May Day

Valchloesmall  It's May! Anne here. I know we're a couple of days past Mayday, but I thought it might be interesting to blog about it.

The first day of May has a long history as a special day of celebration. In pre-Christian Rome, it was celebrated as the festival of Flora, the Roman goddess of flowers and fertility, and still in many countries, the underlying theme of most May festivals is fertility.

In England, it's a traditional first-day-of-summer holiday — stop reading and wave to the English enjoying their long weekend right now. Traditionally maidens danced around the maypole, weaving a pattern with the ribbons they held, and men leapt about with bells on their knees, performing Morris dances and such. Some beauteous village maiden was also crowned Queen of the May. Remnants of these traditions still survive today and revivals are taking place on some regions.
MaypoleVintage  

Remember the old nursery songs about going a'maying? Chamber's Book of Days (1869) described it thus:

In the sixteenth century it was still customary for the middle and humbler classes to go forth at an early hour of the morning, in order to gather flowers and hawthorn branches, which they brought home about sunrise, with accompaniments of horn and tabor, and all possible signs of; joy and merriment. With these spoils they would decorate every door and window in the village. By a natural transition of ideas, they gave to the hawthorn bloom the name of the May; they called this ceremony 'the bringing home the May;' they spoke of the expedition to the woods as 'going a-Maying.' The fairest maid of the village was crowned with flowers, as the 'Queen of the May;' the lads and lasses met, danced and sang together, with a freedom which we would fain think of as bespeaking comparative innocence as well as simplicity.

The good Mr. Chambers also had this to say about non-English customs, which made me chuckle:

Among the barbarous Celtic populations of Europe, there was a heathen festival on the same day, but it does not seem to have been connected with flowers.

And thus they are dismissed. LOL

BeltaneFireFest  

 In Celtic nations, May is the time of the pagan festival of Beltane, sometimes celebrated on the 1st, though it varies. The festival of Beltane features bonfires to symbolize purification and to welcome in summer in the hope of a good harvest. There also some rituals to ensure health and protect people from harm, especially other worldly harm.

Many of these rituals still take place today. In Edinburgh, for instance, the Beltane Fire Festival is an annual event that was revived in 1988, and has grown in popularity since. As well as the bonfires and traditional rituals, it's also an arts and music festival. I don't know whether it's my Scottish blood, but I do  love a good bonfire.
ArthursSeat  

Another traditional ritual still practiced by some in Edinburgh is to climb to Arthur's Seat at dawn on the first of May to wash your face in the morning dew. In ancient times, druids gathered this dew before dawn on May Day. To the druids, it was the most sacred of all water forms and Beltane morning dew was believed to hold special virtue, assuring any who were sprinkled with it of health and well being — and, of course, beauty, which made the ritual popular with young women and girls.

Lily_of_the_Valley-01  The French have a lovely tradition for May 1st. On that day in 1561, Charles IX of France was given some sweet-scented lily-of-the-valley as a lucky charm. Obviously a bit of a charmer himself, he decided to present the ladies of his court with lily-of-the-valley as well. The practice survived even the Revolution, and to this day it's a custom in France to give a sprig of lily-of-the-valley — and selling it is even free of tax. The tradition is for the lady receiving the flower to give a kiss in return. No wonder the tradition has lasted. 

Flowers are also the gift of choice in Hawaii, where May Day is Lei Day. The day might have been invented by journalist in the 1920's but it's a lovely idea, and celebrates native Hawaiian culture, so what's not to love?
8hrDayMon  

For many people around the world MayDay has quite another meaning — it's Labour Day, and celebrates workers' achievements, particularly the fight for the eight hour day. That was achieved first in Australia and the first Eight Hour Procession was first held in Melbourne in May, 1856. They marched behind a banner declaring "Eight Hours Labour, Eight Hours Rest, Eight Hours Recreation" and whenever I go into the city I pass this memorial, which commemorates it. 

So what does May Day mean to you? A holiday? An occasion to be celebrated? Just another day? And what May Day tradition would you like to adopt? Me, I want a bonfire and some lily-of-the-valley, please. So, what did you do on May Day?

105 thoughts on “May Day”

  1. Hi Anne! My honorary granddaughter’s birthday is May 1st so it’s usually a day of celebration for that reason.
    May Day doesn’t seem to be celebrated as much nowadays as it was when I was a child. I have fond memories of dancing around decorated maypoles at school. Also, as children, my brothers and I would make baskets out of construction paper and decorate them with crayons and bits of ribbon. Then we would get up early and collect wild flowers (including lily of the valley) from the woods behind our house. Each basket would be filled with flowers which we would then place on the doorsteps of our neighbors. We would ring the bell or knock then quickly hide so we could watch their reaction when they found the flowers. It was a lovely way to celebrate the first day of May.

    Reply
  2. Hi Anne! My honorary granddaughter’s birthday is May 1st so it’s usually a day of celebration for that reason.
    May Day doesn’t seem to be celebrated as much nowadays as it was when I was a child. I have fond memories of dancing around decorated maypoles at school. Also, as children, my brothers and I would make baskets out of construction paper and decorate them with crayons and bits of ribbon. Then we would get up early and collect wild flowers (including lily of the valley) from the woods behind our house. Each basket would be filled with flowers which we would then place on the doorsteps of our neighbors. We would ring the bell or knock then quickly hide so we could watch their reaction when they found the flowers. It was a lovely way to celebrate the first day of May.

    Reply
  3. Hi Anne! My honorary granddaughter’s birthday is May 1st so it’s usually a day of celebration for that reason.
    May Day doesn’t seem to be celebrated as much nowadays as it was when I was a child. I have fond memories of dancing around decorated maypoles at school. Also, as children, my brothers and I would make baskets out of construction paper and decorate them with crayons and bits of ribbon. Then we would get up early and collect wild flowers (including lily of the valley) from the woods behind our house. Each basket would be filled with flowers which we would then place on the doorsteps of our neighbors. We would ring the bell or knock then quickly hide so we could watch their reaction when they found the flowers. It was a lovely way to celebrate the first day of May.

