Mea Culpa

From Loretta:
Black_lace_barbie Since I am in Deadline Hell and funneling all creating thinking into the WIP (now officially titled DON’T TEMPT ME) I once more dip into the Readers Questions bag.  This is not an activity for the fainthearted.  There are things with fangs in there.  This week’s is an older question from Jaclyne Laurin.  She’s actually asked several questions, with material for several blogs, so I’m snipping.

“I know that once a story is submitted to the editor, it goes through a series of proof-reading and corrections, reworking storylines and editing.  Why is it that after all that work some of these mistakes are still found in the story?  Do the authors not keep vitals on their characters in order to keep his/her description accurate all through the book?”

Last week, we had a lively discussion about titles, and how readers feel about mistakes made in that department.  It’s only one example of how easy it is for authors to make mistakes.  Including really horrendous, ridiculous ones.  I speak from experience.

Notes I research the daylights out of my subjects.  I keep spreadsheets of character names, physical descriptions, dates of birth, dates of important events, and historical data.  I keep a notebook of facts and details I need to check.  A phrase in Chapter 2 might be too modern.  I’ve changed a character’s hair or eye color or name or age part way through the story.  I need to find out where a shop is.  I make a note in the notebook and go back to the WIP.

Dictionary_of_the_vulgar_tongueI do this because stopping to correct these kinds of details while in the process of writing disrupts my concentration, mood, and the story’s flow.  Because I revise so much while writing, it’s usually better to reserve the detail work for later in the process, when I’m cleaning up the manuscript before submitting it.  But sometimes, in the frenzy and exhaustion of Deadline Hell, I miss one of my notes, and the mistake appears in print, to annoy readers like Jaclyne, who wonders how this can happen, when so many pairs of eyes review my work.

Chicago_manual Mistakes with eye or hair color or other vital statistics are the kind someone really ought to catch, same as they ought to catch a writer's using, say, "flaunt" when the correct word is "flout," or a comma where there should be a period, or a missing end quote.  If I’m such a babbling idiot by Deadline time as to miss an obvious mistake, a copy editor ought to catch it, and most will.  But I’ve never had the same copy editor twice, and as is the case in all professions, some are sharper than others.  (Along with covers, the subject of copy editors is one guaranteed to get a group of authors very excited.  And not in a good way.)

1817accidentsinquadrilledancing_2 When it comes to historical detail or foreign languages (for Yanks, the latter would include British English), it’s mainly the author’s responsibility.  And this author, though a nerd, ALWAYS makes at least one mistake per book.  It’s not that I don’t care.  I drive myself  & others crazy with the obsession to Get It Exactly Right.  Yet inevitably, there are errors.  Because Nobody’s Perfect.  (For the best use ever of this phrase, please see Some Like It Hot.)

Lord_of_scoundrels_07sm_3 ArticlesI could do a whole blog–or several–on the pitfalls of historical research, but foreign languages allow for an easy demonstration of the If You Don't Know It's Wrong, How Do You Know It's Wrong principle.

A few years ago I found out that there were a few errors in the Italian (pronouns and gender errors) in Lord of Scoundrels.  This happened despite my consulting books as well as people who spoke and wrote Italian.  Trouble was, I did not realize how difficult and complicated Italian was–trickier grammatically than French, for instance.  I did not know that the book I relied on was inadequate.  Neither I nor my consultants realized my queries to them should have been more detailed.  What I needed was an experienced professional translator, but I didn’t know enough to know this.

Americanisms_3

I cannot expect editor and copy editor to catch Americanisms (i.e., words or phrases the English wouldn’t have used) or anachronistic language.  So no, I can’t expect them to catch errors in every single foreign language that appears in my books–like Arabic as understood by English speakers in the 19th C (for Mr. Impossible).

Jaclyne says, “It sometimes annoys me to find these in the books I read, thinking that if I found them, they should have been easily corrected in the editing process.  It makes me think I should become a proof-reader… seems to me the ones that are supposed to do the job are only skimming the story, not reading it, and so, not doing their job properly.”

That may be a little harsh.  True, I and other authors have discovered errors introduced by others during the editing/copyediting/proofreading process–and not corrected, despite our protests.  We’ve also discovered mistakes that every single person reviewing the manuscript somehow overlooked.  But we definitely can't expect those reviewing to be omniscient.  We’ve all made mistakes, I think, for which we can blame no one but ourselves, and all we can say to readers is, Mea Culpa.
Criminal

But I’d like to know what other readers think.  When you find mistakes in a book, what’s your reaction?

245 thoughts on “Mea Culpa”

  1. Well, it depends on how well the book is going generally.
    I flinch at white wedding dresses. Hello too early. The potato in England way too early. (I pretend it is a mistranslation for turnip.) Sabotage too early.

    Reply
  2. Well, it depends on how well the book is going generally.
    I flinch at white wedding dresses. Hello too early. The potato in England way too early. (I pretend it is a mistranslation for turnip.) Sabotage too early.

    Reply
  3. Well, it depends on how well the book is going generally.
    I flinch at white wedding dresses. Hello too early. The potato in England way too early. (I pretend it is a mistranslation for turnip.) Sabotage too early.

    Reply
  4. Well, it depends on how well the book is going generally.
    I flinch at white wedding dresses. Hello too early. The potato in England way too early. (I pretend it is a mistranslation for turnip.) Sabotage too early.

    Reply
  5. Well, it depends on how well the book is going generally.
    I flinch at white wedding dresses. Hello too early. The potato in England way too early. (I pretend it is a mistranslation for turnip.) Sabotage too early.

    Reply
  6. I just finished a book that had oodles of typos, grammatical mistakes, off things, really. But it was a fabulous book, and I didn’t mind. I’m not going to write to the author and grump. I suppose I’m forgiving when I I’m entranced with the story; it’s when the book is not well-written to begin with and then compounded with careless mistakes that my arm reflexively yearns to pitch it against a wall.
    I know when I write it’s so easy to read over mistakes. Even with a Word program it won’t catch everything.

    Reply
  7. I just finished a book that had oodles of typos, grammatical mistakes, off things, really. But it was a fabulous book, and I didn’t mind. I’m not going to write to the author and grump. I suppose I’m forgiving when I I’m entranced with the story; it’s when the book is not well-written to begin with and then compounded with careless mistakes that my arm reflexively yearns to pitch it against a wall.
    I know when I write it’s so easy to read over mistakes. Even with a Word program it won’t catch everything.

    Reply
  8. I just finished a book that had oodles of typos, grammatical mistakes, off things, really. But it was a fabulous book, and I didn’t mind. I’m not going to write to the author and grump. I suppose I’m forgiving when I I’m entranced with the story; it’s when the book is not well-written to begin with and then compounded with careless mistakes that my arm reflexively yearns to pitch it against a wall.
    I know when I write it’s so easy to read over mistakes. Even with a Word program it won’t catch everything.

    Reply
  9. I just finished a book that had oodles of typos, grammatical mistakes, off things, really. But it was a fabulous book, and I didn’t mind. I’m not going to write to the author and grump. I suppose I’m forgiving when I I’m entranced with the story; it’s when the book is not well-written to begin with and then compounded with careless mistakes that my arm reflexively yearns to pitch it against a wall.
    I know when I write it’s so easy to read over mistakes. Even with a Word program it won’t catch everything.

    Reply
  10. I just finished a book that had oodles of typos, grammatical mistakes, off things, really. But it was a fabulous book, and I didn’t mind. I’m not going to write to the author and grump. I suppose I’m forgiving when I I’m entranced with the story; it’s when the book is not well-written to begin with and then compounded with careless mistakes that my arm reflexively yearns to pitch it against a wall.
    I know when I write it’s so easy to read over mistakes. Even with a Word program it won’t catch everything.

    Reply
  11. I think there is no way every author or editor can know everything there is to know about the world, so word choices etc don’t really bother me. It’s unlikely I would catch them anyway. I know about the potatoes in England, but for the average romance novel, I don’t expect the author to have studied the entire history of food. Even if the author picked up two different reference books on food for her novel, she might still miss this somehow.
    Copy editing mistakes bother me when I find them in abundance,like a book I read recently that was under 300 pages and had multiple mistakes per chapter–and this from a reputable publisher.
    I am much more bothered by things that don’t jive with my emotional sense of continuity, like when heroes or heroines make utterly inexplicable choices in light of how they’ve been drawn in the story.
    Because my area of expertise is historical dress, I do notice costuming issues, but some of those things are obscure so I’m pretty forgiving–unless the whole book is moronic, but I probably wouldn’t keep reading it, in that case.
    In fact, I’m more likely to be upset by reading a review of a book that attacks the book for historical accuracy when I know the *reviewer* is the one in error. That drives me nuts. After all, the reviewer chose to slam someone for something and didn’t bother to check their facts. That makes me want to reach into cyberspace and strangle someone.
    It is interesting to me how often the review situation happens. How, I wonder, do authors who do meticulous research handle the situation when people’s perception of a time and place is really a fantasy, sometimes based on a lifetime of reading other novels, as opposed to having actually studied the time in question? Does it make you crazy? Or do editors prefer you err on the side of the fantasy?

    Reply
  12. I think there is no way every author or editor can know everything there is to know about the world, so word choices etc don’t really bother me. It’s unlikely I would catch them anyway. I know about the potatoes in England, but for the average romance novel, I don’t expect the author to have studied the entire history of food. Even if the author picked up two different reference books on food for her novel, she might still miss this somehow.
    Copy editing mistakes bother me when I find them in abundance,like a book I read recently that was under 300 pages and had multiple mistakes per chapter–and this from a reputable publisher.
    I am much more bothered by things that don’t jive with my emotional sense of continuity, like when heroes or heroines make utterly inexplicable choices in light of how they’ve been drawn in the story.
    Because my area of expertise is historical dress, I do notice costuming issues, but some of those things are obscure so I’m pretty forgiving–unless the whole book is moronic, but I probably wouldn’t keep reading it, in that case.
    In fact, I’m more likely to be upset by reading a review of a book that attacks the book for historical accuracy when I know the *reviewer* is the one in error. That drives me nuts. After all, the reviewer chose to slam someone for something and didn’t bother to check their facts. That makes me want to reach into cyberspace and strangle someone.
    It is interesting to me how often the review situation happens. How, I wonder, do authors who do meticulous research handle the situation when people’s perception of a time and place is really a fantasy, sometimes based on a lifetime of reading other novels, as opposed to having actually studied the time in question? Does it make you crazy? Or do editors prefer you err on the side of the fantasy?

    Reply
  13. I think there is no way every author or editor can know everything there is to know about the world, so word choices etc don’t really bother me. It’s unlikely I would catch them anyway. I know about the potatoes in England, but for the average romance novel, I don’t expect the author to have studied the entire history of food. Even if the author picked up two different reference books on food for her novel, she might still miss this somehow.
    Copy editing mistakes bother me when I find them in abundance,like a book I read recently that was under 300 pages and had multiple mistakes per chapter–and this from a reputable publisher.
    I am much more bothered by things that don’t jive with my emotional sense of continuity, like when heroes or heroines make utterly inexplicable choices in light of how they’ve been drawn in the story.
    Because my area of expertise is historical dress, I do notice costuming issues, but some of those things are obscure so I’m pretty forgiving–unless the whole book is moronic, but I probably wouldn’t keep reading it, in that case.
    In fact, I’m more likely to be upset by reading a review of a book that attacks the book for historical accuracy when I know the *reviewer* is the one in error. That drives me nuts. After all, the reviewer chose to slam someone for something and didn’t bother to check their facts. That makes me want to reach into cyberspace and strangle someone.
    It is interesting to me how often the review situation happens. How, I wonder, do authors who do meticulous research handle the situation when people’s perception of a time and place is really a fantasy, sometimes based on a lifetime of reading other novels, as opposed to having actually studied the time in question? Does it make you crazy? Or do editors prefer you err on the side of the fantasy?

    Reply
  14. I think there is no way every author or editor can know everything there is to know about the world, so word choices etc don’t really bother me. It’s unlikely I would catch them anyway. I know about the potatoes in England, but for the average romance novel, I don’t expect the author to have studied the entire history of food. Even if the author picked up two different reference books on food for her novel, she might still miss this somehow.
    Copy editing mistakes bother me when I find them in abundance,like a book I read recently that was under 300 pages and had multiple mistakes per chapter–and this from a reputable publisher.
    I am much more bothered by things that don’t jive with my emotional sense of continuity, like when heroes or heroines make utterly inexplicable choices in light of how they’ve been drawn in the story.
    Because my area of expertise is historical dress, I do notice costuming issues, but some of those things are obscure so I’m pretty forgiving–unless the whole book is moronic, but I probably wouldn’t keep reading it, in that case.
    In fact, I’m more likely to be upset by reading a review of a book that attacks the book for historical accuracy when I know the *reviewer* is the one in error. That drives me nuts. After all, the reviewer chose to slam someone for something and didn’t bother to check their facts. That makes me want to reach into cyberspace and strangle someone.
    It is interesting to me how often the review situation happens. How, I wonder, do authors who do meticulous research handle the situation when people’s perception of a time and place is really a fantasy, sometimes based on a lifetime of reading other novels, as opposed to having actually studied the time in question? Does it make you crazy? Or do editors prefer you err on the side of the fantasy?

