Medicine and Mayhem!

Medicine 8Andrea here, busy polishing up promo material for the release of MURDER AT THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, my new Wrexford & Sloane mystery, which hits the shelves (virtual and real) on September 28th. I’m thrilled that Publishers Weekly gave it a lovely shout-out, saying, “Swashbuckling…Roars to an exciting climax, followed by a sweet denouement. Historical fans will have fun.”

Murder at the Royal Botanic Gardens-lo resHere’s the cover blurb: (And you can read an excerpt here!) The upcoming marriage of the Earl of Wrexford and Lady Charlotte Sloane promises to be a highlight of the season, if they can first untangle—and survive—a web of intrigue and murder involving the most brilliant scientific minds in Regency London . . .
The plot of the book revolves around a “wonder drug” botanical medicine that will save countless lives. I started on it before the pandemic, but in a strange “Life imitates Art” twist, I wrote last half of the book during the height of the lockdown here in the U. S. Naturally, it made me think a lot about the terrors of getting sick, and how in our modern world, we’re so extraordinarily lucky that modern medicine can cure so many things that were fatal during the Regency.


Medicine 2It’s no wonder that people in the Regency were so concerned with any little sign of ill-health. A sore throat could turn putrid . . . a fever could spike . . . a scratch could become infected . . . little everyday things that we treat with common over-the-counter remedies were a source of worry and fear—and rightfully so!

That the era saw an explosion of “patent medicines” is no surprise. Some of them were based on legitimate botanicals, like willowbark for fevers. But many were not, and the stuff that was pedaled ranged from useless to addictive to downright poisonous! (Yes, the Regency was, like most every era, plagued by a babble of disinformation!) Which led me to do a little research into the history of quacks and flim-flam medicine . . .

Medicine 1The term ‘patent medicine” originated in England during the late 17th century. It referred to the fact the those who made a medical elixir that found found favor with royalty were granted a “letter patent” allowing them to use the royal endorsement in advertising their product. (They were also known as “nostrums”, which derives from the Latin term nostrum remedium, which means ‘our remedy.’)

Medicine 5Now, few people ever actually applied for a patent, because that would have meant revealing the ingredients! (heaven forfend!) In reality they were "proprietary" medicines—in other words, the creators each had their own formulas, and were allowed to make whatever claims they wished about the efficacy of their products. And those claims ran the gamut—from elixirs that would cure every illness to ones designed for the most arcane ailment imaginable.

Medicine 3Daffy's Elixir Salutis for "colic and griping," Dr. Bateman's Pectoral Drops, John Hooper's Female Pills . . . It’s interesting to note that patent medicines were the first big category that helped develop the art of marketing and advertising! Many modern techniques for selling were developed during the Regency. A brand name was very important! (Using Latin or reference to royalty added gravitas to a product. So did naming it after a Doctor—even if such personage didn’t exist!) And marketing that name—and making it a household byword—was key. And so launched the age of advertising flyers and newspaper ads for selling products.

Medicine 6So, what was in the concoctions? Many of them contained a LOT of alcohol. And then, of course, there were drugs. Regency aficionados have of course heard of laudanum, a tincture of opium used for treating “nervous” disorders. Morphine and cocaine also became popular ingredients. Truly poisonous ingredients were also sold as cures: mercury oxide was used to treat syphilitic lesions and eye disorders; chloroform was used in cough and colic tonics, and sulfuric acid was often added to cinchona bark (a legitimate fever medicine) to make a treatment for fever. (Arrgh!)

Medicine 9Mixed in with all the bad, there were also some “good “ medicines out there, based on centuries of empirical knowledge gathered by herbalists and healers. Oil of clove does help with toothaches; willow bark does reduce fevers; castor oil is a safe purgative, calcium carbonate (Epsom salts) helps with neutralizing stomach acid. In fact a few brands from the early 19th century are still around—Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound, invented by American Lydia Pinkham for menstrual/menopause problems, still exists today in a modified formula. It included black cohosh, which is a very popular herbal supplement for modern-day women.)

I, for one, am very grateful that our medicines today are better regulated—though there are still plenty of “supplements” out there that are questionable. However, I am also glad that we—like the botanist in my new book!—are paying more serious attention to the healing power of herbs and botanicals.

What about you? Do you have a favorite herbal or botanical that you use? I find green tea or mint tea very soothing when I have a cold. (Then again, one of my favorite concoctions for a sore throat—lemon, honey and whisky—probably falls under the patent medicine label because of the high alcohol content! Hmm, I think I’ll make an exception!) Please share your thoughts! I’ll be giving away an ARC copy of my new book to one lucky winner chosen from those who leave a comment. (U. S. only for paper. If you’re outside of the U.S. I’ll send you an e-book in whatever format you need.)

215 thoughts on “Medicine and Mayhem!”

  1. I just finished reading a short story (Regency Era) about a little girl who wanted her father to come home for Christmas, so she pretended to be sick. Her nervous nurse called in the local quack, I mean doctor, and he proceeded to treat her with bleeding and toxic meds. Next thing you knew she was at deaths doorstep. But, of course, it all ended well. So many cures were worse than the illness.
    Thanks for the reminder that there actually were some cures that helped – or at least didn’t kill you. I do keep peppermint on hand for an upset tummy. And your lemon, honey and whisky concoction sounds interesting.
    Thanks for the excerpt – your book sounds great.

    Reply
  2. I just finished reading a short story (Regency Era) about a little girl who wanted her father to come home for Christmas, so she pretended to be sick. Her nervous nurse called in the local quack, I mean doctor, and he proceeded to treat her with bleeding and toxic meds. Next thing you knew she was at deaths doorstep. But, of course, it all ended well. So many cures were worse than the illness.
    Thanks for the reminder that there actually were some cures that helped – or at least didn’t kill you. I do keep peppermint on hand for an upset tummy. And your lemon, honey and whisky concoction sounds interesting.
    Thanks for the excerpt – your book sounds great.

    Reply
  3. I just finished reading a short story (Regency Era) about a little girl who wanted her father to come home for Christmas, so she pretended to be sick. Her nervous nurse called in the local quack, I mean doctor, and he proceeded to treat her with bleeding and toxic meds. Next thing you knew she was at deaths doorstep. But, of course, it all ended well. So many cures were worse than the illness.
    Thanks for the reminder that there actually were some cures that helped – or at least didn’t kill you. I do keep peppermint on hand for an upset tummy. And your lemon, honey and whisky concoction sounds interesting.
    Thanks for the excerpt – your book sounds great.

    Reply
  4. I just finished reading a short story (Regency Era) about a little girl who wanted her father to come home for Christmas, so she pretended to be sick. Her nervous nurse called in the local quack, I mean doctor, and he proceeded to treat her with bleeding and toxic meds. Next thing you knew she was at deaths doorstep. But, of course, it all ended well. So many cures were worse than the illness.
    Thanks for the reminder that there actually were some cures that helped – or at least didn’t kill you. I do keep peppermint on hand for an upset tummy. And your lemon, honey and whisky concoction sounds interesting.
    Thanks for the excerpt – your book sounds great.

    Reply
  5. I just finished reading a short story (Regency Era) about a little girl who wanted her father to come home for Christmas, so she pretended to be sick. Her nervous nurse called in the local quack, I mean doctor, and he proceeded to treat her with bleeding and toxic meds. Next thing you knew she was at deaths doorstep. But, of course, it all ended well. So many cures were worse than the illness.
    Thanks for the reminder that there actually were some cures that helped – or at least didn’t kill you. I do keep peppermint on hand for an upset tummy. And your lemon, honey and whisky concoction sounds interesting.
    Thanks for the excerpt – your book sounds great.

