Mary Hart Perry on What Makes a Hero….Heroic?

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

I’m delighted to welcome back author Kathryn Johnson, today in her guise as Mary Hart Perry, author of romantic Victorian thrillers based on the real lives of Queen Victoria’s daughters.  Wench Susan interviewed her about the first Mary Hart Perry book, The Wild Princesswhich featured the rebellious Princess Louise.

Now the second book, Seducing the Princess, features Victoria’s SeducingthePrincess_coveryoungest daughter, Princess Beatrice, and the book has Mary Hart Perry pondering what makes heroes heroic.  Her thoughts:

Mary Hart Perry

I've been giving this question a great deal of thought lately. Some writers admit that they model all of their heroes after a single image in their minds–the "perfect" man. But perfection is in the eye of the beholder, is it not? What may seem ideal to one woman, may be totally unappealing to another.

I'm discovering this is true even as I work my way through the third book in my series of romantic Victorian thrillers based on the lives of Queen Victoria's daughters. The second novel (Seducing the Princess) has just been published, and the first (The Wild Princess) came out last fall. In the third, my hero is unlike either of the other two men who woo Princesses Beatrice and Louise. And yet they share certain characteristics that appeal to me and, I hope, to my readers.

For me, the ideal hero is a blend of characteristics. First, he must be intelligent. 220px-Queen_Victoria_and_Princess_Beatrice_as_babyYup, that's right. I'm likely to pass by a guy who's so fantastic looking that women get whiplash when he passes through a room. I've learned that guys who depend upon their hunkiness to get women usually are all too aware of their looks and expect us to fall at their feet. Something inside me rebels at that. I want to be thought of as special, not just another fling. So if he's got brains and he can hold up his end of an interesting conversation, I'm likely to hang around for a while. That's what I like about Henry in Seducing the Princess. He's a clever guy, and he uses his head to win the woman of his dreams. But neither is he squeamish about taking on his enemy in a physical way, to protect Bea.

I'll give you an example from real life that I've never told anyone before. When I was much younger, I had an immense crush on political pundit, George Will. (Don't laugh!) Seriously. I know he wasn't cover model gorgeous. With his nappy college-prof jackets and horn-rimmed glasses and conservative haircuts, he didn't look like a beefed-up romance hero. But I could listen to that man forever! Because, while he spoke, there was that mysterious, playful twinkle in his eyes that made me suspect he was a lot more fun than he wanted to let on to the world. (Like in bed?) Was he saving that fun for a special lady? I imagined it might be (gulp)…me!

So brains turn me on, and I'll bet they throw the switch for other women, too.

What else? Okay, to be honest–money. Or, at least, the lack of a need for me to 433px-Princess_Beatrice_coloured_bookplatehave money. My fantasy lover is so smart, he's made his million by the time he turned 25…or at least before we met. And he's generous with his fortune. He would be thrilled to take me on a whirlwind tour of Europe or invite me to cruise with him on his yacht in the Virgin Islands. I suppose this is a natural, given today's economy. We all are super-conscious about our budgets. But wouldn't it be lover-ly (as Eliza Doolittle sings in My Fair Lady) to have someone provide for us whatever we need or want–food, clothing, jewelry, travel…?  So my heroes are likely not to have money problems and will never beg for loans from my heroines. In Seducing, my hero is one of four brothers and a prince in his own right. He isn't ostentatiously wealthy, and actually his family is less well off than the queen and her family. But it's pretty clear that he will always have enough cash on hand to take care of his beloved and, perhaps, afford the occasional yachting adventure or diamond bracelet.

The third trait I find necessary for my heroes is that they are nice guys. Truly. If they have a bad-boy image, it's because no one really understands them, or they have cultivated that image for a purpose. A guy who's cruel, arrogant, pushy, selfish, prone to jealousy or needs to always be the boss to be happy…he's not one of my heroes. In The Wild Princess, the hero seems at first self-important and aloof, but there's a good reason for the way he is. And eventually Princess Louise discovers how to break through that barrier. Besides being quite a good guy in many other ways, he's physically very impressive and darn good at saving lives.

220px-Prince_Henry_of_BattenbergFinally–oh, all right, I give up–there's the way he looks. So it's not at the top of my list but appearance still matters. The difference is, perfection still doesn't appeal to me. My ideal hero will have one or more striking aspects–tall, muscled, a super dresser, whatever–but he's not rock-star gorgeous and may well have flaws that would make him less attractive to other women. In a word, he's unique.

The hero I'm developing for my third book in the Victorian series isn't wealthy, DSC_0126titled, or a hunk in the traditional sense. But he's dedicated, aggressive when it comes to doing his job (tracking down a notorious murderer of women), and he "gets" the heroine. Whereas others don't understand her and can only feel sorry for her, thinking she has no future–he recognizes her talents, intelligence, and beauty.  And he's smitten.

MJP: Which princess is the heroine of the third book?  Inquiring minds want to know!

MHP:  In Book 3 of the series, Crown Princess Vickie returns to London at the urgent request of her niece, Princess Maud, whose brother has just been accused of being the infamous serial killer, Jack the Ripper.

So there you have it. Heroes–at least the way I look at them.

I'd love to hear your favorite 3 or 4 traits for your fictional (or real-life) heroes. Come on…give it a go! 

Hugs, Mary Hart Perry

Thanks, Mary/Kathryn!  Book 3 sounds like another great story.  Isn't it fortunate that Queen Victoria had such a passel of daughters for you to work with?!!  Here are some excerpts of Seducing the Princess if you'd like a taste!

Mary Jo, adding that the bride above is Princess Beatrice in her gorgeous wedding gown

 

100 thoughts on “Mary Hart Perry on What Makes a Hero….Heroic?”

  1. Mary/Kathryn – sorry, this is off-topic in that it isn’t answering the question you posed. I don’t normally read books set in the Victorian period so I haven’t come across yours before and I apologise if this is obvious to everyone else! My question is: given that you’re writing about real people (the daughters of Queen Victoria) how are you able to dream up heroes for them? Don’t we know who they loved and/or married?
    Or do you just use the princesses as your starting point, and create entirely imaginary stories for them? In that case, do you also imagine what the princesses were like, or do you use what is known about their personalities and work from there?
    I really like your analysis of the important traits of a hero. I agree with them!

    Reply
  2. Mary/Kathryn – sorry, this is off-topic in that it isn’t answering the question you posed. I don’t normally read books set in the Victorian period so I haven’t come across yours before and I apologise if this is obvious to everyone else! My question is: given that you’re writing about real people (the daughters of Queen Victoria) how are you able to dream up heroes for them? Don’t we know who they loved and/or married?
    Or do you just use the princesses as your starting point, and create entirely imaginary stories for them? In that case, do you also imagine what the princesses were like, or do you use what is known about their personalities and work from there?
    I really like your analysis of the important traits of a hero. I agree with them!