    Reply
  4. Hi Anne! My honorary granddaughter’s birthday is May 1st so it’s usually a day of celebration for that reason.
    May Day doesn’t seem to be celebrated as much nowadays as it was when I was a child. I have fond memories of dancing around decorated maypoles at school. Also, as children, my brothers and I would make baskets out of construction paper and decorate them with crayons and bits of ribbon. Then we would get up early and collect wild flowers (including lily of the valley) from the woods behind our house. Each basket would be filled with flowers which we would then place on the doorsteps of our neighbors. We would ring the bell or knock then quickly hide so we could watch their reaction when they found the flowers. It was a lovely way to celebrate the first day of May.

    Reply
  5. Hi Anne! My honorary granddaughter’s birthday is May 1st so it’s usually a day of celebration for that reason.
    May Day doesn’t seem to be celebrated as much nowadays as it was when I was a child. I have fond memories of dancing around decorated maypoles at school. Also, as children, my brothers and I would make baskets out of construction paper and decorate them with crayons and bits of ribbon. Then we would get up early and collect wild flowers (including lily of the valley) from the woods behind our house. Each basket would be filled with flowers which we would then place on the doorsteps of our neighbors. We would ring the bell or knock then quickly hide so we could watch their reaction when they found the flowers. It was a lovely way to celebrate the first day of May.

    Reply
  6. I remember celebrating May Day as a kid in school. I also remember the Beltane celebrations my maternal grandparents held. Small, family centered…it never occurred to me that their Christian beliefs were at odds with the whole thing. I’m not sure they had any problems with it though.
    Through the years, it’s just become another day to me, more or less. Yes, I remember the date, but unless I were to begin a tradition with my family, there isn’t anything here celebrating it except for the store sales.
    Maybe a tradition would be a good thing…

    Reply
  7. I remember celebrating May Day as a kid in school. I also remember the Beltane celebrations my maternal grandparents held. Small, family centered…it never occurred to me that their Christian beliefs were at odds with the whole thing. I’m not sure they had any problems with it though.
    Through the years, it’s just become another day to me, more or less. Yes, I remember the date, but unless I were to begin a tradition with my family, there isn’t anything here celebrating it except for the store sales.
    Maybe a tradition would be a good thing…

    Reply
  8. I remember celebrating May Day as a kid in school. I also remember the Beltane celebrations my maternal grandparents held. Small, family centered…it never occurred to me that their Christian beliefs were at odds with the whole thing. I’m not sure they had any problems with it though.
    Through the years, it’s just become another day to me, more or less. Yes, I remember the date, but unless I were to begin a tradition with my family, there isn’t anything here celebrating it except for the store sales.
    Maybe a tradition would be a good thing…

    Reply
  9. I remember celebrating May Day as a kid in school. I also remember the Beltane celebrations my maternal grandparents held. Small, family centered…it never occurred to me that their Christian beliefs were at odds with the whole thing. I’m not sure they had any problems with it though.
    Through the years, it’s just become another day to me, more or less. Yes, I remember the date, but unless I were to begin a tradition with my family, there isn’t anything here celebrating it except for the store sales.
    Maybe a tradition would be a good thing…

    Reply
  10. I remember celebrating May Day as a kid in school. I also remember the Beltane celebrations my maternal grandparents held. Small, family centered…it never occurred to me that their Christian beliefs were at odds with the whole thing. I’m not sure they had any problems with it though.
    Through the years, it’s just become another day to me, more or less. Yes, I remember the date, but unless I were to begin a tradition with my family, there isn’t anything here celebrating it except for the store sales.
    Maybe a tradition would be a good thing…

    Reply
  11. I’d like to adopt this tradition, “climb to Arthur’s Seat at dawn on the first of May to wash your face in the morning dew.”
    But Scotland is so far away, so I will simply drive up to the Nu’uanu Pali overlooking Kaneohe Bay and be refreshed by the beautiful scenery. A poor substitute but one that will have to do in a pinch!

    Reply
  12. I’d like to adopt this tradition, “climb to Arthur’s Seat at dawn on the first of May to wash your face in the morning dew.”
    But Scotland is so far away, so I will simply drive up to the Nu’uanu Pali overlooking Kaneohe Bay and be refreshed by the beautiful scenery. A poor substitute but one that will have to do in a pinch!

    Reply
  13. I’d like to adopt this tradition, “climb to Arthur’s Seat at dawn on the first of May to wash your face in the morning dew.”
    But Scotland is so far away, so I will simply drive up to the Nu’uanu Pali overlooking Kaneohe Bay and be refreshed by the beautiful scenery. A poor substitute but one that will have to do in a pinch!

    Reply
  14. I’d like to adopt this tradition, “climb to Arthur’s Seat at dawn on the first of May to wash your face in the morning dew.”
    But Scotland is so far away, so I will simply drive up to the Nu’uanu Pali overlooking Kaneohe Bay and be refreshed by the beautiful scenery. A poor substitute but one that will have to do in a pinch!

    Reply
  15. I’d like to adopt this tradition, “climb to Arthur’s Seat at dawn on the first of May to wash your face in the morning dew.”
    But Scotland is so far away, so I will simply drive up to the Nu’uanu Pali overlooking Kaneohe Bay and be refreshed by the beautiful scenery. A poor substitute but one that will have to do in a pinch!

    Reply
  16. I can remember as a kid in NY picking flowers and putting them on the neighbors’ porches, but there was no such tradition when we moved to KY, perhaps because flowers bloomed earlier there?
    I just know my gardens about to burst into a riot of roses and clematis and I’d love to celebrate!

    Reply
  17. I can remember as a kid in NY picking flowers and putting them on the neighbors’ porches, but there was no such tradition when we moved to KY, perhaps because flowers bloomed earlier there?
    I just know my gardens about to burst into a riot of roses and clematis and I’d love to celebrate!

