Mamma Mia! Or, How Friendship is Like an Onion.

Cat_243_dover by Mary Jo

It’s the rump end of summer.  Half the world—and all of New York publishing!—are on vacation and maybe you are, too, so I’ll keep today’s post sort of fluffy. 

Being a blogger is like being a columnist, only the stakes are lower and we don’t get paid.  But I do find myself watching the world and making mental notes about topics that might make an interesting riff.  Today, I’m thinking about two such ideas, both of which turned out to be about female friendships. 

First was the RWA national conference in San Francisco.  You’re heard about the floral crab and the awards and the brainstorming speech and the general fun.  But another aspect that is true of conferences in general is the fellowship. 

In a very early blog, I talked about how I’d met each of the other Wenches, and in five out of six cases, Pier_39_crab it was at a conference.  (Loretta and I first connected through snail mail, but when we finally met in person, yes, it was at a conference.)  So first and foremost, conferences are a great way to meet new people, and to see old friends face to face rather than electronically. 

But there are many levels of friendship.  Not just the through-hell-and-high-water friends who are the ones you call when your publisher dumps you, or you’re told you need major surgery, or your cat just died.  Such friends are more valuable than gold, and one doesn’t usually have a lot in this category, partly because true affinity is rare, and partly because this level of friendship is a mutual give and take that requires regular time and tending. 

But there are other levels of friendship.  I think of friendship as like an onion—there’s just a few people Onion there in the center with you, but there are lots of circles further out.  Those relationships might not run as deep.  You may not connect often or ask much of each other.  But that doesn’t mean the interactions aren’t true, valued, and valuable. 

After 22 years in the romance business, I know a LOT of people, and part of the fun of a conference is the unanticipated meetings with people from every ring in the onion.  To meet a specific person, I’ve learned to set up a date in advance for breakfast or coffee, or we’ll probably never see each other.   

But there are so many other delightful and unexpected encounters.  There’s the historical author with whom I shared an agent for many years.  The agent has retired and we’ve both moved on, but in San Francisco, we chatted several times about career up and downs and prospects.  And swimming with dolphins.

Or there’s the friendship formed when two of us bonded late one night—at a conference—while sharing horror stories of the editor who was torturing both of us.   That’s a foxhole friendship for sure.

There’s the writer I knew as a newby who has grown to serious bestsellerdom without losing her sense of the absurd, and the mega-star who always stops for a few friendly words.  There’s an editor I always hug, and the old friend of whom I demand the latest pictures of her daughter. 

Santorini There’s new people, too.  I met a brand new author at the Kensington cocktail party.  Her first book won’t be out until next year, but no matter.  We found we had Santorini in common, among other things.  And there was the Australian author—a lot of Aussies came because San Francisco is about as good as it gets if they want to come to the American national conference—who recognized my nametag in an elevator and promptly gave me a delightful little pincher koala bear dressed in proper outback style. <G> 

All these encounters are enjoyable and add greatly to the value of the conference.  This is why the conference business is HUGE—if introverted authors can have so much fun hanging out with our own kind, it’s not surprising that so many professional and affinity groups like to get together for networking and socializing.

Which brings me to the even fluffier idea, Mamma Mia!, the stage musical and now movie built around the songbook of the wildly popular singing group, ABBA.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABBA The slight, fun plot involves a young girl, Sophie, who lives with her mother, Donna, on a small Greek island, where Mamma_mia_1 they run an inn.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mamma_Mia! )

Sophie is about to marry her boyfriend, Sky, but she desperately wants to have her father at the ceremony—except she doesn’t know who her father is.  Sophie finds her mother’s diary for the summer when Sophie was conceived, and discovers that there are three candidates for her father.  So Sophie invites all three of them to the wedding, figuring she’ll know her real father when she sees him.  Except she doesn’t. <G>

Clearly, the possibilities for farce and slapstick are huge, and Mamma Mia! takes full advantage, with lots of bright, bouncy ABBA music and dancing.  When the movie came out in July, I was surprised at Meryl_and_pierce how weak the reviews were.  How can a movie with Meryl Streep (who can sing), Pierce Brosnan (who can’t), Colin Firth, and a lot of other first rate actors not be pretty good?  Particularly since I’d seen the show on stage and liked it greatly.

So I went to see the movie, and the Mayhem Consultant and I both loved it.  At which point I realized that all of the reviews I’d seen had been by men, and Mamma Mia! is SOOOOOOO much a chick flick!

Early in the movie, young Sophie runs squealing to greet her two best friends when they arrive to be bridesmaids.  Great fun.  And the scene is duplicated when Donna’s two best friends, her co-singers from their old group Donna and the Dynamos, arrive.  They run squealing into each others’ arms—andDonna_dynamos  anyone who thinks that mature women don’t squeal when greeting friends they haven’t seen in too long has never been in the lobby of a hotel that has an RWA convention checking in. <G>  Friendship is an important element in many romances, as it is in real life. 

One of the things I really enjoyed was how the movie depicted longstanding friendships, and how even Gal_pals women well into their middle years can have silly fun together.  Mamma Mia! also features a mature love story between two characters who definitely have some mileage on them, and how often does one see that? 

So how do you feel about the friendship-is-an-onion metaphor?  Do you have people like with whom you share something real and special even if you don’t see them often?  Do you go to conferences or other gatherings so you can see a lot of people you won’t see otherwise, but you still delight in connecting, however briefly?

Movie_poster And are you like me, and you just don’t care whether or not Pierce Brosnan can sing? <G>

Mary Jo, wishing a happy Labor Day Weekend  to all our American readers….

110 thoughts on “Mamma Mia! Or, How Friendship is Like an Onion.”

  1. I’ve seen Mamma Mia! twice and loved it both times. I went in expecting a fun movie with danceable music, and got it. Plus I got to see Colin Firth with a wet shirt on (and off!), and that is NEVER a waste of time. 🙂
    Phooey on those reviewers. The fact that the movie has made over $124 million dollars in the US and become the highest grossing movie musical is proof that more people agree with us than the critics.

    Reply
  2. I’ve seen Mamma Mia! twice and loved it both times. I went in expecting a fun movie with danceable music, and got it. Plus I got to see Colin Firth with a wet shirt on (and off!), and that is NEVER a waste of time. 🙂
    Phooey on those reviewers. The fact that the movie has made over $124 million dollars in the US and become the highest grossing movie musical is proof that more people agree with us than the critics.

