Lucky Charms

Stgeorge_dijon_12th_century  April 23rd is Saint George’s Day in England ~~ so Happy St. George’s Day! 

Well, so the day isn’t celebrated with quite the exuberance of St. Patrick’s Day in Ireland and America, but still it must bring good luck for the English. St George has long been regarded as the patron saint and spiritual protector of England, winning out over native English saints like Edward the Confessor–who was quite a hair-shirt-watered-wine dullard of a king, not one to inspire good luck or protection. St. George first caught the imagination and loyalty of the English during the Crusades, when he was said to appear in the clouds above crusading troops during the Battle of Antioch, protecting them against the Saracen army. Edward III declared St. George the patron saint of England when he established the Order of the Garter in the 14th century…and after the Battle of Agincourt, when the cry “For God, King Harry and Saint George!” inspired the English troops to another victory, St. George’s reputation for special protection increased.

Dragon_medieval_manuscript_2 And there was that dragon…though that’s not my point today. I posted a St George and the Dragon blog in March, which for the curious is available in our Word Wenches Archives, along the right-hand bar.

Chivalry_dicksee As a model of chivalry and knighthood, St. George was a revered, if mostly fictional, hero during the Medieval and Renaissance eras in England and elsewhere. As the supreme and original Chivalric Guy, saving a damsel from a dragon (and in some versions allowing her to lead that dragon away on a leash, while in another version marrying the princess, and in a lesser known version, getting her pregnant first, then marrying her), St. George is the original chivalric archetype for a wide range of historical romance heroes from early medieval through nineteenth century. Chivalry was alive and well for centuries beyond the days of armor and jousts…and it’s still alive now, let’s give credit where credit is due.

Donatello_st_george So it seems to me that St. George’s Day should be a holiday for historical romance writers too. He could be our patron saint as well–just imagine that hero of all Heroes appearing in the clouds above a romance writer’s conference, inspiring us and spurring us on to victory at the awards ceremonies…or privately appearing in a vision as a writer takes yet another walk or a pass digging in the garden as she tries to work out a plot and the character development of a hero in her head….maybe we should all fly the red-cross banner above our desks or as decals on our computers to bring us luck and give us protection and inspiration as we head out into the mad fray of writing, creativity, publishers, reviewers, and market competition. It would be great to have that sort of divine protection and intercession!

Which brings me to my final point: most of us like a little extra luck, some protective and inspirational items that we keep nearby as we work. Maybe not a statue of St. George and the dragon…but something. What do you keep on your desk or in your workspace that you feel brings you luck and gives you a sense of protection and inspiration?

I have a few things on my desk and in my office that I like having around, and I like to think they bring me luck.  For example, on my desk and around my office I have:

Angeli_laudantes ~ an angel on the desk, and a few others on bookshelves (okay and all around my house, I’ve collected angels for many years, and now I have so many that I have to pack them away and rotate on a regular basis)

~a postcard of St George & the Dragon on the bulletin board

~a few historical Barbies (very inspiring)

~a couple of little quotes taped to the monitor (including “We can do no great things, only small things with great love.” –Mother Teresa)

Triskelion ~a triple spiral, the Celtic good luck symbol associated with Brighid, the goddess of creativity

~and a basket to one side of the desk where I toss everything that gets in my way and distracts me (I figure it’s good luck if I can find anything in there at all)…

Do you keep good luck charms around you for protection, inspiration, or any other reason?
What do you always keep on your desk or with you when you’re working, writing, reading?

And does anything particularly help? I could sure use some good luck!  😉

Susan Sarah

44 thoughts on “Lucky Charms”

  1. Good Morning, Wench Susan/Sarah!
    Thank you on the info about St George. Very informative.
    I’m not one for “Good Luck” but I do have a few objects that bring me strength via the attached memory. The first is a hand made card my daughter handed me on a day I was particularly down about my writing. The verse read “Mom you’re a writer and you can’t change that.” I cut it out and taped it to my laptop as a reminder to never give up on who I am and who she believes me to be.
    Another item is a gift I received from an author friend who posts here regularly. When sitting in my writing chair, the item, wrapped in a burgundy bow, is in my field of vision, a reminder of the serendipitous way she walked into my life and how she seems to be standing at every fork in the road, pointing the way.
    Nina, thankful for the support of friends and family