    Reply
  18. I can remember as a kid in NY picking flowers and putting them on the neighbors’ porches, but there was no such tradition when we moved to KY, perhaps because flowers bloomed earlier there?
    I just know my gardens about to burst into a riot of roses and clematis and I’d love to celebrate!

    Reply
  19. I can remember as a kid in NY picking flowers and putting them on the neighbors’ porches, but there was no such tradition when we moved to KY, perhaps because flowers bloomed earlier there?
    I just know my gardens about to burst into a riot of roses and clematis and I’d love to celebrate!

    Reply
  20. I can remember as a kid in NY picking flowers and putting them on the neighbors’ porches, but there was no such tradition when we moved to KY, perhaps because flowers bloomed earlier there?
    I just know my gardens about to burst into a riot of roses and clematis and I’d love to celebrate!

    Reply
  21. I’m an Upstate New Yorker like where Pat was a child (not sure where the puppymom is from), and we also made paper baskets and put in flowers and took them to the neighbors. Maybe it was so far north that the spring flowers were particularly valued? Usually we put in daffodils, which bloom much, much earlier in Maryland.
    Good for Australia for pioneering the 8 hour work day!

    Reply
  22. I’m an Upstate New Yorker like where Pat was a child (not sure where the puppymom is from), and we also made paper baskets and put in flowers and took them to the neighbors. Maybe it was so far north that the spring flowers were particularly valued? Usually we put in daffodils, which bloom much, much earlier in Maryland.
    Good for Australia for pioneering the 8 hour work day!

    Reply
  23. I’m an Upstate New Yorker like where Pat was a child (not sure where the puppymom is from), and we also made paper baskets and put in flowers and took them to the neighbors. Maybe it was so far north that the spring flowers were particularly valued? Usually we put in daffodils, which bloom much, much earlier in Maryland.
    Good for Australia for pioneering the 8 hour work day!

    Reply
  24. I’m an Upstate New Yorker like where Pat was a child (not sure where the puppymom is from), and we also made paper baskets and put in flowers and took them to the neighbors. Maybe it was so far north that the spring flowers were particularly valued? Usually we put in daffodils, which bloom much, much earlier in Maryland.
    Good for Australia for pioneering the 8 hour work day!

    Reply
  25. I’m an Upstate New Yorker like where Pat was a child (not sure where the puppymom is from), and we also made paper baskets and put in flowers and took them to the neighbors. Maybe it was so far north that the spring flowers were particularly valued? Usually we put in daffodils, which bloom much, much earlier in Maryland.
    Good for Australia for pioneering the 8 hour work day!

    Reply
  26. pj, I love the tradition of gathering flowers and leaving them on your neighbor’s doorsteps. Lily-of-the-valley doesn’t grow wild here, and doesn’t always thrive in the dry, but my elderly neighbor used to have a huge patch of it that had spread and each year she would leave me a bunch of my doorstep. Alas when her house was sold, the new owner paved over the lily-of-the-valley beds. 🙁
    Theo, I think many pagan traditions are celebrated along with Christian ones — it was the only way the early christian authorities could get the local populations to convert — incorporate their festivals and subvert or downplay the meaning. And who doesn’t love a bonfire? I think people do need traditions to mark their lives and feel part of something older and more lasting. They also link generations.

    Reply
  27. pj, I love the tradition of gathering flowers and leaving them on your neighbor’s doorsteps. Lily-of-the-valley doesn’t grow wild here, and doesn’t always thrive in the dry, but my elderly neighbor used to have a huge patch of it that had spread and each year she would leave me a bunch of my doorstep. Alas when her house was sold, the new owner paved over the lily-of-the-valley beds. 🙁
    Theo, I think many pagan traditions are celebrated along with Christian ones — it was the only way the early christian authorities could get the local populations to convert — incorporate their festivals and subvert or downplay the meaning. And who doesn’t love a bonfire? I think people do need traditions to mark their lives and feel part of something older and more lasting. They also link generations.

    Reply
  28. pj, I love the tradition of gathering flowers and leaving them on your neighbor’s doorsteps. Lily-of-the-valley doesn’t grow wild here, and doesn’t always thrive in the dry, but my elderly neighbor used to have a huge patch of it that had spread and each year she would leave me a bunch of my doorstep. Alas when her house was sold, the new owner paved over the lily-of-the-valley beds. 🙁
    Theo, I think many pagan traditions are celebrated along with Christian ones — it was the only way the early christian authorities could get the local populations to convert — incorporate their festivals and subvert or downplay the meaning. And who doesn’t love a bonfire? I think people do need traditions to mark their lives and feel part of something older and more lasting. They also link generations.

    Reply
  29. pj, I love the tradition of gathering flowers and leaving them on your neighbor’s doorsteps. Lily-of-the-valley doesn’t grow wild here, and doesn’t always thrive in the dry, but my elderly neighbor used to have a huge patch of it that had spread and each year she would leave me a bunch of my doorstep. Alas when her house was sold, the new owner paved over the lily-of-the-valley beds. 🙁
    Theo, I think many pagan traditions are celebrated along with Christian ones — it was the only way the early christian authorities could get the local populations to convert — incorporate their festivals and subvert or downplay the meaning. And who doesn’t love a bonfire? I think people do need traditions to mark their lives and feel part of something older and more lasting. They also link generations.

    Reply
  30. pj, I love the tradition of gathering flowers and leaving them on your neighbor’s doorsteps. Lily-of-the-valley doesn’t grow wild here, and doesn’t always thrive in the dry, but my elderly neighbor used to have a huge patch of it that had spread and each year she would leave me a bunch of my doorstep. Alas when her house was sold, the new owner paved over the lily-of-the-valley beds. 🙁
    Theo, I think many pagan traditions are celebrated along with Christian ones — it was the only way the early christian authorities could get the local populations to convert — incorporate their festivals and subvert or downplay the meaning. And who doesn’t love a bonfire? I think people do need traditions to mark their lives and feel part of something older and more lasting. They also link generations.