    Reply
  3. I’ve seen Mamma Mia! twice and loved it both times. I went in expecting a fun movie with danceable music, and got it. Plus I got to see Colin Firth with a wet shirt on (and off!), and that is NEVER a waste of time. 🙂
    Phooey on those reviewers. The fact that the movie has made over $124 million dollars in the US and become the highest grossing movie musical is proof that more people agree with us than the critics.

    Reply
  4. I’ve seen Mamma Mia! twice and loved it both times. I went in expecting a fun movie with danceable music, and got it. Plus I got to see Colin Firth with a wet shirt on (and off!), and that is NEVER a waste of time. 🙂
    Phooey on those reviewers. The fact that the movie has made over $124 million dollars in the US and become the highest grossing movie musical is proof that more people agree with us than the critics.

    Reply
  5. I’ve seen Mamma Mia! twice and loved it both times. I went in expecting a fun movie with danceable music, and got it. Plus I got to see Colin Firth with a wet shirt on (and off!), and that is NEVER a waste of time. 🙂
    Phooey on those reviewers. The fact that the movie has made over $124 million dollars in the US and become the highest grossing movie musical is proof that more people agree with us than the critics.

    Reply
  6. So true. They say you can never have too many friends. But you can only fit in so many close intense friendships before you’re not doing them justice. Forgetting birthdays is my vice!
    A schoolfriend I haven’t spoken to in years phoned last week. We chatted ferociously for over an hour, but didn’t feel the need to say at the end to falsely say “we must meet up soon” because we’d never do it. Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.

    Reply
  7. So true. They say you can never have too many friends. But you can only fit in so many close intense friendships before you’re not doing them justice. Forgetting birthdays is my vice!
    A schoolfriend I haven’t spoken to in years phoned last week. We chatted ferociously for over an hour, but didn’t feel the need to say at the end to falsely say “we must meet up soon” because we’d never do it. Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.

    Reply
  8. So true. They say you can never have too many friends. But you can only fit in so many close intense friendships before you’re not doing them justice. Forgetting birthdays is my vice!
    A schoolfriend I haven’t spoken to in years phoned last week. We chatted ferociously for over an hour, but didn’t feel the need to say at the end to falsely say “we must meet up soon” because we’d never do it. Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.

    Reply
  9. So true. They say you can never have too many friends. But you can only fit in so many close intense friendships before you’re not doing them justice. Forgetting birthdays is my vice!
    A schoolfriend I haven’t spoken to in years phoned last week. We chatted ferociously for over an hour, but didn’t feel the need to say at the end to falsely say “we must meet up soon” because we’d never do it. Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.

    Reply
  10. So true. They say you can never have too many friends. But you can only fit in so many close intense friendships before you’re not doing them justice. Forgetting birthdays is my vice!
    A schoolfriend I haven’t spoken to in years phoned last week. We chatted ferociously for over an hour, but didn’t feel the need to say at the end to falsely say “we must meet up soon” because we’d never do it. Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.

    Reply
  11. I love your onion image, which perfectly describes authorly friendships, and other sorts as well.
    And let me just say that I loved, loved, loved breakfasting together with you and Wench Pat and more during NINC-NYC a few months ago! The fellowship and connections old and new that occur at conferences is just as important, perhaps more so, than all the industry info and buzz.

    Reply
  12. I love your onion image, which perfectly describes authorly friendships, and other sorts as well.
    And let me just say that I loved, loved, loved breakfasting together with you and Wench Pat and more during NINC-NYC a few months ago! The fellowship and connections old and new that occur at conferences is just as important, perhaps more so, than all the industry info and buzz.

    Reply
  13. I love your onion image, which perfectly describes authorly friendships, and other sorts as well.
    And let me just say that I loved, loved, loved breakfasting together with you and Wench Pat and more during NINC-NYC a few months ago! The fellowship and connections old and new that occur at conferences is just as important, perhaps more so, than all the industry info and buzz.

    Reply
  14. I love your onion image, which perfectly describes authorly friendships, and other sorts as well.
    And let me just say that I loved, loved, loved breakfasting together with you and Wench Pat and more during NINC-NYC a few months ago! The fellowship and connections old and new that occur at conferences is just as important, perhaps more so, than all the industry info and buzz.

    Reply
  15. I love your onion image, which perfectly describes authorly friendships, and other sorts as well.
    And let me just say that I loved, loved, loved breakfasting together with you and Wench Pat and more during NINC-NYC a few months ago! The fellowship and connections old and new that occur at conferences is just as important, perhaps more so, than all the industry info and buzz.

    Reply
  16. I think the onion is a perfect representation of the friendships in our lives! You hit the nail right on the head.
    I have many kinds of friends. Friends so close that I know they’d do anything for me, to the friend I see or talk to once or twice in a blue moon but who, when I do, carries on a conversation with me as if we’d just seen each other the day before.
    I read a quote years ago and I wish I could remember who to attribute it to, but a paraphrase is, you’ll touch a million lives before you die, and I believe that’s very true because, regardless of the type of friendship, the people you touch, touch someone else and on it goes and as they do, there’s a little part of you in there, somewhere.

    Reply
  17. I think the onion is a perfect representation of the friendships in our lives! You hit the nail right on the head.
    I have many kinds of friends. Friends so close that I know they’d do anything for me, to the friend I see or talk to once or twice in a blue moon but who, when I do, carries on a conversation with me as if we’d just seen each other the day before.
    I read a quote years ago and I wish I could remember who to attribute it to, but a paraphrase is, you’ll touch a million lives before you die, and I believe that’s very true because, regardless of the type of friendship, the people you touch, touch someone else and on it goes and as they do, there’s a little part of you in there, somewhere.

    Reply
  18. I think the onion is a perfect representation of the friendships in our lives! You hit the nail right on the head.
    I have many kinds of friends. Friends so close that I know they’d do anything for me, to the friend I see or talk to once or twice in a blue moon but who, when I do, carries on a conversation with me as if we’d just seen each other the day before.
    I read a quote years ago and I wish I could remember who to attribute it to, but a paraphrase is, you’ll touch a million lives before you die, and I believe that’s very true because, regardless of the type of friendship, the people you touch, touch someone else and on it goes and as they do, there’s a little part of you in there, somewhere.

    Reply
  19. I think the onion is a perfect representation of the friendships in our lives! You hit the nail right on the head.
    I have many kinds of friends. Friends so close that I know they’d do anything for me, to the friend I see or talk to once or twice in a blue moon but who, when I do, carries on a conversation with me as if we’d just seen each other the day before.
    I read a quote years ago and I wish I could remember who to attribute it to, but a paraphrase is, you’ll touch a million lives before you die, and I believe that’s very true because, regardless of the type of friendship, the people you touch, touch someone else and on it goes and as they do, there’s a little part of you in there, somewhere.

