Maggie Robinson and a Lady Unlaced!

by Mary JoCat 243 Dover

Maggie Robinson has been a regular Word Wench reader and commenter for years, and the Wenches celebrated when she sold her first book.  She’s now written 8 historical romances as Maggie Robinson, and 2 darker, sexier books as Margaret Rowe, as well as novellas and short stories in three anthologies.
 
Maggie is with us today because I so enjoyed her July book, In the Arms of the Heiress.  The first of her Ladies Unlaced Series, it’s Maggie Robinson by Megan Jonessmart, fresh, and funny, and is set in 1903, a delightful and unusual time period that Maggie takes full advantage of.  Maggie, would you care to tell us about Louisa, Charles…and Maximillian Norwich?
 
MR: Charles is a working-class hero who has pulled himself up by his bootstraps as a scholarship boy, and then risen on his own merit in the army. The after-affects of the Second Boer War have just about broken him until Louisa rolls into his life in her little French car. She appears to have every advantage, but as we know, looks can be deceiving. Her family has interfered with her happiness forever, and in a burst of demonic genius (she thinks), she invents a husband to keep them at bay. "Maximillian Norwich" is impossibly perfect and suave. Charles agrees to play him for a visit to her family, though he's far from perfect or suave. What he IS, though, proves to be perfect for Louisa.
  
MJP:  What drew you to 1903?  How is it different from the much more usual 19th century settings?
 
MR: Some years ago I did a "Turn of the Centuries" exhibit for a local historical society museum. We had a ton of artifacts and photographs from the Gilded Age, and the era always resonated with me. When I had the opportunity to leave the Regency behind, the choice was obvious–Gibson Girls Gone Wild! (We settled on Ladies Unlaced for the series name instead, LOL, especially since the Gibson Girl was a uniquely American type.)

It didn't hurt that Downton Abbey was making such a splash, though my series is set about a decade earlier than Season I. The early 1900s were such a turbulent time, and it's been fun putting my characters in cars instead of carriages.

Inthearmsoftheheiress-270x405 
MJP: Here’s a delightful excerpt from The Heiress: 

Nice, France, early November 1903

Dear Aunt Grace,

It is with the heaviest of hearts I write to tell you my beloved husband Maximillian is dead.

“You are killing him?”
     Her maid Kathleen had the most annoying habit of sneaking up behind her when she least expected it.
     “It’s not as if he even exists,” Louisa Stratton replied, wiping up the splotch of ink.
      Kathleen opened the terrace doors to the Mediterranean, and a chill damp breeze almost blew Louisa’s letter away. It was supposed to be warmer in the south of France. It was not.
     “How did he die, then?”
     “I don’t know yet. Avalanche? Train wreck?” Maximillian might be a mountaineer when he wasn’t in museums, clad in tight leather, his face burnished by the great outdoors. The tender lines around his cerulean blue eyes from squinting at the sun would fan like out like ecru lace. Louisa would trace them with a fingertip as he hovered over her—
     Kathleen slammed the doors shut. “Both would have been all over the newspapers.”
     “Damn it.” She should have thought of that.
     “Indeed. You’ll have to find something less sensational. A heart murmur, perhaps. A septic finger.”
     Louisa brightened. “Yes! He was picking late roses for me and caught a thorn. Such a tiny thing, yet so dangerous. You know how he spoiled me—fresh flowers every day, no matter the season. The man should have been wearing his gloves. His hands were so lovely. Long and smooth, with hardly any hair on his knuckles. He could do anything with them.” She gave Kathleen a naughty smile.
     Kathleen tsked. “None of that talk. It still won’t work. After all, Maximillian Norwich is supposed to be an important man. You’ve made him so. You know your aunt always reads the obituaries and she’ll wonder why you didn’t put the notice in.”
     “I was simply prostrate with grief. Half out of my mind. She thinks I’m mad anyway.”
     Louisa usually had an answer for everything. If there had really been a Maximillian, she was sure she’d show all the proper feeling for losing the love of her life. She probably wouldn’t rise from her lonely bed for weeks, perhaps months. Years. She’d rival the late queen in her longing for Albert, only be far more attractively dressed.
 

MJP:  What was the inspiration for the Evensong Agency—and wouldn’t we all like to have one of those to call on?!!
 
MR:  Who doesn't want a Fairy Godmother? The Evensong Agency has been "Performing the Impossible Before Breakfast Since 1888," under the auspices of Intheheartofthehighlander-200x300canny, mysterious Mrs. Evensong, who once ran a duke's household. As a writer, the agency provides a platform for me to include more ordinary individuals than just dukes and debs.
 
 MJP: You have a background well designed for creating a writer.  Can you tell us more about yourself and how you got your start as an author?
 
 MR: Well, I used to 'pretend" a lot as an only child. That segued into becoming an English major in college, an English and reading teacher, and library clerk. So, books R us, so to speak. To write them now is a dream come true. I fiddled around for years but never got serious until 2006, when I decided to try to get my act together. Two years later I got my wonderful agent Laura Bradford, and the rest is historical romance!
 
 MJP: Your next books in the Ladies Unlaced series will be out from Berkley in October.  Please tell us something about In the Heart of the Highlander.
 
MR: Mrs. Evensong–that is, the faux Mrs. Evensong–gets to have her very own adventure with a hot Scot. She lays a trap for the man responsible for said hot Scot's wife's death, and almost winds up joining her!
 
MJP: What else is stirring in that creative imagination of yours?  
 
MR: My editor has what I hope will be Ladies Unlaced #3 on her desk, featuring an unconventional artist and the secretary who's pressed into becoming his temporary governess (all arranged by the Evensong Agency, of course). In November, I'm in an anthology with five other writers, Snowbound for Christmas. I challenged myself to write a contemporary novella, but I couldn't help making the hero an English viscount. Some habits are hard to break. 🙂
 
MJP: I understand perfectly—when I wrote a western novella called “Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know,” I made the hero a gamblin’, amblin’ younger son from England.  <G> 

MR: Thanks so much for having me blog with you all. Another dream come true!
 