    Reply
  15. I think there is no way every author or editor can know everything there is to know about the world, so word choices etc don’t really bother me. It’s unlikely I would catch them anyway. I know about the potatoes in England, but for the average romance novel, I don’t expect the author to have studied the entire history of food. Even if the author picked up two different reference books on food for her novel, she might still miss this somehow.
    Copy editing mistakes bother me when I find them in abundance,like a book I read recently that was under 300 pages and had multiple mistakes per chapter–and this from a reputable publisher.
    I am much more bothered by things that don’t jive with my emotional sense of continuity, like when heroes or heroines make utterly inexplicable choices in light of how they’ve been drawn in the story.
    Because my area of expertise is historical dress, I do notice costuming issues, but some of those things are obscure so I’m pretty forgiving–unless the whole book is moronic, but I probably wouldn’t keep reading it, in that case.
    In fact, I’m more likely to be upset by reading a review of a book that attacks the book for historical accuracy when I know the *reviewer* is the one in error. That drives me nuts. After all, the reviewer chose to slam someone for something and didn’t bother to check their facts. That makes me want to reach into cyberspace and strangle someone.
    It is interesting to me how often the review situation happens. How, I wonder, do authors who do meticulous research handle the situation when people’s perception of a time and place is really a fantasy, sometimes based on a lifetime of reading other novels, as opposed to having actually studied the time in question? Does it make you crazy? Or do editors prefer you err on the side of the fantasy?

    Reply
  16. I’m a very forgiving reader, and for the most part, I just blow by errors, especially in fiction. I’m reading for entertainment, and I’m not going to get bogged down in the details. I did email an author a “did you know?” a few years ago about an error in the gender of a horse. I believe the line was something along the lines of, “The gelding stood in the hay next to her foal.” It made me laugh when I read it, and the author had been completely unaware the error was in the published book. Oops! 🙂
    Lezlie
    Books ‘N Border Collies

    Reply
  17. I’m a very forgiving reader, and for the most part, I just blow by errors, especially in fiction. I’m reading for entertainment, and I’m not going to get bogged down in the details. I did email an author a “did you know?” a few years ago about an error in the gender of a horse. I believe the line was something along the lines of, “The gelding stood in the hay next to her foal.” It made me laugh when I read it, and the author had been completely unaware the error was in the published book. Oops! 🙂
    Lezlie
    Books ‘N Border Collies

    Reply
  18. I’m a very forgiving reader, and for the most part, I just blow by errors, especially in fiction. I’m reading for entertainment, and I’m not going to get bogged down in the details. I did email an author a “did you know?” a few years ago about an error in the gender of a horse. I believe the line was something along the lines of, “The gelding stood in the hay next to her foal.” It made me laugh when I read it, and the author had been completely unaware the error was in the published book. Oops! 🙂
    Lezlie
    Books ‘N Border Collies

    Reply
  19. I’m a very forgiving reader, and for the most part, I just blow by errors, especially in fiction. I’m reading for entertainment, and I’m not going to get bogged down in the details. I did email an author a “did you know?” a few years ago about an error in the gender of a horse. I believe the line was something along the lines of, “The gelding stood in the hay next to her foal.” It made me laugh when I read it, and the author had been completely unaware the error was in the published book. Oops! 🙂
    Lezlie
    Books ‘N Border Collies

    Reply
  20. I’m a very forgiving reader, and for the most part, I just blow by errors, especially in fiction. I’m reading for entertainment, and I’m not going to get bogged down in the details. I did email an author a “did you know?” a few years ago about an error in the gender of a horse. I believe the line was something along the lines of, “The gelding stood in the hay next to her foal.” It made me laugh when I read it, and the author had been completely unaware the error was in the published book. Oops! 🙂
    Lezlie
    Books ‘N Border Collies

    Reply
  21. I admit to being a bit of a grammar snob. That said, I know mistakes are common, and I’m willing to overlook small typos.
    However, when the author clearly doesn’t have a grasp on basic writing techniques, it gets on my nerves. Repeated comma splices and run-on sentences make me crazy.
    Even worse, though, is when someone is called another character’s name accidentally. That gets my chuck-the-book-at-the-wall reflex going. It seems like it only happens with new authors, so I’m not sure if it’s a reflection of the author’s inexperience or poor copyeditors at lower levels changing things incorrectly. Either way, through, I find it jarring, and it interrupts the story.
    I’m totally with Jaclyne though – every time I catch mistakes, I think I should become a copyeditor too. How’s the pay? Hehe.

    Reply
  22. I admit to being a bit of a grammar snob. That said, I know mistakes are common, and I’m willing to overlook small typos.
    However, when the author clearly doesn’t have a grasp on basic writing techniques, it gets on my nerves. Repeated comma splices and run-on sentences make me crazy.
    Even worse, though, is when someone is called another character’s name accidentally. That gets my chuck-the-book-at-the-wall reflex going. It seems like it only happens with new authors, so I’m not sure if it’s a reflection of the author’s inexperience or poor copyeditors at lower levels changing things incorrectly. Either way, through, I find it jarring, and it interrupts the story.
    I’m totally with Jaclyne though – every time I catch mistakes, I think I should become a copyeditor too. How’s the pay? Hehe.

    Reply
  23. I admit to being a bit of a grammar snob. That said, I know mistakes are common, and I’m willing to overlook small typos.
    However, when the author clearly doesn’t have a grasp on basic writing techniques, it gets on my nerves. Repeated comma splices and run-on sentences make me crazy.
    Even worse, though, is when someone is called another character’s name accidentally. That gets my chuck-the-book-at-the-wall reflex going. It seems like it only happens with new authors, so I’m not sure if it’s a reflection of the author’s inexperience or poor copyeditors at lower levels changing things incorrectly. Either way, through, I find it jarring, and it interrupts the story.
    I’m totally with Jaclyne though – every time I catch mistakes, I think I should become a copyeditor too. How’s the pay? Hehe.

    Reply
  24. I admit to being a bit of a grammar snob. That said, I know mistakes are common, and I’m willing to overlook small typos.
    However, when the author clearly doesn’t have a grasp on basic writing techniques, it gets on my nerves. Repeated comma splices and run-on sentences make me crazy.
    Even worse, though, is when someone is called another character’s name accidentally. That gets my chuck-the-book-at-the-wall reflex going. It seems like it only happens with new authors, so I’m not sure if it’s a reflection of the author’s inexperience or poor copyeditors at lower levels changing things incorrectly. Either way, through, I find it jarring, and it interrupts the story.
    I’m totally with Jaclyne though – every time I catch mistakes, I think I should become a copyeditor too. How’s the pay? Hehe.

    Reply
  25. I admit to being a bit of a grammar snob. That said, I know mistakes are common, and I’m willing to overlook small typos.
    However, when the author clearly doesn’t have a grasp on basic writing techniques, it gets on my nerves. Repeated comma splices and run-on sentences make me crazy.
    Even worse, though, is when someone is called another character’s name accidentally. That gets my chuck-the-book-at-the-wall reflex going. It seems like it only happens with new authors, so I’m not sure if it’s a reflection of the author’s inexperience or poor copyeditors at lower levels changing things incorrectly. Either way, through, I find it jarring, and it interrupts the story.
    I’m totally with Jaclyne though – every time I catch mistakes, I think I should become a copyeditor too. How’s the pay? Hehe.

    Reply
  26. Mostly I can just blow by the errors (at least on the first reading of a book), on the second I tend to notice them more – but I can still ignore errors, but it is a case of ignorance is bliss. If my knowledge on an area is light (most everything) then I’m not too bothered by it, but if it is something that I happen to know a lot about, then errors really bother me. Just another reason I have a hard time reading mysteries and watching CSI.

    Reply
  27. Mostly I can just blow by the errors (at least on the first reading of a book), on the second I tend to notice them more – but I can still ignore errors, but it is a case of ignorance is bliss. If my knowledge on an area is light (most everything) then I’m not too bothered by it, but if it is something that I happen to know a lot about, then errors really bother me. Just another reason I have a hard time reading mysteries and watching CSI.

    Reply
  28. Mostly I can just blow by the errors (at least on the first reading of a book), on the second I tend to notice them more – but I can still ignore errors, but it is a case of ignorance is bliss. If my knowledge on an area is light (most everything) then I’m not too bothered by it, but if it is something that I happen to know a lot about, then errors really bother me. Just another reason I have a hard time reading mysteries and watching CSI.

    Reply
  29. Mostly I can just blow by the errors (at least on the first reading of a book), on the second I tend to notice them more – but I can still ignore errors, but it is a case of ignorance is bliss. If my knowledge on an area is light (most everything) then I’m not too bothered by it, but if it is something that I happen to know a lot about, then errors really bother me. Just another reason I have a hard time reading mysteries and watching CSI.

    Reply
  30. Mostly I can just blow by the errors (at least on the first reading of a book), on the second I tend to notice them more – but I can still ignore errors, but it is a case of ignorance is bliss. If my knowledge on an area is light (most everything) then I’m not too bothered by it, but if it is something that I happen to know a lot about, then errors really bother me. Just another reason I have a hard time reading mysteries and watching CSI.

    Reply
  31. I usually mark through the error with a pen or put a question mark over the may-be-mistake. This makes my family (if they read the book after me, which sometimes happens) crazy.

    Reply
  32. I usually mark through the error with a pen or put a question mark over the may-be-mistake. This makes my family (if they read the book after me, which sometimes happens) crazy.

    Reply
  33. I usually mark through the error with a pen or put a question mark over the may-be-mistake. This makes my family (if they read the book after me, which sometimes happens) crazy.

    Reply
  34. I usually mark through the error with a pen or put a question mark over the may-be-mistake. This makes my family (if they read the book after me, which sometimes happens) crazy.

    Reply
  35. I usually mark through the error with a pen or put a question mark over the may-be-mistake. This makes my family (if they read the book after me, which sometimes happens) crazy.

    Reply
  36. At one point in my chronically underpaid life, I was a copyeditor. As a result, I am particularly annoyed by errors in grammar, usage or punctuation, or inconsistency in character description because these are precisely the kinds of errors copyeditors are supposed to catch.
    As a reader, however, I am most annoyed by factual howlers. I recently read a book in which the Mona Lisa was mentioned frequently. I will give the author a pass for not knowing it was hanging in Napoleon’s bedroom when one of the characters presumably saw it in the Louvre. That’s a sufficiently odd bit of information. But I will not give anyone a pass for attributing the panting to Michaelangelo.

    Reply
  37. At one point in my chronically underpaid life, I was a copyeditor. As a result, I am particularly annoyed by errors in grammar, usage or punctuation, or inconsistency in character description because these are precisely the kinds of errors copyeditors are supposed to catch.
    As a reader, however, I am most annoyed by factual howlers. I recently read a book in which the Mona Lisa was mentioned frequently. I will give the author a pass for not knowing it was hanging in Napoleon’s bedroom when one of the characters presumably saw it in the Louvre. That’s a sufficiently odd bit of information. But I will not give anyone a pass for attributing the panting to Michaelangelo.

    Reply
  38. At one point in my chronically underpaid life, I was a copyeditor. As a result, I am particularly annoyed by errors in grammar, usage or punctuation, or inconsistency in character description because these are precisely the kinds of errors copyeditors are supposed to catch.
    As a reader, however, I am most annoyed by factual howlers. I recently read a book in which the Mona Lisa was mentioned frequently. I will give the author a pass for not knowing it was hanging in Napoleon’s bedroom when one of the characters presumably saw it in the Louvre. That’s a sufficiently odd bit of information. But I will not give anyone a pass for attributing the panting to Michaelangelo.

    Reply
  39. At one point in my chronically underpaid life, I was a copyeditor. As a result, I am particularly annoyed by errors in grammar, usage or punctuation, or inconsistency in character description because these are precisely the kinds of errors copyeditors are supposed to catch.
    As a reader, however, I am most annoyed by factual howlers. I recently read a book in which the Mona Lisa was mentioned frequently. I will give the author a pass for not knowing it was hanging in Napoleon’s bedroom when one of the characters presumably saw it in the Louvre. That’s a sufficiently odd bit of information. But I will not give anyone a pass for attributing the panting to Michaelangelo.