    Reply
  31. Hi, Anne. My daughter and I made May Day baskets (heart-shaped woven paper baskets) to deliver to the neighbor kids and we picked a small bouquet of violets and lily-of-the-valley for our elderly neighbor gal. I cannot believe how many people don’t know about or don’t do the May Day basket-thing. It was great fun when I was little and I am glad I’m carrying on the tradition with my daughter.

    Reply
  32. Hi, Anne. My daughter and I made May Day baskets (heart-shaped woven paper baskets) to deliver to the neighbor kids and we picked a small bouquet of violets and lily-of-the-valley for our elderly neighbor gal. I cannot believe how many people don’t know about or don’t do the May Day basket-thing. It was great fun when I was little and I am glad I’m carrying on the tradition with my daughter.

    Reply
  33. Hi, Anne. My daughter and I made May Day baskets (heart-shaped woven paper baskets) to deliver to the neighbor kids and we picked a small bouquet of violets and lily-of-the-valley for our elderly neighbor gal. I cannot believe how many people don’t know about or don’t do the May Day basket-thing. It was great fun when I was little and I am glad I’m carrying on the tradition with my daughter.

    Reply
  34. Hi, Anne. My daughter and I made May Day baskets (heart-shaped woven paper baskets) to deliver to the neighbor kids and we picked a small bouquet of violets and lily-of-the-valley for our elderly neighbor gal. I cannot believe how many people don’t know about or don’t do the May Day basket-thing. It was great fun when I was little and I am glad I’m carrying on the tradition with my daughter.

    Reply
  35. Hi, Anne. My daughter and I made May Day baskets (heart-shaped woven paper baskets) to deliver to the neighbor kids and we picked a small bouquet of violets and lily-of-the-valley for our elderly neighbor gal. I cannot believe how many people don’t know about or don’t do the May Day basket-thing. It was great fun when I was little and I am glad I’m carrying on the tradition with my daughter.

    Reply
  36. Kim, I thought the morning dew tradition was lovely, too. I even remember when I was a child, hearing about how if you washed your face in morning dew you’d have beautiful skin. You probably would too — it’d be very clean and bracing. 😉
    It’s interesting that it lasted so long after so many other rituals died — maybe vanity never dies. On the web I found photos from the 1960’s where Scots girls were washing their faces in the morning dew.
    I think Nu’uanu Pali would work just as well.

    Reply
  37. Kim, I thought the morning dew tradition was lovely, too. I even remember when I was a child, hearing about how if you washed your face in morning dew you’d have beautiful skin. You probably would too — it’d be very clean and bracing. 😉
    It’s interesting that it lasted so long after so many other rituals died — maybe vanity never dies. On the web I found photos from the 1960’s where Scots girls were washing their faces in the morning dew.
    I think Nu’uanu Pali would work just as well.

    Reply
  38. Kim, I thought the morning dew tradition was lovely, too. I even remember when I was a child, hearing about how if you washed your face in morning dew you’d have beautiful skin. You probably would too — it’d be very clean and bracing. 😉
    It’s interesting that it lasted so long after so many other rituals died — maybe vanity never dies. On the web I found photos from the 1960’s where Scots girls were washing their faces in the morning dew.
    I think Nu’uanu Pali would work just as well.

    Reply
  39. Kim, I thought the morning dew tradition was lovely, too. I even remember when I was a child, hearing about how if you washed your face in morning dew you’d have beautiful skin. You probably would too — it’d be very clean and bracing. 😉
    It’s interesting that it lasted so long after so many other rituals died — maybe vanity never dies. On the web I found photos from the 1960’s where Scots girls were washing their faces in the morning dew.
    I think Nu’uanu Pali would work just as well.

    Reply
  40. Kim, I thought the morning dew tradition was lovely, too. I even remember when I was a child, hearing about how if you washed your face in morning dew you’d have beautiful skin. You probably would too — it’d be very clean and bracing. 😉
    It’s interesting that it lasted so long after so many other rituals died — maybe vanity never dies. On the web I found photos from the 1960’s where Scots girls were washing their faces in the morning dew.
    I think Nu’uanu Pali would work just as well.

    Reply
  41. Pat, celebrate your garden for me — mine is looking sadder and sadder — not just the season (we’re heading toward winter here) but years of drought, and water restrictions that meant most plants were on their own…
    Mary Jo, the early timing of that 8 hour day win by aussie workers is because there was a shortage of workers –the 1850’s were gold rush times here, and the colony of Victoria was booming, but so many men were off digging for gold. That’s what gave the workers the edge in negotiating fair hours.

    Reply
  42. Pat, celebrate your garden for me — mine is looking sadder and sadder — not just the season (we’re heading toward winter here) but years of drought, and water restrictions that meant most plants were on their own…
    Mary Jo, the early timing of that 8 hour day win by aussie workers is because there was a shortage of workers –the 1850’s were gold rush times here, and the colony of Victoria was booming, but so many men were off digging for gold. That’s what gave the workers the edge in negotiating fair hours.

    Reply
  43. Pat, celebrate your garden for me — mine is looking sadder and sadder — not just the season (we’re heading toward winter here) but years of drought, and water restrictions that meant most plants were on their own…
    Mary Jo, the early timing of that 8 hour day win by aussie workers is because there was a shortage of workers –the 1850’s were gold rush times here, and the colony of Victoria was booming, but so many men were off digging for gold. That’s what gave the workers the edge in negotiating fair hours.

    Reply
  44. Pat, celebrate your garden for me — mine is looking sadder and sadder — not just the season (we’re heading toward winter here) but years of drought, and water restrictions that meant most plants were on their own…
    Mary Jo, the early timing of that 8 hour day win by aussie workers is because there was a shortage of workers –the 1850’s were gold rush times here, and the colony of Victoria was booming, but so many men were off digging for gold. That’s what gave the workers the edge in negotiating fair hours.