    Reply
  2. Good Morning, Wench Susan/Sarah!
    Thank you on the info about St George. Very informative.
    I’m not one for “Good Luck” but I do have a few objects that bring me strength via the attached memory. The first is a hand made card my daughter handed me on a day I was particularly down about my writing. The verse read “Mom you’re a writer and you can’t change that.” I cut it out and taped it to my laptop as a reminder to never give up on who I am and who she believes me to be.
    Another item is a gift I received from an author friend who posts here regularly. When sitting in my writing chair, the item, wrapped in a burgundy bow, is in my field of vision, a reminder of the serendipitous way she walked into my life and how she seems to be standing at every fork in the road, pointing the way.
    Nina, thankful for the support of friends and family

    Reply
  3. Good Morning, Wench Susan/Sarah!
    Thank you on the info about St George. Very informative.
    I’m not one for “Good Luck” but I do have a few objects that bring me strength via the attached memory. The first is a hand made card my daughter handed me on a day I was particularly down about my writing. The verse read “Mom you’re a writer and you can’t change that.” I cut it out and taped it to my laptop as a reminder to never give up on who I am and who she believes me to be.
    Another item is a gift I received from an author friend who posts here regularly. When sitting in my writing chair, the item, wrapped in a burgundy bow, is in my field of vision, a reminder of the serendipitous way she walked into my life and how she seems to be standing at every fork in the road, pointing the way.
    Nina, thankful for the support of friends and family

    Reply
  4. Good Morning, Wench Susan/Sarah!
    Thank you on the info about St George. Very informative.
    I’m not one for “Good Luck” but I do have a few objects that bring me strength via the attached memory. The first is a hand made card my daughter handed me on a day I was particularly down about my writing. The verse read “Mom you’re a writer and you can’t change that.” I cut it out and taped it to my laptop as a reminder to never give up on who I am and who she believes me to be.
    Another item is a gift I received from an author friend who posts here regularly. When sitting in my writing chair, the item, wrapped in a burgundy bow, is in my field of vision, a reminder of the serendipitous way she walked into my life and how she seems to be standing at every fork in the road, pointing the way.
    Nina, thankful for the support of friends and family

    Reply
  5. My talisman is a gift my husband gave me for my birthday last yeat. It’s a sort of campaign commemorative coin that, if my understanding is correct, that would’ve been given to veterans of the Peninsular War. (My brother the lieutenant colonel was very impressed by it, because they give out such things for modern wars/campaigns, but he hadn’t realized they went back so far.) On one side there’s a profile of Wellington and a Latin inscription that translates as “Wellington liberated Spain and Portugal,” and on the reverse there’s a list of major battles and dates. I don’t keep it on my desk, but I’m thinking of either having it framed so I can do so or set in a pendant so I can wear it.
    It’s a talisman because of who gave it to me, because I’d just finished a manuscript set in the Peninsular War with a rifleman hero, and because at the time we were going through some issues with our daughter’s development (now happily resolved) that made me wonder if I should give up writing to devote more time and attention to her. The coin was my husband’s way of saying “don’t you DARE give up your dream.”

    Reply
  6. My talisman is a gift my husband gave me for my birthday last yeat. It’s a sort of campaign commemorative coin that, if my understanding is correct, that would’ve been given to veterans of the Peninsular War. (My brother the lieutenant colonel was very impressed by it, because they give out such things for modern wars/campaigns, but he hadn’t realized they went back so far.) On one side there’s a profile of Wellington and a Latin inscription that translates as “Wellington liberated Spain and Portugal,” and on the reverse there’s a list of major battles and dates. I don’t keep it on my desk, but I’m thinking of either having it framed so I can do so or set in a pendant so I can wear it.
    It’s a talisman because of who gave it to me, because I’d just finished a manuscript set in the Peninsular War with a rifleman hero, and because at the time we were going through some issues with our daughter’s development (now happily resolved) that made me wonder if I should give up writing to devote more time and attention to her. The coin was my husband’s way of saying “don’t you DARE give up your dream.”