    Reply
  40. At one point in my chronically underpaid life, I was a copyeditor. As a result, I am particularly annoyed by errors in grammar, usage or punctuation, or inconsistency in character description because these are precisely the kinds of errors copyeditors are supposed to catch.
    As a reader, however, I am most annoyed by factual howlers. I recently read a book in which the Mona Lisa was mentioned frequently. I will give the author a pass for not knowing it was hanging in Napoleon’s bedroom when one of the characters presumably saw it in the Louvre. That’s a sufficiently odd bit of information. But I will not give anyone a pass for attributing the panting to Michaelangelo.

    Reply
  41. I just read a RITA-winning novel which was absolutely filled with errors. I wish I could remember them all. There were problems with its/it’s in every chapter and many, many spelling mistakes (including the kind where the word sounds the same but the spelling makes it something else entirely). Also I think the burro changed genders for a while (though I could be wrong about that, I was paying too much attention to the spelling mistakes to follow the storyline completely).
    I’m with all the lovely readers who think they should be copy editors — I think that all the time myself. It seems to me that somewhere, someone sucks at it, and I’d be willing to volunteer (oh yes, please) to check their work.
    There is a recent book by a wonderful author that I picked up in the store and put down again when on the first page the hero’s scar “dissected” his eyebrow (um, shouldn’t that be “bisected”?). I’ll read it eventually, of course, but just then I couldn’t bring myself to put it in the basket. . .
    It is so good to know that it isn’t “just me” noticing this. . .

    Reply
  42. I just read a RITA-winning novel which was absolutely filled with errors. I wish I could remember them all. There were problems with its/it’s in every chapter and many, many spelling mistakes (including the kind where the word sounds the same but the spelling makes it something else entirely). Also I think the burro changed genders for a while (though I could be wrong about that, I was paying too much attention to the spelling mistakes to follow the storyline completely).
    I’m with all the lovely readers who think they should be copy editors — I think that all the time myself. It seems to me that somewhere, someone sucks at it, and I’d be willing to volunteer (oh yes, please) to check their work.
    There is a recent book by a wonderful author that I picked up in the store and put down again when on the first page the hero’s scar “dissected” his eyebrow (um, shouldn’t that be “bisected”?). I’ll read it eventually, of course, but just then I couldn’t bring myself to put it in the basket. . .
    It is so good to know that it isn’t “just me” noticing this. . .

    Reply
  43. I just read a RITA-winning novel which was absolutely filled with errors. I wish I could remember them all. There were problems with its/it’s in every chapter and many, many spelling mistakes (including the kind where the word sounds the same but the spelling makes it something else entirely). Also I think the burro changed genders for a while (though I could be wrong about that, I was paying too much attention to the spelling mistakes to follow the storyline completely).
    I’m with all the lovely readers who think they should be copy editors — I think that all the time myself. It seems to me that somewhere, someone sucks at it, and I’d be willing to volunteer (oh yes, please) to check their work.
    There is a recent book by a wonderful author that I picked up in the store and put down again when on the first page the hero’s scar “dissected” his eyebrow (um, shouldn’t that be “bisected”?). I’ll read it eventually, of course, but just then I couldn’t bring myself to put it in the basket. . .
    It is so good to know that it isn’t “just me” noticing this. . .

    Reply
  44. I just read a RITA-winning novel which was absolutely filled with errors. I wish I could remember them all. There were problems with its/it’s in every chapter and many, many spelling mistakes (including the kind where the word sounds the same but the spelling makes it something else entirely). Also I think the burro changed genders for a while (though I could be wrong about that, I was paying too much attention to the spelling mistakes to follow the storyline completely).
    I’m with all the lovely readers who think they should be copy editors — I think that all the time myself. It seems to me that somewhere, someone sucks at it, and I’d be willing to volunteer (oh yes, please) to check their work.
    There is a recent book by a wonderful author that I picked up in the store and put down again when on the first page the hero’s scar “dissected” his eyebrow (um, shouldn’t that be “bisected”?). I’ll read it eventually, of course, but just then I couldn’t bring myself to put it in the basket. . .
    It is so good to know that it isn’t “just me” noticing this. . .

    Reply
  45. I just read a RITA-winning novel which was absolutely filled with errors. I wish I could remember them all. There were problems with its/it’s in every chapter and many, many spelling mistakes (including the kind where the word sounds the same but the spelling makes it something else entirely). Also I think the burro changed genders for a while (though I could be wrong about that, I was paying too much attention to the spelling mistakes to follow the storyline completely).
    I’m with all the lovely readers who think they should be copy editors — I think that all the time myself. It seems to me that somewhere, someone sucks at it, and I’d be willing to volunteer (oh yes, please) to check their work.
    There is a recent book by a wonderful author that I picked up in the store and put down again when on the first page the hero’s scar “dissected” his eyebrow (um, shouldn’t that be “bisected”?). I’ll read it eventually, of course, but just then I couldn’t bring myself to put it in the basket. . .
    It is so good to know that it isn’t “just me” noticing this. . .

    Reply
  46. My favorite mistaken-word error came in the very first sentence of a book by a big-name author & publishing house, both of whom should have known better:
    “The women’s scream rendered the night.”

    Reply
  47. My favorite mistaken-word error came in the very first sentence of a book by a big-name author & publishing house, both of whom should have known better:
    “The women’s scream rendered the night.”

    Reply
  48. My favorite mistaken-word error came in the very first sentence of a book by a big-name author & publishing house, both of whom should have known better:
    “The women’s scream rendered the night.”

    Reply
  49. My favorite mistaken-word error came in the very first sentence of a book by a big-name author & publishing house, both of whom should have known better:
    “The women’s scream rendered the night.”

    Reply
  50. My favorite mistaken-word error came in the very first sentence of a book by a big-name author & publishing house, both of whom should have known better:
    “The women’s scream rendered the night.”

    Reply
  51. ***How, I wonder, do authors who do meticulous research handle the situation when people’s perception of a time and place is really a fantasy, sometimes based on a lifetime of reading other novels, as opposed to having actually studied the time in question? Does it make you crazy?***
    Yes, it makes me crazy.
    I’m a guppy in the genre, but I’ve caught my share of crap from readers/reviewers who somehow failed to grasp that the 1780s are different than “the Regency” they might be more familiar with. Not much you can do about it though. It does make it extra sweet when a reputable reviewer lauds you for getting it right!
    To a certain extent, “Romancelandia” has become the de facto setting for all Historical Romances. And in the fantasy kingdom of Romancelandia, story trumps history and plot twist trumps reality, law and sometimes even the laws of physics, LOL!
    Also, I’m the QUEEN to typos (it’s the damn dyslexia). I pity my copy editors, and so should you.

    Reply
  52. ***How, I wonder, do authors who do meticulous research handle the situation when people’s perception of a time and place is really a fantasy, sometimes based on a lifetime of reading other novels, as opposed to having actually studied the time in question? Does it make you crazy?***
    Yes, it makes me crazy.
    I’m a guppy in the genre, but I’ve caught my share of crap from readers/reviewers who somehow failed to grasp that the 1780s are different than “the Regency” they might be more familiar with. Not much you can do about it though. It does make it extra sweet when a reputable reviewer lauds you for getting it right!
    To a certain extent, “Romancelandia” has become the de facto setting for all Historical Romances. And in the fantasy kingdom of Romancelandia, story trumps history and plot twist trumps reality, law and sometimes even the laws of physics, LOL!
    Also, I’m the QUEEN to typos (it’s the damn dyslexia). I pity my copy editors, and so should you.

    Reply
  53. ***How, I wonder, do authors who do meticulous research handle the situation when people’s perception of a time and place is really a fantasy, sometimes based on a lifetime of reading other novels, as opposed to having actually studied the time in question? Does it make you crazy?***
    Yes, it makes me crazy.
    I’m a guppy in the genre, but I’ve caught my share of crap from readers/reviewers who somehow failed to grasp that the 1780s are different than “the Regency” they might be more familiar with. Not much you can do about it though. It does make it extra sweet when a reputable reviewer lauds you for getting it right!
    To a certain extent, “Romancelandia” has become the de facto setting for all Historical Romances. And in the fantasy kingdom of Romancelandia, story trumps history and plot twist trumps reality, law and sometimes even the laws of physics, LOL!
    Also, I’m the QUEEN to typos (it’s the damn dyslexia). I pity my copy editors, and so should you.

    Reply
  54. ***How, I wonder, do authors who do meticulous research handle the situation when people’s perception of a time and place is really a fantasy, sometimes based on a lifetime of reading other novels, as opposed to having actually studied the time in question? Does it make you crazy?***
    Yes, it makes me crazy.
    I’m a guppy in the genre, but I’ve caught my share of crap from readers/reviewers who somehow failed to grasp that the 1780s are different than “the Regency” they might be more familiar with. Not much you can do about it though. It does make it extra sweet when a reputable reviewer lauds you for getting it right!
    To a certain extent, “Romancelandia” has become the de facto setting for all Historical Romances. And in the fantasy kingdom of Romancelandia, story trumps history and plot twist trumps reality, law and sometimes even the laws of physics, LOL!
    Also, I’m the QUEEN to typos (it’s the damn dyslexia). I pity my copy editors, and so should you.

    Reply
  55. ***How, I wonder, do authors who do meticulous research handle the situation when people’s perception of a time and place is really a fantasy, sometimes based on a lifetime of reading other novels, as opposed to having actually studied the time in question? Does it make you crazy?***
    Yes, it makes me crazy.
    I’m a guppy in the genre, but I’ve caught my share of crap from readers/reviewers who somehow failed to grasp that the 1780s are different than “the Regency” they might be more familiar with. Not much you can do about it though. It does make it extra sweet when a reputable reviewer lauds you for getting it right!
    To a certain extent, “Romancelandia” has become the de facto setting for all Historical Romances. And in the fantasy kingdom of Romancelandia, story trumps history and plot twist trumps reality, law and sometimes even the laws of physics, LOL!
    Also, I’m the QUEEN to typos (it’s the damn dyslexia). I pity my copy editors, and so should you.

    Reply
  56. For the most part I don’t mind minor errors because, as you said, we are all human and nothing is perfect. For me, the most annoying thing is a timeline that is off. When an author has a prologue or refers back to a previous event in a story with dates and ages of the hero and heroine at that time then in my mind I start off with characters at a definite age. When the story indicates a certain amount of time has passed I add those years on to the original age and I should have the current age but sometimes I am surprised to find that the figures are off. I don’t mean by months but by several years. I’ve wondered if someone besides the author changed a date or age but didn’t check the entire story to make sure the numbers added up.

    Reply
  57. For the most part I don’t mind minor errors because, as you said, we are all human and nothing is perfect. For me, the most annoying thing is a timeline that is off. When an author has a prologue or refers back to a previous event in a story with dates and ages of the hero and heroine at that time then in my mind I start off with characters at a definite age. When the story indicates a certain amount of time has passed I add those years on to the original age and I should have the current age but sometimes I am surprised to find that the figures are off. I don’t mean by months but by several years. I’ve wondered if someone besides the author changed a date or age but didn’t check the entire story to make sure the numbers added up.

    Reply
  58. For the most part I don’t mind minor errors because, as you said, we are all human and nothing is perfect. For me, the most annoying thing is a timeline that is off. When an author has a prologue or refers back to a previous event in a story with dates and ages of the hero and heroine at that time then in my mind I start off with characters at a definite age. When the story indicates a certain amount of time has passed I add those years on to the original age and I should have the current age but sometimes I am surprised to find that the figures are off. I don’t mean by months but by several years. I’ve wondered if someone besides the author changed a date or age but didn’t check the entire story to make sure the numbers added up.

    Reply
  59. For the most part I don’t mind minor errors because, as you said, we are all human and nothing is perfect. For me, the most annoying thing is a timeline that is off. When an author has a prologue or refers back to a previous event in a story with dates and ages of the hero and heroine at that time then in my mind I start off with characters at a definite age. When the story indicates a certain amount of time has passed I add those years on to the original age and I should have the current age but sometimes I am surprised to find that the figures are off. I don’t mean by months but by several years. I’ve wondered if someone besides the author changed a date or age but didn’t check the entire story to make sure the numbers added up.