    Reply
  6. On visiting historic houses the ‘below stairs’ region often has displays of medication, kitchen tools etc. I will pay closer attention next time I visit! Apart from the universal blood letting with leaches … ugh, the very thought of surgery in those days is a subject for nightmares! I’m thankful that science has rescued us to some extent. As for favourite herbal remedy a good scotch malt on the rocks cures a lot for me!
    Andrea, I see that an audio version will be available but it is No 5 in the series and earlier books are not available. Will this one work as a stand alone? It sounds intriguing.

    Reply
  7. On visiting historic houses the ‘below stairs’ region often has displays of medication, kitchen tools etc. I will pay closer attention next time I visit! Apart from the universal blood letting with leaches … ugh, the very thought of surgery in those days is a subject for nightmares! I’m thankful that science has rescued us to some extent. As for favourite herbal remedy a good scotch malt on the rocks cures a lot for me!
    Andrea, I see that an audio version will be available but it is No 5 in the series and earlier books are not available. Will this one work as a stand alone? It sounds intriguing.

    Reply
  8. On visiting historic houses the ‘below stairs’ region often has displays of medication, kitchen tools etc. I will pay closer attention next time I visit! Apart from the universal blood letting with leaches … ugh, the very thought of surgery in those days is a subject for nightmares! I’m thankful that science has rescued us to some extent. As for favourite herbal remedy a good scotch malt on the rocks cures a lot for me!
    Andrea, I see that an audio version will be available but it is No 5 in the series and earlier books are not available. Will this one work as a stand alone? It sounds intriguing.

    Reply
  9. On visiting historic houses the ‘below stairs’ region often has displays of medication, kitchen tools etc. I will pay closer attention next time I visit! Apart from the universal blood letting with leaches … ugh, the very thought of surgery in those days is a subject for nightmares! I’m thankful that science has rescued us to some extent. As for favourite herbal remedy a good scotch malt on the rocks cures a lot for me!
    Andrea, I see that an audio version will be available but it is No 5 in the series and earlier books are not available. Will this one work as a stand alone? It sounds intriguing.

    Reply
  10. On visiting historic houses the ‘below stairs’ region often has displays of medication, kitchen tools etc. I will pay closer attention next time I visit! Apart from the universal blood letting with leaches … ugh, the very thought of surgery in those days is a subject for nightmares! I’m thankful that science has rescued us to some extent. As for favourite herbal remedy a good scotch malt on the rocks cures a lot for me!
    Andrea, I see that an audio version will be available but it is No 5 in the series and earlier books are not available. Will this one work as a stand alone? It sounds intriguing.

    Reply
  11. Many, many years ago, when I lived in England and where my children were born, I gave them ‘Gripe Water’ when they were babies. ‘Gripe Water’, still sold today, was given for colic-like symptoms. It seemed to work.
    It was invented in the mid 1850s by an American born and trained pharmacist, who settled in England, by the name of Woodward. He developed his formula when he noticed that a remedy for fen fever, probably malaria, also calmed fretful babies. The original mixture contained a fair amount of alcohol, and it wasn’t until 1992 that Britain banned alcohol in all ‘Gripe Water’.
    Today there are several brands of ‘Gripe Water’, including Woodwards, and the ingredients are things like sodium bicarbonate, dill, fennel, ginger and sugar. It is the sugar that many believe is the soother.
    I am eagerly awaiting your new book, as I love the Wrexford and Sloane series.

    Reply
  12. Many, many years ago, when I lived in England and where my children were born, I gave them ‘Gripe Water’ when they were babies. ‘Gripe Water’, still sold today, was given for colic-like symptoms. It seemed to work.
    It was invented in the mid 1850s by an American born and trained pharmacist, who settled in England, by the name of Woodward. He developed his formula when he noticed that a remedy for fen fever, probably malaria, also calmed fretful babies. The original mixture contained a fair amount of alcohol, and it wasn’t until 1992 that Britain banned alcohol in all ‘Gripe Water’.
    Today there are several brands of ‘Gripe Water’, including Woodwards, and the ingredients are things like sodium bicarbonate, dill, fennel, ginger and sugar. It is the sugar that many believe is the soother.
    I am eagerly awaiting your new book, as I love the Wrexford and Sloane series.

    Reply
  13. Many, many years ago, when I lived in England and where my children were born, I gave them ‘Gripe Water’ when they were babies. ‘Gripe Water’, still sold today, was given for colic-like symptoms. It seemed to work.
    It was invented in the mid 1850s by an American born and trained pharmacist, who settled in England, by the name of Woodward. He developed his formula when he noticed that a remedy for fen fever, probably malaria, also calmed fretful babies. The original mixture contained a fair amount of alcohol, and it wasn’t until 1992 that Britain banned alcohol in all ‘Gripe Water’.
    Today there are several brands of ‘Gripe Water’, including Woodwards, and the ingredients are things like sodium bicarbonate, dill, fennel, ginger and sugar. It is the sugar that many believe is the soother.
    I am eagerly awaiting your new book, as I love the Wrexford and Sloane series.

    Reply
  14. Many, many years ago, when I lived in England and where my children were born, I gave them ‘Gripe Water’ when they were babies. ‘Gripe Water’, still sold today, was given for colic-like symptoms. It seemed to work.
    It was invented in the mid 1850s by an American born and trained pharmacist, who settled in England, by the name of Woodward. He developed his formula when he noticed that a remedy for fen fever, probably malaria, also calmed fretful babies. The original mixture contained a fair amount of alcohol, and it wasn’t until 1992 that Britain banned alcohol in all ‘Gripe Water’.
    Today there are several brands of ‘Gripe Water’, including Woodwards, and the ingredients are things like sodium bicarbonate, dill, fennel, ginger and sugar. It is the sugar that many believe is the soother.
    I am eagerly awaiting your new book, as I love the Wrexford and Sloane series.

    Reply
  15. Many, many years ago, when I lived in England and where my children were born, I gave them ‘Gripe Water’ when they were babies. ‘Gripe Water’, still sold today, was given for colic-like symptoms. It seemed to work.
    It was invented in the mid 1850s by an American born and trained pharmacist, who settled in England, by the name of Woodward. He developed his formula when he noticed that a remedy for fen fever, probably malaria, also calmed fretful babies. The original mixture contained a fair amount of alcohol, and it wasn’t until 1992 that Britain banned alcohol in all ‘Gripe Water’.
    Today there are several brands of ‘Gripe Water’, including Woodwards, and the ingredients are things like sodium bicarbonate, dill, fennel, ginger and sugar. It is the sugar that many believe is the soother.
    I am eagerly awaiting your new book, as I love the Wrexford and Sloane series.