    Reply
  20. I think the onion is a perfect representation of the friendships in our lives! You hit the nail right on the head.
    I have many kinds of friends. Friends so close that I know they’d do anything for me, to the friend I see or talk to once or twice in a blue moon but who, when I do, carries on a conversation with me as if we’d just seen each other the day before.
    I read a quote years ago and I wish I could remember who to attribute it to, but a paraphrase is, you’ll touch a million lives before you die, and I believe that’s very true because, regardless of the type of friendship, the people you touch, touch someone else and on it goes and as they do, there’s a little part of you in there, somewhere.

    Reply
  21. Oh! And Mama Mia? I love the Abba songs, but I have definite ideas in my mind when I hear them and I just can’t bring myself to watch the movie and have those ideas changed into a story. *sigh* I know, stupid, but I can’t help it.

    Reply
  22. Oh! And Mama Mia? I love the Abba songs, but I have definite ideas in my mind when I hear them and I just can’t bring myself to watch the movie and have those ideas changed into a story. *sigh* I know, stupid, but I can’t help it.

    Reply
  23. Oh! And Mama Mia? I love the Abba songs, but I have definite ideas in my mind when I hear them and I just can’t bring myself to watch the movie and have those ideas changed into a story. *sigh* I know, stupid, but I can’t help it.

    Reply
  24. Oh! And Mama Mia? I love the Abba songs, but I have definite ideas in my mind when I hear them and I just can’t bring myself to watch the movie and have those ideas changed into a story. *sigh* I know, stupid, but I can’t help it.

    Reply
  25. Oh! And Mama Mia? I love the Abba songs, but I have definite ideas in my mind when I hear them and I just can’t bring myself to watch the movie and have those ideas changed into a story. *sigh* I know, stupid, but I can’t help it.

    Reply
  26. I think of my friendships not just as an onion of concentric circles but of interlocking rings. I love having all these communities of people I met at my various jobs, through my children, through shared beliefs (political, religious, etc), and through our mutual love of books. In each ring some people are much closer than others, but I love how they interact and provide richness to each other.

    Reply
  27. I think of my friendships not just as an onion of concentric circles but of interlocking rings. I love having all these communities of people I met at my various jobs, through my children, through shared beliefs (political, religious, etc), and through our mutual love of books. In each ring some people are much closer than others, but I love how they interact and provide richness to each other.

    Reply
  28. I think of my friendships not just as an onion of concentric circles but of interlocking rings. I love having all these communities of people I met at my various jobs, through my children, through shared beliefs (political, religious, etc), and through our mutual love of books. In each ring some people are much closer than others, but I love how they interact and provide richness to each other.

    Reply
  29. I think of my friendships not just as an onion of concentric circles but of interlocking rings. I love having all these communities of people I met at my various jobs, through my children, through shared beliefs (political, religious, etc), and through our mutual love of books. In each ring some people are much closer than others, but I love how they interact and provide richness to each other.

    Reply
  30. I think of my friendships not just as an onion of concentric circles but of interlocking rings. I love having all these communities of people I met at my various jobs, through my children, through shared beliefs (political, religious, etc), and through our mutual love of books. In each ring some people are much closer than others, but I love how they interact and provide richness to each other.

    Reply
  31. I still have not seen this movie. Grumble. My very best friends live far away, but we make do with constant e-mail.
    I love to watch my three daughters, who consider each other to be their best friends, and how they each blend their non-family friends so that the onion gets to be big and juicy. A good friend of Daughter #1 is now living with the good male friend of Daughter #2, for example. They came to visit us on our family vacation at a lake house, met and fell in love. Maybe someone should write a book about it. *g*

    Reply
  32. I still have not seen this movie. Grumble. My very best friends live far away, but we make do with constant e-mail.
    I love to watch my three daughters, who consider each other to be their best friends, and how they each blend their non-family friends so that the onion gets to be big and juicy. A good friend of Daughter #1 is now living with the good male friend of Daughter #2, for example. They came to visit us on our family vacation at a lake house, met and fell in love. Maybe someone should write a book about it. *g*

    Reply
  33. I still have not seen this movie. Grumble. My very best friends live far away, but we make do with constant e-mail.
    I love to watch my three daughters, who consider each other to be their best friends, and how they each blend their non-family friends so that the onion gets to be big and juicy. A good friend of Daughter #1 is now living with the good male friend of Daughter #2, for example. They came to visit us on our family vacation at a lake house, met and fell in love. Maybe someone should write a book about it. *g*

    Reply
  34. I still have not seen this movie. Grumble. My very best friends live far away, but we make do with constant e-mail.
    I love to watch my three daughters, who consider each other to be their best friends, and how they each blend their non-family friends so that the onion gets to be big and juicy. A good friend of Daughter #1 is now living with the good male friend of Daughter #2, for example. They came to visit us on our family vacation at a lake house, met and fell in love. Maybe someone should write a book about it. *g*

    Reply
  35. I still have not seen this movie. Grumble. My very best friends live far away, but we make do with constant e-mail.
    I love to watch my three daughters, who consider each other to be their best friends, and how they each blend their non-family friends so that the onion gets to be big and juicy. A good friend of Daughter #1 is now living with the good male friend of Daughter #2, for example. They came to visit us on our family vacation at a lake house, met and fell in love. Maybe someone should write a book about it. *g*

    Reply
  36. From MJP:
    “”Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.””
    GREAT image, Francois! I have people like that in my life. We can go years without meeting, and pick up right where we left off when we see each other again.
    Margaret, that breakfast at Ninc is a perfect example of the lovely interactions that happen at such events. We even scooped up Anne Gracie, who was up from Down Under, and that made breakfast even better. These kinds of connections nourish the soul just as meeting editors and agents nourishes the career.
    >>Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.
    << What a lovely thought, Theo. Ripples in a pond, going on and on and on. I like Susan/DC's image of interlocking circles, too. One can never have too many good metaphors for friendship. Theo, the ABBA songs in Mamma Mia! don't really turn into a story. This is a musical, after all. Any excuse will do for the leads and a back up chorus of Greek islanders to start leaping around. I didn’t find that it messed up my affection for the originals at all. Worth considering….
    “They came to visit us on our family vacation at a lake house, met and fell in love. Maybe someone should write a book about it. *g*”
    LOL! Probably someone has, Maggie.