    Reply
  60. For the most part I don’t mind minor errors because, as you said, we are all human and nothing is perfect. For me, the most annoying thing is a timeline that is off. When an author has a prologue or refers back to a previous event in a story with dates and ages of the hero and heroine at that time then in my mind I start off with characters at a definite age. When the story indicates a certain amount of time has passed I add those years on to the original age and I should have the current age but sometimes I am surprised to find that the figures are off. I don’t mean by months but by several years. I’ve wondered if someone besides the author changed a date or age but didn’t check the entire story to make sure the numbers added up.

    Reply
  61. Sad to say, but I’ve found that History is bunk.
    It’s written by the victors.
    I researched a murder that happened a few hundred years ago and amassed a pile of books – exactly 12 saying he done it, and 12 saying he didn’t. After a generation, History definitely becomes fiction.
    And editors are ‘Way Important!
    This author, at least, is phobic about math and has been declared an “innumerate.” So if my math is off and an editor doesn’t catch it – Ouch!
    And then please to note that had I not caught the error in the proofs, I’d have had a hero kissing the heroine’s rosy hips.
    (Hmmm… maybe the book would have sold better if he had?)
    Sorry to sound so cynical, but I’ve found History to be like mercury, it slides through living fingers and always takes on new shapes.
    That’s enough analogies for History. ’nuff said! Mea Culpa too, and mea commiserates.

    Reply
  62. Sad to say, but I’ve found that History is bunk.
    It’s written by the victors.
    I researched a murder that happened a few hundred years ago and amassed a pile of books – exactly 12 saying he done it, and 12 saying he didn’t. After a generation, History definitely becomes fiction.
    And editors are ‘Way Important!
    This author, at least, is phobic about math and has been declared an “innumerate.” So if my math is off and an editor doesn’t catch it – Ouch!
    And then please to note that had I not caught the error in the proofs, I’d have had a hero kissing the heroine’s rosy hips.
    (Hmmm… maybe the book would have sold better if he had?)
    Sorry to sound so cynical, but I’ve found History to be like mercury, it slides through living fingers and always takes on new shapes.
    That’s enough analogies for History. ’nuff said! Mea Culpa too, and mea commiserates.

    Reply
  63. Sad to say, but I’ve found that History is bunk.
    It’s written by the victors.
    I researched a murder that happened a few hundred years ago and amassed a pile of books – exactly 12 saying he done it, and 12 saying he didn’t. After a generation, History definitely becomes fiction.
    And editors are ‘Way Important!
    This author, at least, is phobic about math and has been declared an “innumerate.” So if my math is off and an editor doesn’t catch it – Ouch!
    And then please to note that had I not caught the error in the proofs, I’d have had a hero kissing the heroine’s rosy hips.
    (Hmmm… maybe the book would have sold better if he had?)
    Sorry to sound so cynical, but I’ve found History to be like mercury, it slides through living fingers and always takes on new shapes.
    That’s enough analogies for History. ’nuff said! Mea Culpa too, and mea commiserates.

    Reply
  64. Sad to say, but I’ve found that History is bunk.
    It’s written by the victors.
    I researched a murder that happened a few hundred years ago and amassed a pile of books – exactly 12 saying he done it, and 12 saying he didn’t. After a generation, History definitely becomes fiction.
    And editors are ‘Way Important!
    This author, at least, is phobic about math and has been declared an “innumerate.” So if my math is off and an editor doesn’t catch it – Ouch!
    And then please to note that had I not caught the error in the proofs, I’d have had a hero kissing the heroine’s rosy hips.
    (Hmmm… maybe the book would have sold better if he had?)
    Sorry to sound so cynical, but I’ve found History to be like mercury, it slides through living fingers and always takes on new shapes.
    That’s enough analogies for History. ’nuff said! Mea Culpa too, and mea commiserates.

    Reply
  65. Sad to say, but I’ve found that History is bunk.
    It’s written by the victors.
    I researched a murder that happened a few hundred years ago and amassed a pile of books – exactly 12 saying he done it, and 12 saying he didn’t. After a generation, History definitely becomes fiction.
    And editors are ‘Way Important!
    This author, at least, is phobic about math and has been declared an “innumerate.” So if my math is off and an editor doesn’t catch it – Ouch!
    And then please to note that had I not caught the error in the proofs, I’d have had a hero kissing the heroine’s rosy hips.
    (Hmmm… maybe the book would have sold better if he had?)
    Sorry to sound so cynical, but I’ve found History to be like mercury, it slides through living fingers and always takes on new shapes.
    That’s enough analogies for History. ’nuff said! Mea Culpa too, and mea commiserates.

    Reply
  66. Maybe I’ve weeded out the awful books, but most of what I read has the spelling and grammar correct, and, now that I know something about the Regency, most of the details correct, too.
    One grammatical error I see way too often is “off of”. He took the cup off of the table. No. He took the cup off the table. That “off of” really drives me crazy.
    The other thing that really annoys me is using contemporary names, slang, and attitudes in historical books. I’m seeing this more and more lately. I don’t expect Regency romances to sound exactly like Jane Austen, but a Regency heroine shouldn’t be named Blythe or Kimberly. (Yes, I saw these names in a recent Regency romance.)And in another book the heroine called the hero a control freak. That’s when I put the book down.

    Reply
  67. Maybe I’ve weeded out the awful books, but most of what I read has the spelling and grammar correct, and, now that I know something about the Regency, most of the details correct, too.
    One grammatical error I see way too often is “off of”. He took the cup off of the table. No. He took the cup off the table. That “off of” really drives me crazy.
    The other thing that really annoys me is using contemporary names, slang, and attitudes in historical books. I’m seeing this more and more lately. I don’t expect Regency romances to sound exactly like Jane Austen, but a Regency heroine shouldn’t be named Blythe or Kimberly. (Yes, I saw these names in a recent Regency romance.)And in another book the heroine called the hero a control freak. That’s when I put the book down.

    Reply
  68. Maybe I’ve weeded out the awful books, but most of what I read has the spelling and grammar correct, and, now that I know something about the Regency, most of the details correct, too.
    One grammatical error I see way too often is “off of”. He took the cup off of the table. No. He took the cup off the table. That “off of” really drives me crazy.
    The other thing that really annoys me is using contemporary names, slang, and attitudes in historical books. I’m seeing this more and more lately. I don’t expect Regency romances to sound exactly like Jane Austen, but a Regency heroine shouldn’t be named Blythe or Kimberly. (Yes, I saw these names in a recent Regency romance.)And in another book the heroine called the hero a control freak. That’s when I put the book down.

    Reply
  69. Maybe I’ve weeded out the awful books, but most of what I read has the spelling and grammar correct, and, now that I know something about the Regency, most of the details correct, too.
    One grammatical error I see way too often is “off of”. He took the cup off of the table. No. He took the cup off the table. That “off of” really drives me crazy.
    The other thing that really annoys me is using contemporary names, slang, and attitudes in historical books. I’m seeing this more and more lately. I don’t expect Regency romances to sound exactly like Jane Austen, but a Regency heroine shouldn’t be named Blythe or Kimberly. (Yes, I saw these names in a recent Regency romance.)And in another book the heroine called the hero a control freak. That’s when I put the book down.

    Reply
  70. Maybe I’ve weeded out the awful books, but most of what I read has the spelling and grammar correct, and, now that I know something about the Regency, most of the details correct, too.
    One grammatical error I see way too often is “off of”. He took the cup off of the table. No. He took the cup off the table. That “off of” really drives me crazy.
    The other thing that really annoys me is using contemporary names, slang, and attitudes in historical books. I’m seeing this more and more lately. I don’t expect Regency romances to sound exactly like Jane Austen, but a Regency heroine shouldn’t be named Blythe or Kimberly. (Yes, I saw these names in a recent Regency romance.)And in another book the heroine called the hero a control freak. That’s when I put the book down.

    Reply
  71. I shall say little, since you all are saying it so well. Only wanted to pick up on a couple of things: “The women’s scream rendered the night.”
    The “heart-rendering” moments are my faves, too, Susan S.___Ooh, Kalen, I trust there is a special place in the netherworld for reviewers who trash a book based on dead-wrong information or, as you so beautifully put it, info from their Encyclopedia Romancelandia.

    Reply
  72. I shall say little, since you all are saying it so well. Only wanted to pick up on a couple of things: “The women’s scream rendered the night.”
    The “heart-rendering” moments are my faves, too, Susan S.___Ooh, Kalen, I trust there is a special place in the netherworld for reviewers who trash a book based on dead-wrong information or, as you so beautifully put it, info from their Encyclopedia Romancelandia.

    Reply
  73. I shall say little, since you all are saying it so well. Only wanted to pick up on a couple of things: “The women’s scream rendered the night.”
    The “heart-rendering” moments are my faves, too, Susan S.___Ooh, Kalen, I trust there is a special place in the netherworld for reviewers who trash a book based on dead-wrong information or, as you so beautifully put it, info from their Encyclopedia Romancelandia.

    Reply
  74. I shall say little, since you all are saying it so well. Only wanted to pick up on a couple of things: “The women’s scream rendered the night.”
    The “heart-rendering” moments are my faves, too, Susan S.___Ooh, Kalen, I trust there is a special place in the netherworld for reviewers who trash a book based on dead-wrong information or, as you so beautifully put it, info from their Encyclopedia Romancelandia.

    Reply
  75. I shall say little, since you all are saying it so well. Only wanted to pick up on a couple of things: “The women’s scream rendered the night.”
    The “heart-rendering” moments are my faves, too, Susan S.___Ooh, Kalen, I trust there is a special place in the netherworld for reviewers who trash a book based on dead-wrong information or, as you so beautifully put it, info from their Encyclopedia Romancelandia.

    Reply
  76. My theory is that we find most offensive errors in our particular areas of expertise. I have read readers rant about a character crossing the wrong bridge or smelling the wrong flowers, errors that I would have forever remained oblivious to if some other reader had not called them to my attention. But I cringe with every “between you and I” and am ready to weep over sentences that have all the grace of a pig on stilts.
    If the characters have substance and likeability, I am generally forgiving of a few errors. Repeated errors do irritate me, as do character inconsistencies and errors that reveal grossly inadequate research. But such errors are rare in my reading experience. Having been embarassed by errors that escaped me and by errors created by an overzealous and mistaken copy editor, I marvel that so few errors actually make their way into print.

    Reply
  77. My theory is that we find most offensive errors in our particular areas of expertise. I have read readers rant about a character crossing the wrong bridge or smelling the wrong flowers, errors that I would have forever remained oblivious to if some other reader had not called them to my attention. But I cringe with every “between you and I” and am ready to weep over sentences that have all the grace of a pig on stilts.
    If the characters have substance and likeability, I am generally forgiving of a few errors. Repeated errors do irritate me, as do character inconsistencies and errors that reveal grossly inadequate research. But such errors are rare in my reading experience. Having been embarassed by errors that escaped me and by errors created by an overzealous and mistaken copy editor, I marvel that so few errors actually make their way into print.

    Reply
  78. My theory is that we find most offensive errors in our particular areas of expertise. I have read readers rant about a character crossing the wrong bridge or smelling the wrong flowers, errors that I would have forever remained oblivious to if some other reader had not called them to my attention. But I cringe with every “between you and I” and am ready to weep over sentences that have all the grace of a pig on stilts.
    If the characters have substance and likeability, I am generally forgiving of a few errors. Repeated errors do irritate me, as do character inconsistencies and errors that reveal grossly inadequate research. But such errors are rare in my reading experience. Having been embarassed by errors that escaped me and by errors created by an overzealous and mistaken copy editor, I marvel that so few errors actually make their way into print.

    Reply
  79. My theory is that we find most offensive errors in our particular areas of expertise. I have read readers rant about a character crossing the wrong bridge or smelling the wrong flowers, errors that I would have forever remained oblivious to if some other reader had not called them to my attention. But I cringe with every “between you and I” and am ready to weep over sentences that have all the grace of a pig on stilts.
    If the characters have substance and likeability, I am generally forgiving of a few errors. Repeated errors do irritate me, as do character inconsistencies and errors that reveal grossly inadequate research. But such errors are rare in my reading experience. Having been embarassed by errors that escaped me and by errors created by an overzealous and mistaken copy editor, I marvel that so few errors actually make their way into print.

    Reply
  80. My theory is that we find most offensive errors in our particular areas of expertise. I have read readers rant about a character crossing the wrong bridge or smelling the wrong flowers, errors that I would have forever remained oblivious to if some other reader had not called them to my attention. But I cringe with every “between you and I” and am ready to weep over sentences that have all the grace of a pig on stilts.
    If the characters have substance and likeability, I am generally forgiving of a few errors. Repeated errors do irritate me, as do character inconsistencies and errors that reveal grossly inadequate research. But such errors are rare in my reading experience. Having been embarassed by errors that escaped me and by errors created by an overzealous and mistaken copy editor, I marvel that so few errors actually make their way into print.