Inthearmsoftheheiress-270x405MJP: Thanks for joining us, Maggie!  I look forward to more Unlaced Ladies. <G> 

Maggie will be giving away a copy of In the Arms of the Heiress, or any other book from her backlist to one commenter between now and midnight Tuesday.

So–what do you think about historical romances set in the 20th century?  Do you like the idea?  Are there other periods you'd like to see used?  And are automobiles an improvement over carriages? <G>
 

135 thoughts on “Maggie Robinson and a Lady Unlaced!”

  1. I think it’s wonderful to set a romance at the turn of the century. The early 1900’s begins an era of change. And it’s a time that has been little utilized in the world of romance fiction.

    Reply
  2. I think it’s wonderful to set a romance at the turn of the century. The early 1900’s begins an era of change. And it’s a time that has been little utilized in the world of romance fiction.

    Reply
  3. I think it’s wonderful to set a romance at the turn of the century. The early 1900’s begins an era of change. And it’s a time that has been little utilized in the world of romance fiction.

    Reply
  4. I think it’s wonderful to set a romance at the turn of the century. The early 1900’s begins an era of change. And it’s a time that has been little utilized in the world of romance fiction.

    Reply
  5. I think it’s wonderful to set a romance at the turn of the century. The early 1900’s begins an era of change. And it’s a time that has been little utilized in the world of romance fiction.

    Reply
  6. I read and really enjoyed In the Arms of the Heiress, and already put the next one in the series on my wish list.
    The turn of the century was a really interesting time, as one can also see from the fiction written in that period. Unfortunately I keep wondering – not with this book, but with almost all others set in the early 1900s, what will become of the characters in the Great War. And let’s not forget the terrible flu that came around 1918. I knew people who actually served in WWI, so the period is not quite as “historic” as, say, the Regency period. Somehow the “happily ever after” is not quite so plausible in many books set in that time.

    Reply
  7. I read and really enjoyed In the Arms of the Heiress, and already put the next one in the series on my wish list.
    The turn of the century was a really interesting time, as one can also see from the fiction written in that period. Unfortunately I keep wondering – not with this book, but with almost all others set in the early 1900s, what will become of the characters in the Great War. And let’s not forget the terrible flu that came around 1918. I knew people who actually served in WWI, so the period is not quite as “historic” as, say, the Regency period. Somehow the “happily ever after” is not quite so plausible in many books set in that time.

    Reply
  8. I read and really enjoyed In the Arms of the Heiress, and already put the next one in the series on my wish list.
    The turn of the century was a really interesting time, as one can also see from the fiction written in that period. Unfortunately I keep wondering – not with this book, but with almost all others set in the early 1900s, what will become of the characters in the Great War. And let’s not forget the terrible flu that came around 1918. I knew people who actually served in WWI, so the period is not quite as “historic” as, say, the Regency period. Somehow the “happily ever after” is not quite so plausible in many books set in that time.

    Reply
  9. I read and really enjoyed In the Arms of the Heiress, and already put the next one in the series on my wish list.
    The turn of the century was a really interesting time, as one can also see from the fiction written in that period. Unfortunately I keep wondering – not with this book, but with almost all others set in the early 1900s, what will become of the characters in the Great War. And let’s not forget the terrible flu that came around 1918. I knew people who actually served in WWI, so the period is not quite as “historic” as, say, the Regency period. Somehow the “happily ever after” is not quite so plausible in many books set in that time.

    Reply
  10. I read and really enjoyed In the Arms of the Heiress, and already put the next one in the series on my wish list.
    The turn of the century was a really interesting time, as one can also see from the fiction written in that period. Unfortunately I keep wondering – not with this book, but with almost all others set in the early 1900s, what will become of the characters in the Great War. And let’s not forget the terrible flu that came around 1918. I knew people who actually served in WWI, so the period is not quite as “historic” as, say, the Regency period. Somehow the “happily ever after” is not quite so plausible in many books set in that time.

    Reply
  11. Good morning! I’m so happy to be here, as my Wench-worship is pretty well-documented.:)Thanks especially to Mary Jo!
    Maria, I know just what you mean. The foreshadowing of WWI is always in my mind, which is why I want to keep the series in the very early 1900s and create circumstances where my heroes and heroines don’t die later on–except in their beds of extreme old age surrounded by their numerous progeny! The artist I mentioned above? If he makes it to print, he’s only 28 in 1904. I decided in 10 years time he’d be working in the War Office drawing really gorgeous accurate maps. I’ve never felt the need before to wonder what my characters are doing in the future, and it’s a bit unsettling.
    Thanks, Cate! I hope to fill a gap. 🙂

    Reply
  12. Good morning! I’m so happy to be here, as my Wench-worship is pretty well-documented.:)Thanks especially to Mary Jo!
    Maria, I know just what you mean. The foreshadowing of WWI is always in my mind, which is why I want to keep the series in the very early 1900s and create circumstances where my heroes and heroines don’t die later on–except in their beds of extreme old age surrounded by their numerous progeny! The artist I mentioned above? If he makes it to print, he’s only 28 in 1904. I decided in 10 years time he’d be working in the War Office drawing really gorgeous accurate maps. I’ve never felt the need before to wonder what my characters are doing in the future, and it’s a bit unsettling.
    Thanks, Cate! I hope to fill a gap. 🙂

    Reply
  13. Good morning! I’m so happy to be here, as my Wench-worship is pretty well-documented.:)Thanks especially to Mary Jo!
    Maria, I know just what you mean. The foreshadowing of WWI is always in my mind, which is why I want to keep the series in the very early 1900s and create circumstances where my heroes and heroines don’t die later on–except in their beds of extreme old age surrounded by their numerous progeny! The artist I mentioned above? If he makes it to print, he’s only 28 in 1904. I decided in 10 years time he’d be working in the War Office drawing really gorgeous accurate maps. I’ve never felt the need before to wonder what my characters are doing in the future, and it’s a bit unsettling.
    Thanks, Cate! I hope to fill a gap. 🙂