    Reply
  3. Mary/Kathryn – sorry, this is off-topic in that it isn’t answering the question you posed. I don’t normally read books set in the Victorian period so I haven’t come across yours before and I apologise if this is obvious to everyone else! My question is: given that you’re writing about real people (the daughters of Queen Victoria) how are you able to dream up heroes for them? Don’t we know who they loved and/or married?
    Or do you just use the princesses as your starting point, and create entirely imaginary stories for them? In that case, do you also imagine what the princesses were like, or do you use what is known about their personalities and work from there?
    I really like your analysis of the important traits of a hero. I agree with them!

    Reply
  4. Mary/Kathryn – sorry, this is off-topic in that it isn’t answering the question you posed. I don’t normally read books set in the Victorian period so I haven’t come across yours before and I apologise if this is obvious to everyone else! My question is: given that you’re writing about real people (the daughters of Queen Victoria) how are you able to dream up heroes for them? Don’t we know who they loved and/or married?
    Or do you just use the princesses as your starting point, and create entirely imaginary stories for them? In that case, do you also imagine what the princesses were like, or do you use what is known about their personalities and work from there?
    I really like your analysis of the important traits of a hero. I agree with them!

    Reply
  5. Mary/Kathryn – sorry, this is off-topic in that it isn’t answering the question you posed. I don’t normally read books set in the Victorian period so I haven’t come across yours before and I apologise if this is obvious to everyone else! My question is: given that you’re writing about real people (the daughters of Queen Victoria) how are you able to dream up heroes for them? Don’t we know who they loved and/or married?
    Or do you just use the princesses as your starting point, and create entirely imaginary stories for them? In that case, do you also imagine what the princesses were like, or do you use what is known about their personalities and work from there?
    I really like your analysis of the important traits of a hero. I agree with them!

    Reply
  6. First of all, I was delighted to read that the second book in this series had been published. I clicked the link and bought it before even continuing the interview!
    I have to say that I agree – for the most part – with your hero’s list of traits. I too would list intelligence at the top of the list. Kind, considerate and nice would also be at the top. You didn’t list humor and that is very important to me (I have four brothers!).
    The one trait that I have a slight quibble with is money. No, I don’t want my hero to be on food stamps, but comfortable is enough. After all, an intelligent man has figured out how to support himself. My prejudice against stacks of money comes from having spent my career in the Thoroughbred racing industry and having known extremely rich men. They are Not. Nice. People.
    Great to “see” you back here!

    Reply
  7. First of all, I was delighted to read that the second book in this series had been published. I clicked the link and bought it before even continuing the interview!
    I have to say that I agree – for the most part – with your hero’s list of traits. I too would list intelligence at the top of the list. Kind, considerate and nice would also be at the top. You didn’t list humor and that is very important to me (I have four brothers!).
    The one trait that I have a slight quibble with is money. No, I don’t want my hero to be on food stamps, but comfortable is enough. After all, an intelligent man has figured out how to support himself. My prejudice against stacks of money comes from having spent my career in the Thoroughbred racing industry and having known extremely rich men. They are Not. Nice. People.
    Great to “see” you back here!

    Reply
  8. First of all, I was delighted to read that the second book in this series had been published. I clicked the link and bought it before even continuing the interview!
    I have to say that I agree – for the most part – with your hero’s list of traits. I too would list intelligence at the top of the list. Kind, considerate and nice would also be at the top. You didn’t list humor and that is very important to me (I have four brothers!).
    The one trait that I have a slight quibble with is money. No, I don’t want my hero to be on food stamps, but comfortable is enough. After all, an intelligent man has figured out how to support himself. My prejudice against stacks of money comes from having spent my career in the Thoroughbred racing industry and having known extremely rich men. They are Not. Nice. People.
    Great to “see” you back here!

    Reply
  9. First of all, I was delighted to read that the second book in this series had been published. I clicked the link and bought it before even continuing the interview!
    I have to say that I agree – for the most part – with your hero’s list of traits. I too would list intelligence at the top of the list. Kind, considerate and nice would also be at the top. You didn’t list humor and that is very important to me (I have four brothers!).
    The one trait that I have a slight quibble with is money. No, I don’t want my hero to be on food stamps, but comfortable is enough. After all, an intelligent man has figured out how to support himself. My prejudice against stacks of money comes from having spent my career in the Thoroughbred racing industry and having known extremely rich men. They are Not. Nice. People.
    Great to “see” you back here!

    Reply
  10. First of all, I was delighted to read that the second book in this series had been published. I clicked the link and bought it before even continuing the interview!
    I have to say that I agree – for the most part – with your hero’s list of traits. I too would list intelligence at the top of the list. Kind, considerate and nice would also be at the top. You didn’t list humor and that is very important to me (I have four brothers!).
    The one trait that I have a slight quibble with is money. No, I don’t want my hero to be on food stamps, but comfortable is enough. After all, an intelligent man has figured out how to support himself. My prejudice against stacks of money comes from having spent my career in the Thoroughbred racing industry and having known extremely rich men. They are Not. Nice. People.
    Great to “see” you back here!

    Reply
  11. Donna, really…when it comes down to it, you’re absolutely right. All I need is “comfortable”. I don’t need a palace, and in reality never will have a palace. But it’s a fantasy that some of us allow ourselves–the never having to worry about money again. And thank you so much for picking up the new book. It’s the support of wonderful readers like you that keeps us authors writing and knowing we’re appreciated. Hugs! MHP

    Reply
  12. Donna, really…when it comes down to it, you’re absolutely right. All I need is “comfortable”. I don’t need a palace, and in reality never will have a palace. But it’s a fantasy that some of us allow ourselves–the never having to worry about money again. And thank you so much for picking up the new book. It’s the support of wonderful readers like you that keeps us authors writing and knowing we’re appreciated. Hugs! MHP

    Reply
  13. Donna, really…when it comes down to it, you’re absolutely right. All I need is “comfortable”. I don’t need a palace, and in reality never will have a palace. But it’s a fantasy that some of us allow ourselves–the never having to worry about money again. And thank you so much for picking up the new book. It’s the support of wonderful readers like you that keeps us authors writing and knowing we’re appreciated. Hugs! MHP

    Reply
  14. Donna, really…when it comes down to it, you’re absolutely right. All I need is “comfortable”. I don’t need a palace, and in reality never will have a palace. But it’s a fantasy that some of us allow ourselves–the never having to worry about money again. And thank you so much for picking up the new book. It’s the support of wonderful readers like you that keeps us authors writing and knowing we’re appreciated. Hugs! MHP

    Reply
  15. Donna, really…when it comes down to it, you’re absolutely right. All I need is “comfortable”. I don’t need a palace, and in reality never will have a palace. But it’s a fantasy that some of us allow ourselves–the never having to worry about money again. And thank you so much for picking up the new book. It’s the support of wonderful readers like you that keeps us authors writing and knowing we’re appreciated. Hugs! MHP