    Reply
  81. The last thing I didn’t juet trip but fell down the stairs over was a Paranormal (vampire) novel written by a Big Name Author…when talking about the justice, ‘police’, prisoners and the penile system.
    *sigh*
    Obviously it should have been penal, but then again, perhaps the first is what was on the author’s mind at the time. Who knows?
    I’m willing to overlook minor mistakes. I realize a book goes through up to a dozen people before it’s printed and sometimes, one or another hasn’t had enough coffee when they’ve proofed it. The mistakes that bother me are huge, glaring plot holes that are so obvious as to be ludicrous and could have easily been repaired with a sentence or two.
    Unfortunately, unless you’ve lived through the era you’re writing about, history is written by fallible humans, the stories passed sometimes through two generations before they’re recorded or are blatantly biased. We can only use the references we have available and hope we get close.

    Reply
  82. The last thing I didn’t juet trip but fell down the stairs over was a Paranormal (vampire) novel written by a Big Name Author…when talking about the justice, ‘police’, prisoners and the penile system.
    *sigh*
    Obviously it should have been penal, but then again, perhaps the first is what was on the author’s mind at the time. Who knows?
    I’m willing to overlook minor mistakes. I realize a book goes through up to a dozen people before it’s printed and sometimes, one or another hasn’t had enough coffee when they’ve proofed it. The mistakes that bother me are huge, glaring plot holes that are so obvious as to be ludicrous and could have easily been repaired with a sentence or two.
    Unfortunately, unless you’ve lived through the era you’re writing about, history is written by fallible humans, the stories passed sometimes through two generations before they’re recorded or are blatantly biased. We can only use the references we have available and hope we get close.

    Reply
  83. The last thing I didn’t juet trip but fell down the stairs over was a Paranormal (vampire) novel written by a Big Name Author…when talking about the justice, ‘police’, prisoners and the penile system.
    *sigh*
    Obviously it should have been penal, but then again, perhaps the first is what was on the author’s mind at the time. Who knows?
    I’m willing to overlook minor mistakes. I realize a book goes through up to a dozen people before it’s printed and sometimes, one or another hasn’t had enough coffee when they’ve proofed it. The mistakes that bother me are huge, glaring plot holes that are so obvious as to be ludicrous and could have easily been repaired with a sentence or two.
    Unfortunately, unless you’ve lived through the era you’re writing about, history is written by fallible humans, the stories passed sometimes through two generations before they’re recorded or are blatantly biased. We can only use the references we have available and hope we get close.

    Reply
  84. The last thing I didn’t juet trip but fell down the stairs over was a Paranormal (vampire) novel written by a Big Name Author…when talking about the justice, ‘police’, prisoners and the penile system.
    *sigh*
    Obviously it should have been penal, but then again, perhaps the first is what was on the author’s mind at the time. Who knows?
    I’m willing to overlook minor mistakes. I realize a book goes through up to a dozen people before it’s printed and sometimes, one or another hasn’t had enough coffee when they’ve proofed it. The mistakes that bother me are huge, glaring plot holes that are so obvious as to be ludicrous and could have easily been repaired with a sentence or two.
    Unfortunately, unless you’ve lived through the era you’re writing about, history is written by fallible humans, the stories passed sometimes through two generations before they’re recorded or are blatantly biased. We can only use the references we have available and hope we get close.

    Reply
  85. The last thing I didn’t juet trip but fell down the stairs over was a Paranormal (vampire) novel written by a Big Name Author…when talking about the justice, ‘police’, prisoners and the penile system.
    *sigh*
    Obviously it should have been penal, but then again, perhaps the first is what was on the author’s mind at the time. Who knows?
    I’m willing to overlook minor mistakes. I realize a book goes through up to a dozen people before it’s printed and sometimes, one or another hasn’t had enough coffee when they’ve proofed it. The mistakes that bother me are huge, glaring plot holes that are so obvious as to be ludicrous and could have easily been repaired with a sentence or two.
    Unfortunately, unless you’ve lived through the era you’re writing about, history is written by fallible humans, the stories passed sometimes through two generations before they’re recorded or are blatantly biased. We can only use the references we have available and hope we get close.

    Reply
  86. I’m pretty forgiving, mostly I’ll wince and think ‘ooo, they’re going to get letters’. Mostly.
    What really gets me are big continuity errors either in a single book or across a series. Because that’s just not thinking things out properly. Or keeping a timeline of your events. Stuff that says to me that you’re not taking it all that seriously.

    Reply
  87. I’m pretty forgiving, mostly I’ll wince and think ‘ooo, they’re going to get letters’. Mostly.
    What really gets me are big continuity errors either in a single book or across a series. Because that’s just not thinking things out properly. Or keeping a timeline of your events. Stuff that says to me that you’re not taking it all that seriously.

    Reply
  88. I’m pretty forgiving, mostly I’ll wince and think ‘ooo, they’re going to get letters’. Mostly.
    What really gets me are big continuity errors either in a single book or across a series. Because that’s just not thinking things out properly. Or keeping a timeline of your events. Stuff that says to me that you’re not taking it all that seriously.

    Reply
  89. I’m pretty forgiving, mostly I’ll wince and think ‘ooo, they’re going to get letters’. Mostly.
    What really gets me are big continuity errors either in a single book or across a series. Because that’s just not thinking things out properly. Or keeping a timeline of your events. Stuff that says to me that you’re not taking it all that seriously.

    Reply
  90. I’m pretty forgiving, mostly I’ll wince and think ‘ooo, they’re going to get letters’. Mostly.
    What really gets me are big continuity errors either in a single book or across a series. Because that’s just not thinking things out properly. Or keeping a timeline of your events. Stuff that says to me that you’re not taking it all that seriously.

    Reply
  91. There’s a lovely set of “Daytime Mysteries” by Linda Palmer (Love Is Murder, Love You Madly, Love Her to Death, Kiss of Death) set in the context of a major long-running soap opera. It has lovely descriptions of the continuity maps, etc., used by the writers and producers. Nevertheless, in one of the books, it’s discovered that a particular character went upstairs to take a nap fifteen years before and never came down again 🙂
    What to do?
    I’ve been doing galley proofs the past week. This thing was in draft eighteen when it went to the publisher. It had been read by two other people besides the co-authors. It has since been read by a professional proof-reader. We’re still catching nits (e.g. “petty” when it should be “pretty).
    I don’t know what it would take to get rid of them all.

    Reply
  92. There’s a lovely set of “Daytime Mysteries” by Linda Palmer (Love Is Murder, Love You Madly, Love Her to Death, Kiss of Death) set in the context of a major long-running soap opera. It has lovely descriptions of the continuity maps, etc., used by the writers and producers. Nevertheless, in one of the books, it’s discovered that a particular character went upstairs to take a nap fifteen years before and never came down again 🙂
    What to do?
    I’ve been doing galley proofs the past week. This thing was in draft eighteen when it went to the publisher. It had been read by two other people besides the co-authors. It has since been read by a professional proof-reader. We’re still catching nits (e.g. “petty” when it should be “pretty).
    I don’t know what it would take to get rid of them all.

    Reply
  93. There’s a lovely set of “Daytime Mysteries” by Linda Palmer (Love Is Murder, Love You Madly, Love Her to Death, Kiss of Death) set in the context of a major long-running soap opera. It has lovely descriptions of the continuity maps, etc., used by the writers and producers. Nevertheless, in one of the books, it’s discovered that a particular character went upstairs to take a nap fifteen years before and never came down again 🙂
    What to do?
    I’ve been doing galley proofs the past week. This thing was in draft eighteen when it went to the publisher. It had been read by two other people besides the co-authors. It has since been read by a professional proof-reader. We’re still catching nits (e.g. “petty” when it should be “pretty).
    I don’t know what it would take to get rid of them all.

    Reply
  94. There’s a lovely set of “Daytime Mysteries” by Linda Palmer (Love Is Murder, Love You Madly, Love Her to Death, Kiss of Death) set in the context of a major long-running soap opera. It has lovely descriptions of the continuity maps, etc., used by the writers and producers. Nevertheless, in one of the books, it’s discovered that a particular character went upstairs to take a nap fifteen years before and never came down again 🙂
    What to do?
    I’ve been doing galley proofs the past week. This thing was in draft eighteen when it went to the publisher. It had been read by two other people besides the co-authors. It has since been read by a professional proof-reader. We’re still catching nits (e.g. “petty” when it should be “pretty).
    I don’t know what it would take to get rid of them all.

    Reply
  95. There’s a lovely set of “Daytime Mysteries” by Linda Palmer (Love Is Murder, Love You Madly, Love Her to Death, Kiss of Death) set in the context of a major long-running soap opera. It has lovely descriptions of the continuity maps, etc., used by the writers and producers. Nevertheless, in one of the books, it’s discovered that a particular character went upstairs to take a nap fifteen years before and never came down again 🙂
    What to do?
    I’ve been doing galley proofs the past week. This thing was in draft eighteen when it went to the publisher. It had been read by two other people besides the co-authors. It has since been read by a professional proof-reader. We’re still catching nits (e.g. “petty” when it should be “pretty).
    I don’t know what it would take to get rid of them all.

    Reply
  96. Sometimes mistakes are in the eye of the beholder. I once set a book in Italy (they were traveling on the Grand Tour) and I used some expressions and phrases from letters written in 1801-2 by a tourist. An Italian lady contacted me to complain of errors, so I scanned in the text I’d used and showed it to her. She then recalled that those expressions were used in Italy at that time and congratulated me on my fine research.
    I think we all do our best not to make mistakes, but we’re human. When I’m working on the final draft of a book, in my mind are the multiple previous drafts, where many of the details were different. At deadline time, the brain doesn’t retain all these as it should, alas.
    I’ve found obvious errors at the proof stage that an otherwise steel-trap-minded copy editor has missed. I’m glad I spotted them, of course, but I also secretly hope they missed it because they got caught up in the story. (Sad isn’t it?)
    Finally, because many of my stories unfold in a character’s point of view, they won’t always be written in correct grammar or full sentences. I’m sorry if this annoys some readers, but people don’t usually think in perfect grammar. We think and speak in snatches. Phrases. Not whole, polished sentences. And start sentences with conjunctions. Sorry, but that’s how it works.

    Reply
  97. Sometimes mistakes are in the eye of the beholder. I once set a book in Italy (they were traveling on the Grand Tour) and I used some expressions and phrases from letters written in 1801-2 by a tourist. An Italian lady contacted me to complain of errors, so I scanned in the text I’d used and showed it to her. She then recalled that those expressions were used in Italy at that time and congratulated me on my fine research.
    I think we all do our best not to make mistakes, but we’re human. When I’m working on the final draft of a book, in my mind are the multiple previous drafts, where many of the details were different. At deadline time, the brain doesn’t retain all these as it should, alas.
    I’ve found obvious errors at the proof stage that an otherwise steel-trap-minded copy editor has missed. I’m glad I spotted them, of course, but I also secretly hope they missed it because they got caught up in the story. (Sad isn’t it?)
    Finally, because many of my stories unfold in a character’s point of view, they won’t always be written in correct grammar or full sentences. I’m sorry if this annoys some readers, but people don’t usually think in perfect grammar. We think and speak in snatches. Phrases. Not whole, polished sentences. And start sentences with conjunctions. Sorry, but that’s how it works.

    Reply
  98. Sometimes mistakes are in the eye of the beholder. I once set a book in Italy (they were traveling on the Grand Tour) and I used some expressions and phrases from letters written in 1801-2 by a tourist. An Italian lady contacted me to complain of errors, so I scanned in the text I’d used and showed it to her. She then recalled that those expressions were used in Italy at that time and congratulated me on my fine research.
    I think we all do our best not to make mistakes, but we’re human. When I’m working on the final draft of a book, in my mind are the multiple previous drafts, where many of the details were different. At deadline time, the brain doesn’t retain all these as it should, alas.
    I’ve found obvious errors at the proof stage that an otherwise steel-trap-minded copy editor has missed. I’m glad I spotted them, of course, but I also secretly hope they missed it because they got caught up in the story. (Sad isn’t it?)
    Finally, because many of my stories unfold in a character’s point of view, they won’t always be written in correct grammar or full sentences. I’m sorry if this annoys some readers, but people don’t usually think in perfect grammar. We think and speak in snatches. Phrases. Not whole, polished sentences. And start sentences with conjunctions. Sorry, but that’s how it works.