    Reply
  14. Good morning! I’m so happy to be here, as my Wench-worship is pretty well-documented.:)Thanks especially to Mary Jo!
    Maria, I know just what you mean. The foreshadowing of WWI is always in my mind, which is why I want to keep the series in the very early 1900s and create circumstances where my heroes and heroines don’t die later on–except in their beds of extreme old age surrounded by their numerous progeny! The artist I mentioned above? If he makes it to print, he’s only 28 in 1904. I decided in 10 years time he’d be working in the War Office drawing really gorgeous accurate maps. I’ve never felt the need before to wonder what my characters are doing in the future, and it’s a bit unsettling.
    Thanks, Cate! I hope to fill a gap. 🙂

    Reply
  15. Good morning! I’m so happy to be here, as my Wench-worship is pretty well-documented.:)Thanks especially to Mary Jo!
    Maria, I know just what you mean. The foreshadowing of WWI is always in my mind, which is why I want to keep the series in the very early 1900s and create circumstances where my heroes and heroines don’t die later on–except in their beds of extreme old age surrounded by their numerous progeny! The artist I mentioned above? If he makes it to print, he’s only 28 in 1904. I decided in 10 years time he’d be working in the War Office drawing really gorgeous accurate maps. I’ve never felt the need before to wonder what my characters are doing in the future, and it’s a bit unsettling.
    Thanks, Cate! I hope to fill a gap. 🙂

    Reply
  16. Maggie, you know I loved In the Arms of the Heiress. I think it’s my favorite of your books, and that’s saying a lot since I’ve enjoyed them all. I’m eagerly awaiting the book of “Mrs. Evensong.”
    I’m a greedy reader. I want romances with carriages and romances with automobiles. 🙂 And I’m delighted to see historical romance edging into the 20th century. One of my top reads last year was Carrie Lofty’s WW II romance, His Very Own Girl.

    Reply
  17. Maggie, you know I loved In the Arms of the Heiress. I think it’s my favorite of your books, and that’s saying a lot since I’ve enjoyed them all. I’m eagerly awaiting the book of “Mrs. Evensong.”
    I’m a greedy reader. I want romances with carriages and romances with automobiles. 🙂 And I’m delighted to see historical romance edging into the 20th century. One of my top reads last year was Carrie Lofty’s WW II romance, His Very Own Girl.

    Reply
  18. Maggie, you know I loved In the Arms of the Heiress. I think it’s my favorite of your books, and that’s saying a lot since I’ve enjoyed them all. I’m eagerly awaiting the book of “Mrs. Evensong.”
    I’m a greedy reader. I want romances with carriages and romances with automobiles. 🙂 And I’m delighted to see historical romance edging into the 20th century. One of my top reads last year was Carrie Lofty’s WW II romance, His Very Own Girl.

    Reply
  19. Maggie, you know I loved In the Arms of the Heiress. I think it’s my favorite of your books, and that’s saying a lot since I’ve enjoyed them all. I’m eagerly awaiting the book of “Mrs. Evensong.”
    I’m a greedy reader. I want romances with carriages and romances with automobiles. 🙂 And I’m delighted to see historical romance edging into the 20th century. One of my top reads last year was Carrie Lofty’s WW II romance, His Very Own Girl.

    Reply
  20. Maggie, you know I loved In the Arms of the Heiress. I think it’s my favorite of your books, and that’s saying a lot since I’ve enjoyed them all. I’m eagerly awaiting the book of “Mrs. Evensong.”
    I’m a greedy reader. I want romances with carriages and romances with automobiles. 🙂 And I’m delighted to see historical romance edging into the 20th century. One of my top reads last year was Carrie Lofty’s WW II romance, His Very Own Girl.

    Reply
  21. I think this is a period in time that has not been used enough and I am looking forward to learning more about it! Thanks for writing…Dee

    Reply
  22. I think this is a period in time that has not been used enough and I am looking forward to learning more about it! Thanks for writing…Dee

    Reply
  23. I think this is a period in time that has not been used enough and I am looking forward to learning more about it! Thanks for writing…Dee

    Reply
  24. I think this is a period in time that has not been used enough and I am looking forward to learning more about it! Thanks for writing…Dee

    Reply
  25. I think this is a period in time that has not been used enough and I am looking forward to learning more about it! Thanks for writing…Dee

    Reply
  26. I think romances at the turn of the century would be interesting. I would love to see how all the new changes in the world affected new romances. I think I would find how men and women reacted to each other would make good romance.

    Reply
  27. I think romances at the turn of the century would be interesting. I would love to see how all the new changes in the world affected new romances. I think I would find how men and women reacted to each other would make good romance.

    Reply
  28. I think romances at the turn of the century would be interesting. I would love to see how all the new changes in the world affected new romances. I think I would find how men and women reacted to each other would make good romance.

    Reply
  29. I think romances at the turn of the century would be interesting. I would love to see how all the new changes in the world affected new romances. I think I would find how men and women reacted to each other would make good romance.

    Reply
  30. I think romances at the turn of the century would be interesting. I would love to see how all the new changes in the world affected new romances. I think I would find how men and women reacted to each other would make good romance.

    Reply
  31. I loved Maggie’s 1903 setting, but I admit that for books set in Britain, the closer the date gets to 1914, the warier I get. I’ve read too many of those ghastly WWI books with the endless, senseless slaughter. And in England, I’ve seen too many churchyard war memorials with long, horrifying lists of names of young men who died. The WWII lists are a lot shorter–and the war made more sense,
    But 1903 was just fine!

    Reply
  32. I loved Maggie’s 1903 setting, but I admit that for books set in Britain, the closer the date gets to 1914, the warier I get. I’ve read too many of those ghastly WWI books with the endless, senseless slaughter. And in England, I’ve seen too many churchyard war memorials with long, horrifying lists of names of young men who died. The WWII lists are a lot shorter–and the war made more sense,
    But 1903 was just fine!