    Reply
  16. HJ–What good questions you’ve come up with! Love it. Okay, so the truth is, sometimes I use the real people/heroes in a heroine’s life. And sometimes I need to create a hero that they deserve, or I feel they deserve. In the case of Beatrice, the youngest daughter, it was easy because she really did marry Henry Battenberg. And he really did have to struggle to win her hand and to win the queen’s approval. So that part of the story is true. But I needed a villain, and so I created the Scot and the plot to infiltrate the family and Court by wooing Beatrice. In the earlier book, Louise’s hero is fiction. But a great deal is rumored about her and her marriage to Lorne. It was thought he was gay, which would have dictated that their marriage was without sexual gratification for her–and that’s somewhat supported by the fact that she never had children…at least so far as the records show. There were rumors or a possible affair or affairs, and other gossip as well about her youth and teen years. That’s where I feel intrigued enough to come up with fictional elements…and supply her with a hero. Hope you enjoy the stories if you get a chance to read them! All my best, MHP

    Reply
  17. HJ–What good questions you’ve come up with! Love it. Okay, so the truth is, sometimes I use the real people/heroes in a heroine’s life. And sometimes I need to create a hero that they deserve, or I feel they deserve. In the case of Beatrice, the youngest daughter, it was easy because she really did marry Henry Battenberg. And he really did have to struggle to win her hand and to win the queen’s approval. So that part of the story is true. But I needed a villain, and so I created the Scot and the plot to infiltrate the family and Court by wooing Beatrice. In the earlier book, Louise’s hero is fiction. But a great deal is rumored about her and her marriage to Lorne. It was thought he was gay, which would have dictated that their marriage was without sexual gratification for her–and that’s somewhat supported by the fact that she never had children…at least so far as the records show. There were rumors or a possible affair or affairs, and other gossip as well about her youth and teen years. That’s where I feel intrigued enough to come up with fictional elements…and supply her with a hero. Hope you enjoy the stories if you get a chance to read them! All my best, MHP

    Reply
  18. HJ–What good questions you’ve come up with! Love it. Okay, so the truth is, sometimes I use the real people/heroes in a heroine’s life. And sometimes I need to create a hero that they deserve, or I feel they deserve. In the case of Beatrice, the youngest daughter, it was easy because she really did marry Henry Battenberg. And he really did have to struggle to win her hand and to win the queen’s approval. So that part of the story is true. But I needed a villain, and so I created the Scot and the plot to infiltrate the family and Court by wooing Beatrice. In the earlier book, Louise’s hero is fiction. But a great deal is rumored about her and her marriage to Lorne. It was thought he was gay, which would have dictated that their marriage was without sexual gratification for her–and that’s somewhat supported by the fact that she never had children…at least so far as the records show. There were rumors or a possible affair or affairs, and other gossip as well about her youth and teen years. That’s where I feel intrigued enough to come up with fictional elements…and supply her with a hero. Hope you enjoy the stories if you get a chance to read them! All my best, MHP

    Reply
  19. HJ–What good questions you’ve come up with! Love it. Okay, so the truth is, sometimes I use the real people/heroes in a heroine’s life. And sometimes I need to create a hero that they deserve, or I feel they deserve. In the case of Beatrice, the youngest daughter, it was easy because she really did marry Henry Battenberg. And he really did have to struggle to win her hand and to win the queen’s approval. So that part of the story is true. But I needed a villain, and so I created the Scot and the plot to infiltrate the family and Court by wooing Beatrice. In the earlier book, Louise’s hero is fiction. But a great deal is rumored about her and her marriage to Lorne. It was thought he was gay, which would have dictated that their marriage was without sexual gratification for her–and that’s somewhat supported by the fact that she never had children…at least so far as the records show. There were rumors or a possible affair or affairs, and other gossip as well about her youth and teen years. That’s where I feel intrigued enough to come up with fictional elements…and supply her with a hero. Hope you enjoy the stories if you get a chance to read them! All my best, MHP

    Reply
  20. HJ–What good questions you’ve come up with! Love it. Okay, so the truth is, sometimes I use the real people/heroes in a heroine’s life. And sometimes I need to create a hero that they deserve, or I feel they deserve. In the case of Beatrice, the youngest daughter, it was easy because she really did marry Henry Battenberg. And he really did have to struggle to win her hand and to win the queen’s approval. So that part of the story is true. But I needed a villain, and so I created the Scot and the plot to infiltrate the family and Court by wooing Beatrice. In the earlier book, Louise’s hero is fiction. But a great deal is rumored about her and her marriage to Lorne. It was thought he was gay, which would have dictated that their marriage was without sexual gratification for her–and that’s somewhat supported by the fact that she never had children…at least so far as the records show. There were rumors or a possible affair or affairs, and other gossip as well about her youth and teen years. That’s where I feel intrigued enough to come up with fictional elements…and supply her with a hero. Hope you enjoy the stories if you get a chance to read them! All my best, MHP

    Reply
  21. I love this series. Book 3 sounds fabulous! I can’t wait.
    As for hero’s traits, if women judged solely on looks, there’d be a lot of men who would never pair up. We are drawn to brains, personality, but above all, I think, a man who cares about us and treats us like a princess. Okay, maybe not like a princess – that is a bit over the top. But really well.
    I love it when my husband indulges me. I’ll bet you do, too.

    Reply
  22. I love this series. Book 3 sounds fabulous! I can’t wait.
    As for hero’s traits, if women judged solely on looks, there’d be a lot of men who would never pair up. We are drawn to brains, personality, but above all, I think, a man who cares about us and treats us like a princess. Okay, maybe not like a princess – that is a bit over the top. But really well.
    I love it when my husband indulges me. I’ll bet you do, too.

    Reply
  23. I love this series. Book 3 sounds fabulous! I can’t wait.
    As for hero’s traits, if women judged solely on looks, there’d be a lot of men who would never pair up. We are drawn to brains, personality, but above all, I think, a man who cares about us and treats us like a princess. Okay, maybe not like a princess – that is a bit over the top. But really well.
    I love it when my husband indulges me. I’ll bet you do, too.

    Reply
  24. I love this series. Book 3 sounds fabulous! I can’t wait.
    As for hero’s traits, if women judged solely on looks, there’d be a lot of men who would never pair up. We are drawn to brains, personality, but above all, I think, a man who cares about us and treats us like a princess. Okay, maybe not like a princess – that is a bit over the top. But really well.
    I love it when my husband indulges me. I’ll bet you do, too.

    Reply
  25. I love this series. Book 3 sounds fabulous! I can’t wait.
    As for hero’s traits, if women judged solely on looks, there’d be a lot of men who would never pair up. We are drawn to brains, personality, but above all, I think, a man who cares about us and treats us like a princess. Okay, maybe not like a princess – that is a bit over the top. But really well.
    I love it when my husband indulges me. I’ll bet you do, too.

    Reply
  26. Welcome, Mary Hart Perry/Kathryn! I’ll agree on brains over looks every time, although we really need to find physical attraction of some sort. But a man who is willing to work hard to get what he wants and has the intelligence to accomplish it is worth all the money in the world!