    Reply
  7. My talisman is a gift my husband gave me for my birthday last yeat. It’s a sort of campaign commemorative coin that, if my understanding is correct, that would’ve been given to veterans of the Peninsular War. (My brother the lieutenant colonel was very impressed by it, because they give out such things for modern wars/campaigns, but he hadn’t realized they went back so far.) On one side there’s a profile of Wellington and a Latin inscription that translates as “Wellington liberated Spain and Portugal,” and on the reverse there’s a list of major battles and dates. I don’t keep it on my desk, but I’m thinking of either having it framed so I can do so or set in a pendant so I can wear it.
    It’s a talisman because of who gave it to me, because I’d just finished a manuscript set in the Peninsular War with a rifleman hero, and because at the time we were going through some issues with our daughter’s development (now happily resolved) that made me wonder if I should give up writing to devote more time and attention to her. The coin was my husband’s way of saying “don’t you DARE give up your dream.”

    Reply
  8. My talisman is a gift my husband gave me for my birthday last yeat. It’s a sort of campaign commemorative coin that, if my understanding is correct, that would’ve been given to veterans of the Peninsular War. (My brother the lieutenant colonel was very impressed by it, because they give out such things for modern wars/campaigns, but he hadn’t realized they went back so far.) On one side there’s a profile of Wellington and a Latin inscription that translates as “Wellington liberated Spain and Portugal,” and on the reverse there’s a list of major battles and dates. I don’t keep it on my desk, but I’m thinking of either having it framed so I can do so or set in a pendant so I can wear it.
    It’s a talisman because of who gave it to me, because I’d just finished a manuscript set in the Peninsular War with a rifleman hero, and because at the time we were going through some issues with our daughter’s development (now happily resolved) that made me wonder if I should give up writing to devote more time and attention to her. The coin was my husband’s way of saying “don’t you DARE give up your dream.”

    Reply
  9. Ooh, thank you for this. . . I saw in an email group someone said Happy St. George’s Day, I thought, huh? LOL But I already forgot to look it up. 🙂
    Good luck huh. . . well, I guess I could count my Kitty, who’s snoozing over here. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  10. Ooh, thank you for this. . . I saw in an email group someone said Happy St. George’s Day, I thought, huh? LOL But I already forgot to look it up. 🙂
    Good luck huh. . . well, I guess I could count my Kitty, who’s snoozing over here. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  11. Ooh, thank you for this. . . I saw in an email group someone said Happy St. George’s Day, I thought, huh? LOL But I already forgot to look it up. 🙂
    Good luck huh. . . well, I guess I could count my Kitty, who’s snoozing over here. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  12. Ooh, thank you for this. . . I saw in an email group someone said Happy St. George’s Day, I thought, huh? LOL But I already forgot to look it up. 🙂
    Good luck huh. . . well, I guess I could count my Kitty, who’s snoozing over here. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  13. Yes. I have a crowd of hedgehogs and Celtic crosses and reproductions of misericords of strange monks, faces and creatures from some of the Cathedrals I’ve sung in….
    I’m sure there is some weird psychological reason for thinking these are ‘lucky’….perhaps the memories just connect me to the less-used, less-rational side of my brain….
    I love your ‘Brighid’ Celtic good luck charm… such a graceful design. (I’ll be looking for some earrings in that design, I think).

    Reply
  14. Yes. I have a crowd of hedgehogs and Celtic crosses and reproductions of misericords of strange monks, faces and creatures from some of the Cathedrals I’ve sung in….
    I’m sure there is some weird psychological reason for thinking these are ‘lucky’….perhaps the memories just connect me to the less-used, less-rational side of my brain….
    I love your ‘Brighid’ Celtic good luck charm… such a graceful design. (I’ll be looking for some earrings in that design, I think).