    Mary Jo

    Reply
  37. From MJP:
    “”Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.””
    GREAT image, Francois! I have people like that in my life. We can go years without meeting, and pick up right where we left off when we see each other again.
    Margaret, that breakfast at Ninc is a perfect example of the lovely interactions that happen at such events. We even scooped up Anne Gracie, who was up from Down Under, and that made breakfast even better. These kinds of connections nourish the soul just as meeting editors and agents nourishes the career.
    >>Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.
    << What a lovely thought, Theo. Ripples in a pond, going on and on and on. I like Susan/DC's image of interlocking circles, too. One can never have too many good metaphors for friendship. Theo, the ABBA songs in Mamma Mia! don't really turn into a story. This is a musical, after all. Any excuse will do for the leads and a back up chorus of Greek islanders to start leaping around. I didn’t find that it messed up my affection for the originals at all. Worth considering….
    “They came to visit us on our family vacation at a lake house, met and fell in love. Maybe someone should write a book about it. *g*”
    LOL! Probably someone has, Maggie.

    Mary Jo

    Reply
  38. From MJP:
    “”Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.””
    GREAT image, Francois! I have people like that in my life. We can go years without meeting, and pick up right where we left off when we see each other again.
    Margaret, that breakfast at Ninc is a perfect example of the lovely interactions that happen at such events. We even scooped up Anne Gracie, who was up from Down Under, and that made breakfast even better. These kinds of connections nourish the soul just as meeting editors and agents nourishes the career.
    >>Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.
    << What a lovely thought, Theo. Ripples in a pond, going on and on and on. I like Susan/DC's image of interlocking circles, too. One can never have too many good metaphors for friendship. Theo, the ABBA songs in Mamma Mia! don't really turn into a story. This is a musical, after all. Any excuse will do for the leads and a back up chorus of Greek islanders to start leaping around. I didn’t find that it messed up my affection for the originals at all. Worth considering….
    “They came to visit us on our family vacation at a lake house, met and fell in love. Maybe someone should write a book about it. *g*”
    LOL! Probably someone has, Maggie.

    Mary Jo

    Reply
  39. From MJP:
    “”Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.””
    GREAT image, Francois! I have people like that in my life. We can go years without meeting, and pick up right where we left off when we see each other again.
    Margaret, that breakfast at Ninc is a perfect example of the lovely interactions that happen at such events. We even scooped up Anne Gracie, who was up from Down Under, and that made breakfast even better. These kinds of connections nourish the soul just as meeting editors and agents nourishes the career.
    >>Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.
    << What a lovely thought, Theo. Ripples in a pond, going on and on and on. I like Susan/DC's image of interlocking circles, too. One can never have too many good metaphors for friendship. Theo, the ABBA songs in Mamma Mia! don't really turn into a story. This is a musical, after all. Any excuse will do for the leads and a back up chorus of Greek islanders to start leaping around. I didn’t find that it messed up my affection for the originals at all. Worth considering….
    “They came to visit us on our family vacation at a lake house, met and fell in love. Maybe someone should write a book about it. *g*”
    LOL! Probably someone has, Maggie.

    Mary Jo

    Reply
  40. From MJP:
    “”Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.””
    GREAT image, Francois! I have people like that in my life. We can go years without meeting, and pick up right where we left off when we see each other again.
    Margaret, that breakfast at Ninc is a perfect example of the lovely interactions that happen at such events. We even scooped up Anne Gracie, who was up from Down Under, and that made breakfast even better. These kinds of connections nourish the soul just as meeting editors and agents nourishes the career.
    >>Some people you’re attached to by a longer piece of elastic than others. It stretches out a long way but its still there.
    << What a lovely thought, Theo. Ripples in a pond, going on and on and on. I like Susan/DC's image of interlocking circles, too. One can never have too many good metaphors for friendship. Theo, the ABBA songs in Mamma Mia! don't really turn into a story. This is a musical, after all. Any excuse will do for the leads and a back up chorus of Greek islanders to start leaping around. I didn’t find that it messed up my affection for the originals at all. Worth considering….
    “They came to visit us on our family vacation at a lake house, met and fell in love. Maybe someone should write a book about it. *g*”
    LOL! Probably someone has, Maggie.

    Mary Jo

    Reply
  41. Tal, how cute!!! And under all that raffia, a beautiful cat. 🙂
    I have a cat. Somewhere. I don’t much see her anymore. She lives on top of my kitchen cupboards, or underneath them in one particular cupboard…
    I have two Dobermans. The puppy adores the cat, and the cat tolerates her, but the big dog, well…he sees the cat as a snack.
    I haven’t seen my cat in weeks. I know she’s alive though. Her food bowl which, along with her water bowl sits on top of my fridge, is empty every morning and her littler box is full…
    *sigh*
    It does in a way, remind me of those friendships as well though. I don’t see the cat for days, which in her little universe probably seems like years for her and yet, when I do, her relationship with me hasn’t changed.
    And I’m waxing poetical today I guess. Sorry, gang.

    Reply
  42. Tal, how cute!!! And under all that raffia, a beautiful cat. 🙂
    I have a cat. Somewhere. I don’t much see her anymore. She lives on top of my kitchen cupboards, or underneath them in one particular cupboard…
    I have two Dobermans. The puppy adores the cat, and the cat tolerates her, but the big dog, well…he sees the cat as a snack.
    I haven’t seen my cat in weeks. I know she’s alive though. Her food bowl which, along with her water bowl sits on top of my fridge, is empty every morning and her littler box is full…
    *sigh*
    It does in a way, remind me of those friendships as well though. I don’t see the cat for days, which in her little universe probably seems like years for her and yet, when I do, her relationship with me hasn’t changed.
    And I’m waxing poetical today I guess. Sorry, gang.

    Reply
  43. Tal, how cute!!! And under all that raffia, a beautiful cat. 🙂
    I have a cat. Somewhere. I don’t much see her anymore. She lives on top of my kitchen cupboards, or underneath them in one particular cupboard…
    I have two Dobermans. The puppy adores the cat, and the cat tolerates her, but the big dog, well…he sees the cat as a snack.
    I haven’t seen my cat in weeks. I know she’s alive though. Her food bowl which, along with her water bowl sits on top of my fridge, is empty every morning and her littler box is full…
    *sigh*
    It does in a way, remind me of those friendships as well though. I don’t see the cat for days, which in her little universe probably seems like years for her and yet, when I do, her relationship with me hasn’t changed.
    And I’m waxing poetical today I guess. Sorry, gang.