    Reply
  27. Welcome, Mary Hart Perry/Kathryn! I’ll agree on brains over looks every time, although we really need to find physical attraction of some sort. But a man who is willing to work hard to get what he wants and has the intelligence to accomplish it is worth all the money in the world!

    Reply
  28. Welcome, Mary Hart Perry/Kathryn! I’ll agree on brains over looks every time, although we really need to find physical attraction of some sort. But a man who is willing to work hard to get what he wants and has the intelligence to accomplish it is worth all the money in the world!

    Reply
  29. Welcome, Mary Hart Perry/Kathryn! I’ll agree on brains over looks every time, although we really need to find physical attraction of some sort. But a man who is willing to work hard to get what he wants and has the intelligence to accomplish it is worth all the money in the world!

    Reply
  30. Welcome, Mary Hart Perry/Kathryn! I’ll agree on brains over looks every time, although we really need to find physical attraction of some sort. But a man who is willing to work hard to get what he wants and has the intelligence to accomplish it is worth all the money in the world!

    Reply
  31. Willa, Elizabeth, and Patricia…thanks so much for your comments! Why weren’t we this smart when we were in our 20’s? LOL! At least, that applies to me. I see a lot of younger women, myself included, who made choices based merely on looks or sexual attraction and later regretted it. For some of us, it takes longer to “wise up” and look for the important character traits in a man.

    Reply
  32. Willa, Elizabeth, and Patricia…thanks so much for your comments! Why weren’t we this smart when we were in our 20’s? LOL! At least, that applies to me. I see a lot of younger women, myself included, who made choices based merely on looks or sexual attraction and later regretted it. For some of us, it takes longer to “wise up” and look for the important character traits in a man.

    Reply
  33. Willa, Elizabeth, and Patricia…thanks so much for your comments! Why weren’t we this smart when we were in our 20’s? LOL! At least, that applies to me. I see a lot of younger women, myself included, who made choices based merely on looks or sexual attraction and later regretted it. For some of us, it takes longer to “wise up” and look for the important character traits in a man.

    Reply
  34. Willa, Elizabeth, and Patricia…thanks so much for your comments! Why weren’t we this smart when we were in our 20’s? LOL! At least, that applies to me. I see a lot of younger women, myself included, who made choices based merely on looks or sexual attraction and later regretted it. For some of us, it takes longer to “wise up” and look for the important character traits in a man.

    Reply
  35. Willa, Elizabeth, and Patricia…thanks so much for your comments! Why weren’t we this smart when we were in our 20’s? LOL! At least, that applies to me. I see a lot of younger women, myself included, who made choices based merely on looks or sexual attraction and later regretted it. For some of us, it takes longer to “wise up” and look for the important character traits in a man.

    Reply
  36. I totally agree with this list of qualities. Uniqueness, intelligence, and kindness…must haves! You forgot one other quality, though, that I would include. A compatible sense of humor. He doesn’t have to be hilarious, but it is good when he shares a similar sense of humor with the heroine. In fact, for me, a good sense of humor will cover a multitude of sins…LOL.
    In my 20s I had a very specific list of qualities I was looking for (which is, in itself, quite hilarious). My boss asked me about it once. He became appalled at its specificity and told me I’d never find that guy. He was right! Older and wiser women finally understand what is important in our heroes!

    Reply
  37. I totally agree with this list of qualities. Uniqueness, intelligence, and kindness…must haves! You forgot one other quality, though, that I would include. A compatible sense of humor. He doesn’t have to be hilarious, but it is good when he shares a similar sense of humor with the heroine. In fact, for me, a good sense of humor will cover a multitude of sins…LOL.
    In my 20s I had a very specific list of qualities I was looking for (which is, in itself, quite hilarious). My boss asked me about it once. He became appalled at its specificity and told me I’d never find that guy. He was right! Older and wiser women finally understand what is important in our heroes!

    Reply
  38. I totally agree with this list of qualities. Uniqueness, intelligence, and kindness…must haves! You forgot one other quality, though, that I would include. A compatible sense of humor. He doesn’t have to be hilarious, but it is good when he shares a similar sense of humor with the heroine. In fact, for me, a good sense of humor will cover a multitude of sins…LOL.
    In my 20s I had a very specific list of qualities I was looking for (which is, in itself, quite hilarious). My boss asked me about it once. He became appalled at its specificity and told me I’d never find that guy. He was right! Older and wiser women finally understand what is important in our heroes!

    Reply
  39. I totally agree with this list of qualities. Uniqueness, intelligence, and kindness…must haves! You forgot one other quality, though, that I would include. A compatible sense of humor. He doesn’t have to be hilarious, but it is good when he shares a similar sense of humor with the heroine. In fact, for me, a good sense of humor will cover a multitude of sins…LOL.
    In my 20s I had a very specific list of qualities I was looking for (which is, in itself, quite hilarious). My boss asked me about it once. He became appalled at its specificity and told me I’d never find that guy. He was right! Older and wiser women finally understand what is important in our heroes!

    Reply
  40. I totally agree with this list of qualities. Uniqueness, intelligence, and kindness…must haves! You forgot one other quality, though, that I would include. A compatible sense of humor. He doesn’t have to be hilarious, but it is good when he shares a similar sense of humor with the heroine. In fact, for me, a good sense of humor will cover a multitude of sins…LOL.
    In my 20s I had a very specific list of qualities I was looking for (which is, in itself, quite hilarious). My boss asked me about it once. He became appalled at its specificity and told me I’d never find that guy. He was right! Older and wiser women finally understand what is important in our heroes!

    Reply
  41. I totally agree with this list of qualities. Uniqueness, intelligence, and kindness…must haves! You forgot one other quality, though, that I would include. A compatible sense of humor. He doesn’t have to be hilarious, but it is good when he shares a similar sense of humor with the heroine. In fact, for me, a good sense of humor will cover a multitude of sins…LOL.
    In my 20s I had a very specific list of qualities I was looking for (which is, in itself, quite hilarious). My boss asked me about it once. He became appalled at its specificity and told me I’d never find that guy. He was right! Older and wiser women finally understand what is important in our heroes!

    Reply
  42. I totally agree with this list of qualities. Uniqueness, intelligence, and kindness…must haves! You forgot one other quality, though, that I would include. A compatible sense of humor. He doesn’t have to be hilarious, but it is good when he shares a similar sense of humor with the heroine. In fact, for me, a good sense of humor will cover a multitude of sins…LOL.
    In my 20s I had a very specific list of qualities I was looking for (which is, in itself, quite hilarious). My boss asked me about it once. He became appalled at its specificity and told me I’d never find that guy. He was right! Older and wiser women finally understand what is important in our heroes!