    Reply
  45. Pat, celebrate your garden for me — mine is looking sadder and sadder — not just the season (we’re heading toward winter here) but years of drought, and water restrictions that meant most plants were on their own…
    Mary Jo, the early timing of that 8 hour day win by aussie workers is because there was a shortage of workers –the 1850’s were gold rush times here, and the colony of Victoria was booming, but so many men were off digging for gold. That’s what gave the workers the edge in negotiating fair hours.

    Reply
  46. Deb, in my brief research for this post I came across references to May Day Baskets, but I’d never heard of it before. There are some great instructions on the web for weaving the paper baskets. I think it’s a lovely idea, especially for kids to do.

    Reply
  47. Deb, in my brief research for this post I came across references to May Day Baskets, but I’d never heard of it before. There are some great instructions on the web for weaving the paper baskets. I think it’s a lovely idea, especially for kids to do.

    Reply
  48. Deb, in my brief research for this post I came across references to May Day Baskets, but I’d never heard of it before. There are some great instructions on the web for weaving the paper baskets. I think it’s a lovely idea, especially for kids to do.

    Reply
  49. Deb, in my brief research for this post I came across references to May Day Baskets, but I’d never heard of it before. There are some great instructions on the web for weaving the paper baskets. I think it’s a lovely idea, especially for kids to do.

    Reply
  50. Deb, in my brief research for this post I came across references to May Day Baskets, but I’d never heard of it before. There are some great instructions on the web for weaving the paper baskets. I think it’s a lovely idea, especially for kids to do.

    Reply
  51. I never heard of May Day until I read Anne of Green Gables as a kid. It sounded like so much fun, I wished we still celebrated it! It’s just another day for me. I spent the day mostly avoiding going out in the rain.

    Reply
  52. I never heard of May Day until I read Anne of Green Gables as a kid. It sounded like so much fun, I wished we still celebrated it! It’s just another day for me. I spent the day mostly avoiding going out in the rain.

    Reply
  53. I never heard of May Day until I read Anne of Green Gables as a kid. It sounded like so much fun, I wished we still celebrated it! It’s just another day for me. I spent the day mostly avoiding going out in the rain.

    Reply
  54. I never heard of May Day until I read Anne of Green Gables as a kid. It sounded like so much fun, I wished we still celebrated it! It’s just another day for me. I spent the day mostly avoiding going out in the rain.

    Reply
  55. I never heard of May Day until I read Anne of Green Gables as a kid. It sounded like so much fun, I wished we still celebrated it! It’s just another day for me. I spent the day mostly avoiding going out in the rain.

    Reply
  56. Hi, Anne, I’m back. 🙂 That’s neat to hear about the paper heart baskets on the Web. But, I got the idea from my grandpa who immigrated from Denmark and he made them to hang on the lower branches of the Christmas tree. When we went to see Grandpa and Grandma (every Sunday–or they came in to see us), Grandpa would take a basket off the tree and hand it to us girls. He filled them with candy and cookies. So, we make them for May Day, too!

    Reply
  57. Hi, Anne, I’m back. 🙂 That’s neat to hear about the paper heart baskets on the Web. But, I got the idea from my grandpa who immigrated from Denmark and he made them to hang on the lower branches of the Christmas tree. When we went to see Grandpa and Grandma (every Sunday–or they came in to see us), Grandpa would take a basket off the tree and hand it to us girls. He filled them with candy and cookies. So, we make them for May Day, too!

    Reply
  58. Hi, Anne, I’m back. 🙂 That’s neat to hear about the paper heart baskets on the Web. But, I got the idea from my grandpa who immigrated from Denmark and he made them to hang on the lower branches of the Christmas tree. When we went to see Grandpa and Grandma (every Sunday–or they came in to see us), Grandpa would take a basket off the tree and hand it to us girls. He filled them with candy and cookies. So, we make them for May Day, too!

    Reply
  59. Hi, Anne, I’m back. 🙂 That’s neat to hear about the paper heart baskets on the Web. But, I got the idea from my grandpa who immigrated from Denmark and he made them to hang on the lower branches of the Christmas tree. When we went to see Grandpa and Grandma (every Sunday–or they came in to see us), Grandpa would take a basket off the tree and hand it to us girls. He filled them with candy and cookies. So, we make them for May Day, too!

    Reply
  60. Hi, Anne, I’m back. 🙂 That’s neat to hear about the paper heart baskets on the Web. But, I got the idea from my grandpa who immigrated from Denmark and he made them to hang on the lower branches of the Christmas tree. When we went to see Grandpa and Grandma (every Sunday–or they came in to see us), Grandpa would take a basket off the tree and hand it to us girls. He filled them with candy and cookies. So, we make them for May Day, too!

    Reply
  61. From Sherrie:
    When I was a kid, my brother and sister and I would make cone shaped paper baskets with a looped paper handle for hanging on doorknobs. Then we would fill the baskets with flowers, hang them on neighbors’ doors, ring their doorbells, then run like the dickens and hide. It was always great fun to hear the neighbors make exaggeratedly pleased exclamations (loudly enough for us kids hiding in the bushes to hear, of course).
    Like many delightful and meaningful traditions of my childhood, May Day seems to have passed into obscurity, replaced by the more popular Cinco de Mayo (which we’d never even heard of when I was a kid!). I also remember dancing the Maypole in school, with colored ribbons attached to a pole. It was very pretty when we finished the dance.
    Pat, I’m envious of your garden. Here in the Pacific NW we are FREEZING! It has been bitterly cold, with rain, sleet, hail, and believe it or not, I actually got snow the other day. Just a halfhearted dusting, but snow nevertheless. For the past two days we have had a wild wind storm, with winds of 50 MPH. Last night it got down to 35 degrees and the wind knocked out my power. For the next two days we’re supposed to have thunderstorms and rain, plus continued high winds. Weather-wise, May Day was just another winter day where I live!