    Reply
  16. A great testimony that i must share to all HERPES patient in the world i never believed that their could be any complete cure for HERPES or any cure for HERPES, i saw people’s testimony on blog sites of how Dr ONUWA prepare herbal cure and brought them back to life again. i use the HERPES DRUGS the doctor gave to me. Right now i can tell you that few months now i have not had any pain, delay in treatment leads to death. All thanks to Dr ONUWA herbal Solution you can contact him through WhatsApp number +2348115914591 or Email; dronuwa2@gmail.com
    https://dronuwa2.wixsite.com/my-site

    Reply
  17. A great testimony that i must share to all HERPES patient in the world i never believed that their could be any complete cure for HERPES or any cure for HERPES, i saw people’s testimony on blog sites of how Dr ONUWA prepare herbal cure and brought them back to life again. i use the HERPES DRUGS the doctor gave to me. Right now i can tell you that few months now i have not had any pain, delay in treatment leads to death. All thanks to Dr ONUWA herbal Solution you can contact him through WhatsApp number +2348115914591 or Email; dronuwa2@gmail.com
    https://dronuwa2.wixsite.com/my-site

    Reply
  18. A great testimony that i must share to all HERPES patient in the world i never believed that their could be any complete cure for HERPES or any cure for HERPES, i saw people’s testimony on blog sites of how Dr ONUWA prepare herbal cure and brought them back to life again. i use the HERPES DRUGS the doctor gave to me. Right now i can tell you that few months now i have not had any pain, delay in treatment leads to death. All thanks to Dr ONUWA herbal Solution you can contact him through WhatsApp number +2348115914591 or Email; dronuwa2@gmail.com
    https://dronuwa2.wixsite.com/my-site

    Reply
  19. A great testimony that i must share to all HERPES patient in the world i never believed that their could be any complete cure for HERPES or any cure for HERPES, i saw people’s testimony on blog sites of how Dr ONUWA prepare herbal cure and brought them back to life again. i use the HERPES DRUGS the doctor gave to me. Right now i can tell you that few months now i have not had any pain, delay in treatment leads to death. All thanks to Dr ONUWA herbal Solution you can contact him through WhatsApp number +2348115914591 or Email; dronuwa2@gmail.com
    https://dronuwa2.wixsite.com/my-site

    Reply
  20. A great testimony that i must share to all HERPES patient in the world i never believed that their could be any complete cure for HERPES or any cure for HERPES, i saw people’s testimony on blog sites of how Dr ONUWA prepare herbal cure and brought them back to life again. i use the HERPES DRUGS the doctor gave to me. Right now i can tell you that few months now i have not had any pain, delay in treatment leads to death. All thanks to Dr ONUWA herbal Solution you can contact him through WhatsApp number +2348115914591 or Email; dronuwa2@gmail.com
    https://dronuwa2.wixsite.com/my-site

    Reply
  21. Sooooo looking forward to the new Wrexford and Sloane (and any Lady Arianna you might have tucked away). I’m sipping a green tea with ginger while I type this. However, Feverfew is my herb of choice. It does wonders for my headaches. WONDERS.

    Reply
  22. Sooooo looking forward to the new Wrexford and Sloane (and any Lady Arianna you might have tucked away). I’m sipping a green tea with ginger while I type this. However, Feverfew is my herb of choice. It does wonders for my headaches. WONDERS.

    Reply
  23. Sooooo looking forward to the new Wrexford and Sloane (and any Lady Arianna you might have tucked away). I’m sipping a green tea with ginger while I type this. However, Feverfew is my herb of choice. It does wonders for my headaches. WONDERS.

    Reply
  24. Sooooo looking forward to the new Wrexford and Sloane (and any Lady Arianna you might have tucked away). I’m sipping a green tea with ginger while I type this. However, Feverfew is my herb of choice. It does wonders for my headaches. WONDERS.

    Reply
  25. Sooooo looking forward to the new Wrexford and Sloane (and any Lady Arianna you might have tucked away). I’m sipping a green tea with ginger while I type this. However, Feverfew is my herb of choice. It does wonders for my headaches. WONDERS.

    Reply
  26. Thank you, mary! So glad you enjoyed the excerpt.
    Bleeding on top of the quack medicines was recipe for disaster, wasn’t it. It’s terrible how many people were killed back then by the so-called cures rather than the original ailment.
    Peppermint is really one of those wonderful botanicals that does ease an number of minor discomforts.

    Reply
  27. Thank you, mary! So glad you enjoyed the excerpt.
    Bleeding on top of the quack medicines was recipe for disaster, wasn’t it. It’s terrible how many people were killed back then by the so-called cures rather than the original ailment.
    Peppermint is really one of those wonderful botanicals that does ease an number of minor discomforts.

    Reply
  28. Thank you, mary! So glad you enjoyed the excerpt.
    Bleeding on top of the quack medicines was recipe for disaster, wasn’t it. It’s terrible how many people were killed back then by the so-called cures rather than the original ailment.
    Peppermint is really one of those wonderful botanicals that does ease an number of minor discomforts.

    Reply
  29. Thank you, mary! So glad you enjoyed the excerpt.
    Bleeding on top of the quack medicines was recipe for disaster, wasn’t it. It’s terrible how many people were killed back then by the so-called cures rather than the original ailment.
    Peppermint is really one of those wonderful botanicals that does ease an number of minor discomforts.

    Reply
  30. Thank you, mary! So glad you enjoyed the excerpt.
    Bleeding on top of the quack medicines was recipe for disaster, wasn’t it. It’s terrible how many people were killed back then by the so-called cures rather than the original ailment.
    Peppermint is really one of those wonderful botanicals that does ease an number of minor discomforts.

    Reply
  31. Quantum, the medicine chests in Regency-era houses are really interesting to see. Some very scary stuff i soften lurking in them.
    I’m totally with you on good Scottish malt curing many ailments!
    I’m very suprised to hear you don’t see audio versions of all the Wrexford & Sloane books. I know they have been made and are available on audible and Amazon here in the U. S. This new book can be read as a stand-alone. But the characters and relationships really develop over the course of the series, so I think it’s a richer experience to read them in order. (But I’m biased on that!)

    Reply
  32. Quantum, the medicine chests in Regency-era houses are really interesting to see. Some very scary stuff i soften lurking in them.
    I’m totally with you on good Scottish malt curing many ailments!
    I’m very suprised to hear you don’t see audio versions of all the Wrexford & Sloane books. I know they have been made and are available on audible and Amazon here in the U. S. This new book can be read as a stand-alone. But the characters and relationships really develop over the course of the series, so I think it’s a richer experience to read them in order. (But I’m biased on that!)

    Reply
  33. Quantum, the medicine chests in Regency-era houses are really interesting to see. Some very scary stuff i soften lurking in them.
    I’m totally with you on good Scottish malt curing many ailments!
    I’m very suprised to hear you don’t see audio versions of all the Wrexford & Sloane books. I know they have been made and are available on audible and Amazon here in the U. S. This new book can be read as a stand-alone. But the characters and relationships really develop over the course of the series, so I think it’s a richer experience to read them in order. (But I’m biased on that!)

    Reply
  34. Quantum, the medicine chests in Regency-era houses are really interesting to see. Some very scary stuff i soften lurking in them.
    I’m totally with you on good Scottish malt curing many ailments!
    I’m very suprised to hear you don’t see audio versions of all the Wrexford & Sloane books. I know they have been made and are available on audible and Amazon here in the U. S. This new book can be read as a stand-alone. But the characters and relationships really develop over the course of the series, so I think it’s a richer experience to read them in order. (But I’m biased on that!)

    Reply
  35. Quantum, the medicine chests in Regency-era houses are really interesting to see. Some very scary stuff i soften lurking in them.
    I’m totally with you on good Scottish malt curing many ailments!
    I’m very suprised to hear you don’t see audio versions of all the Wrexford & Sloane books. I know they have been made and are available on audible and Amazon here in the U. S. This new book can be read as a stand-alone. But the characters and relationships really develop over the course of the series, so I think it’s a richer experience to read them in order. (But I’m biased on that!)