    Reply
  44. Tal, how cute!!! And under all that raffia, a beautiful cat. 🙂
    I have a cat. Somewhere. I don’t much see her anymore. She lives on top of my kitchen cupboards, or underneath them in one particular cupboard…
    I have two Dobermans. The puppy adores the cat, and the cat tolerates her, but the big dog, well…he sees the cat as a snack.
    I haven’t seen my cat in weeks. I know she’s alive though. Her food bowl which, along with her water bowl sits on top of my fridge, is empty every morning and her littler box is full…
    *sigh*
    It does in a way, remind me of those friendships as well though. I don’t see the cat for days, which in her little universe probably seems like years for her and yet, when I do, her relationship with me hasn’t changed.
    And I’m waxing poetical today I guess. Sorry, gang.

    Reply
  45. Tal, how cute!!! And under all that raffia, a beautiful cat. 🙂
    I have a cat. Somewhere. I don’t much see her anymore. She lives on top of my kitchen cupboards, or underneath them in one particular cupboard…
    I have two Dobermans. The puppy adores the cat, and the cat tolerates her, but the big dog, well…he sees the cat as a snack.
    I haven’t seen my cat in weeks. I know she’s alive though. Her food bowl which, along with her water bowl sits on top of my fridge, is empty every morning and her littler box is full…
    *sigh*
    It does in a way, remind me of those friendships as well though. I don’t see the cat for days, which in her little universe probably seems like years for her and yet, when I do, her relationship with me hasn’t changed.
    And I’m waxing poetical today I guess. Sorry, gang.

    Reply
  46. I am a Good Acquaintance (I’ll stop to talk to anyone at the grocery store, on the street, in the airport). However, I am a Bad Friend, mostly because I don’t like the phone (my job is almost totally phone work, so at home when the phone rings I moan, “Oh, no. . .” which drives Husband nuts). I’m good In the Moment (intense personal conversation one-on-one), but very bad at Follow-Up (calling the next day to say “how are you today?”). The Internet has helped me follow up/ reconnect/ stay connected with many friend folk from the past and present, giving me a way to negotiate past this Fatal Flaw.
    I did love Mamma Mia the Movie, and found Pierce Brosnan’s non-musical singing rather endearing. (Kind of like, Baby, I’m so overcome with emotion that I have to sing even though I suck at it!) In particular, I found myself tearing up at the wedding reception scene where Pierce sings to his bride, badly–I mean, haven’t we all been to one of those weddings where a family member sings and it’s awful and beautiful all at the same time?

    Reply
  47. I am a Good Acquaintance (I’ll stop to talk to anyone at the grocery store, on the street, in the airport). However, I am a Bad Friend, mostly because I don’t like the phone (my job is almost totally phone work, so at home when the phone rings I moan, “Oh, no. . .” which drives Husband nuts). I’m good In the Moment (intense personal conversation one-on-one), but very bad at Follow-Up (calling the next day to say “how are you today?”). The Internet has helped me follow up/ reconnect/ stay connected with many friend folk from the past and present, giving me a way to negotiate past this Fatal Flaw.
    I did love Mamma Mia the Movie, and found Pierce Brosnan’s non-musical singing rather endearing. (Kind of like, Baby, I’m so overcome with emotion that I have to sing even though I suck at it!) In particular, I found myself tearing up at the wedding reception scene where Pierce sings to his bride, badly–I mean, haven’t we all been to one of those weddings where a family member sings and it’s awful and beautiful all at the same time?

    Reply
  48. I am a Good Acquaintance (I’ll stop to talk to anyone at the grocery store, on the street, in the airport). However, I am a Bad Friend, mostly because I don’t like the phone (my job is almost totally phone work, so at home when the phone rings I moan, “Oh, no. . .” which drives Husband nuts). I’m good In the Moment (intense personal conversation one-on-one), but very bad at Follow-Up (calling the next day to say “how are you today?”). The Internet has helped me follow up/ reconnect/ stay connected with many friend folk from the past and present, giving me a way to negotiate past this Fatal Flaw.
    I did love Mamma Mia the Movie, and found Pierce Brosnan’s non-musical singing rather endearing. (Kind of like, Baby, I’m so overcome with emotion that I have to sing even though I suck at it!) In particular, I found myself tearing up at the wedding reception scene where Pierce sings to his bride, badly–I mean, haven’t we all been to one of those weddings where a family member sings and it’s awful and beautiful all at the same time?

    Reply
  49. I am a Good Acquaintance (I’ll stop to talk to anyone at the grocery store, on the street, in the airport). However, I am a Bad Friend, mostly because I don’t like the phone (my job is almost totally phone work, so at home when the phone rings I moan, “Oh, no. . .” which drives Husband nuts). I’m good In the Moment (intense personal conversation one-on-one), but very bad at Follow-Up (calling the next day to say “how are you today?”). The Internet has helped me follow up/ reconnect/ stay connected with many friend folk from the past and present, giving me a way to negotiate past this Fatal Flaw.
    I did love Mamma Mia the Movie, and found Pierce Brosnan’s non-musical singing rather endearing. (Kind of like, Baby, I’m so overcome with emotion that I have to sing even though I suck at it!) In particular, I found myself tearing up at the wedding reception scene where Pierce sings to his bride, badly–I mean, haven’t we all been to one of those weddings where a family member sings and it’s awful and beautiful all at the same time?

    Reply
  50. I am a Good Acquaintance (I’ll stop to talk to anyone at the grocery store, on the street, in the airport). However, I am a Bad Friend, mostly because I don’t like the phone (my job is almost totally phone work, so at home when the phone rings I moan, “Oh, no. . .” which drives Husband nuts). I’m good In the Moment (intense personal conversation one-on-one), but very bad at Follow-Up (calling the next day to say “how are you today?”). The Internet has helped me follow up/ reconnect/ stay connected with many friend folk from the past and present, giving me a way to negotiate past this Fatal Flaw.
    I did love Mamma Mia the Movie, and found Pierce Brosnan’s non-musical singing rather endearing. (Kind of like, Baby, I’m so overcome with emotion that I have to sing even though I suck at it!) In particular, I found myself tearing up at the wedding reception scene where Pierce sings to his bride, badly–I mean, haven’t we all been to one of those weddings where a family member sings and it’s awful and beautiful all at the same time?