    Reply
  62. From Sherrie:
    When I was a kid, my brother and sister and I would make cone shaped paper baskets with a looped paper handle for hanging on doorknobs. Then we would fill the baskets with flowers, hang them on neighbors’ doors, ring their doorbells, then run like the dickens and hide. It was always great fun to hear the neighbors make exaggeratedly pleased exclamations (loudly enough for us kids hiding in the bushes to hear, of course).
    Like many delightful and meaningful traditions of my childhood, May Day seems to have passed into obscurity, replaced by the more popular Cinco de Mayo (which we’d never even heard of when I was a kid!). I also remember dancing the Maypole in school, with colored ribbons attached to a pole. It was very pretty when we finished the dance.
    Pat, I’m envious of your garden. Here in the Pacific NW we are FREEZING! It has been bitterly cold, with rain, sleet, hail, and believe it or not, I actually got snow the other day. Just a halfhearted dusting, but snow nevertheless. For the past two days we have had a wild wind storm, with winds of 50 MPH. Last night it got down to 35 degrees and the wind knocked out my power. For the next two days we’re supposed to have thunderstorms and rain, plus continued high winds. Weather-wise, May Day was just another winter day where I live!

    Reply
  63. From Sherrie:
    When I was a kid, my brother and sister and I would make cone shaped paper baskets with a looped paper handle for hanging on doorknobs. Then we would fill the baskets with flowers, hang them on neighbors’ doors, ring their doorbells, then run like the dickens and hide. It was always great fun to hear the neighbors make exaggeratedly pleased exclamations (loudly enough for us kids hiding in the bushes to hear, of course).
    Like many delightful and meaningful traditions of my childhood, May Day seems to have passed into obscurity, replaced by the more popular Cinco de Mayo (which we’d never even heard of when I was a kid!). I also remember dancing the Maypole in school, with colored ribbons attached to a pole. It was very pretty when we finished the dance.
    Pat, I’m envious of your garden. Here in the Pacific NW we are FREEZING! It has been bitterly cold, with rain, sleet, hail, and believe it or not, I actually got snow the other day. Just a halfhearted dusting, but snow nevertheless. For the past two days we have had a wild wind storm, with winds of 50 MPH. Last night it got down to 35 degrees and the wind knocked out my power. For the next two days we’re supposed to have thunderstorms and rain, plus continued high winds. Weather-wise, May Day was just another winter day where I live!

    Reply
  64. From Sherrie:
    When I was a kid, my brother and sister and I would make cone shaped paper baskets with a looped paper handle for hanging on doorknobs. Then we would fill the baskets with flowers, hang them on neighbors’ doors, ring their doorbells, then run like the dickens and hide. It was always great fun to hear the neighbors make exaggeratedly pleased exclamations (loudly enough for us kids hiding in the bushes to hear, of course).
    Like many delightful and meaningful traditions of my childhood, May Day seems to have passed into obscurity, replaced by the more popular Cinco de Mayo (which we’d never even heard of when I was a kid!). I also remember dancing the Maypole in school, with colored ribbons attached to a pole. It was very pretty when we finished the dance.
    Pat, I’m envious of your garden. Here in the Pacific NW we are FREEZING! It has been bitterly cold, with rain, sleet, hail, and believe it or not, I actually got snow the other day. Just a halfhearted dusting, but snow nevertheless. For the past two days we have had a wild wind storm, with winds of 50 MPH. Last night it got down to 35 degrees and the wind knocked out my power. For the next two days we’re supposed to have thunderstorms and rain, plus continued high winds. Weather-wise, May Day was just another winter day where I live!

    Reply
  65. From Sherrie:
    When I was a kid, my brother and sister and I would make cone shaped paper baskets with a looped paper handle for hanging on doorknobs. Then we would fill the baskets with flowers, hang them on neighbors’ doors, ring their doorbells, then run like the dickens and hide. It was always great fun to hear the neighbors make exaggeratedly pleased exclamations (loudly enough for us kids hiding in the bushes to hear, of course).
    Like many delightful and meaningful traditions of my childhood, May Day seems to have passed into obscurity, replaced by the more popular Cinco de Mayo (which we’d never even heard of when I was a kid!). I also remember dancing the Maypole in school, with colored ribbons attached to a pole. It was very pretty when we finished the dance.
    Pat, I’m envious of your garden. Here in the Pacific NW we are FREEZING! It has been bitterly cold, with rain, sleet, hail, and believe it or not, I actually got snow the other day. Just a halfhearted dusting, but snow nevertheless. For the past two days we have had a wild wind storm, with winds of 50 MPH. Last night it got down to 35 degrees and the wind knocked out my power. For the next two days we’re supposed to have thunderstorms and rain, plus continued high winds. Weather-wise, May Day was just another winter day where I live!

    Reply
  66. PJ, I *still* live in Michigan, but alas, the flowers are terribly late this year. My trillium finally started blooming two days ago and the Mayapples aren’t even close to ready yet. I don’t think the Lily of the Valley will be up for another week either. So much for May Day this year. *sigh*
    Anne, I have a *huge* firepit in my backyard. I do love a good bonfire, but I think the real reason we have it is all men are a bit of a pyromaniac at heart ;o)

    Reply
  67. PJ, I *still* live in Michigan, but alas, the flowers are terribly late this year. My trillium finally started blooming two days ago and the Mayapples aren’t even close to ready yet. I don’t think the Lily of the Valley will be up for another week either. So much for May Day this year. *sigh*
    Anne, I have a *huge* firepit in my backyard. I do love a good bonfire, but I think the real reason we have it is all men are a bit of a pyromaniac at heart ;o)

    Reply
  68. PJ, I *still* live in Michigan, but alas, the flowers are terribly late this year. My trillium finally started blooming two days ago and the Mayapples aren’t even close to ready yet. I don’t think the Lily of the Valley will be up for another week either. So much for May Day this year. *sigh*
    Anne, I have a *huge* firepit in my backyard. I do love a good bonfire, but I think the real reason we have it is all men are a bit of a pyromaniac at heart ;o)