    Reply
  36. How interesting, Alison! Yes, alcohol was a favorite ingredient in medicine for children—I guess because it did put them to sleep! But the formula you describe sounds like a very nice and legitimate botanical. I recognize the ingredients, and al are great. I forgot to mention that ginger is also a favorite of mine for an upset stomach.
    And thanks so much for the nice words on the series.

    Reply
  37. How interesting, Alison! Yes, alcohol was a favorite ingredient in medicine for children—I guess because it did put them to sleep! But the formula you describe sounds like a very nice and legitimate botanical. I recognize the ingredients, and al are great. I forgot to mention that ginger is also a favorite of mine for an upset stomach.
    And thanks so much for the nice words on the series.

    Reply
  38. How interesting, Alison! Yes, alcohol was a favorite ingredient in medicine for children—I guess because it did put them to sleep! But the formula you describe sounds like a very nice and legitimate botanical. I recognize the ingredients, and al are great. I forgot to mention that ginger is also a favorite of mine for an upset stomach.
    And thanks so much for the nice words on the series.

    Reply
  39. How interesting, Alison! Yes, alcohol was a favorite ingredient in medicine for children—I guess because it did put them to sleep! But the formula you describe sounds like a very nice and legitimate botanical. I recognize the ingredients, and al are great. I forgot to mention that ginger is also a favorite of mine for an upset stomach.
    And thanks so much for the nice words on the series.

    Reply
  40. How interesting, Alison! Yes, alcohol was a favorite ingredient in medicine for children—I guess because it did put them to sleep! But the formula you describe sounds like a very nice and legitimate botanical. I recognize the ingredients, and al are great. I forgot to mention that ginger is also a favorite of mine for an upset stomach.
    And thanks so much for the nice words on the series.

    Reply
  41. Wow, that fabulous, Tempest. I’ve heard of feverfew, but I have never actually tried it. Good to know it really works.
    Ginger is a real favorite of mine too. I have an herbal ginger tea which I love.
    And thanks on Wrexford & Sloane. And I do have another Lady Arianna that I just finished. It will be coming out just after the new year!

    Reply
  42. Wow, that fabulous, Tempest. I’ve heard of feverfew, but I have never actually tried it. Good to know it really works.
    Ginger is a real favorite of mine too. I have an herbal ginger tea which I love.
    And thanks on Wrexford & Sloane. And I do have another Lady Arianna that I just finished. It will be coming out just after the new year!

    Reply
  43. Wow, that fabulous, Tempest. I’ve heard of feverfew, but I have never actually tried it. Good to know it really works.
    Ginger is a real favorite of mine too. I have an herbal ginger tea which I love.
    And thanks on Wrexford & Sloane. And I do have another Lady Arianna that I just finished. It will be coming out just after the new year!

    Reply
  44. Wow, that fabulous, Tempest. I’ve heard of feverfew, but I have never actually tried it. Good to know it really works.
    Ginger is a real favorite of mine too. I have an herbal ginger tea which I love.
    And thanks on Wrexford & Sloane. And I do have another Lady Arianna that I just finished. It will be coming out just after the new year!

    Reply
  45. Wow, that fabulous, Tempest. I’ve heard of feverfew, but I have never actually tried it. Good to know it really works.
    Ginger is a real favorite of mine too. I have an herbal ginger tea which I love.
    And thanks on Wrexford & Sloane. And I do have another Lady Arianna that I just finished. It will be coming out just after the new year!

    Reply
  46. Best wishes, Andrea, on the publication of MURDER AT THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS. Wishing you and it much success.
    I can’t think of any herbal remedies that I take; however, for a general curative, I recommend chocolate. It certainly elevates my mood!

    Reply
  47. Best wishes, Andrea, on the publication of MURDER AT THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS. Wishing you and it much success.
    I can’t think of any herbal remedies that I take; however, for a general curative, I recommend chocolate. It certainly elevates my mood!

    Reply
  48. Best wishes, Andrea, on the publication of MURDER AT THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS. Wishing you and it much success.
    I can’t think of any herbal remedies that I take; however, for a general curative, I recommend chocolate. It certainly elevates my mood!

    Reply
  49. Best wishes, Andrea, on the publication of MURDER AT THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS. Wishing you and it much success.
    I can’t think of any herbal remedies that I take; however, for a general curative, I recommend chocolate. It certainly elevates my mood!

    Reply
  50. Best wishes, Andrea, on the publication of MURDER AT THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS. Wishing you and it much success.
    I can’t think of any herbal remedies that I take; however, for a general curative, I recommend chocolate. It certainly elevates my mood!

    Reply
  51. September 28 is a big day for me. I am excited about the new book and looking forward to it. That day is also my last chemo treatment speaking of barbaric medications…I am part of a clinical trial to reduce the amount of chemo used to treat breast cancer. Praying that is possible.

    Reply
  52. September 28 is a big day for me. I am excited about the new book and looking forward to it. That day is also my last chemo treatment speaking of barbaric medications…I am part of a clinical trial to reduce the amount of chemo used to treat breast cancer. Praying that is possible.

    Reply
  53. September 28 is a big day for me. I am excited about the new book and looking forward to it. That day is also my last chemo treatment speaking of barbaric medications…I am part of a clinical trial to reduce the amount of chemo used to treat breast cancer. Praying that is possible.

    Reply
  54. September 28 is a big day for me. I am excited about the new book and looking forward to it. That day is also my last chemo treatment speaking of barbaric medications…I am part of a clinical trial to reduce the amount of chemo used to treat breast cancer. Praying that is possible.

    Reply
  55. September 28 is a big day for me. I am excited about the new book and looking forward to it. That day is also my last chemo treatment speaking of barbaric medications…I am part of a clinical trial to reduce the amount of chemo used to treat breast cancer. Praying that is possible.

    Reply
  56. My favorite (when I have a cold) is honey that has some eucalyptus in it. Or lacking that, I mix some Fazer eucalyptus candies and honey to my tea. I also have mint, peppermint, apple mint and chocolate mint growing in small pots. And candelabra aloe (Aloe arborescens), or herb aloe as it’s called in Finnish.

    Reply
  57. My favorite (when I have a cold) is honey that has some eucalyptus in it. Or lacking that, I mix some Fazer eucalyptus candies and honey to my tea. I also have mint, peppermint, apple mint and chocolate mint growing in small pots. And candelabra aloe (Aloe arborescens), or herb aloe as it’s called in Finnish.

    Reply
  58. My favorite (when I have a cold) is honey that has some eucalyptus in it. Or lacking that, I mix some Fazer eucalyptus candies and honey to my tea. I also have mint, peppermint, apple mint and chocolate mint growing in small pots. And candelabra aloe (Aloe arborescens), or herb aloe as it’s called in Finnish.

    Reply
  59. My favorite (when I have a cold) is honey that has some eucalyptus in it. Or lacking that, I mix some Fazer eucalyptus candies and honey to my tea. I also have mint, peppermint, apple mint and chocolate mint growing in small pots. And candelabra aloe (Aloe arborescens), or herb aloe as it’s called in Finnish.

    Reply
  60. My favorite (when I have a cold) is honey that has some eucalyptus in it. Or lacking that, I mix some Fazer eucalyptus candies and honey to my tea. I also have mint, peppermint, apple mint and chocolate mint growing in small pots. And candelabra aloe (Aloe arborescens), or herb aloe as it’s called in Finnish.