    Reply
  43. I totally agree with this list of qualities. Uniqueness, intelligence, and kindness…must haves! You forgot one other quality, though, that I would include. A compatible sense of humor. He doesn’t have to be hilarious, but it is good when he shares a similar sense of humor with the heroine. In fact, for me, a good sense of humor will cover a multitude of sins…LOL.
    In my 20s I had a very specific list of qualities I was looking for (which is, in itself, quite hilarious). My boss asked me about it once. He became appalled at its specificity and told me I’d never find that guy. He was right! Older and wiser women finally understand what is important in our heroes!

    Reply
  44. I totally agree with this list of qualities. Uniqueness, intelligence, and kindness…must haves! You forgot one other quality, though, that I would include. A compatible sense of humor. He doesn’t have to be hilarious, but it is good when he shares a similar sense of humor with the heroine. In fact, for me, a good sense of humor will cover a multitude of sins…LOL.
    In my 20s I had a very specific list of qualities I was looking for (which is, in itself, quite hilarious). My boss asked me about it once. He became appalled at its specificity and told me I’d never find that guy. He was right! Older and wiser women finally understand what is important in our heroes!

    Reply
  45. I totally agree with this list of qualities. Uniqueness, intelligence, and kindness…must haves! You forgot one other quality, though, that I would include. A compatible sense of humor. He doesn’t have to be hilarious, but it is good when he shares a similar sense of humor with the heroine. In fact, for me, a good sense of humor will cover a multitude of sins…LOL.
    In my 20s I had a very specific list of qualities I was looking for (which is, in itself, quite hilarious). My boss asked me about it once. He became appalled at its specificity and told me I’d never find that guy. He was right! Older and wiser women finally understand what is important in our heroes!

    Reply
  46. Hi Mary/Kathryn, I agree with your list of qualities, too. But I have to add chemistry.
    And IMO, chemistry trumps all, which is why people sometimes love and marry the weirdest people. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t.
    The trick in a novel, of course, is to get the reader to buy into the wild chemical attraction if the hero seems lacking in some areas of the list!
    IMO, that is,
    Jo

    Reply
  47. Hi Mary/Kathryn, I agree with your list of qualities, too. But I have to add chemistry.
    And IMO, chemistry trumps all, which is why people sometimes love and marry the weirdest people. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t.
    The trick in a novel, of course, is to get the reader to buy into the wild chemical attraction if the hero seems lacking in some areas of the list!
    IMO, that is,
    Jo

    Reply
  48. Hi Mary/Kathryn, I agree with your list of qualities, too. But I have to add chemistry.
    And IMO, chemistry trumps all, which is why people sometimes love and marry the weirdest people. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t.
    The trick in a novel, of course, is to get the reader to buy into the wild chemical attraction if the hero seems lacking in some areas of the list!
    IMO, that is,
    Jo

    Reply
  49. Hi Mary/Kathryn, I agree with your list of qualities, too. But I have to add chemistry.
    And IMO, chemistry trumps all, which is why people sometimes love and marry the weirdest people. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t.
    The trick in a novel, of course, is to get the reader to buy into the wild chemical attraction if the hero seems lacking in some areas of the list!
    IMO, that is,
    Jo

    Reply
  50. Hi Mary/Kathryn, I agree with your list of qualities, too. But I have to add chemistry.
    And IMO, chemistry trumps all, which is why people sometimes love and marry the weirdest people. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t.
    The trick in a novel, of course, is to get the reader to buy into the wild chemical attraction if the hero seems lacking in some areas of the list!
    IMO, that is,
    Jo

    Reply
  51. Hi, Jamie and Jo! Thanks for your thoughts. Yes, chemistry. Love that chemistry. I will never forget the first moment I laid eyes on my husband to be. We both happened to be at a ballroom dance class and had never met. I was about to leave because I didn’t know anyone there and I seemed not to be hitting it off with anyone, and the music wasn’t that great…so I was on my way toward the door and home. And I saw this man walking across the ballroom floor toward me. Looking straight at me and nowhere else. Six feet tall. A smile as wide as Texas. And the bluest eyes this brown-eyed girl. Pow! And I thought to myself, “Now, lady, you’re really in trouble.” Because he just looked like a heart breaker. But he turned out to be the sweetest guy ever. Chemistry.

    Reply
  52. Hi, Jamie and Jo! Thanks for your thoughts. Yes, chemistry. Love that chemistry. I will never forget the first moment I laid eyes on my husband to be. We both happened to be at a ballroom dance class and had never met. I was about to leave because I didn’t know anyone there and I seemed not to be hitting it off with anyone, and the music wasn’t that great…so I was on my way toward the door and home. And I saw this man walking across the ballroom floor toward me. Looking straight at me and nowhere else. Six feet tall. A smile as wide as Texas. And the bluest eyes this brown-eyed girl. Pow! And I thought to myself, “Now, lady, you’re really in trouble.” Because he just looked like a heart breaker. But he turned out to be the sweetest guy ever. Chemistry.

    Reply
  53. Hi, Jamie and Jo! Thanks for your thoughts. Yes, chemistry. Love that chemistry. I will never forget the first moment I laid eyes on my husband to be. We both happened to be at a ballroom dance class and had never met. I was about to leave because I didn’t know anyone there and I seemed not to be hitting it off with anyone, and the music wasn’t that great…so I was on my way toward the door and home. And I saw this man walking across the ballroom floor toward me. Looking straight at me and nowhere else. Six feet tall. A smile as wide as Texas. And the bluest eyes this brown-eyed girl. Pow! And I thought to myself, “Now, lady, you’re really in trouble.” Because he just looked like a heart breaker. But he turned out to be the sweetest guy ever. Chemistry.

    Reply
  54. Hi, Jamie and Jo! Thanks for your thoughts. Yes, chemistry. Love that chemistry. I will never forget the first moment I laid eyes on my husband to be. We both happened to be at a ballroom dance class and had never met. I was about to leave because I didn’t know anyone there and I seemed not to be hitting it off with anyone, and the music wasn’t that great…so I was on my way toward the door and home. And I saw this man walking across the ballroom floor toward me. Looking straight at me and nowhere else. Six feet tall. A smile as wide as Texas. And the bluest eyes this brown-eyed girl. Pow! And I thought to myself, “Now, lady, you’re really in trouble.” Because he just looked like a heart breaker. But he turned out to be the sweetest guy ever. Chemistry.

    Reply
  55. Hi, Jamie and Jo! Thanks for your thoughts. Yes, chemistry. Love that chemistry. I will never forget the first moment I laid eyes on my husband to be. We both happened to be at a ballroom dance class and had never met. I was about to leave because I didn’t know anyone there and I seemed not to be hitting it off with anyone, and the music wasn’t that great…so I was on my way toward the door and home. And I saw this man walking across the ballroom floor toward me. Looking straight at me and nowhere else. Six feet tall. A smile as wide as Texas. And the bluest eyes this brown-eyed girl. Pow! And I thought to myself, “Now, lady, you’re really in trouble.” Because he just looked like a heart breaker. But he turned out to be the sweetest guy ever. Chemistry.