    Reply
  99. Sometimes mistakes are in the eye of the beholder. I once set a book in Italy (they were traveling on the Grand Tour) and I used some expressions and phrases from letters written in 1801-2 by a tourist. An Italian lady contacted me to complain of errors, so I scanned in the text I’d used and showed it to her. She then recalled that those expressions were used in Italy at that time and congratulated me on my fine research.
    I think we all do our best not to make mistakes, but we’re human. When I’m working on the final draft of a book, in my mind are the multiple previous drafts, where many of the details were different. At deadline time, the brain doesn’t retain all these as it should, alas.
    I’ve found obvious errors at the proof stage that an otherwise steel-trap-minded copy editor has missed. I’m glad I spotted them, of course, but I also secretly hope they missed it because they got caught up in the story. (Sad isn’t it?)
    Finally, because many of my stories unfold in a character’s point of view, they won’t always be written in correct grammar or full sentences. I’m sorry if this annoys some readers, but people don’t usually think in perfect grammar. We think and speak in snatches. Phrases. Not whole, polished sentences. And start sentences with conjunctions. Sorry, but that’s how it works.

    Reply
  100. Sometimes mistakes are in the eye of the beholder. I once set a book in Italy (they were traveling on the Grand Tour) and I used some expressions and phrases from letters written in 1801-2 by a tourist. An Italian lady contacted me to complain of errors, so I scanned in the text I’d used and showed it to her. She then recalled that those expressions were used in Italy at that time and congratulated me on my fine research.
    I think we all do our best not to make mistakes, but we’re human. When I’m working on the final draft of a book, in my mind are the multiple previous drafts, where many of the details were different. At deadline time, the brain doesn’t retain all these as it should, alas.
    I’ve found obvious errors at the proof stage that an otherwise steel-trap-minded copy editor has missed. I’m glad I spotted them, of course, but I also secretly hope they missed it because they got caught up in the story. (Sad isn’t it?)
    Finally, because many of my stories unfold in a character’s point of view, they won’t always be written in correct grammar or full sentences. I’m sorry if this annoys some readers, but people don’t usually think in perfect grammar. We think and speak in snatches. Phrases. Not whole, polished sentences. And start sentences with conjunctions. Sorry, but that’s how it works.

    Reply
  101. A couple of comments here really struck home with me. Linda Banche’s mention of contemporary names and language usage in historical fiction was absolutely correct! I majored in history in college, and I can categorically say that giving a 19th-century character a 21st-century name is a real turn-off for me. The other big boo-boo that gives me fits is, as another commenter said, lack of attention to continuity, especially in series fiction. Even in some of my favorite series I’ve found inconsistencies, although it’s mainly been in the actions of secondary characters. Still, it does put a damper in my enjoyment of a book to find errors that should be easily detected in the editing process.

    Reply
  102. A couple of comments here really struck home with me. Linda Banche’s mention of contemporary names and language usage in historical fiction was absolutely correct! I majored in history in college, and I can categorically say that giving a 19th-century character a 21st-century name is a real turn-off for me. The other big boo-boo that gives me fits is, as another commenter said, lack of attention to continuity, especially in series fiction. Even in some of my favorite series I’ve found inconsistencies, although it’s mainly been in the actions of secondary characters. Still, it does put a damper in my enjoyment of a book to find errors that should be easily detected in the editing process.

    Reply
  103. A couple of comments here really struck home with me. Linda Banche’s mention of contemporary names and language usage in historical fiction was absolutely correct! I majored in history in college, and I can categorically say that giving a 19th-century character a 21st-century name is a real turn-off for me. The other big boo-boo that gives me fits is, as another commenter said, lack of attention to continuity, especially in series fiction. Even in some of my favorite series I’ve found inconsistencies, although it’s mainly been in the actions of secondary characters. Still, it does put a damper in my enjoyment of a book to find errors that should be easily detected in the editing process.

    Reply
  104. A couple of comments here really struck home with me. Linda Banche’s mention of contemporary names and language usage in historical fiction was absolutely correct! I majored in history in college, and I can categorically say that giving a 19th-century character a 21st-century name is a real turn-off for me. The other big boo-boo that gives me fits is, as another commenter said, lack of attention to continuity, especially in series fiction. Even in some of my favorite series I’ve found inconsistencies, although it’s mainly been in the actions of secondary characters. Still, it does put a damper in my enjoyment of a book to find errors that should be easily detected in the editing process.

    Reply
  105. A couple of comments here really struck home with me. Linda Banche’s mention of contemporary names and language usage in historical fiction was absolutely correct! I majored in history in college, and I can categorically say that giving a 19th-century character a 21st-century name is a real turn-off for me. The other big boo-boo that gives me fits is, as another commenter said, lack of attention to continuity, especially in series fiction. Even in some of my favorite series I’ve found inconsistencies, although it’s mainly been in the actions of secondary characters. Still, it does put a damper in my enjoyment of a book to find errors that should be easily detected in the editing process.

    Reply
  106. Another source of potential errors involves correct forms of plurals. I can’t count the number of times I’ve read “a millenia” (singular is “millenium”) or “a phenomena” (singular is “phenomenon”).
    I agree with best ever use of “Nobody’s perfect!” The other quote I like from that movie is “How does she move like that? Like jello on springs.”

    Reply
  107. Another source of potential errors involves correct forms of plurals. I can’t count the number of times I’ve read “a millenia” (singular is “millenium”) or “a phenomena” (singular is “phenomenon”).
    I agree with best ever use of “Nobody’s perfect!” The other quote I like from that movie is “How does she move like that? Like jello on springs.”

    Reply
  108. Another source of potential errors involves correct forms of plurals. I can’t count the number of times I’ve read “a millenia” (singular is “millenium”) or “a phenomena” (singular is “phenomenon”).
    I agree with best ever use of “Nobody’s perfect!” The other quote I like from that movie is “How does she move like that? Like jello on springs.”

    Reply
  109. Another source of potential errors involves correct forms of plurals. I can’t count the number of times I’ve read “a millenia” (singular is “millenium”) or “a phenomena” (singular is “phenomenon”).
    I agree with best ever use of “Nobody’s perfect!” The other quote I like from that movie is “How does she move like that? Like jello on springs.”

    Reply
  110. Another source of potential errors involves correct forms of plurals. I can’t count the number of times I’ve read “a millenia” (singular is “millenium”) or “a phenomena” (singular is “phenomenon”).
    I agree with best ever use of “Nobody’s perfect!” The other quote I like from that movie is “How does she move like that? Like jello on springs.”

    Reply
  111. Edith: RICHARD DIDN’T DO IT!!!
    I tend to blame such things as its/it’s errors on proofreaders and/or copyeditors if the author generally impresses me as literate. I have been both, paid (USAEEC) and unpaid (college literary mag), as well as teaching English composition more or less at the college level. (Well, *I* was at the college level, but I won’t vouch for my students.) Like the rest of you, I am really bugged by obvious errors in names, dates, costumes, and the like. (One very famous historical writer had a fairly recent bestseller in which the characters got milk from a billy goat!) And I really want to throw something at the author when a character who was a blue-eyed blond in Chapter 3 is a brown-eyed brunet in Chapter 14. I’m also bugged by out-of-period references, such as “the penny dropped” in a Regency, or the use of “mecca” in a fantasy set in another world, even when they are in the author’s voice.
    I actually don’t mind anachronisms if the author notes them; I’ve read several historical mysteries in which Siamese cats were depicted years before they were actually introduced into England, but as far as I know only Barbara Michaels noted the fact.
    I once read a book in which the heroine, hired as the author-hero’s secretary, caught the fact that he had put two full moons in a single month. I’d NEVER have spotted that–not in a million years!

    Reply
  112. Edith: RICHARD DIDN’T DO IT!!!
    I tend to blame such things as its/it’s errors on proofreaders and/or copyeditors if the author generally impresses me as literate. I have been both, paid (USAEEC) and unpaid (college literary mag), as well as teaching English composition more or less at the college level. (Well, *I* was at the college level, but I won’t vouch for my students.) Like the rest of you, I am really bugged by obvious errors in names, dates, costumes, and the like. (One very famous historical writer had a fairly recent bestseller in which the characters got milk from a billy goat!) And I really want to throw something at the author when a character who was a blue-eyed blond in Chapter 3 is a brown-eyed brunet in Chapter 14. I’m also bugged by out-of-period references, such as “the penny dropped” in a Regency, or the use of “mecca” in a fantasy set in another world, even when they are in the author’s voice.
    I actually don’t mind anachronisms if the author notes them; I’ve read several historical mysteries in which Siamese cats were depicted years before they were actually introduced into England, but as far as I know only Barbara Michaels noted the fact.
    I once read a book in which the heroine, hired as the author-hero’s secretary, caught the fact that he had put two full moons in a single month. I’d NEVER have spotted that–not in a million years!

    Reply
  113. Edith: RICHARD DIDN’T DO IT!!!
    I tend to blame such things as its/it’s errors on proofreaders and/or copyeditors if the author generally impresses me as literate. I have been both, paid (USAEEC) and unpaid (college literary mag), as well as teaching English composition more or less at the college level. (Well, *I* was at the college level, but I won’t vouch for my students.) Like the rest of you, I am really bugged by obvious errors in names, dates, costumes, and the like. (One very famous historical writer had a fairly recent bestseller in which the characters got milk from a billy goat!) And I really want to throw something at the author when a character who was a blue-eyed blond in Chapter 3 is a brown-eyed brunet in Chapter 14. I’m also bugged by out-of-period references, such as “the penny dropped” in a Regency, or the use of “mecca” in a fantasy set in another world, even when they are in the author’s voice.
    I actually don’t mind anachronisms if the author notes them; I’ve read several historical mysteries in which Siamese cats were depicted years before they were actually introduced into England, but as far as I know only Barbara Michaels noted the fact.
    I once read a book in which the heroine, hired as the author-hero’s secretary, caught the fact that he had put two full moons in a single month. I’d NEVER have spotted that–not in a million years!

    Reply
  114. Edith: RICHARD DIDN’T DO IT!!!
    I tend to blame such things as its/it’s errors on proofreaders and/or copyeditors if the author generally impresses me as literate. I have been both, paid (USAEEC) and unpaid (college literary mag), as well as teaching English composition more or less at the college level. (Well, *I* was at the college level, but I won’t vouch for my students.) Like the rest of you, I am really bugged by obvious errors in names, dates, costumes, and the like. (One very famous historical writer had a fairly recent bestseller in which the characters got milk from a billy goat!) And I really want to throw something at the author when a character who was a blue-eyed blond in Chapter 3 is a brown-eyed brunet in Chapter 14. I’m also bugged by out-of-period references, such as “the penny dropped” in a Regency, or the use of “mecca” in a fantasy set in another world, even when they are in the author’s voice.
    I actually don’t mind anachronisms if the author notes them; I’ve read several historical mysteries in which Siamese cats were depicted years before they were actually introduced into England, but as far as I know only Barbara Michaels noted the fact.
    I once read a book in which the heroine, hired as the author-hero’s secretary, caught the fact that he had put two full moons in a single month. I’d NEVER have spotted that–not in a million years!

    Reply
  115. Edith: RICHARD DIDN’T DO IT!!!
    I tend to blame such things as its/it’s errors on proofreaders and/or copyeditors if the author generally impresses me as literate. I have been both, paid (USAEEC) and unpaid (college literary mag), as well as teaching English composition more or less at the college level. (Well, *I* was at the college level, but I won’t vouch for my students.) Like the rest of you, I am really bugged by obvious errors in names, dates, costumes, and the like. (One very famous historical writer had a fairly recent bestseller in which the characters got milk from a billy goat!) And I really want to throw something at the author when a character who was a blue-eyed blond in Chapter 3 is a brown-eyed brunet in Chapter 14. I’m also bugged by out-of-period references, such as “the penny dropped” in a Regency, or the use of “mecca” in a fantasy set in another world, even when they are in the author’s voice.
    I actually don’t mind anachronisms if the author notes them; I’ve read several historical mysteries in which Siamese cats were depicted years before they were actually introduced into England, but as far as I know only Barbara Michaels noted the fact.
    I once read a book in which the heroine, hired as the author-hero’s secretary, caught the fact that he had put two full moons in a single month. I’d NEVER have spotted that–not in a million years!

    Reply
  116. Two full moons in a single month is not impossible, since a lunar month only lasts 29.5 days. You would have to make sure you spaced them far enough apart, though.

    Reply
  117. Two full moons in a single month is not impossible, since a lunar month only lasts 29.5 days. You would have to make sure you spaced them far enough apart, though.

    Reply
  118. Two full moons in a single month is not impossible, since a lunar month only lasts 29.5 days. You would have to make sure you spaced them far enough apart, though.

    Reply
  119. Two full moons in a single month is not impossible, since a lunar month only lasts 29.5 days. You would have to make sure you spaced them far enough apart, though.

