the Industrial Revolution got underway, cottons became significantly cheaper.

    Reply
  312. Hi Margot, dressmakers did work hard and had seamstresses to help, but yes, a whole wardrobe in a short time always makes me feel for the seamstresses, working by candlelight well into the night! As I mentioned above, it’s the trimmings that take the most time; the main seams are relatively straight forward. I suspect that many dresses were made over or re-decorated, even those belonging to the wealthy. The fabrics were very expensive, although once the Industrial Revolution got underway, cottons became significantly cheaper.

    Reply
  313. Hi Margot, dressmakers did work hard and had seamstresses to help, but yes, a whole wardrobe in a short time always makes me feel for the seamstresses, working by candlelight well into the night! As I mentioned above, it’s the trimmings that take the most time; the main seams are relatively straight forward. I suspect that many dresses were made over or re-decorated, even those belonging to the wealthy. The fabrics were very expensive, although once the Industrial Revolution got underway, cottons became significantly cheaper.

    Reply
  314. Hi Margot, dressmakers did work hard and had seamstresses to help, but yes, a whole wardrobe in a short time always makes me feel for the seamstresses, working by candlelight well into the night! As I mentioned above, it’s the trimmings that take the most time; the main seams are relatively straight forward. I suspect that many dresses were made over or re-decorated, even those belonging to the wealthy. The fabrics were very expensive, although once the Industrial Revolution got underway, cottons became significantly cheaper.

    Reply
  315. Hi Margot, dressmakers did work hard and had seamstresses to help, but yes, a whole wardrobe in a short time always makes me feel for the seamstresses, working by candlelight well into the night! As I mentioned above, it’s the trimmings that take the most time; the main seams are relatively straight forward. I suspect that many dresses were made over or re-decorated, even those belonging to the wealthy. The fabrics were very expensive, although once the Industrial Revolution got underway, cottons became significantly cheaper.

    Reply

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