    Reply
  33. I loved Maggie’s 1903 setting, but I admit that for books set in Britain, the closer the date gets to 1914, the warier I get. I’ve read too many of those ghastly WWI books with the endless, senseless slaughter. And in England, I’ve seen too many churchyard war memorials with long, horrifying lists of names of young men who died. The WWII lists are a lot shorter–and the war made more sense,
    But 1903 was just fine!

    Reply
  34. I loved Maggie’s 1903 setting, but I admit that for books set in Britain, the closer the date gets to 1914, the warier I get. I’ve read too many of those ghastly WWI books with the endless, senseless slaughter. And in England, I’ve seen too many churchyard war memorials with long, horrifying lists of names of young men who died. The WWII lists are a lot shorter–and the war made more sense,
    But 1903 was just fine!

    Reply
  35. I loved Maggie’s 1903 setting, but I admit that for books set in Britain, the closer the date gets to 1914, the warier I get. I’ve read too many of those ghastly WWI books with the endless, senseless slaughter. And in England, I’ve seen too many churchyard war memorials with long, horrifying lists of names of young men who died. The WWII lists are a lot shorter–and the war made more sense,
    But 1903 was just fine!

    Reply
  36. Thanks for hosting Maggie today, Mary Jo!
    Hi Maggie! I adored IN THE ARMS OF THE HEIRESS. Like Janga, it’s one of my favorites of your books. The early 1900’s is an era I enjoy which is why I’m so delighted to see you setting this particular series during those years. Can’t wait for IN THE HEART OF THE HIGHLANDER. I do ♥ those hot Scots! 😉

    Reply
  37. Thanks for hosting Maggie today, Mary Jo!
    Hi Maggie! I adored IN THE ARMS OF THE HEIRESS. Like Janga, it’s one of my favorites of your books. The early 1900’s is an era I enjoy which is why I’m so delighted to see you setting this particular series during those years. Can’t wait for IN THE HEART OF THE HIGHLANDER. I do ♥ those hot Scots! 😉

    Reply
  38. Thanks for hosting Maggie today, Mary Jo!
    Hi Maggie! I adored IN THE ARMS OF THE HEIRESS. Like Janga, it’s one of my favorites of your books. The early 1900’s is an era I enjoy which is why I’m so delighted to see you setting this particular series during those years. Can’t wait for IN THE HEART OF THE HIGHLANDER. I do ♥ those hot Scots! 😉

    Reply
  39. Thanks for hosting Maggie today, Mary Jo!
    Hi Maggie! I adored IN THE ARMS OF THE HEIRESS. Like Janga, it’s one of my favorites of your books. The early 1900’s is an era I enjoy which is why I’m so delighted to see you setting this particular series during those years. Can’t wait for IN THE HEART OF THE HIGHLANDER. I do ♥ those hot Scots! 😉

    Reply
  40. Thanks for hosting Maggie today, Mary Jo!
    Hi Maggie! I adored IN THE ARMS OF THE HEIRESS. Like Janga, it’s one of my favorites of your books. The early 1900’s is an era I enjoy which is why I’m so delighted to see you setting this particular series during those years. Can’t wait for IN THE HEART OF THE HIGHLANDER. I do ♥ those hot Scots! 😉

    Reply
  41. I am very interested in reading historical romances set in the early twentieth century. Fascinating to read about the modern times, the changes and that era is compelling and special.

    Reply
  42. I am very interested in reading historical romances set in the early twentieth century. Fascinating to read about the modern times, the changes and that era is compelling and special.

    Reply
  43. I am very interested in reading historical romances set in the early twentieth century. Fascinating to read about the modern times, the changes and that era is compelling and special.

    Reply
  44. I am very interested in reading historical romances set in the early twentieth century. Fascinating to read about the modern times, the changes and that era is compelling and special.

    Reply
  45. I am very interested in reading historical romances set in the early twentieth century. Fascinating to read about the modern times, the changes and that era is compelling and special.

    Reply
  46. Thanks for highlighting an author I’ve never read! I’m always looking for new reads. I’m definitely going to check Maggie’s books out.

    Reply
  47. Thanks for highlighting an author I’ve never read! I’m always looking for new reads. I’m definitely going to check Maggie’s books out.

    Reply
  48. Thanks for highlighting an author I’ve never read! I’m always looking for new reads. I’m definitely going to check Maggie’s books out.

    Reply
  49. Thanks for highlighting an author I’ve never read! I’m always looking for new reads. I’m definitely going to check Maggie’s books out.

    Reply
  50. Thanks for highlighting an author I’ve never read! I’m always looking for new reads. I’m definitely going to check Maggie’s books out.

    Reply
  51. Glad to see a era of change (and great clothes!) being explored, and skipping the dreary Victorians. I’ve been spending a lot of time in the decades between the wars lately and getting tired of it. WW1 casts a long shadow both before and after, but all wars do…even the Cold War. And believe me, the social war of the 6os and 70s still raises an ugly bump now and then.

    Reply
  52. Glad to see a era of change (and great clothes!) being explored, and skipping the dreary Victorians. I’ve been spending a lot of time in the decades between the wars lately and getting tired of it. WW1 casts a long shadow both before and after, but all wars do…even the Cold War. And believe me, the social war of the 6os and 70s still raises an ugly bump now and then.

    Reply
  53. Glad to see a era of change (and great clothes!) being explored, and skipping the dreary Victorians. I’ve been spending a lot of time in the decades between the wars lately and getting tired of it. WW1 casts a long shadow both before and after, but all wars do…even the Cold War. And believe me, the social war of the 6os and 70s still raises an ugly bump now and then.

    Reply
  54. Glad to see a era of change (and great clothes!) being explored, and skipping the dreary Victorians. I’ve been spending a lot of time in the decades between the wars lately and getting tired of it. WW1 casts a long shadow both before and after, but all wars do…even the Cold War. And believe me, the social war of the 6os and 70s still raises an ugly bump now and then.

    Reply
  55. Glad to see a era of change (and great clothes!) being explored, and skipping the dreary Victorians. I’ve been spending a lot of time in the decades between the wars lately and getting tired of it. WW1 casts a long shadow both before and after, but all wars do…even the Cold War. And believe me, the social war of the 6os and 70s still raises an ugly bump now and then.