    Reply
  56. Sherrie, here. Oh, what a delectable subject! I’d have to say that intelligence is probably tops on my list for a hero. Next, as Jo Beverley mentioned, is chemistry. I’m not so concerned about looks, because I have found that if the guy is intelligent and the chemistry is right, looks don’t matter, and in fact he *becomes* attractive in my eyes. Side note: I was once engaged to a drop dead gorgeous guy: 6’4″, killer smile, sexy as all get-out, double degrees–a veterinarian AND a lawyer, smart as a whip. And narcissistic. Oh my. I’m glad we never married.
    I have the published diary of a pioneer woman who kept a journal as she and her parents crossed the prairies in a covered wagon during the expansion of the American West. A single lady and her brother were also making the trek, and this diary keeper wrote (a bit jealously) that the single lady was quite homely, yet she was so lively and so much fun that every evening all the unmarried young bucks fluttered over to her campfire like moths to a flame.
    Like you, Mary/Kathryn, I prefer heroes who are flawed. Perfection is boring. Flawed heroes are so much more interesting!

    Reply
  57. Sherrie, here. Oh, what a delectable subject! I’d have to say that intelligence is probably tops on my list for a hero. Next, as Jo Beverley mentioned, is chemistry. I’m not so concerned about looks, because I have found that if the guy is intelligent and the chemistry is right, looks don’t matter, and in fact he *becomes* attractive in my eyes. Side note: I was once engaged to a drop dead gorgeous guy: 6’4″, killer smile, sexy as all get-out, double degrees–a veterinarian AND a lawyer, smart as a whip. And narcissistic. Oh my. I’m glad we never married.
    I have the published diary of a pioneer woman who kept a journal as she and her parents crossed the prairies in a covered wagon during the expansion of the American West. A single lady and her brother were also making the trek, and this diary keeper wrote (a bit jealously) that the single lady was quite homely, yet she was so lively and so much fun that every evening all the unmarried young bucks fluttered over to her campfire like moths to a flame.
    Like you, Mary/Kathryn, I prefer heroes who are flawed. Perfection is boring. Flawed heroes are so much more interesting!

    Reply
  58. Sherrie, here. Oh, what a delectable subject! I’d have to say that intelligence is probably tops on my list for a hero. Next, as Jo Beverley mentioned, is chemistry. I’m not so concerned about looks, because I have found that if the guy is intelligent and the chemistry is right, looks don’t matter, and in fact he *becomes* attractive in my eyes. Side note: I was once engaged to a drop dead gorgeous guy: 6’4″, killer smile, sexy as all get-out, double degrees–a veterinarian AND a lawyer, smart as a whip. And narcissistic. Oh my. I’m glad we never married.
    I have the published diary of a pioneer woman who kept a journal as she and her parents crossed the prairies in a covered wagon during the expansion of the American West. A single lady and her brother were also making the trek, and this diary keeper wrote (a bit jealously) that the single lady was quite homely, yet she was so lively and so much fun that every evening all the unmarried young bucks fluttered over to her campfire like moths to a flame.
    Like you, Mary/Kathryn, I prefer heroes who are flawed. Perfection is boring. Flawed heroes are so much more interesting!

    Reply
  59. Sherrie, here. Oh, what a delectable subject! I’d have to say that intelligence is probably tops on my list for a hero. Next, as Jo Beverley mentioned, is chemistry. I’m not so concerned about looks, because I have found that if the guy is intelligent and the chemistry is right, looks don’t matter, and in fact he *becomes* attractive in my eyes. Side note: I was once engaged to a drop dead gorgeous guy: 6’4″, killer smile, sexy as all get-out, double degrees–a veterinarian AND a lawyer, smart as a whip. And narcissistic. Oh my. I’m glad we never married.
    I have the published diary of a pioneer woman who kept a journal as she and her parents crossed the prairies in a covered wagon during the expansion of the American West. A single lady and her brother were also making the trek, and this diary keeper wrote (a bit jealously) that the single lady was quite homely, yet she was so lively and so much fun that every evening all the unmarried young bucks fluttered over to her campfire like moths to a flame.
    Like you, Mary/Kathryn, I prefer heroes who are flawed. Perfection is boring. Flawed heroes are so much more interesting!

    Reply
  60. Sherrie, here. Oh, what a delectable subject! I’d have to say that intelligence is probably tops on my list for a hero. Next, as Jo Beverley mentioned, is chemistry. I’m not so concerned about looks, because I have found that if the guy is intelligent and the chemistry is right, looks don’t matter, and in fact he *becomes* attractive in my eyes. Side note: I was once engaged to a drop dead gorgeous guy: 6’4″, killer smile, sexy as all get-out, double degrees–a veterinarian AND a lawyer, smart as a whip. And narcissistic. Oh my. I’m glad we never married.
    I have the published diary of a pioneer woman who kept a journal as she and her parents crossed the prairies in a covered wagon during the expansion of the American West. A single lady and her brother were also making the trek, and this diary keeper wrote (a bit jealously) that the single lady was quite homely, yet she was so lively and so much fun that every evening all the unmarried young bucks fluttered over to her campfire like moths to a flame.
    Like you, Mary/Kathryn, I prefer heroes who are flawed. Perfection is boring. Flawed heroes are so much more interesting!

    Reply
  61. Fabulous interview. Thank you Mary Hart Perry/Kathryn and Mary Jo. I can’t wait to pick up the books. I totally agree on the intelligence. It’s top of my list too. I can find the most unlikely guys fascinating if their conversation intrigues me. A colleague of mine when I worked in universities used to call it mind meld which I believe she borrowed from Star Trek!
    Kindness, generosity of spirit, a good sense of humour, integrity and resourcefulness are also on my list.
    Ah, the chemistry. When I first met my husband we were at a college reception and I could feel someone looking at me. I turned around and saw him and thought “uh oh!” because even on the basis of 10 seconds acquaintance I knew this was going to be serious and I wasn’t ready for serious. It worked out in the end though!

    Reply
  62. Fabulous interview. Thank you Mary Hart Perry/Kathryn and Mary Jo. I can’t wait to pick up the books. I totally agree on the intelligence. It’s top of my list too. I can find the most unlikely guys fascinating if their conversation intrigues me. A colleague of mine when I worked in universities used to call it mind meld which I believe she borrowed from Star Trek!
    Kindness, generosity of spirit, a good sense of humour, integrity and resourcefulness are also on my list.
    Ah, the chemistry. When I first met my husband we were at a college reception and I could feel someone looking at me. I turned around and saw him and thought “uh oh!” because even on the basis of 10 seconds acquaintance I knew this was going to be serious and I wasn’t ready for serious. It worked out in the end though!