    Reply
  51. I’m with RevMelinda in the Good Acquaintance / Bad Friend category. I’m good in a crisis and bad on the little things like birthday cards, and returning those “hey let’s get together” phone messages.
    I really like your Onion analogy, Mary Jo. Fits nicely. Over these last weeks, life has sent me digging dip into the middle of the onion for my true friends. And you know, the people who I thought would be there, weren’t, and friends I thought were more toward the outer edge, were actually the middle. Unexpected, hurtful but comforting all at the same time.
    To Mamma Mia… Pierce Brosnan can do whatever he wants as long as he flashes that come hither smile. 🙂

    Reply
  52. I’m with RevMelinda in the Good Acquaintance / Bad Friend category. I’m good in a crisis and bad on the little things like birthday cards, and returning those “hey let’s get together” phone messages.
    I really like your Onion analogy, Mary Jo. Fits nicely. Over these last weeks, life has sent me digging dip into the middle of the onion for my true friends. And you know, the people who I thought would be there, weren’t, and friends I thought were more toward the outer edge, were actually the middle. Unexpected, hurtful but comforting all at the same time.
    To Mamma Mia… Pierce Brosnan can do whatever he wants as long as he flashes that come hither smile. 🙂

    Reply
  53. I’m with RevMelinda in the Good Acquaintance / Bad Friend category. I’m good in a crisis and bad on the little things like birthday cards, and returning those “hey let’s get together” phone messages.
    I really like your Onion analogy, Mary Jo. Fits nicely. Over these last weeks, life has sent me digging dip into the middle of the onion for my true friends. And you know, the people who I thought would be there, weren’t, and friends I thought were more toward the outer edge, were actually the middle. Unexpected, hurtful but comforting all at the same time.
    To Mamma Mia… Pierce Brosnan can do whatever he wants as long as he flashes that come hither smile. 🙂

    Reply
  54. I’m with RevMelinda in the Good Acquaintance / Bad Friend category. I’m good in a crisis and bad on the little things like birthday cards, and returning those “hey let’s get together” phone messages.
    I really like your Onion analogy, Mary Jo. Fits nicely. Over these last weeks, life has sent me digging dip into the middle of the onion for my true friends. And you know, the people who I thought would be there, weren’t, and friends I thought were more toward the outer edge, were actually the middle. Unexpected, hurtful but comforting all at the same time.
    To Mamma Mia… Pierce Brosnan can do whatever he wants as long as he flashes that come hither smile. 🙂

    Reply
  55. I’m with RevMelinda in the Good Acquaintance / Bad Friend category. I’m good in a crisis and bad on the little things like birthday cards, and returning those “hey let’s get together” phone messages.
    I really like your Onion analogy, Mary Jo. Fits nicely. Over these last weeks, life has sent me digging dip into the middle of the onion for my true friends. And you know, the people who I thought would be there, weren’t, and friends I thought were more toward the outer edge, were actually the middle. Unexpected, hurtful but comforting all at the same time.
    To Mamma Mia… Pierce Brosnan can do whatever he wants as long as he flashes that come hither smile. 🙂

    Reply
  56. From MJP:
    Rev Melinda, I’d think that ability to connect deeply is a power tool of ministry. I can understand the aversion to telephones, but as you say, there are other ways to follow-up.
    I liked your point that Pierce’s singing at the wedding had the good/awful quality of real life. 🙂
    Nina, as you found, crisis brings out unexpected traits in people, and you don’t always know who has the stamina to be there in need. People have different strangths. Some simply can’t deal with hospitals, for example, but if you need someone to feed your cat or your kids when you have to take off, they’re there. Or maybe they’re good listeners when you need one.
    Part of friendship, I think, is knowing and accepting the strengths and weaknesses of our friends. It’s easier if we don’t expect something they’re ill-equipped to give.
    And if a friend who hates hospitals comes anyhow–all the more credit is due her.
    Mary Jo, rambling. And feeling sorry for Theo’s cat.

    Reply
  57. From MJP:
    Rev Melinda, I’d think that ability to connect deeply is a power tool of ministry. I can understand the aversion to telephones, but as you say, there are other ways to follow-up.
    I liked your point that Pierce’s singing at the wedding had the good/awful quality of real life. 🙂
    Nina, as you found, crisis brings out unexpected traits in people, and you don’t always know who has the stamina to be there in need. People have different strangths. Some simply can’t deal with hospitals, for example, but if you need someone to feed your cat or your kids when you have to take off, they’re there. Or maybe they’re good listeners when you need one.
    Part of friendship, I think, is knowing and accepting the strengths and weaknesses of our friends. It’s easier if we don’t expect something they’re ill-equipped to give.
    And if a friend who hates hospitals comes anyhow–all the more credit is due her.
    Mary Jo, rambling. And feeling sorry for Theo’s cat.

    Reply
  58. From MJP:
    Rev Melinda, I’d think that ability to connect deeply is a power tool of ministry. I can understand the aversion to telephones, but as you say, there are other ways to follow-up.
    I liked your point that Pierce’s singing at the wedding had the good/awful quality of real life. 🙂
    Nina, as you found, crisis brings out unexpected traits in people, and you don’t always know who has the stamina to be there in need. People have different strangths. Some simply can’t deal with hospitals, for example, but if you need someone to feed your cat or your kids when you have to take off, they’re there. Or maybe they’re good listeners when you need one.
    Part of friendship, I think, is knowing and accepting the strengths and weaknesses of our friends. It’s easier if we don’t expect something they’re ill-equipped to give.
    And if a friend who hates hospitals comes anyhow–all the more credit is due her.
    Mary Jo, rambling. And feeling sorry for Theo’s cat.

    Reply
  59. From MJP:
    Rev Melinda, I’d think that ability to connect deeply is a power tool of ministry. I can understand the aversion to telephones, but as you say, there are other ways to follow-up.
    I liked your point that Pierce’s singing at the wedding had the good/awful quality of real life. 🙂
    Nina, as you found, crisis brings out unexpected traits in people, and you don’t always know who has the stamina to be there in need. People have different strangths. Some simply can’t deal with hospitals, for example, but if you need someone to feed your cat or your kids when you have to take off, they’re there. Or maybe they’re good listeners when you need one.
    Part of friendship, I think, is knowing and accepting the strengths and weaknesses of our friends. It’s easier if we don’t expect something they’re ill-equipped to give.
    And if a friend who hates hospitals comes anyhow–all the more credit is due her.
    Mary Jo, rambling. And feeling sorry for Theo’s cat.