    Reply
  56. Historical romance that continues into a new era appeals to me. More novels written during this period would be captivating.

    Reply
  57. Historical romance that continues into a new era appeals to me. More novels written during this period would be captivating.

    Reply
  58. Historical romance that continues into a new era appeals to me. More novels written during this period would be captivating.

    Reply
  59. Historical romance that continues into a new era appeals to me. More novels written during this period would be captivating.

    Reply
  60. Historical romance that continues into a new era appeals to me. More novels written during this period would be captivating.

    Reply
  61. Well I have to admit that riding in a horse driven carriage sounds a lot more romantic than driving around in a car.
    Don’t think I’ve read many in that time period but as long as it’s well written love story I’m all for it.

    Reply
  62. Well I have to admit that riding in a horse driven carriage sounds a lot more romantic than driving around in a car.
    Don’t think I’ve read many in that time period but as long as it’s well written love story I’m all for it.

    Reply
  63. Well I have to admit that riding in a horse driven carriage sounds a lot more romantic than driving around in a car.
    Don’t think I’ve read many in that time period but as long as it’s well written love story I’m all for it.

    Reply
  64. Well I have to admit that riding in a horse driven carriage sounds a lot more romantic than driving around in a car.
    Don’t think I’ve read many in that time period but as long as it’s well written love story I’m all for it.

    Reply
  65. Well I have to admit that riding in a horse driven carriage sounds a lot more romantic than driving around in a car.
    Don’t think I’ve read many in that time period but as long as it’s well written love story I’m all for it.

    Reply
  66. I love your books, Maggie! I wouldn’t mind reading historical books set in the early 1900’s, just as long as they aren’t during a war. There were so many changes during the turn of the century.

    Reply
  67. I love your books, Maggie! I wouldn’t mind reading historical books set in the early 1900’s, just as long as they aren’t during a war. There were so many changes during the turn of the century.

    Reply
  68. I love your books, Maggie! I wouldn’t mind reading historical books set in the early 1900’s, just as long as they aren’t during a war. There were so many changes during the turn of the century.

    Reply
  69. I love your books, Maggie! I wouldn’t mind reading historical books set in the early 1900’s, just as long as they aren’t during a war. There were so many changes during the turn of the century.

    Reply
  70. I love your books, Maggie! I wouldn’t mind reading historical books set in the early 1900’s, just as long as they aren’t during a war. There were so many changes during the turn of the century.

    Reply
  71. Thanks for all the kind comments! For inspiration, I have a fabulous picture of my grandmother and her sisters in their turn-of-the-century togs and topknots, plus several more with hats so big I wonder how they ever got out of the house.
    I was lucky enough to work in a local museum that showcased Charles Dana Gibson, who was a summer resident, and always wished I had enough hair to wear that celebrated up-do, LOL. Even my wedding outfit ( a puffy-sleeved lace blouse and skirt)was very Edwardian, come to think of it. So it’s been fun to discover a new era. 🙂

    Reply
  72. Thanks for all the kind comments! For inspiration, I have a fabulous picture of my grandmother and her sisters in their turn-of-the-century togs and topknots, plus several more with hats so big I wonder how they ever got out of the house.
    I was lucky enough to work in a local museum that showcased Charles Dana Gibson, who was a summer resident, and always wished I had enough hair to wear that celebrated up-do, LOL. Even my wedding outfit ( a puffy-sleeved lace blouse and skirt)was very Edwardian, come to think of it. So it’s been fun to discover a new era. 🙂

    Reply
  73. Thanks for all the kind comments! For inspiration, I have a fabulous picture of my grandmother and her sisters in their turn-of-the-century togs and topknots, plus several more with hats so big I wonder how they ever got out of the house.
    I was lucky enough to work in a local museum that showcased Charles Dana Gibson, who was a summer resident, and always wished I had enough hair to wear that celebrated up-do, LOL. Even my wedding outfit ( a puffy-sleeved lace blouse and skirt)was very Edwardian, come to think of it. So it’s been fun to discover a new era. 🙂

    Reply
  74. Thanks for all the kind comments! For inspiration, I have a fabulous picture of my grandmother and her sisters in their turn-of-the-century togs and topknots, plus several more with hats so big I wonder how they ever got out of the house.
    I was lucky enough to work in a local museum that showcased Charles Dana Gibson, who was a summer resident, and always wished I had enough hair to wear that celebrated up-do, LOL. Even my wedding outfit ( a puffy-sleeved lace blouse and skirt)was very Edwardian, come to think of it. So it’s been fun to discover a new era. 🙂

    Reply
  75. Thanks for all the kind comments! For inspiration, I have a fabulous picture of my grandmother and her sisters in their turn-of-the-century togs and topknots, plus several more with hats so big I wonder how they ever got out of the house.
    I was lucky enough to work in a local museum that showcased Charles Dana Gibson, who was a summer resident, and always wished I had enough hair to wear that celebrated up-do, LOL. Even my wedding outfit ( a puffy-sleeved lace blouse and skirt)was very Edwardian, come to think of it. So it’s been fun to discover a new era. 🙂

    Reply
  76. I”ll happily read romances of any period and the early 1900s should be fun with all the new inventions and more freedom for women. Which might lead to more, and different, conflict of traditional vs new.
    As this is getting closer to times I heard my mother talk about, I wonder at what point, for me, it will not be ‘historical’. This will be interesting, as I do not care for modern romances.

    Reply
  77. I”ll happily read romances of any period and the early 1900s should be fun with all the new inventions and more freedom for women. Which might lead to more, and different, conflict of traditional vs new.
    As this is getting closer to times I heard my mother talk about, I wonder at what point, for me, it will not be ‘historical’. This will be interesting, as I do not care for modern romances.