    Reply
  63. Fabulous interview. Thank you Mary Hart Perry/Kathryn and Mary Jo. I can’t wait to pick up the books. I totally agree on the intelligence. It’s top of my list too. I can find the most unlikely guys fascinating if their conversation intrigues me. A colleague of mine when I worked in universities used to call it mind meld which I believe she borrowed from Star Trek!
    Kindness, generosity of spirit, a good sense of humour, integrity and resourcefulness are also on my list.
    Ah, the chemistry. When I first met my husband we were at a college reception and I could feel someone looking at me. I turned around and saw him and thought “uh oh!” because even on the basis of 10 seconds acquaintance I knew this was going to be serious and I wasn’t ready for serious. It worked out in the end though!

    Reply
  64. Fabulous interview. Thank you Mary Hart Perry/Kathryn and Mary Jo. I can’t wait to pick up the books. I totally agree on the intelligence. It’s top of my list too. I can find the most unlikely guys fascinating if their conversation intrigues me. A colleague of mine when I worked in universities used to call it mind meld which I believe she borrowed from Star Trek!
    Kindness, generosity of spirit, a good sense of humour, integrity and resourcefulness are also on my list.
    Ah, the chemistry. When I first met my husband we were at a college reception and I could feel someone looking at me. I turned around and saw him and thought “uh oh!” because even on the basis of 10 seconds acquaintance I knew this was going to be serious and I wasn’t ready for serious. It worked out in the end though!

    Reply
  65. Fabulous interview. Thank you Mary Hart Perry/Kathryn and Mary Jo. I can’t wait to pick up the books. I totally agree on the intelligence. It’s top of my list too. I can find the most unlikely guys fascinating if their conversation intrigues me. A colleague of mine when I worked in universities used to call it mind meld which I believe she borrowed from Star Trek!
    Kindness, generosity of spirit, a good sense of humour, integrity and resourcefulness are also on my list.
    Ah, the chemistry. When I first met my husband we were at a college reception and I could feel someone looking at me. I turned around and saw him and thought “uh oh!” because even on the basis of 10 seconds acquaintance I knew this was going to be serious and I wasn’t ready for serious. It worked out in the end though!

    Reply
  66. Good afternoon, Ms. Perry & Ms. Putney! πŸ™‚
    I adore the depth of intrique and how fully realised your characters have become as the series progresses! πŸ™‚ I was curious, has adding in the element of Jack the Ripper changed in your preception of whom we always thought it was compared to who it turned out to being, now that the case was finally resolved!? I was curious how authors were going to deal with that, as its such an auspicious ending to such a horrid event in history!
    My favourite traits in a hero are rooted in my observations of the men in my own family,… including ancestral, as I enjoy digging into our past through genealogy — men of strength of character as much as advocacy of the rights of others, who applaud a women’s right to have her own voice in all affairs, take charge individuals who yield when they’re in the thick of something they don’t know, but are ready to aid in something they can contribute too,… kind, sensitive, yet not in a bashful way, who take the time to present themselves well to society, but care more about hearth, home, and family rather than egocentric ideals. And, humour to encourage the lighter side of life whilst walking through the harried days of strife, inasmuch as celebrating the joys!
    It’s a curious question for sure! And, one that has a lot depth to respond too!

    Reply
  67. Good afternoon, Ms. Perry & Ms. Putney! πŸ™‚
    I adore the depth of intrique and how fully realised your characters have become as the series progresses! πŸ™‚ I was curious, has adding in the element of Jack the Ripper changed in your preception of whom we always thought it was compared to who it turned out to being, now that the case was finally resolved!? I was curious how authors were going to deal with that, as its such an auspicious ending to such a horrid event in history!
    My favourite traits in a hero are rooted in my observations of the men in my own family,… including ancestral, as I enjoy digging into our past through genealogy — men of strength of character as much as advocacy of the rights of others, who applaud a women’s right to have her own voice in all affairs, take charge individuals who yield when they’re in the thick of something they don’t know, but are ready to aid in something they can contribute too,… kind, sensitive, yet not in a bashful way, who take the time to present themselves well to society, but care more about hearth, home, and family rather than egocentric ideals. And, humour to encourage the lighter side of life whilst walking through the harried days of strife, inasmuch as celebrating the joys!
    It’s a curious question for sure! And, one that has a lot depth to respond too!

    Reply
  68. Good afternoon, Ms. Perry & Ms. Putney! πŸ™‚
    I adore the depth of intrique and how fully realised your characters have become as the series progresses! πŸ™‚ I was curious, has adding in the element of Jack the Ripper changed in your preception of whom we always thought it was compared to who it turned out to being, now that the case was finally resolved!? I was curious how authors were going to deal with that, as its such an auspicious ending to such a horrid event in history!
    My favourite traits in a hero are rooted in my observations of the men in my own family,… including ancestral, as I enjoy digging into our past through genealogy — men of strength of character as much as advocacy of the rights of others, who applaud a women’s right to have her own voice in all affairs, take charge individuals who yield when they’re in the thick of something they don’t know, but are ready to aid in something they can contribute too,… kind, sensitive, yet not in a bashful way, who take the time to present themselves well to society, but care more about hearth, home, and family rather than egocentric ideals. And, humour to encourage the lighter side of life whilst walking through the harried days of strife, inasmuch as celebrating the joys!
    It’s a curious question for sure! And, one that has a lot depth to respond too!

    Reply
  69. Good afternoon, Ms. Perry & Ms. Putney! πŸ™‚
    I adore the depth of intrique and how fully realised your characters have become as the series progresses! πŸ™‚ I was curious, has adding in the element of Jack the Ripper changed in your preception of whom we always thought it was compared to who it turned out to being, now that the case was finally resolved!? I was curious how authors were going to deal with that, as its such an auspicious ending to such a horrid event in history!
    My favourite traits in a hero are rooted in my observations of the men in my own family,… including ancestral, as I enjoy digging into our past through genealogy — men of strength of character as much as advocacy of the rights of others, who applaud a women’s right to have her own voice in all affairs, take charge individuals who yield when they’re in the thick of something they don’t know, but are ready to aid in something they can contribute too,… kind, sensitive, yet not in a bashful way, who take the time to present themselves well to society, but care more about hearth, home, and family rather than egocentric ideals. And, humour to encourage the lighter side of life whilst walking through the harried days of strife, inasmuch as celebrating the joys!
    It’s a curious question for sure! And, one that has a lot depth to respond too!

    Reply
  70. Good afternoon, Ms. Perry & Ms. Putney! πŸ™‚
    I adore the depth of intrique and how fully realised your characters have become as the series progresses! πŸ™‚ I was curious, has adding in the element of Jack the Ripper changed in your preception of whom we always thought it was compared to who it turned out to being, now that the case was finally resolved!? I was curious how authors were going to deal with that, as its such an auspicious ending to such a horrid event in history!
    My favourite traits in a hero are rooted in my observations of the men in my own family,… including ancestral, as I enjoy digging into our past through genealogy — men of strength of character as much as advocacy of the rights of others, who applaud a women’s right to have her own voice in all affairs, take charge individuals who yield when they’re in the thick of something they don’t know, but are ready to aid in something they can contribute too,… kind, sensitive, yet not in a bashful way, who take the time to present themselves well to society, but care more about hearth, home, and family rather than egocentric ideals. And, humour to encourage the lighter side of life whilst walking through the harried days of strife, inasmuch as celebrating the joys!
    It’s a curious question for sure! And, one that has a lot depth to respond too!