    Reply
  61. Just wanted to say how excited I am about your new book – I absolutely love the series. Can’t wait for Wrexford to become a married man – and a father! How he handles all this should be such fun! And of course how his assistant fits in! Don’t live in the US and only read paper so I’m out but no big deal – just wanted to say Congrats!!! Only home remedy I take is honey and lemon for a sore throat – I take melatonin for help falling asleep but I don’t think that counts!

    Reply
  62. Just wanted to say how excited I am about your new book – I absolutely love the series. Can’t wait for Wrexford to become a married man – and a father! How he handles all this should be such fun! And of course how his assistant fits in! Don’t live in the US and only read paper so I’m out but no big deal – just wanted to say Congrats!!! Only home remedy I take is honey and lemon for a sore throat – I take melatonin for help falling asleep but I don’t think that counts!

    Reply
  63. Just wanted to say how excited I am about your new book – I absolutely love the series. Can’t wait for Wrexford to become a married man – and a father! How he handles all this should be such fun! And of course how his assistant fits in! Don’t live in the US and only read paper so I’m out but no big deal – just wanted to say Congrats!!! Only home remedy I take is honey and lemon for a sore throat – I take melatonin for help falling asleep but I don’t think that counts!

    Reply
  64. Just wanted to say how excited I am about your new book – I absolutely love the series. Can’t wait for Wrexford to become a married man – and a father! How he handles all this should be such fun! And of course how his assistant fits in! Don’t live in the US and only read paper so I’m out but no big deal – just wanted to say Congrats!!! Only home remedy I take is honey and lemon for a sore throat – I take melatonin for help falling asleep but I don’t think that counts!

    Reply
  65. Just wanted to say how excited I am about your new book – I absolutely love the series. Can’t wait for Wrexford to become a married man – and a father! How he handles all this should be such fun! And of course how his assistant fits in! Don’t live in the US and only read paper so I’m out but no big deal – just wanted to say Congrats!!! Only home remedy I take is honey and lemon for a sore throat – I take melatonin for help falling asleep but I don’t think that counts!

    Reply
  66. Eagerly awaiting your books!
    I don’t do much herbal medicine. (My mother quacked me when I was growing up in the 30s, which gave me a huge distaste for self medication.)
    My daily drink is a very lighltly brewed tea 1 bag jasmine with two bags of the herbal tea picked for that brewing. When brewed I refrigerated it, then mix it with a noncafinated soda. The brand we use is LaCroix, there probably are others.
    The idea in this mixture is to decafinate me (the jasmine is for a base flavor, it’s so diluted it doesn’t add caffeine.
    And the only use I ever heard of for Epsom Salts was for soaking out physical pain. It works.

    Reply
  67. Eagerly awaiting your books!
    I don’t do much herbal medicine. (My mother quacked me when I was growing up in the 30s, which gave me a huge distaste for self medication.)
    My daily drink is a very lighltly brewed tea 1 bag jasmine with two bags of the herbal tea picked for that brewing. When brewed I refrigerated it, then mix it with a noncafinated soda. The brand we use is LaCroix, there probably are others.
    The idea in this mixture is to decafinate me (the jasmine is for a base flavor, it’s so diluted it doesn’t add caffeine.
    And the only use I ever heard of for Epsom Salts was for soaking out physical pain. It works.

    Reply
  68. Eagerly awaiting your books!
    I don’t do much herbal medicine. (My mother quacked me when I was growing up in the 30s, which gave me a huge distaste for self medication.)
    My daily drink is a very lighltly brewed tea 1 bag jasmine with two bags of the herbal tea picked for that brewing. When brewed I refrigerated it, then mix it with a noncafinated soda. The brand we use is LaCroix, there probably are others.
    The idea in this mixture is to decafinate me (the jasmine is for a base flavor, it’s so diluted it doesn’t add caffeine.
    And the only use I ever heard of for Epsom Salts was for soaking out physical pain. It works.

    Reply
  69. Eagerly awaiting your books!
    I don’t do much herbal medicine. (My mother quacked me when I was growing up in the 30s, which gave me a huge distaste for self medication.)
    My daily drink is a very lighltly brewed tea 1 bag jasmine with two bags of the herbal tea picked for that brewing. When brewed I refrigerated it, then mix it with a noncafinated soda. The brand we use is LaCroix, there probably are others.
    The idea in this mixture is to decafinate me (the jasmine is for a base flavor, it’s so diluted it doesn’t add caffeine.
    And the only use I ever heard of for Epsom Salts was for soaking out physical pain. It works.

    Reply
  70. Eagerly awaiting your books!
    I don’t do much herbal medicine. (My mother quacked me when I was growing up in the 30s, which gave me a huge distaste for self medication.)
    My daily drink is a very lighltly brewed tea 1 bag jasmine with two bags of the herbal tea picked for that brewing. When brewed I refrigerated it, then mix it with a noncafinated soda. The brand we use is LaCroix, there probably are others.
    The idea in this mixture is to decafinate me (the jasmine is for a base flavor, it’s so diluted it doesn’t add caffeine.
    And the only use I ever heard of for Epsom Salts was for soaking out physical pain. It works.

    Reply
  71. Ginger tea is my favorite. Before retirement I was a teacher at elementary level. I would get a lot of colds, coughs. My MIL told me about ginger tea and he favorite – Gold Kili. So during the winter I would have that tea; it was so warming. It kept that bronchial stuff away. Now I also drink it when I have an upset stomach. And ginger candy – yum!

    Reply
  72. Ginger tea is my favorite. Before retirement I was a teacher at elementary level. I would get a lot of colds, coughs. My MIL told me about ginger tea and he favorite – Gold Kili. So during the winter I would have that tea; it was so warming. It kept that bronchial stuff away. Now I also drink it when I have an upset stomach. And ginger candy – yum!

    Reply
  73. Ginger tea is my favorite. Before retirement I was a teacher at elementary level. I would get a lot of colds, coughs. My MIL told me about ginger tea and he favorite – Gold Kili. So during the winter I would have that tea; it was so warming. It kept that bronchial stuff away. Now I also drink it when I have an upset stomach. And ginger candy – yum!

    Reply
  74. Ginger tea is my favorite. Before retirement I was a teacher at elementary level. I would get a lot of colds, coughs. My MIL told me about ginger tea and he favorite – Gold Kili. So during the winter I would have that tea; it was so warming. It kept that bronchial stuff away. Now I also drink it when I have an upset stomach. And ginger candy – yum!

    Reply
  75. Ginger tea is my favorite. Before retirement I was a teacher at elementary level. I would get a lot of colds, coughs. My MIL told me about ginger tea and he favorite – Gold Kili. So during the winter I would have that tea; it was so warming. It kept that bronchial stuff away. Now I also drink it when I have an upset stomach. And ginger candy – yum!

    Reply
  76. Thank you, Sue! really appreciate that.
    I can understand your dislike of home remedies if you had a bad experience growing up. I hadn’t heard of ingesting Epsom salts either (and not sure I ever ind tend to try) but the article I read said it’s an okay remedy for stomach acid) Like you, I’ll stick to soaking a sore foot in it.
    Your home-brewed botanical-based daily drink sounds lovely!