    Reply
  78. I”ll happily read romances of any period and the early 1900s should be fun with all the new inventions and more freedom for women. Which might lead to more, and different, conflict of traditional vs new.
    As this is getting closer to times I heard my mother talk about, I wonder at what point, for me, it will not be ‘historical’. This will be interesting, as I do not care for modern romances.

    Reply
  79. I”ll happily read romances of any period and the early 1900s should be fun with all the new inventions and more freedom for women. Which might lead to more, and different, conflict of traditional vs new.
    As this is getting closer to times I heard my mother talk about, I wonder at what point, for me, it will not be ‘historical’. This will be interesting, as I do not care for modern romances.

    Reply
  80. I”ll happily read romances of any period and the early 1900s should be fun with all the new inventions and more freedom for women. Which might lead to more, and different, conflict of traditional vs new.
    As this is getting closer to times I heard my mother talk about, I wonder at what point, for me, it will not be ‘historical’. This will be interesting, as I do not care for modern romances.

    Reply
  81. I love anything Maggie writes in ALL of her incarnations! Like many of the previous posters I don’t think I would enjoy reading anything later than the very early 1900’s. I work in a world of uncivil, poorly educated Philistines, frankly. I don’t want to go to that world when I read for pleasure. The years after around the first decade of the twentieth century begin the slow end of good manners, chivalry, gentility and the love of learning for the joy of it – or at least that is how I see it.
    I LOVED the excerpt! Who knew contemplating the demise of a faux husband could be so much fun! 🙂

    Reply
  82. I love anything Maggie writes in ALL of her incarnations! Like many of the previous posters I don’t think I would enjoy reading anything later than the very early 1900’s. I work in a world of uncivil, poorly educated Philistines, frankly. I don’t want to go to that world when I read for pleasure. The years after around the first decade of the twentieth century begin the slow end of good manners, chivalry, gentility and the love of learning for the joy of it – or at least that is how I see it.
    I LOVED the excerpt! Who knew contemplating the demise of a faux husband could be so much fun! 🙂

    Reply
  83. I love anything Maggie writes in ALL of her incarnations! Like many of the previous posters I don’t think I would enjoy reading anything later than the very early 1900’s. I work in a world of uncivil, poorly educated Philistines, frankly. I don’t want to go to that world when I read for pleasure. The years after around the first decade of the twentieth century begin the slow end of good manners, chivalry, gentility and the love of learning for the joy of it – or at least that is how I see it.
    I LOVED the excerpt! Who knew contemplating the demise of a faux husband could be so much fun! 🙂

    Reply
  84. I love anything Maggie writes in ALL of her incarnations! Like many of the previous posters I don’t think I would enjoy reading anything later than the very early 1900’s. I work in a world of uncivil, poorly educated Philistines, frankly. I don’t want to go to that world when I read for pleasure. The years after around the first decade of the twentieth century begin the slow end of good manners, chivalry, gentility and the love of learning for the joy of it – or at least that is how I see it.
    I LOVED the excerpt! Who knew contemplating the demise of a faux husband could be so much fun! 🙂

    Reply
  85. I love anything Maggie writes in ALL of her incarnations! Like many of the previous posters I don’t think I would enjoy reading anything later than the very early 1900’s. I work in a world of uncivil, poorly educated Philistines, frankly. I don’t want to go to that world when I read for pleasure. The years after around the first decade of the twentieth century begin the slow end of good manners, chivalry, gentility and the love of learning for the joy of it – or at least that is how I see it.
    I LOVED the excerpt! Who knew contemplating the demise of a faux husband could be so much fun! 🙂

    Reply
  86. Well bless you! After a tough Monday at work (I work for the devil who wears Prada), reading the excerpt from In the Arms of the Heiress was just what I needed! I love your wit and now can’t wait to read the book.
    I think you’ve picked an interesting time period and I look forward to exploring it with you.

    Reply
  87. Well bless you! After a tough Monday at work (I work for the devil who wears Prada), reading the excerpt from In the Arms of the Heiress was just what I needed! I love your wit and now can’t wait to read the book.
    I think you’ve picked an interesting time period and I look forward to exploring it with you.

    Reply
  88. Well bless you! After a tough Monday at work (I work for the devil who wears Prada), reading the excerpt from In the Arms of the Heiress was just what I needed! I love your wit and now can’t wait to read the book.
    I think you’ve picked an interesting time period and I look forward to exploring it with you.

    Reply
  89. Well bless you! After a tough Monday at work (I work for the devil who wears Prada), reading the excerpt from In the Arms of the Heiress was just what I needed! I love your wit and now can’t wait to read the book.
    I think you’ve picked an interesting time period and I look forward to exploring it with you.

    Reply
  90. Well bless you! After a tough Monday at work (I work for the devil who wears Prada), reading the excerpt from In the Arms of the Heiress was just what I needed! I love your wit and now can’t wait to read the book.
    I think you’ve picked an interesting time period and I look forward to exploring it with you.

    Reply
  91. Donna–how nice that Maggie’s excerpt cured you of the devil wearing Prada! I don’t think you or anyone else will be disappointed when reading the whole book. There’s a lot of smart humor and freshness. I really hope this turns into a long running series!

    Reply
  92. Donna–how nice that Maggie’s excerpt cured you of the devil wearing Prada! I don’t think you or anyone else will be disappointed when reading the whole book. There’s a lot of smart humor and freshness. I really hope this turns into a long running series!

    Reply
  93. Donna–how nice that Maggie’s excerpt cured you of the devil wearing Prada! I don’t think you or anyone else will be disappointed when reading the whole book. There’s a lot of smart humor and freshness. I really hope this turns into a long running series!

    Reply
  94. Donna–how nice that Maggie’s excerpt cured you of the devil wearing Prada! I don’t think you or anyone else will be disappointed when reading the whole book. There’s a lot of smart humor and freshness. I really hope this turns into a long running series!

    Reply
  95. Donna–how nice that Maggie’s excerpt cured you of the devil wearing Prada! I don’t think you or anyone else will be disappointed when reading the whole book. There’s a lot of smart humor and freshness. I really hope this turns into a long running series!