    Reply
  60. From MJP:
    Rev Melinda, I’d think that ability to connect deeply is a power tool of ministry. I can understand the aversion to telephones, but as you say, there are other ways to follow-up.
    I liked your point that Pierce’s singing at the wedding had the good/awful quality of real life. 🙂
    Nina, as you found, crisis brings out unexpected traits in people, and you don’t always know who has the stamina to be there in need. People have different strangths. Some simply can’t deal with hospitals, for example, but if you need someone to feed your cat or your kids when you have to take off, they’re there. Or maybe they’re good listeners when you need one.
    Part of friendship, I think, is knowing and accepting the strengths and weaknesses of our friends. It’s easier if we don’t expect something they’re ill-equipped to give.
    And if a friend who hates hospitals comes anyhow–all the more credit is due her.
    Mary Jo, rambling. And feeling sorry for Theo’s cat.

    Reply
  61. *sigh*
    I feel sorry for my cat too, MJ. I do climb up on a chair and grab her to hold her. And she hisses and claws (thankfully, she has none) the whole time. Then when I sit, the dogs of course have to see what she is so she sits in my lap and bats at them. The puppy thinks it’s a game. The big dog…I’m not sure. His tail isn’t wagging but he doesn’t quite have murder in his eyes either. More like a…’Oooh! I can probably destroy THIS toy in about 10 minutes!’ look.
    *sigh*
    But hey! All she has to do is show them who’s boss! She’d rather be the martyr because she gets held more that way I suppose. Who knows about cats? They don’t have owners, they let you live with them.
    Back to the subject, I think you’re right about those who don’t like the hospital and come anyway, or those who can’t cook to save their lives but when you’re sick, they grab the recipe book and try to make you chicken soup, knowing their inability to make it well most of the time.
    A friend to me might be someone in that outside layer who steps into the center occasionally to fill the gap of someone who’s stepped out. Because no friend can be all things to you and it’s nice to know that you have, just a few, who are willing to take their place if need be.
    And I’m an only so I don’t know if it makes a difference, but I cherish my friends all the more because they’re there.

    Reply
  62. *sigh*
    I feel sorry for my cat too, MJ. I do climb up on a chair and grab her to hold her. And she hisses and claws (thankfully, she has none) the whole time. Then when I sit, the dogs of course have to see what she is so she sits in my lap and bats at them. The puppy thinks it’s a game. The big dog…I’m not sure. His tail isn’t wagging but he doesn’t quite have murder in his eyes either. More like a…’Oooh! I can probably destroy THIS toy in about 10 minutes!’ look.
    *sigh*
    But hey! All she has to do is show them who’s boss! She’d rather be the martyr because she gets held more that way I suppose. Who knows about cats? They don’t have owners, they let you live with them.
    Back to the subject, I think you’re right about those who don’t like the hospital and come anyway, or those who can’t cook to save their lives but when you’re sick, they grab the recipe book and try to make you chicken soup, knowing their inability to make it well most of the time.
    A friend to me might be someone in that outside layer who steps into the center occasionally to fill the gap of someone who’s stepped out. Because no friend can be all things to you and it’s nice to know that you have, just a few, who are willing to take their place if need be.
    And I’m an only so I don’t know if it makes a difference, but I cherish my friends all the more because they’re there.

    Reply
  63. *sigh*
    I feel sorry for my cat too, MJ. I do climb up on a chair and grab her to hold her. And she hisses and claws (thankfully, she has none) the whole time. Then when I sit, the dogs of course have to see what she is so she sits in my lap and bats at them. The puppy thinks it’s a game. The big dog…I’m not sure. His tail isn’t wagging but he doesn’t quite have murder in his eyes either. More like a…’Oooh! I can probably destroy THIS toy in about 10 minutes!’ look.
    *sigh*
    But hey! All she has to do is show them who’s boss! She’d rather be the martyr because she gets held more that way I suppose. Who knows about cats? They don’t have owners, they let you live with them.
    Back to the subject, I think you’re right about those who don’t like the hospital and come anyway, or those who can’t cook to save their lives but when you’re sick, they grab the recipe book and try to make you chicken soup, knowing their inability to make it well most of the time.
    A friend to me might be someone in that outside layer who steps into the center occasionally to fill the gap of someone who’s stepped out. Because no friend can be all things to you and it’s nice to know that you have, just a few, who are willing to take their place if need be.
    And I’m an only so I don’t know if it makes a difference, but I cherish my friends all the more because they’re there.

    Reply
  64. *sigh*
    I feel sorry for my cat too, MJ. I do climb up on a chair and grab her to hold her. And she hisses and claws (thankfully, she has none) the whole time. Then when I sit, the dogs of course have to see what she is so she sits in my lap and bats at them. The puppy thinks it’s a game. The big dog…I’m not sure. His tail isn’t wagging but he doesn’t quite have murder in his eyes either. More like a…’Oooh! I can probably destroy THIS toy in about 10 minutes!’ look.
    *sigh*
    But hey! All she has to do is show them who’s boss! She’d rather be the martyr because she gets held more that way I suppose. Who knows about cats? They don’t have owners, they let you live with them.
    Back to the subject, I think you’re right about those who don’t like the hospital and come anyway, or those who can’t cook to save their lives but when you’re sick, they grab the recipe book and try to make you chicken soup, knowing their inability to make it well most of the time.
    A friend to me might be someone in that outside layer who steps into the center occasionally to fill the gap of someone who’s stepped out. Because no friend can be all things to you and it’s nice to know that you have, just a few, who are willing to take their place if need be.
    And I’m an only so I don’t know if it makes a difference, but I cherish my friends all the more because they’re there.

    Reply
  65. *sigh*
    I feel sorry for my cat too, MJ. I do climb up on a chair and grab her to hold her. And she hisses and claws (thankfully, she has none) the whole time. Then when I sit, the dogs of course have to see what she is so she sits in my lap and bats at them. The puppy thinks it’s a game. The big dog…I’m not sure. His tail isn’t wagging but he doesn’t quite have murder in his eyes either. More like a…’Oooh! I can probably destroy THIS toy in about 10 minutes!’ look.
    *sigh*
    But hey! All she has to do is show them who’s boss! She’d rather be the martyr because she gets held more that way I suppose. Who knows about cats? They don’t have owners, they let you live with them.
    Back to the subject, I think you’re right about those who don’t like the hospital and come anyway, or those who can’t cook to save their lives but when you’re sick, they grab the recipe book and try to make you chicken soup, knowing their inability to make it well most of the time.
    A friend to me might be someone in that outside layer who steps into the center occasionally to fill the gap of someone who’s stepped out. Because no friend can be all things to you and it’s nice to know that you have, just a few, who are willing to take their place if need be.
    And I’m an only so I don’t know if it makes a difference, but I cherish my friends all the more because they’re there.