    Reply
  15. Yes. I have a crowd of hedgehogs and Celtic crosses and reproductions of misericords of strange monks, faces and creatures from some of the Cathedrals I’ve sung in….
    I’m sure there is some weird psychological reason for thinking these are ‘lucky’….perhaps the memories just connect me to the less-used, less-rational side of my brain….
    I love your ‘Brighid’ Celtic good luck charm… such a graceful design. (I’ll be looking for some earrings in that design, I think).

    Reply
  16. Yes. I have a crowd of hedgehogs and Celtic crosses and reproductions of misericords of strange monks, faces and creatures from some of the Cathedrals I’ve sung in….
    I’m sure there is some weird psychological reason for thinking these are ‘lucky’….perhaps the memories just connect me to the less-used, less-rational side of my brain….
    I love your ‘Brighid’ Celtic good luck charm… such a graceful design. (I’ll be looking for some earrings in that design, I think).

    Reply
  17. Greetings, wenches and wench watchers:
    I was in England listening to the radio last week, and the host of the show was making a big song and dance about how Britain doesn’t give St. George’s Day the same kind of attention that the Irish give St. Paddy’s Day. He was earnestly urging people to rush out and buy bunting and flags and make a general hoopla.
    In the National Gallery a few days later I saw a picture of St. Geo. killing the dragon, and a very strange dragon it was. It had an almost human face, with glowing red eyes that exactly matched its nipples! Maybe there’s a hint there about what St. George was really killing? (There was no maiden in the picture; another clue, perhaps.)
    As for good luck charms… I guess I’d have to say mine are the tools of the trade. They come and go, of course, as tools tend to do, but there probably hasn’t been a time since I was about 9 that I haven’t had a favorite pen or pencil which I clutch with superstitious fervor. Once I’ve got the instrument in hand, there’s really nothing to do but write, is there?

    Reply
  18. Greetings, wenches and wench watchers:
    I was in England listening to the radio last week, and the host of the show was making a big song and dance about how Britain doesn’t give St. George’s Day the same kind of attention that the Irish give St. Paddy’s Day. He was earnestly urging people to rush out and buy bunting and flags and make a general hoopla.
    In the National Gallery a few days later I saw a picture of St. Geo. killing the dragon, and a very strange dragon it was. It had an almost human face, with glowing red eyes that exactly matched its nipples! Maybe there’s a hint there about what St. George was really killing? (There was no maiden in the picture; another clue, perhaps.)
    As for good luck charms… I guess I’d have to say mine are the tools of the trade. They come and go, of course, as tools tend to do, but there probably hasn’t been a time since I was about 9 that I haven’t had a favorite pen or pencil which I clutch with superstitious fervor. Once I’ve got the instrument in hand, there’s really nothing to do but write, is there?

    Reply
  19. Greetings, wenches and wench watchers:
    I was in England listening to the radio last week, and the host of the show was making a big song and dance about how Britain doesn’t give St. George’s Day the same kind of attention that the Irish give St. Paddy’s Day. He was earnestly urging people to rush out and buy bunting and flags and make a general hoopla.
    In the National Gallery a few days later I saw a picture of St. Geo. killing the dragon, and a very strange dragon it was. It had an almost human face, with glowing red eyes that exactly matched its nipples! Maybe there’s a hint there about what St. George was really killing? (There was no maiden in the picture; another clue, perhaps.)
    As for good luck charms… I guess I’d have to say mine are the tools of the trade. They come and go, of course, as tools tend to do, but there probably hasn’t been a time since I was about 9 that I haven’t had a favorite pen or pencil which I clutch with superstitious fervor. Once I’ve got the instrument in hand, there’s really nothing to do but write, is there?

    Reply
  20. Greetings, wenches and wench watchers:
    I was in England listening to the radio last week, and the host of the show was making a big song and dance about how Britain doesn’t give St. George’s Day the same kind of attention that the Irish give St. Paddy’s Day. He was earnestly urging people to rush out and buy bunting and flags and make a general hoopla.
    In the National Gallery a few days later I saw a picture of St. Geo. killing the dragon, and a very strange dragon it was. It had an almost human face, with glowing red eyes that exactly matched its nipples! Maybe there’s a hint there about what St. George was really killing? (There was no maiden in the picture; another clue, perhaps.)
    As for good luck charms… I guess I’d have to say mine are the tools of the trade. They come and go, of course, as tools tend to do, but there probably hasn’t been a time since I was about 9 that I haven’t had a favorite pen or pencil which I clutch with superstitious fervor. Once I’ve got the instrument in hand, there’s really nothing to do but write, is there?