    Reply
  96. Sherrie here. Hi, Maggie. Humor is hard to write if you don’t have that natural funny bone, and it’s obvious you have it! Your excerpt was written with a deft and restrained hand. In such a short snippet we have a very clear picture of both Louisa and her maid, Kathleen.
    I’m happy to see more romances branching out into other eras such as yours. I immediately perked up when I saw your book took place in 1903, because it’s an age that’s been largely ignored by romance authors. I’m not too worried about stories that lapse over into difficult times, such as WWI or the great flu pandemic. To me, it’s all part of history, and I like when an author brings historical aspects into her story. (I often learn something, too!) It would be unrealistic for an author to ignore history, and I must trust that most romance authors would keep the focus on the romance and not burden the reader with historical minutia to the detriment of the story.
    In the last few years I’ve seen more and more books that take place in the Gay 90s, the Edwardian, the Roaring Twenties, and even WWII eras. Each era had its own fascinating history (history I ho-hummed over in school), so it’s nice to revisit those eras with a more mature outlook. *g*

    Reply
  97. Sherrie here. Hi, Maggie. Humor is hard to write if you don’t have that natural funny bone, and it’s obvious you have it! Your excerpt was written with a deft and restrained hand. In such a short snippet we have a very clear picture of both Louisa and her maid, Kathleen.
    I’m happy to see more romances branching out into other eras such as yours. I immediately perked up when I saw your book took place in 1903, because it’s an age that’s been largely ignored by romance authors. I’m not too worried about stories that lapse over into difficult times, such as WWI or the great flu pandemic. To me, it’s all part of history, and I like when an author brings historical aspects into her story. (I often learn something, too!) It would be unrealistic for an author to ignore history, and I must trust that most romance authors would keep the focus on the romance and not burden the reader with historical minutia to the detriment of the story.
    In the last few years I’ve seen more and more books that take place in the Gay 90s, the Edwardian, the Roaring Twenties, and even WWII eras. Each era had its own fascinating history (history I ho-hummed over in school), so it’s nice to revisit those eras with a more mature outlook. *g*

    Reply
  98. Sherrie here. Hi, Maggie. Humor is hard to write if you don’t have that natural funny bone, and it’s obvious you have it! Your excerpt was written with a deft and restrained hand. In such a short snippet we have a very clear picture of both Louisa and her maid, Kathleen.
    I’m happy to see more romances branching out into other eras such as yours. I immediately perked up when I saw your book took place in 1903, because it’s an age that’s been largely ignored by romance authors. I’m not too worried about stories that lapse over into difficult times, such as WWI or the great flu pandemic. To me, it’s all part of history, and I like when an author brings historical aspects into her story. (I often learn something, too!) It would be unrealistic for an author to ignore history, and I must trust that most romance authors would keep the focus on the romance and not burden the reader with historical minutia to the detriment of the story.
    In the last few years I’ve seen more and more books that take place in the Gay 90s, the Edwardian, the Roaring Twenties, and even WWII eras. Each era had its own fascinating history (history I ho-hummed over in school), so it’s nice to revisit those eras with a more mature outlook. *g*

    Reply
  99. Sherrie here. Hi, Maggie. Humor is hard to write if you don’t have that natural funny bone, and it’s obvious you have it! Your excerpt was written with a deft and restrained hand. In such a short snippet we have a very clear picture of both Louisa and her maid, Kathleen.
    I’m happy to see more romances branching out into other eras such as yours. I immediately perked up when I saw your book took place in 1903, because it’s an age that’s been largely ignored by romance authors. I’m not too worried about stories that lapse over into difficult times, such as WWI or the great flu pandemic. To me, it’s all part of history, and I like when an author brings historical aspects into her story. (I often learn something, too!) It would be unrealistic for an author to ignore history, and I must trust that most romance authors would keep the focus on the romance and not burden the reader with historical minutia to the detriment of the story.
    In the last few years I’ve seen more and more books that take place in the Gay 90s, the Edwardian, the Roaring Twenties, and even WWII eras. Each era had its own fascinating history (history I ho-hummed over in school), so it’s nice to revisit those eras with a more mature outlook. *g*

    Reply
  100. Sherrie here. Hi, Maggie. Humor is hard to write if you don’t have that natural funny bone, and it’s obvious you have it! Your excerpt was written with a deft and restrained hand. In such a short snippet we have a very clear picture of both Louisa and her maid, Kathleen.
    I’m happy to see more romances branching out into other eras such as yours. I immediately perked up when I saw your book took place in 1903, because it’s an age that’s been largely ignored by romance authors. I’m not too worried about stories that lapse over into difficult times, such as WWI or the great flu pandemic. To me, it’s all part of history, and I like when an author brings historical aspects into her story. (I often learn something, too!) It would be unrealistic for an author to ignore history, and I must trust that most romance authors would keep the focus on the romance and not burden the reader with historical minutia to the detriment of the story.
    In the last few years I’ve seen more and more books that take place in the Gay 90s, the Edwardian, the Roaring Twenties, and even WWII eras. Each era had its own fascinating history (history I ho-hummed over in school), so it’s nice to revisit those eras with a more mature outlook. *g*

    Reply
  101. I agree with Sherrie. I think most of us love the mysteries set in the first half of the 20th century in England, like Dorothy Sayers, Patricia Wentworth, etc., so WWI and even the foreshadowing of WWII in the 1930’s doesn’t put me off at all.

    Reply
  102. I agree with Sherrie. I think most of us love the mysteries set in the first half of the 20th century in England, like Dorothy Sayers, Patricia Wentworth, etc., so WWI and even the foreshadowing of WWII in the 1930’s doesn’t put me off at all.

    Reply
  103. I agree with Sherrie. I think most of us love the mysteries set in the first half of the 20th century in England, like Dorothy Sayers, Patricia Wentworth, etc., so WWI and even the foreshadowing of WWII in the 1930’s doesn’t put me off at all.

    Reply
  104. I agree with Sherrie. I think most of us love the mysteries set in the first half of the 20th century in England, like Dorothy Sayers, Patricia Wentworth, etc., so WWI and even the foreshadowing of WWII in the 1930’s doesn’t put me off at all.