    Reply
  66. Theo, I just got a bag from my local Safeway, and I’m sure you can get them at the likes of PetsMart, Petco, and Drs. Foster & Smith.
    http://www.greenies.com/en_US/
    I just sent for a free sample on their website. If you (and anyone else!) is/are interested, please e-mail me so I can recommend you, as for every two people I recommend I get a freebie for Sethra and Aliera.

    Reply
  67. Theo, I just got a bag from my local Safeway, and I’m sure you can get them at the likes of PetsMart, Petco, and Drs. Foster & Smith.
    http://www.greenies.com/en_US/
    I just sent for a free sample on their website. If you (and anyone else!) is/are interested, please e-mail me so I can recommend you, as for every two people I recommend I get a freebie for Sethra and Aliera.

    Reply
  68. Theo, I just got a bag from my local Safeway, and I’m sure you can get them at the likes of PetsMart, Petco, and Drs. Foster & Smith.
    http://www.greenies.com/en_US/
    I just sent for a free sample on their website. If you (and anyone else!) is/are interested, please e-mail me so I can recommend you, as for every two people I recommend I get a freebie for Sethra and Aliera.

    Reply
  69. Theo, I just got a bag from my local Safeway, and I’m sure you can get them at the likes of PetsMart, Petco, and Drs. Foster & Smith.
    http://www.greenies.com/en_US/
    I just sent for a free sample on their website. If you (and anyone else!) is/are interested, please e-mail me so I can recommend you, as for every two people I recommend I get a freebie for Sethra and Aliera.

    Reply
  70. Theo, I just got a bag from my local Safeway, and I’m sure you can get them at the likes of PetsMart, Petco, and Drs. Foster & Smith.
    http://www.greenies.com/en_US/
    I just sent for a free sample on their website. If you (and anyone else!) is/are interested, please e-mail me so I can recommend you, as for every two people I recommend I get a freebie for Sethra and Aliera.

    Reply
  71. Don’t see an email! Give me yours through the contact page when you click on my name and I’ll send you my info. (don’t want the evil bots to get the email. They’re getting smarter all the time!)

    Reply
  72. Don’t see an email! Give me yours through the contact page when you click on my name and I’ll send you my info. (don’t want the evil bots to get the email. They’re getting smarter all the time!)

    Reply
  73. Don’t see an email! Give me yours through the contact page when you click on my name and I’ll send you my info. (don’t want the evil bots to get the email. They’re getting smarter all the time!)

    Reply
  74. Don’t see an email! Give me yours through the contact page when you click on my name and I’ll send you my info. (don’t want the evil bots to get the email. They’re getting smarter all the time!)

    Reply
  75. Don’t see an email! Give me yours through the contact page when you click on my name and I’ll send you my info. (don’t want the evil bots to get the email. They’re getting smarter all the time!)

    Reply
  76. Theo, your link takes me to a group site, and I can’t tell which one is you. Post your address on my blog, and I’ll copy it and delete it immediately. It’s not as if my blog is the crossroads of the Western world!

    Reply
  77. Theo, your link takes me to a group site, and I can’t tell which one is you. Post your address on my blog, and I’ll copy it and delete it immediately. It’s not as if my blog is the crossroads of the Western world!

    Reply
  78. Theo, your link takes me to a group site, and I can’t tell which one is you. Post your address on my blog, and I’ll copy it and delete it immediately. It’s not as if my blog is the crossroads of the Western world!

    Reply
  79. Theo, your link takes me to a group site, and I can’t tell which one is you. Post your address on my blog, and I’ll copy it and delete it immediately. It’s not as if my blog is the crossroads of the Western world!

    Reply
  80. Theo, your link takes me to a group site, and I can’t tell which one is you. Post your address on my blog, and I’ll copy it and delete it immediately. It’s not as if my blog is the crossroads of the Western world!

    Reply
  81. Will do. You know, I forgot that I don’t use that name over here! Silly me!! And I don’t know if there’s a contact for the admin there (that’s me too but DUH! how would you know that if I don’t tell you???)
    Yesterday was a loooooooong day and I wasn’t well…

    Reply
  82. Will do. You know, I forgot that I don’t use that name over here! Silly me!! And I don’t know if there’s a contact for the admin there (that’s me too but DUH! how would you know that if I don’t tell you???)
    Yesterday was a loooooooong day and I wasn’t well…

    Reply
  83. Will do. You know, I forgot that I don’t use that name over here! Silly me!! And I don’t know if there’s a contact for the admin there (that’s me too but DUH! how would you know that if I don’t tell you???)
    Yesterday was a loooooooong day and I wasn’t well…

    Reply
  84. Will do. You know, I forgot that I don’t use that name over here! Silly me!! And I don’t know if there’s a contact for the admin there (that’s me too but DUH! how would you know that if I don’t tell you???)
    Yesterday was a loooooooong day and I wasn’t well…

    Reply
  85. Will do. You know, I forgot that I don’t use that name over here! Silly me!! And I don’t know if there’s a contact for the admin there (that’s me too but DUH! how would you know that if I don’t tell you???)
    Yesterday was a loooooooong day and I wasn’t well…

    Reply
  86. Will do. You know, I forgot that I don’t use that name over here! Silly me!! And I don’t know if there’s a contact for the admin there (that’s me too but DUH! how would you know that if I don’t tell you???)
    Yesterday was a loooooooong day and I wasn’t well…

    Reply
  87. Will do. You know, I forgot that I don’t use that name over here! Silly me!! And I don’t know if there’s a contact for the admin there (that’s me too but DUH! how would you know that if I don’t tell you???)
    Yesterday was a loooooooong day and I wasn’t well…

    Reply
  88. Will do. You know, I forgot that I don’t use that name over here! Silly me!! And I don’t know if there’s a contact for the admin there (that’s me too but DUH! how would you know that if I don’t tell you???)
    Yesterday was a loooooooong day and I wasn’t well…

    Reply
  89. Will do. You know, I forgot that I don’t use that name over here! Silly me!! And I don’t know if there’s a contact for the admin there (that’s me too but DUH! how would you know that if I don’t tell you???)
    Yesterday was a loooooooong day and I wasn’t well…

    Reply
  90. Will do. You know, I forgot that I don’t use that name over here! Silly me!! And I don’t know if there’s a contact for the admin there (that’s me too but DUH! how would you know that if I don’t tell you???)
    Yesterday was a loooooooong day and I wasn’t well…

    Reply

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