    Reply
  69. PJ, I *still* live in Michigan, but alas, the flowers are terribly late this year. My trillium finally started blooming two days ago and the Mayapples aren’t even close to ready yet. I don’t think the Lily of the Valley will be up for another week either. So much for May Day this year. *sigh*
    Anne, I have a *huge* firepit in my backyard. I do love a good bonfire, but I think the real reason we have it is all men are a bit of a pyromaniac at heart ;o)

    Reply
  70. PJ, I *still* live in Michigan, but alas, the flowers are terribly late this year. My trillium finally started blooming two days ago and the Mayapples aren’t even close to ready yet. I don’t think the Lily of the Valley will be up for another week either. So much for May Day this year. *sigh*
    Anne, I have a *huge* firepit in my backyard. I do love a good bonfire, but I think the real reason we have it is all men are a bit of a pyromaniac at heart ;o)

    Reply
  71. hi, here in Puerto Rico we don`t celebrate anything importat, remenber we have mothers day coming and a lot a graduations to celebrate,so we have a lot of joy coming and we are one of the most happy contry in all the world, so we celebrate almost everyday something

    Reply
  72. hi, here in Puerto Rico we don`t celebrate anything importat, remenber we have mothers day coming and a lot a graduations to celebrate,so we have a lot of joy coming and we are one of the most happy contry in all the world, so we celebrate almost everyday something

    Reply
  73. hi, here in Puerto Rico we don`t celebrate anything importat, remenber we have mothers day coming and a lot a graduations to celebrate,so we have a lot of joy coming and we are one of the most happy contry in all the world, so we celebrate almost everyday something

    Reply
  74. hi, here in Puerto Rico we don`t celebrate anything importat, remenber we have mothers day coming and a lot a graduations to celebrate,so we have a lot of joy coming and we are one of the most happy contry in all the world, so we celebrate almost everyday something

    Reply
  75. hi, here in Puerto Rico we don`t celebrate anything importat, remenber we have mothers day coming and a lot a graduations to celebrate,so we have a lot of joy coming and we are one of the most happy contry in all the world, so we celebrate almost everyday something

    Reply
  76. May Day is mostly Labour Day over here. It is a public holiday and the Social Democrats usually host ralleys, beer tent parties and so forth.
    In villages they put up May poles and it is a point of honour to have the highest one. Young men have to climb them. They are very hard to climb as they are polished so people sometimes fall down and hurt themselves, but this year I haven’t heart of any victims!

    Reply
  77. May Day is mostly Labour Day over here. It is a public holiday and the Social Democrats usually host ralleys, beer tent parties and so forth.
    In villages they put up May poles and it is a point of honour to have the highest one. Young men have to climb them. They are very hard to climb as they are polished so people sometimes fall down and hurt themselves, but this year I haven’t heart of any victims!

    Reply
  78. May Day is mostly Labour Day over here. It is a public holiday and the Social Democrats usually host ralleys, beer tent parties and so forth.
    In villages they put up May poles and it is a point of honour to have the highest one. Young men have to climb them. They are very hard to climb as they are polished so people sometimes fall down and hurt themselves, but this year I haven’t heart of any victims!

    Reply
  79. May Day is mostly Labour Day over here. It is a public holiday and the Social Democrats usually host ralleys, beer tent parties and so forth.
    In villages they put up May poles and it is a point of honour to have the highest one. Young men have to climb them. They are very hard to climb as they are polished so people sometimes fall down and hurt themselves, but this year I haven’t heart of any victims!

    Reply
  80. May Day is mostly Labour Day over here. It is a public holiday and the Social Democrats usually host ralleys, beer tent parties and so forth.
    In villages they put up May poles and it is a point of honour to have the highest one. Young men have to climb them. They are very hard to climb as they are polished so people sometimes fall down and hurt themselves, but this year I haven’t heart of any victims!

    Reply
  81. Chey, yes, I’d forgotten about Anne of Green Gables. May Day’s not much of an event for me, either, and though I could skip the maypole, I’d love some of the other activities.
    Theo, our plants are confused, also — I have a plum tree feebly blossoming and we’re heading for winter. And it’s not only men who love a fire — me, me. When I was a kid and we had bonfire night (5th Nov Gyuy Fawkes night — British heritage) it was the highlight of my year. And I still don’t understand barbecues that are gas or electric –OK, clean and convenient, yes, but I want a real fire.

    Reply
  82. Chey, yes, I’d forgotten about Anne of Green Gables. May Day’s not much of an event for me, either, and though I could skip the maypole, I’d love some of the other activities.
    Theo, our plants are confused, also — I have a plum tree feebly blossoming and we’re heading for winter. And it’s not only men who love a fire — me, me. When I was a kid and we had bonfire night (5th Nov Gyuy Fawkes night — British heritage) it was the highlight of my year. And I still don’t understand barbecues that are gas or electric –OK, clean and convenient, yes, but I want a real fire.

    Reply
  83. Chey, yes, I’d forgotten about Anne of Green Gables. May Day’s not much of an event for me, either, and though I could skip the maypole, I’d love some of the other activities.
    Theo, our plants are confused, also — I have a plum tree feebly blossoming and we’re heading for winter. And it’s not only men who love a fire — me, me. When I was a kid and we had bonfire night (5th Nov Gyuy Fawkes night — British heritage) it was the highlight of my year. And I still don’t understand barbecues that are gas or electric –OK, clean and convenient, yes, but I want a real fire.

    Reply
  84. Chey, yes, I’d forgotten about Anne of Green Gables. May Day’s not much of an event for me, either, and though I could skip the maypole, I’d love some of the other activities.
    Theo, our plants are confused, also — I have a plum tree feebly blossoming and we’re heading for winter. And it’s not only men who love a fire — me, me. When I was a kid and we had bonfire night (5th Nov Gyuy Fawkes night — British heritage) it was the highlight of my year. And I still don’t understand barbecues that are gas or electric –OK, clean and convenient, yes, but I want a real fire.