    Reply
  77. Thank you, Sue! really appreciate that.
    I can understand your dislike of home remedies if you had a bad experience growing up. I hadn’t heard of ingesting Epsom salts either (and not sure I ever ind tend to try) but the article I read said it’s an okay remedy for stomach acid) Like you, I’ll stick to soaking a sore foot in it.
    Your home-brewed botanical-based daily drink sounds lovely!

    Reply
  78. Thank you, Sue! really appreciate that.
    I can understand your dislike of home remedies if you had a bad experience growing up. I hadn’t heard of ingesting Epsom salts either (and not sure I ever ind tend to try) but the article I read said it’s an okay remedy for stomach acid) Like you, I’ll stick to soaking a sore foot in it.
    Your home-brewed botanical-based daily drink sounds lovely!

    Reply
  79. Thank you, Sue! really appreciate that.
    I can understand your dislike of home remedies if you had a bad experience growing up. I hadn’t heard of ingesting Epsom salts either (and not sure I ever ind tend to try) but the article I read said it’s an okay remedy for stomach acid) Like you, I’ll stick to soaking a sore foot in it.
    Your home-brewed botanical-based daily drink sounds lovely!

    Reply
  80. Thank you, Sue! really appreciate that.
    I can understand your dislike of home remedies if you had a bad experience growing up. I hadn’t heard of ingesting Epsom salts either (and not sure I ever ind tend to try) but the article I read said it’s an okay remedy for stomach acid) Like you, I’ll stick to soaking a sore foot in it.
    Your home-brewed botanical-based daily drink sounds lovely!

    Reply
  81. Here’s a peppermint hint that could be useful to all of the writers in our group, or anyone who works for long periods in one position: a few drops of peppermint OIL (not extract) rubbed into the back of the neck immediately relaxes tense muscles and minds. Like magic! Smells so good, too. Look for the oil at a pharmacy, not a grocery store. Ahhhhhh ….

    Reply
  82. Here’s a peppermint hint that could be useful to all of the writers in our group, or anyone who works for long periods in one position: a few drops of peppermint OIL (not extract) rubbed into the back of the neck immediately relaxes tense muscles and minds. Like magic! Smells so good, too. Look for the oil at a pharmacy, not a grocery store. Ahhhhhh ….

    Reply
  83. Here’s a peppermint hint that could be useful to all of the writers in our group, or anyone who works for long periods in one position: a few drops of peppermint OIL (not extract) rubbed into the back of the neck immediately relaxes tense muscles and minds. Like magic! Smells so good, too. Look for the oil at a pharmacy, not a grocery store. Ahhhhhh ….

    Reply
  84. Here’s a peppermint hint that could be useful to all of the writers in our group, or anyone who works for long periods in one position: a few drops of peppermint OIL (not extract) rubbed into the back of the neck immediately relaxes tense muscles and minds. Like magic! Smells so good, too. Look for the oil at a pharmacy, not a grocery store. Ahhhhhh ….

    Reply
  85. Here’s a peppermint hint that could be useful to all of the writers in our group, or anyone who works for long periods in one position: a few drops of peppermint OIL (not extract) rubbed into the back of the neck immediately relaxes tense muscles and minds. Like magic! Smells so good, too. Look for the oil at a pharmacy, not a grocery store. Ahhhhhh ….

    Reply
  86. I make a pleasant jamaica tea by steeping ~1/2 cup dried hibiscus flowers with 2 packets of Prince of Peace honey-ginger crystals in my coffeemaker. (Both available from Amazon, etc.) Fill with water, then put the ingreds in the emptied pot and run the drip cycle. Let steep on keep-warm, cool to room temp, strain, and fridge. Very nice summer drink with minimal sweetness, and could be reheated for winter warmth.

    Reply
  87. I make a pleasant jamaica tea by steeping ~1/2 cup dried hibiscus flowers with 2 packets of Prince of Peace honey-ginger crystals in my coffeemaker. (Both available from Amazon, etc.) Fill with water, then put the ingreds in the emptied pot and run the drip cycle. Let steep on keep-warm, cool to room temp, strain, and fridge. Very nice summer drink with minimal sweetness, and could be reheated for winter warmth.

    Reply
  88. I make a pleasant jamaica tea by steeping ~1/2 cup dried hibiscus flowers with 2 packets of Prince of Peace honey-ginger crystals in my coffeemaker. (Both available from Amazon, etc.) Fill with water, then put the ingreds in the emptied pot and run the drip cycle. Let steep on keep-warm, cool to room temp, strain, and fridge. Very nice summer drink with minimal sweetness, and could be reheated for winter warmth.

    Reply
  89. I make a pleasant jamaica tea by steeping ~1/2 cup dried hibiscus flowers with 2 packets of Prince of Peace honey-ginger crystals in my coffeemaker. (Both available from Amazon, etc.) Fill with water, then put the ingreds in the emptied pot and run the drip cycle. Let steep on keep-warm, cool to room temp, strain, and fridge. Very nice summer drink with minimal sweetness, and could be reheated for winter warmth.

    Reply
  90. I make a pleasant jamaica tea by steeping ~1/2 cup dried hibiscus flowers with 2 packets of Prince of Peace honey-ginger crystals in my coffeemaker. (Both available from Amazon, etc.) Fill with water, then put the ingreds in the emptied pot and run the drip cycle. Let steep on keep-warm, cool to room temp, strain, and fridge. Very nice summer drink with minimal sweetness, and could be reheated for winter warmth.

    Reply
  91. Wrexford, Sloane, and the weasels. All together. I can’t wait! I am definitely a fan of a hot toddy for head colds. I’ve had ginger candy for nausea. Back in college I found spicy food was good for a queasy stomach, kill or cure perhaps. I think the chili pepper, cumin, etc in Tex-Mex food actually helped. Or maybe a good enchilada was just comfort food.

    Reply
  92. Wrexford, Sloane, and the weasels. All together. I can’t wait! I am definitely a fan of a hot toddy for head colds. I’ve had ginger candy for nausea. Back in college I found spicy food was good for a queasy stomach, kill or cure perhaps. I think the chili pepper, cumin, etc in Tex-Mex food actually helped. Or maybe a good enchilada was just comfort food.

    Reply
  93. Wrexford, Sloane, and the weasels. All together. I can’t wait! I am definitely a fan of a hot toddy for head colds. I’ve had ginger candy for nausea. Back in college I found spicy food was good for a queasy stomach, kill or cure perhaps. I think the chili pepper, cumin, etc in Tex-Mex food actually helped. Or maybe a good enchilada was just comfort food.

    Reply
  94. Wrexford, Sloane, and the weasels. All together. I can’t wait! I am definitely a fan of a hot toddy for head colds. I’ve had ginger candy for nausea. Back in college I found spicy food was good for a queasy stomach, kill or cure perhaps. I think the chili pepper, cumin, etc in Tex-Mex food actually helped. Or maybe a good enchilada was just comfort food.

    Reply
  95. Wrexford, Sloane, and the weasels. All together. I can’t wait! I am definitely a fan of a hot toddy for head colds. I’ve had ginger candy for nausea. Back in college I found spicy food was good for a queasy stomach, kill or cure perhaps. I think the chili pepper, cumin, etc in Tex-Mex food actually helped. Or maybe a good enchilada was just comfort food.