    Reply
  105. I agree with Sherrie. I think most of us love the mysteries set in the first half of the 20th century in England, like Dorothy Sayers, Patricia Wentworth, etc., so WWI and even the foreshadowing of WWII in the 1930’s doesn’t put me off at all.

    Reply
  106. We tend to think “historical” as being 18th century, but in reality 19th century is as well. We are in the 21st century after all. The only thing is the clothing. The Regency and Victorian clothes, especially for women, were flamboyant, colourful, textural etc. but 1900 onwards the womens’ clothing tended to be dull – lots of brown, grey, navy, and the mens’ was also dull. But then today will be historical in 100 years time, so it is all relative.

    Reply
  107. We tend to think “historical” as being 18th century, but in reality 19th century is as well. We are in the 21st century after all. The only thing is the clothing. The Regency and Victorian clothes, especially for women, were flamboyant, colourful, textural etc. but 1900 onwards the womens’ clothing tended to be dull – lots of brown, grey, navy, and the mens’ was also dull. But then today will be historical in 100 years time, so it is all relative.

    Reply
  108. We tend to think “historical” as being 18th century, but in reality 19th century is as well. We are in the 21st century after all. The only thing is the clothing. The Regency and Victorian clothes, especially for women, were flamboyant, colourful, textural etc. but 1900 onwards the womens’ clothing tended to be dull – lots of brown, grey, navy, and the mens’ was also dull. But then today will be historical in 100 years time, so it is all relative.

    Reply
  109. We tend to think “historical” as being 18th century, but in reality 19th century is as well. We are in the 21st century after all. The only thing is the clothing. The Regency and Victorian clothes, especially for women, were flamboyant, colourful, textural etc. but 1900 onwards the womens’ clothing tended to be dull – lots of brown, grey, navy, and the mens’ was also dull. But then today will be historical in 100 years time, so it is all relative.

    Reply
  110. We tend to think “historical” as being 18th century, but in reality 19th century is as well. We are in the 21st century after all. The only thing is the clothing. The Regency and Victorian clothes, especially for women, were flamboyant, colourful, textural etc. but 1900 onwards the womens’ clothing tended to be dull – lots of brown, grey, navy, and the mens’ was also dull. But then today will be historical in 100 years time, so it is all relative.

    Reply
  111. Jenny–
    One can only imagine what the fashion historians will say a century from now. They’ll probably agree that the tribal wear of our time period is jeans. *G* And athletic shoes are our footwear!

    Reply
  112. Jenny–
    One can only imagine what the fashion historians will say a century from now. They’ll probably agree that the tribal wear of our time period is jeans. *G* And athletic shoes are our footwear!

    Reply
  113. Jenny–
    One can only imagine what the fashion historians will say a century from now. They’ll probably agree that the tribal wear of our time period is jeans. *G* And athletic shoes are our footwear!

    Reply
  114. Jenny–
    One can only imagine what the fashion historians will say a century from now. They’ll probably agree that the tribal wear of our time period is jeans. *G* And athletic shoes are our footwear!

    Reply
  115. Jenny–
    One can only imagine what the fashion historians will say a century from now. They’ll probably agree that the tribal wear of our time period is jeans. *G* And athletic shoes are our footwear!

    Reply
  116. I was a fan of the television series A Horseman Riding By and Flambards in the late ’70s and ’80s (and the books they were based on), so I’m excited about reading more books set in the early 20th century. Though both of these series took the stories into and through WWI. I definitely want to read In the Arms of the Heiresss, Maggie! Thanks for visiting the Wenches!

    Reply
  117. I was a fan of the television series A Horseman Riding By and Flambards in the late ’70s and ’80s (and the books they were based on), so I’m excited about reading more books set in the early 20th century. Though both of these series took the stories into and through WWI. I definitely want to read In the Arms of the Heiresss, Maggie! Thanks for visiting the Wenches!

    Reply
  118. I was a fan of the television series A Horseman Riding By and Flambards in the late ’70s and ’80s (and the books they were based on), so I’m excited about reading more books set in the early 20th century. Though both of these series took the stories into and through WWI. I definitely want to read In the Arms of the Heiresss, Maggie! Thanks for visiting the Wenches!

    Reply
  119. I was a fan of the television series A Horseman Riding By and Flambards in the late ’70s and ’80s (and the books they were based on), so I’m excited about reading more books set in the early 20th century. Though both of these series took the stories into and through WWI. I definitely want to read In the Arms of the Heiresss, Maggie! Thanks for visiting the Wenches!

    Reply
  120. I was a fan of the television series A Horseman Riding By and Flambards in the late ’70s and ’80s (and the books they were based on), so I’m excited about reading more books set in the early 20th century. Though both of these series took the stories into and through WWI. I definitely want to read In the Arms of the Heiresss, Maggie! Thanks for visiting the Wenches!

    Reply
  121. Coming in late here, and waving to Mary Jo and Maggie from Western Australia, where I’ve been at the Aussie romance conference.
    So thrilled with your career, Maggie. Congratulations. Can’t wait to read this one.

    Reply
  122. Coming in late here, and waving to Mary Jo and Maggie from Western Australia, where I’ve been at the Aussie romance conference.
    So thrilled with your career, Maggie. Congratulations. Can’t wait to read this one.

    Reply
  123. Coming in late here, and waving to Mary Jo and Maggie from Western Australia, where I’ve been at the Aussie romance conference.
    So thrilled with your career, Maggie. Congratulations. Can’t wait to read this one.

    Reply
  124. Coming in late here, and waving to Mary Jo and Maggie from Western Australia, where I’ve been at the Aussie romance conference.
    So thrilled with your career, Maggie. Congratulations. Can’t wait to read this one.

    Reply
  125. Coming in late here, and waving to Mary Jo and Maggie from Western Australia, where I’ve been at the Aussie romance conference.
    So thrilled with your career, Maggie. Congratulations. Can’t wait to read this one.

    Reply

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