    Reply
  120. Two full moons in a single month is not impossible, since a lunar month only lasts 29.5 days. You would have to make sure you spaced them far enough apart, though.

    Reply
  121. It depends on the kind of error.
    I don’t read looking for mistakes; I read hoping to be entertained — therefore if the error I notice is minor (or a matter of taste or opinion), I cruise on undisturbed. Bad spellcheck errors (their for there, for example) fall in this class; I know the author knows the difference and it’s just one of those things. Stuff happens.
    If, however, the error is the sort that betokens a complete contempt for the reader (the late Irene Loyd Black, with her regency photography, springs to mind), it becomes a wallbanger.
    According to my lights, nobody that I’ve read among the Wenches has committed a wallbanger.

    Reply
  122. It depends on the kind of error.
    I don’t read looking for mistakes; I read hoping to be entertained — therefore if the error I notice is minor (or a matter of taste or opinion), I cruise on undisturbed. Bad spellcheck errors (their for there, for example) fall in this class; I know the author knows the difference and it’s just one of those things. Stuff happens.
    If, however, the error is the sort that betokens a complete contempt for the reader (the late Irene Loyd Black, with her regency photography, springs to mind), it becomes a wallbanger.
    According to my lights, nobody that I’ve read among the Wenches has committed a wallbanger.

    Reply
  123. It depends on the kind of error.
    I don’t read looking for mistakes; I read hoping to be entertained — therefore if the error I notice is minor (or a matter of taste or opinion), I cruise on undisturbed. Bad spellcheck errors (their for there, for example) fall in this class; I know the author knows the difference and it’s just one of those things. Stuff happens.
    If, however, the error is the sort that betokens a complete contempt for the reader (the late Irene Loyd Black, with her regency photography, springs to mind), it becomes a wallbanger.
    According to my lights, nobody that I’ve read among the Wenches has committed a wallbanger.

    Reply
  124. It depends on the kind of error.
    I don’t read looking for mistakes; I read hoping to be entertained — therefore if the error I notice is minor (or a matter of taste or opinion), I cruise on undisturbed. Bad spellcheck errors (their for there, for example) fall in this class; I know the author knows the difference and it’s just one of those things. Stuff happens.
    If, however, the error is the sort that betokens a complete contempt for the reader (the late Irene Loyd Black, with her regency photography, springs to mind), it becomes a wallbanger.
    According to my lights, nobody that I’ve read among the Wenches has committed a wallbanger.

    Reply
  125. It depends on the kind of error.
    I don’t read looking for mistakes; I read hoping to be entertained — therefore if the error I notice is minor (or a matter of taste or opinion), I cruise on undisturbed. Bad spellcheck errors (their for there, for example) fall in this class; I know the author knows the difference and it’s just one of those things. Stuff happens.
    If, however, the error is the sort that betokens a complete contempt for the reader (the late Irene Loyd Black, with her regency photography, springs to mind), it becomes a wallbanger.
    According to my lights, nobody that I’ve read among the Wenches has committed a wallbanger.

    Reply
  126. If it takes me out of the story, I have a problem with it. I don’t want to be puzzling over a sentence when I can be reading a story. I don’t want the flow of the story to be interrupted because a character is calling the Duke of Wellington John and not Arthur; or that Michangelo painted the Mona Lisa, etc. I don’t want to read a story where the heroine has a modern name, etc.
    I’ll admit that I keep reading just because I *have* to know what happens, even if a book turns me off. I might skim it more than read it, but I have to know the outcome.

    Reply
  127. If it takes me out of the story, I have a problem with it. I don’t want to be puzzling over a sentence when I can be reading a story. I don’t want the flow of the story to be interrupted because a character is calling the Duke of Wellington John and not Arthur; or that Michangelo painted the Mona Lisa, etc. I don’t want to read a story where the heroine has a modern name, etc.
    I’ll admit that I keep reading just because I *have* to know what happens, even if a book turns me off. I might skim it more than read it, but I have to know the outcome.

    Reply
  128. If it takes me out of the story, I have a problem with it. I don’t want to be puzzling over a sentence when I can be reading a story. I don’t want the flow of the story to be interrupted because a character is calling the Duke of Wellington John and not Arthur; or that Michangelo painted the Mona Lisa, etc. I don’t want to read a story where the heroine has a modern name, etc.
    I’ll admit that I keep reading just because I *have* to know what happens, even if a book turns me off. I might skim it more than read it, but I have to know the outcome.

    Reply
  129. If it takes me out of the story, I have a problem with it. I don’t want to be puzzling over a sentence when I can be reading a story. I don’t want the flow of the story to be interrupted because a character is calling the Duke of Wellington John and not Arthur; or that Michangelo painted the Mona Lisa, etc. I don’t want to read a story where the heroine has a modern name, etc.
    I’ll admit that I keep reading just because I *have* to know what happens, even if a book turns me off. I might skim it more than read it, but I have to know the outcome.

    Reply
  130. If it takes me out of the story, I have a problem with it. I don’t want to be puzzling over a sentence when I can be reading a story. I don’t want the flow of the story to be interrupted because a character is calling the Duke of Wellington John and not Arthur; or that Michangelo painted the Mona Lisa, etc. I don’t want to read a story where the heroine has a modern name, etc.
    I’ll admit that I keep reading just because I *have* to know what happens, even if a book turns me off. I might skim it more than read it, but I have to know the outcome.

    Reply
  131. Just have to share that the following drive me nuts. I see some of these a lot.
    “He poured over the manuscript.”
    “Don’t ring a peel over my head.”
    “He took a bite and wretched.”
    “She held the reigns tightly.”
    “He leaned against the mantle.”
    Thank you for letting me get that out of my system.

    Reply
  132. Just have to share that the following drive me nuts. I see some of these a lot.
    “He poured over the manuscript.”
    “Don’t ring a peel over my head.”
    “He took a bite and wretched.”
    “She held the reigns tightly.”
    “He leaned against the mantle.”
    Thank you for letting me get that out of my system.

    Reply
  133. Just have to share that the following drive me nuts. I see some of these a lot.
    “He poured over the manuscript.”
    “Don’t ring a peel over my head.”
    “He took a bite and wretched.”
    “She held the reigns tightly.”
    “He leaned against the mantle.”
    Thank you for letting me get that out of my system.

    Reply
  134. Just have to share that the following drive me nuts. I see some of these a lot.
    “He poured over the manuscript.”
    “Don’t ring a peel over my head.”
    “He took a bite and wretched.”
    “She held the reigns tightly.”
    “He leaned against the mantle.”
    Thank you for letting me get that out of my system.

    Reply
  135. Just have to share that the following drive me nuts. I see some of these a lot.
    “He poured over the manuscript.”
    “Don’t ring a peel over my head.”
    “He took a bite and wretched.”
    “She held the reigns tightly.”
    “He leaned against the mantle.”
    Thank you for letting me get that out of my system.

    Reply
  136. I must say, I usually only notice the minor mistakes on the third or fourth reading–but I do reread my favorites pretty often!
    RevMelinda, you forgot “He gave his temper free reign.”
    I gave JAK a hard time recently for confusing “spore” with “spoor.” Poor thing, she deserves better from me.

    Reply
  137. I must say, I usually only notice the minor mistakes on the third or fourth reading–but I do reread my favorites pretty often!
    RevMelinda, you forgot “He gave his temper free reign.”
    I gave JAK a hard time recently for confusing “spore” with “spoor.” Poor thing, she deserves better from me.

    Reply
  138. I must say, I usually only notice the minor mistakes on the third or fourth reading–but I do reread my favorites pretty often!
    RevMelinda, you forgot “He gave his temper free reign.”
    I gave JAK a hard time recently for confusing “spore” with “spoor.” Poor thing, she deserves better from me.

    Reply
  139. I must say, I usually only notice the minor mistakes on the third or fourth reading–but I do reread my favorites pretty often!
    RevMelinda, you forgot “He gave his temper free reign.”
    I gave JAK a hard time recently for confusing “spore” with “spoor.” Poor thing, she deserves better from me.

    Reply
  140. I must say, I usually only notice the minor mistakes on the third or fourth reading–but I do reread my favorites pretty often!
    RevMelinda, you forgot “He gave his temper free reign.”
    I gave JAK a hard time recently for confusing “spore” with “spoor.” Poor thing, she deserves better from me.

    Reply
  141. I agree with many of the comments above. In any text of more than about 5000 words, the opportunities for errors are so extensive that something is almost bound to get through. Those of us who write non-fiction with illustrations have yet another source of problems, especially since images, as well as text, are now usually submitted as digital files, which are oh-so-easy to tinker with at production stage, after the author and editors have passed the final proofs. I speak from bitter experience.
    Many other small errors actually do seem to enter in a mysterious manner at a very late stage, and computers, although they facilitate both writing and the later phases of production, make it easier to change things sneakily after everyone has checked the proofs. In letterpress days, post-page-proof changes were very rare indeed. Both writers and editors are increasingly proof-reading on screen, and this is a tried and tested recipe for missing things.
    Like others here, I am most irritated by gross errors by authors, rather than language slips that might be the result of a series of changes or a bad editor. I loved the ‘gelding and her foal’ example! If a person doesn’t know a mare from a gelding from a stallion, she would be wiser just to write ‘horse’! A related one I saw in a category romance years ago was a description of a litter of newborn kittens that were represented as hairless, like baby mice.

    Reply
  142. I agree with many of the comments above. In any text of more than about 5000 words, the opportunities for errors are so extensive that something is almost bound to get through. Those of us who write non-fiction with illustrations have yet another source of problems, especially since images, as well as text, are now usually submitted as digital files, which are oh-so-easy to tinker with at production stage, after the author and editors have passed the final proofs. I speak from bitter experience.
    Many other small errors actually do seem to enter in a mysterious manner at a very late stage, and computers, although they facilitate both writing and the later phases of production, make it easier to change things sneakily after everyone has checked the proofs. In letterpress days, post-page-proof changes were very rare indeed. Both writers and editors are increasingly proof-reading on screen, and this is a tried and tested recipe for missing things.
    Like others here, I am most irritated by gross errors by authors, rather than language slips that might be the result of a series of changes or a bad editor. I loved the ‘gelding and her foal’ example! If a person doesn’t know a mare from a gelding from a stallion, she would be wiser just to write ‘horse’! A related one I saw in a category romance years ago was a description of a litter of newborn kittens that were represented as hairless, like baby mice.

    Reply
  143. I agree with many of the comments above. In any text of more than about 5000 words, the opportunities for errors are so extensive that something is almost bound to get through. Those of us who write non-fiction with illustrations have yet another source of problems, especially since images, as well as text, are now usually submitted as digital files, which are oh-so-easy to tinker with at production stage, after the author and editors have passed the final proofs. I speak from bitter experience.
    Many other small errors actually do seem to enter in a mysterious manner at a very late stage, and computers, although they facilitate both writing and the later phases of production, make it easier to change things sneakily after everyone has checked the proofs. In letterpress days, post-page-proof changes were very rare indeed. Both writers and editors are increasingly proof-reading on screen, and this is a tried and tested recipe for missing things.
    Like others here, I am most irritated by gross errors by authors, rather than language slips that might be the result of a series of changes or a bad editor. I loved the ‘gelding and her foal’ example! If a person doesn’t know a mare from a gelding from a stallion, she would be wiser just to write ‘horse’! A related one I saw in a category romance years ago was a description of a litter of newborn kittens that were represented as hairless, like baby mice.

    Reply
  144. I agree with many of the comments above. In any text of more than about 5000 words, the opportunities for errors are so extensive that something is almost bound to get through. Those of us who write non-fiction with illustrations have yet another source of problems, especially since images, as well as text, are now usually submitted as digital files, which are oh-so-easy to tinker with at production stage, after the author and editors have passed the final proofs. I speak from bitter experience.
    Many other small errors actually do seem to enter in a mysterious manner at a very late stage, and computers, although they facilitate both writing and the later phases of production, make it easier to change things sneakily after everyone has checked the proofs. In letterpress days, post-page-proof changes were very rare indeed. Both writers and editors are increasingly proof-reading on screen, and this is a tried and tested recipe for missing things.
    Like others here, I am most irritated by gross errors by authors, rather than language slips that might be the result of a series of changes or a bad editor. I loved the ‘gelding and her foal’ example! If a person doesn’t know a mare from a gelding from a stallion, she would be wiser just to write ‘horse’! A related one I saw in a category romance years ago was a description of a litter of newborn kittens that were represented as hairless, like baby mice.