    Reply
  71. Jorie, I was intrigued by your comment: “now that the case was finally resolved”–that is, the question of Jack the Ripper’s identity. I’ve done a lot of research and read many different theories, but so far I haven’t seen a definitive answer to who he was. No solid evidence. Can you tell me your source? I have my own theory, but want to make sure I haven’t overlooked new facts that are well supported. Thanks for letting me know! MHP

    Reply
  72. Jorie, I was intrigued by your comment: “now that the case was finally resolved”–that is, the question of Jack the Ripper’s identity. I’ve done a lot of research and read many different theories, but so far I haven’t seen a definitive answer to who he was. No solid evidence. Can you tell me your source? I have my own theory, but want to make sure I haven’t overlooked new facts that are well supported. Thanks for letting me know! MHP

    Reply
  73. Jorie, I was intrigued by your comment: “now that the case was finally resolved”–that is, the question of Jack the Ripper’s identity. I’ve done a lot of research and read many different theories, but so far I haven’t seen a definitive answer to who he was. No solid evidence. Can you tell me your source? I have my own theory, but want to make sure I haven’t overlooked new facts that are well supported. Thanks for letting me know! MHP

    Reply
  74. Jorie, I was intrigued by your comment: “now that the case was finally resolved”–that is, the question of Jack the Ripper’s identity. I’ve done a lot of research and read many different theories, but so far I haven’t seen a definitive answer to who he was. No solid evidence. Can you tell me your source? I have my own theory, but want to make sure I haven’t overlooked new facts that are well supported. Thanks for letting me know! MHP

    Reply
  75. Jorie, I was intrigued by your comment: “now that the case was finally resolved”–that is, the question of Jack the Ripper’s identity. I’ve done a lot of research and read many different theories, but so far I haven’t seen a definitive answer to who he was. No solid evidence. Can you tell me your source? I have my own theory, but want to make sure I haven’t overlooked new facts that are well supported. Thanks for letting me know! MHP

    Reply
  76. All right…Jorie and I have now had a chat, off-blog. And here’s what we figured out. A couple of years ago, she saw the documentary on TV with Patricia Cornwall and others theorizing about Jack the Ripper. Because the show was so convincing, she thought it was a closed case. Not so, say many others who have studied the Ripper cases for years. There are still so many unproven statements, conflicting theories and clues that most experts on the 19th-century serial killer admit we’ll probably never know who he/she was. And that’s what’s making writing a book about this subject so exciting. I love to look for the little holes in history, and then fit a plot and characters into that space in time. Thanks, Jorie, for getting back to me with your explanation! Mary Hart Perry

    Reply
  77. All right…Jorie and I have now had a chat, off-blog. And here’s what we figured out. A couple of years ago, she saw the documentary on TV with Patricia Cornwall and others theorizing about Jack the Ripper. Because the show was so convincing, she thought it was a closed case. Not so, say many others who have studied the Ripper cases for years. There are still so many unproven statements, conflicting theories and clues that most experts on the 19th-century serial killer admit we’ll probably never know who he/she was. And that’s what’s making writing a book about this subject so exciting. I love to look for the little holes in history, and then fit a plot and characters into that space in time. Thanks, Jorie, for getting back to me with your explanation! Mary Hart Perry

    Reply
  78. All right…Jorie and I have now had a chat, off-blog. And here’s what we figured out. A couple of years ago, she saw the documentary on TV with Patricia Cornwall and others theorizing about Jack the Ripper. Because the show was so convincing, she thought it was a closed case. Not so, say many others who have studied the Ripper cases for years. There are still so many unproven statements, conflicting theories and clues that most experts on the 19th-century serial killer admit we’ll probably never know who he/she was. And that’s what’s making writing a book about this subject so exciting. I love to look for the little holes in history, and then fit a plot and characters into that space in time. Thanks, Jorie, for getting back to me with your explanation! Mary Hart Perry

    Reply
  79. All right…Jorie and I have now had a chat, off-blog. And here’s what we figured out. A couple of years ago, she saw the documentary on TV with Patricia Cornwall and others theorizing about Jack the Ripper. Because the show was so convincing, she thought it was a closed case. Not so, say many others who have studied the Ripper cases for years. There are still so many unproven statements, conflicting theories and clues that most experts on the 19th-century serial killer admit we’ll probably never know who he/she was. And that’s what’s making writing a book about this subject so exciting. I love to look for the little holes in history, and then fit a plot and characters into that space in time. Thanks, Jorie, for getting back to me with your explanation! Mary Hart Perry

    Reply
  80. All right…Jorie and I have now had a chat, off-blog. And here’s what we figured out. A couple of years ago, she saw the documentary on TV with Patricia Cornwall and others theorizing about Jack the Ripper. Because the show was so convincing, she thought it was a closed case. Not so, say many others who have studied the Ripper cases for years. There are still so many unproven statements, conflicting theories and clues that most experts on the 19th-century serial killer admit we’ll probably never know who he/she was. And that’s what’s making writing a book about this subject so exciting. I love to look for the little holes in history, and then fit a plot and characters into that space in time. Thanks, Jorie, for getting back to me with your explanation! Mary Hart Perry

    Reply
  81. MHP–I wondered if it might be Cornwell’s confidence that made it seem like the Ripper was “case closed,” but I have a friend who is a Ripper buff who read Cornwell’s book and promptly told me it was just another set of opinions. I’m not a Ripper buff, so I just watch from the sidelines!

    Reply
  82. MHP–I wondered if it might be Cornwell’s confidence that made it seem like the Ripper was “case closed,” but I have a friend who is a Ripper buff who read Cornwell’s book and promptly told me it was just another set of opinions. I’m not a Ripper buff, so I just watch from the sidelines!

    Reply
  83. MHP–I wondered if it might be Cornwell’s confidence that made it seem like the Ripper was “case closed,” but I have a friend who is a Ripper buff who read Cornwell’s book and promptly told me it was just another set of opinions. I’m not a Ripper buff, so I just watch from the sidelines!

    Reply
  84. MHP–I wondered if it might be Cornwell’s confidence that made it seem like the Ripper was “case closed,” but I have a friend who is a Ripper buff who read Cornwell’s book and promptly told me it was just another set of opinions. I’m not a Ripper buff, so I just watch from the sidelines!

    Reply
  85. MHP–I wondered if it might be Cornwell’s confidence that made it seem like the Ripper was “case closed,” but I have a friend who is a Ripper buff who read Cornwell’s book and promptly told me it was just another set of opinions. I’m not a Ripper buff, so I just watch from the sidelines!

    Reply

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