    Reply
  96. Interesting post and comments. I personally cannot stand sweet ginger and I don’t feel it helps settle my stomach at all. (But ginger is essential in curries and I love it in savoury dishes of any kind). But then I can’t stand mint tea either, but love as an ingredient in cooking, especially with lamb.
    As for botanicals I go to: Camomile infusions for stomach aches, pads soaked in black tea for inflamed eyes, pure cranberry juice for bladder infections (no sugar added, so very sour!) or a herbal tea mix instead (but that is rather bitter, so also not pleasant and sugar again forbidden). Hot lemon juice with honey for colds, I tried the addition of whiskey once or twice and it at least put me to sleep.
    Since I already have the book on order, I do not need to be considered for the ARC.

    Reply
  97. Interesting post and comments. I personally cannot stand sweet ginger and I don’t feel it helps settle my stomach at all. (But ginger is essential in curries and I love it in savoury dishes of any kind). But then I can’t stand mint tea either, but love as an ingredient in cooking, especially with lamb.
    As for botanicals I go to: Camomile infusions for stomach aches, pads soaked in black tea for inflamed eyes, pure cranberry juice for bladder infections (no sugar added, so very sour!) or a herbal tea mix instead (but that is rather bitter, so also not pleasant and sugar again forbidden). Hot lemon juice with honey for colds, I tried the addition of whiskey once or twice and it at least put me to sleep.
    Since I already have the book on order, I do not need to be considered for the ARC.

    Reply
  98. Interesting post and comments. I personally cannot stand sweet ginger and I don’t feel it helps settle my stomach at all. (But ginger is essential in curries and I love it in savoury dishes of any kind). But then I can’t stand mint tea either, but love as an ingredient in cooking, especially with lamb.
    As for botanicals I go to: Camomile infusions for stomach aches, pads soaked in black tea for inflamed eyes, pure cranberry juice for bladder infections (no sugar added, so very sour!) or a herbal tea mix instead (but that is rather bitter, so also not pleasant and sugar again forbidden). Hot lemon juice with honey for colds, I tried the addition of whiskey once or twice and it at least put me to sleep.
    Since I already have the book on order, I do not need to be considered for the ARC.

    Reply
  99. Interesting post and comments. I personally cannot stand sweet ginger and I don’t feel it helps settle my stomach at all. (But ginger is essential in curries and I love it in savoury dishes of any kind). But then I can’t stand mint tea either, but love as an ingredient in cooking, especially with lamb.
    As for botanicals I go to: Camomile infusions for stomach aches, pads soaked in black tea for inflamed eyes, pure cranberry juice for bladder infections (no sugar added, so very sour!) or a herbal tea mix instead (but that is rather bitter, so also not pleasant and sugar again forbidden). Hot lemon juice with honey for colds, I tried the addition of whiskey once or twice and it at least put me to sleep.
    Since I already have the book on order, I do not need to be considered for the ARC.

    Reply
  100. Interesting post and comments. I personally cannot stand sweet ginger and I don’t feel it helps settle my stomach at all. (But ginger is essential in curries and I love it in savoury dishes of any kind). But then I can’t stand mint tea either, but love as an ingredient in cooking, especially with lamb.
    As for botanicals I go to: Camomile infusions for stomach aches, pads soaked in black tea for inflamed eyes, pure cranberry juice for bladder infections (no sugar added, so very sour!) or a herbal tea mix instead (but that is rather bitter, so also not pleasant and sugar again forbidden). Hot lemon juice with honey for colds, I tried the addition of whiskey once or twice and it at least put me to sleep.
    Since I already have the book on order, I do not need to be considered for the ARC.

    Reply
  101. Katja, I get the feeling you are definitely a “savory” not “sweet” aficionado. The black tea for eye compresses is a really one, as is cranberry juice for bladder infections (though I need a touch of sugar.) I I do like what everyday botanicals like ginger and herbs/species can do for wellness.
    And thank you so much for being a fan of the series. I really appreciate it!

    Reply
  102. Katja, I get the feeling you are definitely a “savory” not “sweet” aficionado. The black tea for eye compresses is a really one, as is cranberry juice for bladder infections (though I need a touch of sugar.) I I do like what everyday botanicals like ginger and herbs/species can do for wellness.
    And thank you so much for being a fan of the series. I really appreciate it!

    Reply
  103. Katja, I get the feeling you are definitely a “savory” not “sweet” aficionado. The black tea for eye compresses is a really one, as is cranberry juice for bladder infections (though I need a touch of sugar.) I I do like what everyday botanicals like ginger and herbs/species can do for wellness.
    And thank you so much for being a fan of the series. I really appreciate it!

    Reply
  104. Katja, I get the feeling you are definitely a “savory” not “sweet” aficionado. The black tea for eye compresses is a really one, as is cranberry juice for bladder infections (though I need a touch of sugar.) I I do like what everyday botanicals like ginger and herbs/species can do for wellness.
    And thank you so much for being a fan of the series. I really appreciate it!

    Reply
  105. Katja, I get the feeling you are definitely a “savory” not “sweet” aficionado. The black tea for eye compresses is a really one, as is cranberry juice for bladder infections (though I need a touch of sugar.) I I do like what everyday botanicals like ginger and herbs/species can do for wellness.
    And thank you so much for being a fan of the series. I really appreciate it!

    Reply
  106. I have many herbal teas I drink for the flavor, and I also make my own to treat colds and coughs. For coughs, I brew a mixture of thyme and fennel seeds. For congestion, I brew tea with fresh grated ginger, which is also good for a stomach upset. To wind down in the evening, I drink Celestial Seasonings Sleepytime tea, or make my own with camomile.
    Please don’t include me in the giveaway because I already have an ARC of Murder at the Royal Botanic Gardens which I won at Goodreads!

    Reply
  107. I have many herbal teas I drink for the flavor, and I also make my own to treat colds and coughs. For coughs, I brew a mixture of thyme and fennel seeds. For congestion, I brew tea with fresh grated ginger, which is also good for a stomach upset. To wind down in the evening, I drink Celestial Seasonings Sleepytime tea, or make my own with camomile.
    Please don’t include me in the giveaway because I already have an ARC of Murder at the Royal Botanic Gardens which I won at Goodreads!

    Reply
  108. I have many herbal teas I drink for the flavor, and I also make my own to treat colds and coughs. For coughs, I brew a mixture of thyme and fennel seeds. For congestion, I brew tea with fresh grated ginger, which is also good for a stomach upset. To wind down in the evening, I drink Celestial Seasonings Sleepytime tea, or make my own with camomile.
    Please don’t include me in the giveaway because I already have an ARC of Murder at the Royal Botanic Gardens which I won at Goodreads!

    Reply
  109. I have many herbal teas I drink for the flavor, and I also make my own to treat colds and coughs. For coughs, I brew a mixture of thyme and fennel seeds. For congestion, I brew tea with fresh grated ginger, which is also good for a stomach upset. To wind down in the evening, I drink Celestial Seasonings Sleepytime tea, or make my own with camomile.
    Please don’t include me in the giveaway because I already have an ARC of Murder at the Royal Botanic Gardens which I won at Goodreads!

    Reply
  110. I have many herbal teas I drink for the flavor, and I also make my own to treat colds and coughs. For coughs, I brew a mixture of thyme and fennel seeds. For congestion, I brew tea with fresh grated ginger, which is also good for a stomach upset. To wind down in the evening, I drink Celestial Seasonings Sleepytime tea, or make my own with camomile.
    Please don’t include me in the giveaway because I already have an ARC of Murder at the Royal Botanic Gardens which I won at Goodreads!

    Reply
  111. Janie, I am holding you in my prayers. I know from family members that what you have faced is very daunting.
    Best to you. God Bless.