    Reply
  145. I agree with many of the comments above. In any text of more than about 5000 words, the opportunities for errors are so extensive that something is almost bound to get through. Those of us who write non-fiction with illustrations have yet another source of problems, especially since images, as well as text, are now usually submitted as digital files, which are oh-so-easy to tinker with at production stage, after the author and editors have passed the final proofs. I speak from bitter experience.
    Many other small errors actually do seem to enter in a mysterious manner at a very late stage, and computers, although they facilitate both writing and the later phases of production, make it easier to change things sneakily after everyone has checked the proofs. In letterpress days, post-page-proof changes were very rare indeed. Both writers and editors are increasingly proof-reading on screen, and this is a tried and tested recipe for missing things.
    Like others here, I am most irritated by gross errors by authors, rather than language slips that might be the result of a series of changes or a bad editor. I loved the ‘gelding and her foal’ example! If a person doesn’t know a mare from a gelding from a stallion, she would be wiser just to write ‘horse’! A related one I saw in a category romance years ago was a description of a litter of newborn kittens that were represented as hairless, like baby mice.

    Reply
  146. How about a Regency(British) lady saying: “He doesn’t have a cent to his name!” Cents are US money, not British, and although we Yanks use penny and cent interchangeably, cents don’t exist in British money.
    Or even worse, the same lady saying “He doesn’t have a pence to his name!” Pence is the plural of penny.
    Argh!!!

    Reply
  147. How about a Regency(British) lady saying: “He doesn’t have a cent to his name!” Cents are US money, not British, and although we Yanks use penny and cent interchangeably, cents don’t exist in British money.
    Or even worse, the same lady saying “He doesn’t have a pence to his name!” Pence is the plural of penny.
    Argh!!!

    Reply
  148. How about a Regency(British) lady saying: “He doesn’t have a cent to his name!” Cents are US money, not British, and although we Yanks use penny and cent interchangeably, cents don’t exist in British money.
    Or even worse, the same lady saying “He doesn’t have a pence to his name!” Pence is the plural of penny.
    Argh!!!

    Reply
  149. How about a Regency(British) lady saying: “He doesn’t have a cent to his name!” Cents are US money, not British, and although we Yanks use penny and cent interchangeably, cents don’t exist in British money.
    Or even worse, the same lady saying “He doesn’t have a pence to his name!” Pence is the plural of penny.
    Argh!!!

    Reply
  150. How about a Regency(British) lady saying: “He doesn’t have a cent to his name!” Cents are US money, not British, and although we Yanks use penny and cent interchangeably, cents don’t exist in British money.
    Or even worse, the same lady saying “He doesn’t have a pence to his name!” Pence is the plural of penny.
    Argh!!!

    Reply
  151. The Bulwer-Lytton site has a page of examples of “bad published writing.” The first example has been duly noted in a number of places: “She wore a dress the same color as her eyes her father brought her from San Francisco.”
    –Danielle Steel, Star
    I used some of the examples to enliven tedious classes.
    If you are interested, the address is http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/sticks.htm

    Reply
  152. The Bulwer-Lytton site has a page of examples of “bad published writing.” The first example has been duly noted in a number of places: “She wore a dress the same color as her eyes her father brought her from San Francisco.”
    –Danielle Steel, Star
    I used some of the examples to enliven tedious classes.
    If you are interested, the address is http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/sticks.htm

    Reply
  153. The Bulwer-Lytton site has a page of examples of “bad published writing.” The first example has been duly noted in a number of places: “She wore a dress the same color as her eyes her father brought her from San Francisco.”
    –Danielle Steel, Star
    I used some of the examples to enliven tedious classes.
    If you are interested, the address is http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/sticks.htm

    Reply
  154. The Bulwer-Lytton site has a page of examples of “bad published writing.” The first example has been duly noted in a number of places: “She wore a dress the same color as her eyes her father brought her from San Francisco.”
    –Danielle Steel, Star
    I used some of the examples to enliven tedious classes.
    If you are interested, the address is http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/sticks.htm

    Reply
  155. The Bulwer-Lytton site has a page of examples of “bad published writing.” The first example has been duly noted in a number of places: “She wore a dress the same color as her eyes her father brought her from San Francisco.”
    –Danielle Steel, Star
    I used some of the examples to enliven tedious classes.
    If you are interested, the address is http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/sticks.htm

    Reply
  156. Yes, there IS a possibility of having 2 full moons in a month. The second one is called a “blue moon”, as in “once in a blue moon.” But of course, it wouldn’t occur in February. 😉

    Reply
  157. Yes, there IS a possibility of having 2 full moons in a month. The second one is called a “blue moon”, as in “once in a blue moon.” But of course, it wouldn’t occur in February. 😉

    Reply
  158. Yes, there IS a possibility of having 2 full moons in a month. The second one is called a “blue moon”, as in “once in a blue moon.” But of course, it wouldn’t occur in February. 😉

    Reply
  159. Yes, there IS a possibility of having 2 full moons in a month. The second one is called a “blue moon”, as in “once in a blue moon.” But of course, it wouldn’t occur in February. 😉

    Reply
  160. Yes, there IS a possibility of having 2 full moons in a month. The second one is called a “blue moon”, as in “once in a blue moon.” But of course, it wouldn’t occur in February. 😉

    Reply
  161. The term blue moon is commonly used metaphorically to describe a rare event, as in the saying “once in a blue moon”.
    Folklore gave each moon a name according to its time of year. A moon which came too early had no folk name – and was called a blue moon.
    The Farmer’s Almanac defined blue moon as an extra full moon that occurred in a season; one season was defined as three full moons. If a season had four full moons, then the third full moon was named a blue moon.
    In the second half of the twentieth century, the common definition of blue moon was the second full moon in a calendar month (this was a misinterpretation of the Maine Farmer’s Almanac in 1946 that became commonly accepted and was discovered in 1999).
    The moon has also literally had a visible blue coloring on rare occasions, caused by atmospheric disturbances. (Wikipedia)

    Reply
  162. The term blue moon is commonly used metaphorically to describe a rare event, as in the saying “once in a blue moon”.
    Folklore gave each moon a name according to its time of year. A moon which came too early had no folk name – and was called a blue moon.
    The Farmer’s Almanac defined blue moon as an extra full moon that occurred in a season; one season was defined as three full moons. If a season had four full moons, then the third full moon was named a blue moon.
    In the second half of the twentieth century, the common definition of blue moon was the second full moon in a calendar month (this was a misinterpretation of the Maine Farmer’s Almanac in 1946 that became commonly accepted and was discovered in 1999).
    The moon has also literally had a visible blue coloring on rare occasions, caused by atmospheric disturbances. (Wikipedia)

    Reply
  163. The term blue moon is commonly used metaphorically to describe a rare event, as in the saying “once in a blue moon”.
    Folklore gave each moon a name according to its time of year. A moon which came too early had no folk name – and was called a blue moon.
    The Farmer’s Almanac defined blue moon as an extra full moon that occurred in a season; one season was defined as three full moons. If a season had four full moons, then the third full moon was named a blue moon.
    In the second half of the twentieth century, the common definition of blue moon was the second full moon in a calendar month (this was a misinterpretation of the Maine Farmer’s Almanac in 1946 that became commonly accepted and was discovered in 1999).
    The moon has also literally had a visible blue coloring on rare occasions, caused by atmospheric disturbances. (Wikipedia)

    Reply
  164. The term blue moon is commonly used metaphorically to describe a rare event, as in the saying “once in a blue moon”.
    Folklore gave each moon a name according to its time of year. A moon which came too early had no folk name – and was called a blue moon.
    The Farmer’s Almanac defined blue moon as an extra full moon that occurred in a season; one season was defined as three full moons. If a season had four full moons, then the third full moon was named a blue moon.
    In the second half of the twentieth century, the common definition of blue moon was the second full moon in a calendar month (this was a misinterpretation of the Maine Farmer’s Almanac in 1946 that became commonly accepted and was discovered in 1999).
    The moon has also literally had a visible blue coloring on rare occasions, caused by atmospheric disturbances. (Wikipedia)

    Reply
  165. The term blue moon is commonly used metaphorically to describe a rare event, as in the saying “once in a blue moon”.
    Folklore gave each moon a name according to its time of year. A moon which came too early had no folk name – and was called a blue moon.
    The Farmer’s Almanac defined blue moon as an extra full moon that occurred in a season; one season was defined as three full moons. If a season had four full moons, then the third full moon was named a blue moon.
    In the second half of the twentieth century, the common definition of blue moon was the second full moon in a calendar month (this was a misinterpretation of the Maine Farmer’s Almanac in 1946 that became commonly accepted and was discovered in 1999).
    The moon has also literally had a visible blue coloring on rare occasions, caused by atmospheric disturbances. (Wikipedia)

    Reply
  166. I’d rather the occasional mistake than an implausible plot. Especially if the author messes with history on purpose to make something happen for the convenience of an entertaining story. All those feisty heroines acting completely uncharacteristically for their time period drive me mad. Ok, some might have got away with it, but generally they would have been ostracised or locked up!

    Reply
  167. I’d rather the occasional mistake than an implausible plot. Especially if the author messes with history on purpose to make something happen for the convenience of an entertaining story. All those feisty heroines acting completely uncharacteristically for their time period drive me mad. Ok, some might have got away with it, but generally they would have been ostracised or locked up!

    Reply
  168. I’d rather the occasional mistake than an implausible plot. Especially if the author messes with history on purpose to make something happen for the convenience of an entertaining story. All those feisty heroines acting completely uncharacteristically for their time period drive me mad. Ok, some might have got away with it, but generally they would have been ostracised or locked up!

    Reply
  169. I’d rather the occasional mistake than an implausible plot. Especially if the author messes with history on purpose to make something happen for the convenience of an entertaining story. All those feisty heroines acting completely uncharacteristically for their time period drive me mad. Ok, some might have got away with it, but generally they would have been ostracised or locked up!

    Reply
  170. I’d rather the occasional mistake than an implausible plot. Especially if the author messes with history on purpose to make something happen for the convenience of an entertaining story. All those feisty heroines acting completely uncharacteristically for their time period drive me mad. Ok, some might have got away with it, but generally they would have been ostracised or locked up!

    Reply
  171. “How can one be impossibly…if they are, then it’s not!!”
    I, on the other hand, would see this as simply exaggeration for effect. Bear in mind, too, that impossible can mean “extremely difficult to deal with or tolerate: an impossible child; an impossible situation” acc to my American Heritage Dictionary. “Impossibly handsome” to me would mean So Gorgeous I Can’t Stand It.

    Reply
  172. “How can one be impossibly…if they are, then it’s not!!”
    I, on the other hand, would see this as simply exaggeration for effect. Bear in mind, too, that impossible can mean “extremely difficult to deal with or tolerate: an impossible child; an impossible situation” acc to my American Heritage Dictionary. “Impossibly handsome” to me would mean So Gorgeous I Can’t Stand It.

    Reply
  173. “How can one be impossibly…if they are, then it’s not!!”
    I, on the other hand, would see this as simply exaggeration for effect. Bear in mind, too, that impossible can mean “extremely difficult to deal with or tolerate: an impossible child; an impossible situation” acc to my American Heritage Dictionary. “Impossibly handsome” to me would mean So Gorgeous I Can’t Stand It.

    Reply
  174. “How can one be impossibly…if they are, then it’s not!!”
    I, on the other hand, would see this as simply exaggeration for effect. Bear in mind, too, that impossible can mean “extremely difficult to deal with or tolerate: an impossible child; an impossible situation” acc to my American Heritage Dictionary. “Impossibly handsome” to me would mean So Gorgeous I Can’t Stand It.

    Reply
  175. “How can one be impossibly…if they are, then it’s not!!”
    I, on the other hand, would see this as simply exaggeration for effect. Bear in mind, too, that impossible can mean “extremely difficult to deal with or tolerate: an impossible child; an impossible situation” acc to my American Heritage Dictionary. “Impossibly handsome” to me would mean So Gorgeous I Can’t Stand It.

    Reply
  176. And if we taxed every use of brilliant, coruscating, incandescent and stellar in RT’s “reviews”, we could close the gap even faster.

    Reply
  177. And if we taxed every use of brilliant, coruscating, incandescent and stellar in RT’s “reviews”, we could close the gap even faster.

    Reply
  178. And if we taxed every use of brilliant, coruscating, incandescent and stellar in RT’s “reviews”, we could close the gap even faster.

    Reply
  179. And if we taxed every use of brilliant, coruscating, incandescent and stellar in RT’s “reviews”, we could close the gap even faster.

    Reply
  180. And if we taxed every use of brilliant, coruscating, incandescent and stellar in RT’s “reviews”, we could close the gap even faster.

    Reply

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