    Reply
  21. What a great topic, Susan Sarah. I’m vitally interested in what people have on their desk, because it is a glimpse into the real person.
    I can’t stand clutter, so all my things are arranged artfully on my desk, but there are a LOT of those things. My desk is huge, meaning I have a lot of room. My friends say it should have its own zip code.
    I’m not into “lucky” things, but am very much influenced by aesthetics. My office and desk are a haven of beautiful things, and there isn’t enough room in this comment to list them all. So I’ll pick some things at random (with apologies for the length of this list!).
    On my desk:
    –wooden pencil cup with a quote from H.G. Wells: “No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else’s draft.” (I am, after all, a freelance editor!)
    –a desk fountain composed of pretty rocks I’ve collected over the years
    –basket filled with dried hydrangeas
    –artsy pottery bowl filled with unusual scented balls made of rolled up string, large seed pods, wicker, etc., all in shades of purple, maroon, and rose. Divine scent
    –a funky folk art carved wooden cat that makes me smile every time I look at it because it’s so whimsical
    –an intricately painted round ceramic ball
    –a neon orange 6″ ruler that says, “Some day everything will work this well.” I love the simplicity of the ruler and the statement
    –a yellow flashlight with black leopard spots. Besides being outrageously cute, I don’t have to stumble around in the dark looking for a flashlight when the power goes out (a frequent occurrence out here in the boonies)
    –a pepper mill because I love the smell of black pepper
    –a small green wind-up plastic godzilla that shoots friction sparks out of its mouth as it walks across the desk
    –formerly boring tape dispenser and two staplers that I spray painted in 2 colors to match the decor of the room
    –stereo and speakers
    –ibuprofen because sitting all day at a computer hurts my back
    –numerous hernia-inducing dictionaries
    –a squirt bottle with an awesome distance range, set on “stream” (not spray) so I can nail the dog or cats without getting out of my chair when they misbehave. Diabolically funny when I sneak a squirt at them when they aren’t looking
    –ceramic Tang Dynasty horse–in blue! (a blue horse!)
    –clear glass bowl filled with clear irridescent marbles
    –statuette of Bastet, the Egyptian cat goddess
    –small white bowl filled with irridescent Paua shell fragments (haliotis iris)
    –dried wheat-like grass tied in a small bunch with a pink ribbon
    –bouquet of rhododendrons, some pink, some purple
    Computer:
    –“words” taped to my monitor that I cut from magazines, postcards, etc.: “To sleep, perchance to dream, perchance to mess with reality,” “The heart has reasons which Reason does not know,” “The dream is coming true,” and for when I’m feeling like I am too busy to write: “No excuse!” I also have a small sticky that has the 5 senses to remind me to use these when writing: “see, hear, smell, taste, touch.”
    Wall decorations, and other:
    large pastoral oil painting, huge wreath made out of pinecones and baby’s breath that I got at a garage sale for 50 cents; 10 framed certificates from winning writing contests; a grouping of framed pictures of people or children reading books; map of U.S. on hutch door because I’m geographically challenged; picture on other hutch door of chewed stub of pencil with the word “persistence” beneath it.
    –several hanging plants
    –grouping of 4 tall skinny wicker baskets of various heights in the corner, filled with: (1) dried pampas grass, (2) tall red twigs, (3) dried palm fronds, and (4) weird dried grass that looks like broom straw
    As a writer, I thrive on visual stimulation, and pretty things make me feel happy. Which is probably why I have so MANY pretty things! (embarrassed grin)