    Reply
  85. Chey, yes, I’d forgotten about Anne of Green Gables. May Day’s not much of an event for me, either, and though I could skip the maypole, I’d love some of the other activities.
    Theo, our plants are confused, also — I have a plum tree feebly blossoming and we’re heading for winter. And it’s not only men who love a fire — me, me. When I was a kid and we had bonfire night (5th Nov Gyuy Fawkes night — British heritage) it was the highlight of my year. And I still don’t understand barbecues that are gas or electric –OK, clean and convenient, yes, but I want a real fire.

    Reply
  86. Maria I love the idea that every day should be a day of celebration. Have a wonderful mothers day, and congratulate all those graduating.
    Liza, beer tents sound like something I could learn to love, as well as watching young men shinnying up poles. 😉 Here on a public holiday people mostly hit the road and go away, usually to the beach.

    Reply
  87. Maria I love the idea that every day should be a day of celebration. Have a wonderful mothers day, and congratulate all those graduating.
    Liza, beer tents sound like something I could learn to love, as well as watching young men shinnying up poles. 😉 Here on a public holiday people mostly hit the road and go away, usually to the beach.

    Reply
  88. Maria I love the idea that every day should be a day of celebration. Have a wonderful mothers day, and congratulate all those graduating.
    Liza, beer tents sound like something I could learn to love, as well as watching young men shinnying up poles. 😉 Here on a public holiday people mostly hit the road and go away, usually to the beach.

    Reply
  89. Maria I love the idea that every day should be a day of celebration. Have a wonderful mothers day, and congratulate all those graduating.
    Liza, beer tents sound like something I could learn to love, as well as watching young men shinnying up poles. 😉 Here on a public holiday people mostly hit the road and go away, usually to the beach.

    Reply
  90. Maria I love the idea that every day should be a day of celebration. Have a wonderful mothers day, and congratulate all those graduating.
    Liza, beer tents sound like something I could learn to love, as well as watching young men shinnying up poles. 😉 Here on a public holiday people mostly hit the road and go away, usually to the beach.

    Reply
  91. It sounds like most of us who did the flower baskets for May Day (our were cone shaped) are from more northern climes–Upstate New York, Michigan, Washington. This reinforces my theory that we value spring more!

    Reply
  92. It sounds like most of us who did the flower baskets for May Day (our were cone shaped) are from more northern climes–Upstate New York, Michigan, Washington. This reinforces my theory that we value spring more!

    Reply
  93. It sounds like most of us who did the flower baskets for May Day (our were cone shaped) are from more northern climes–Upstate New York, Michigan, Washington. This reinforces my theory that we value spring more!

    Reply
  94. It sounds like most of us who did the flower baskets for May Day (our were cone shaped) are from more northern climes–Upstate New York, Michigan, Washington. This reinforces my theory that we value spring more!

    Reply
  95. It sounds like most of us who did the flower baskets for May Day (our were cone shaped) are from more northern climes–Upstate New York, Michigan, Washington. This reinforces my theory that we value spring more!

    Reply
  96. Sherrie, loved your description of taking flowers to your neighbors and hiding. Just gorgeous. Sorry to hear of your freezing weather.
    We used to play on a maypole at school, but it has chains, not ribbons, long chains with a handle at the base and we’d run and swing out, holding the chains as we flew in a circle around the pole, and came down, bumping against each other. Great fun.
    Mary Jo, I wonder if those traditions came from some particular region in Europe or the UK, and then spread locally. Like Deb’s Danish baskets. I love the woven Danish paper hearts, too.
    As for valuing spring — I’m sure any place that spends winter buried in snow must really want to celebrate when spring comes.

    Reply
  97. Sherrie, loved your description of taking flowers to your neighbors and hiding. Just gorgeous. Sorry to hear of your freezing weather.
    We used to play on a maypole at school, but it has chains, not ribbons, long chains with a handle at the base and we’d run and swing out, holding the chains as we flew in a circle around the pole, and came down, bumping against each other. Great fun.
    Mary Jo, I wonder if those traditions came from some particular region in Europe or the UK, and then spread locally. Like Deb’s Danish baskets. I love the woven Danish paper hearts, too.
    As for valuing spring — I’m sure any place that spends winter buried in snow must really want to celebrate when spring comes.

    Reply
  98. Sherrie, loved your description of taking flowers to your neighbors and hiding. Just gorgeous. Sorry to hear of your freezing weather.
    We used to play on a maypole at school, but it has chains, not ribbons, long chains with a handle at the base and we’d run and swing out, holding the chains as we flew in a circle around the pole, and came down, bumping against each other. Great fun.
    Mary Jo, I wonder if those traditions came from some particular region in Europe or the UK, and then spread locally. Like Deb’s Danish baskets. I love the woven Danish paper hearts, too.
    As for valuing spring — I’m sure any place that spends winter buried in snow must really want to celebrate when spring comes.

    Reply
  99. Sherrie, loved your description of taking flowers to your neighbors and hiding. Just gorgeous. Sorry to hear of your freezing weather.
    We used to play on a maypole at school, but it has chains, not ribbons, long chains with a handle at the base and we’d run and swing out, holding the chains as we flew in a circle around the pole, and came down, bumping against each other. Great fun.
    Mary Jo, I wonder if those traditions came from some particular region in Europe or the UK, and then spread locally. Like Deb’s Danish baskets. I love the woven Danish paper hearts, too.
    As for valuing spring — I’m sure any place that spends winter buried in snow must really want to celebrate when spring comes.

    Reply
  100. Sherrie, loved your description of taking flowers to your neighbors and hiding. Just gorgeous. Sorry to hear of your freezing weather.
    We used to play on a maypole at school, but it has chains, not ribbons, long chains with a handle at the base and we’d run and swing out, holding the chains as we flew in a circle around the pole, and came down, bumping against each other. Great fun.
    Mary Jo, I wonder if those traditions came from some particular region in Europe or the UK, and then spread locally. Like Deb’s Danish baskets. I love the woven Danish paper hearts, too.
    As for valuing spring — I’m sure any place that spends winter buried in snow must really want to celebrate when spring comes.

    Reply

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