    Reply
  112. Janie, I am holding you in my prayers. I know from family members that what you have faced is very daunting.
    Best to you. God Bless.

    Reply
  113. Janie, I am holding you in my prayers. I know from family members that what you have faced is very daunting.
    Best to you. God Bless.

    Reply
  114. Janie, I am holding you in my prayers. I know from family members that what you have faced is very daunting.
    Best to you. God Bless.

    Reply
  115. Janie, I am holding you in my prayers. I know from family members that what you have faced is very daunting.
    Best to you. God Bless.

    Reply
  116. First, thanks for the excerpt. I look forward to reading this entry in the series.
    I know that raspberry leaf tea can help shorten labor. I learned it when we showed dogs and it worked for them. And since they were delivering more than one pup at a time, it was evident, shortening the labor time was a big deal.
    I take capsules to help deal with the pain and inflammation I have. I take turmeric, cinnamon, tart cherry and ginger root. They seem to help take the edge off for me.

    Reply
  117. First, thanks for the excerpt. I look forward to reading this entry in the series.
    I know that raspberry leaf tea can help shorten labor. I learned it when we showed dogs and it worked for them. And since they were delivering more than one pup at a time, it was evident, shortening the labor time was a big deal.
    I take capsules to help deal with the pain and inflammation I have. I take turmeric, cinnamon, tart cherry and ginger root. They seem to help take the edge off for me.

    Reply
  118. First, thanks for the excerpt. I look forward to reading this entry in the series.
    I know that raspberry leaf tea can help shorten labor. I learned it when we showed dogs and it worked for them. And since they were delivering more than one pup at a time, it was evident, shortening the labor time was a big deal.
    I take capsules to help deal with the pain and inflammation I have. I take turmeric, cinnamon, tart cherry and ginger root. They seem to help take the edge off for me.

    Reply
  119. First, thanks for the excerpt. I look forward to reading this entry in the series.
    I know that raspberry leaf tea can help shorten labor. I learned it when we showed dogs and it worked for them. And since they were delivering more than one pup at a time, it was evident, shortening the labor time was a big deal.
    I take capsules to help deal with the pain and inflammation I have. I take turmeric, cinnamon, tart cherry and ginger root. They seem to help take the edge off for me.

    Reply
  120. First, thanks for the excerpt. I look forward to reading this entry in the series.
    I know that raspberry leaf tea can help shorten labor. I learned it when we showed dogs and it worked for them. And since they were delivering more than one pup at a time, it was evident, shortening the labor time was a big deal.
    I take capsules to help deal with the pain and inflammation I have. I take turmeric, cinnamon, tart cherry and ginger root. They seem to help take the edge off for me.

    Reply
  121. I have just ordered some oil of cloves because my mouth is a mess due to ancient fillings falling out and my phobia about dentists resulting from a terrible experience with a dentist who did not believe in Novocain for children! I am also using a mixture of neem and clove oil for regular dental health. BTW, as I recall Lydia Pinkham’s original formula included opium. It was designed to help counter-act the chronic pain many women experienced due to injuries and infections related to childbirth, known as “women’s complaints.”

    Reply
  122. I have just ordered some oil of cloves because my mouth is a mess due to ancient fillings falling out and my phobia about dentists resulting from a terrible experience with a dentist who did not believe in Novocain for children! I am also using a mixture of neem and clove oil for regular dental health. BTW, as I recall Lydia Pinkham’s original formula included opium. It was designed to help counter-act the chronic pain many women experienced due to injuries and infections related to childbirth, known as “women’s complaints.”

    Reply
  123. I have just ordered some oil of cloves because my mouth is a mess due to ancient fillings falling out and my phobia about dentists resulting from a terrible experience with a dentist who did not believe in Novocain for children! I am also using a mixture of neem and clove oil for regular dental health. BTW, as I recall Lydia Pinkham’s original formula included opium. It was designed to help counter-act the chronic pain many women experienced due to injuries and infections related to childbirth, known as “women’s complaints.”

    Reply
  124. I have just ordered some oil of cloves because my mouth is a mess due to ancient fillings falling out and my phobia about dentists resulting from a terrible experience with a dentist who did not believe in Novocain for children! I am also using a mixture of neem and clove oil for regular dental health. BTW, as I recall Lydia Pinkham’s original formula included opium. It was designed to help counter-act the chronic pain many women experienced due to injuries and infections related to childbirth, known as “women’s complaints.”

    Reply
  125. I have just ordered some oil of cloves because my mouth is a mess due to ancient fillings falling out and my phobia about dentists resulting from a terrible experience with a dentist who did not believe in Novocain for children! I am also using a mixture of neem and clove oil for regular dental health. BTW, as I recall Lydia Pinkham’s original formula included opium. It was designed to help counter-act the chronic pain many women experienced due to injuries and infections related to childbirth, known as “women’s complaints.”

    Reply
  126. OMG, Ruchama, I think I had that same dentist! When I finally got novocaine as an adult, it was a revelation. I never complained when I was a kid, because I thought the dentist was supposed to be painful.

    Reply
  127. OMG, Ruchama, I think I had that same dentist! When I finally got novocaine as an adult, it was a revelation. I never complained when I was a kid, because I thought the dentist was supposed to be painful.

    Reply
  128. OMG, Ruchama, I think I had that same dentist! When I finally got novocaine as an adult, it was a revelation. I never complained when I was a kid, because I thought the dentist was supposed to be painful.

    Reply
  129. OMG, Ruchama, I think I had that same dentist! When I finally got novocaine as an adult, it was a revelation. I never complained when I was a kid, because I thought the dentist was supposed to be painful.

    Reply
  130. OMG, Ruchama, I think I had that same dentist! When I finally got novocaine as an adult, it was a revelation. I never complained when I was a kid, because I thought the dentist was supposed to be painful.

    Reply
  131. Ruchama, I’m not surprised to hear that the original Lydia Pinkham’s had opium. So many of the patent medicines did. A false “feel-good” if ever there was one!
    And I also had a dentist who wouldn’t give novocaine to a kid. I was told that it was only for “real” and the drilling couldn’t possibly hurt that much.

    Reply
  132. Ruchama, I’m not surprised to hear that the original Lydia Pinkham’s had opium. So many of the patent medicines did. A false “feel-good” if ever there was one!
    And I also had a dentist who wouldn’t give novocaine to a kid. I was told that it was only for “real” and the drilling couldn’t possibly hurt that much.

    Reply
  133. Ruchama, I’m not surprised to hear that the original Lydia Pinkham’s had opium. So many of the patent medicines did. A false “feel-good” if ever there was one!
    And I also had a dentist who wouldn’t give novocaine to a kid. I was told that it was only for “real” and the drilling couldn’t possibly hurt that much.

    Reply
  134. Ruchama, I’m not surprised to hear that the original Lydia Pinkham’s had opium. So many of the patent medicines did. A false “feel-good” if ever there was one!
    And I also had a dentist who wouldn’t give novocaine to a kid. I was told that it was only for “real” and the drilling couldn’t possibly hurt that much.

    Reply
  135. Ruchama, I’m not surprised to hear that the original Lydia Pinkham’s had opium. So many of the patent medicines did. A false “feel-good” if ever there was one!
    And I also had a dentist who wouldn’t give novocaine to a kid. I was told that it was only for “real” and the drilling couldn’t possibly hurt that much.

    Reply

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