    Reply
  22. What a great topic, Susan Sarah. I’m vitally interested in what people have on their desk, because it is a glimpse into the real person.
    I can’t stand clutter, so all my things are arranged artfully on my desk, but there are a LOT of those things. My desk is huge, meaning I have a lot of room. My friends say it should have its own zip code.
    I’m not into “lucky” things, but am very much influenced by aesthetics. My office and desk are a haven of beautiful things, and there isn’t enough room in this comment to list them all. So I’ll pick some things at random (with apologies for the length of this list!).
    On my desk:
    –wooden pencil cup with a quote from H.G. Wells: “No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else’s draft.” (I am, after all, a freelance editor!)
    –a desk fountain composed of pretty rocks I’ve collected over the years
    –basket filled with dried hydrangeas
    –artsy pottery bowl filled with unusual scented balls made of rolled up string, large seed pods, wicker, etc., all in shades of purple, maroon, and rose. Divine scent
    –a funky folk art carved wooden cat that makes me smile every time I look at it because it’s so whimsical
    –an intricately painted round ceramic ball
    –a neon orange 6″ ruler that says, “Some day everything will work this well.” I love the simplicity of the ruler and the statement
    –a yellow flashlight with black leopard spots. Besides being outrageously cute, I don’t have to stumble around in the dark looking for a flashlight when the power goes out (a frequent occurrence out here in the boonies)
    –a pepper mill because I love the smell of black pepper
    –a small green wind-up plastic godzilla that shoots friction sparks out of its mouth as it walks across the desk
    –formerly boring tape dispenser and two staplers that I spray painted in 2 colors to match the decor of the room
    –stereo and speakers
    –ibuprofen because sitting all day at a computer hurts my back
    –numerous hernia-inducing dictionaries
    –a squirt bottle with an awesome distance range, set on “stream” (not spray) so I can nail the dog or cats without getting out of my chair when they misbehave. Diabolically funny when I sneak a squirt at them when they aren’t looking
    –ceramic Tang Dynasty horse–in blue! (a blue horse!)
    –clear glass bowl filled with clear irridescent marbles
    –statuette of Bastet, the Egyptian cat goddess
    –small white bowl filled with irridescent Paua shell fragments (haliotis iris)
    –dried wheat-like grass tied in a small bunch with a pink ribbon
    –bouquet of rhododendrons, some pink, some purple
    Computer:
    –“words” taped to my monitor that I cut from magazines, postcards, etc.: “To sleep, perchance to dream, perchance to mess with reality,” “The heart has reasons which Reason does not know,” “The dream is coming true,” and for when I’m feeling like I am too busy to write: “No excuse!” I also have a small sticky that has the 5 senses to remind me to use these when writing: “see, hear, smell, taste, touch.”
    Wall decorations, and other:
    large pastoral oil painting, huge wreath made out of pinecones and baby’s breath that I got at a garage sale for 50 cents; 10 framed certificates from winning writing contests; a grouping of framed pictures of people or children reading books; map of U.S. on hutch door because I’m geographically challenged; picture on other hutch door of chewed stub of pencil with the word “persistence” beneath it.
    –several hanging plants
    –grouping of 4 tall skinny wicker baskets of various heights in the corner, filled with: (1) dried pampas grass, (2) tall red twigs, (3) dried palm fronds, and (4) weird dried grass that looks like broom straw
    As a writer, I thrive on visual stimulation, and pretty things make me feel happy. Which is probably why I have so MANY pretty things! (embarrassed grin)

    Reply
  23. What a great topic, Susan Sarah. I’m vitally interested in what people have on their desk, because it is a glimpse into the real person.
    I can’t stand clutter, so all my things are arranged artfully on my desk, but there are a LOT of those things. My desk is huge, meaning I have a lot of room. My friends say it should have its own zip code.
    I’m not into “lucky” things, but am very much influenced by aesthetics. My office and desk are a haven of beautiful things, and there isn’t enough room in this comment to list them all. So I’ll pick some things at random (with apologies for the length of this list!).
    On my desk:
    –wooden pencil cup with a quote from H.G. Wells: “No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else’s draft.” (I am, after all, a freelance editor!)
    –a desk fountain composed of pretty rocks I’ve collected over the years
    –basket filled with dried hydrangeas
    –artsy pottery bowl filled with unusual scented balls made of rolled up string, large seed pods, wicker, etc., all in shades of purple, maroon, and rose. Divine scent
    –a funky folk art carved wooden cat that makes me smile every time I look at it because it’s so whimsical
    –an intricately painted round ceramic ball
    –a neon orange 6″ ruler that says, “Some day everything will work this well.” I love the simplicity of the ruler and the statement
    –a yellow flashlight with black leopard spots. Besides being outrageously cute, I don’t have to stumble around in the dark looking for a flashlight when the power goes out (a frequent occurrence out here in the boonies)
    –a pepper mill because I love the smell of black pepper
    –a small green wind-up plastic godzilla that shoots friction sparks out of its mouth as it walks across the desk
    –formerly boring tape dispenser and two staplers that I spray painted in 2 colors to match the decor of the room
    –stereo and speakers
    –ibuprofen because sitting all day at a computer hurts my back
    –numerous hernia-inducing dictionaries
    –a squirt bottle with an awesome distance range, set on “stream” (not spray) so I can nail the dog or cats without getting out of my chair when they misbehave. Diabolically funny when I sneak a squirt at them when they aren’t looking
    –ceramic Tang Dynasty horse–in blue! (a blue horse!)
    –clear glass bowl filled with clear irridescent marbles
    –statuette of Bastet, the Egyptian cat goddess
    –small white bowl filled with irridescent Paua shell fragments (haliotis iris)
    –dried wheat-like grass tied in a small bunch with a pink ribbon
    –bouquet of rhododendrons, some pink, some purple
    Computer:
    –“words” taped to my monitor that I cut from magazines, postcards, etc.: “To sleep, perchance to dream, perchance to mess with reality,” “The heart has reasons which Reason does not know,” “The dream is coming true,” and for when I’m feeling like I am too busy to write: “No excuse!” I also have a small sticky that has the 5 senses to remind me to use these when writing: “see, hear, smell, taste, touch.”
    Wall decorations, and other:
    large pastoral oil painting, huge wreath made out of pinecones and baby’s breath that I got at a garage sale for 50 cents; 10 framed certificates from winning writing contests; a grouping of framed pictures of people or children reading books; map of U.S. on hutch door because I’m geographically challenged; picture on other hutch door of chewed stub of pencil with the word “persistence” beneath it.
    –several hanging plants
    –grouping of 4 tall skinny wicker baskets of various heights in the corner, filled with: (1) dried pampas grass, (2) tall red twigs, (3) dried palm fronds, and (4) weird dried grass that looks like broom straw
    As a writer, I thrive on visual stimulation, and pretty things make me feel happy. Which is probably why I have so MANY pretty things! (embarrassed grin)

    Reply
  24. What a great topic, Susan Sarah. I’m vitally interested in what people have on their desk, because it is a glimpse into the real person.
    I can’t stand clutter, so all my things are arranged artfully on my desk, but there are a LOT of those things. My desk is huge, meaning I have a lot of room. My friends say it should have its own zip code.
    I’m not into “lucky” things, but am very much influenced by aesthetics. My office and desk are a haven of beautiful things, and there isn’t enough room in this comment to list them all. So I’ll pick some things at random (with apologies for the length of this list!).
    On my desk:
    –wooden pencil cup with a quote from H.G. Wells: “No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else’s draft.” (I am, after all, a freelance editor!)
    –a desk fountain composed of pretty rocks I’ve collected over the years
    –basket filled with dried hydrangeas
    –artsy pottery bowl filled with unusual scented balls made of rolled up string, large seed pods, wicker, etc., all in shades of purple, maroon, and rose. Divine scent
    –a funky folk art carved wooden cat that makes me smile every time I look at it because it’s so whimsical
    –an intricately painted round ceramic ball
    –a neon orange 6″ ruler that says, “Some day everything will work this well.” I love the simplicity of the ruler and the statement
    –a yellow flashlight with black leopard spots. Besides being outrageously cute, I don’t have to stumble around in the dark looking for a flashlight when the power goes out (a frequent occurrence out here in the boonies)
    –a pepper mill because I love the smell of black pepper
    –a small green wind-up plastic godzilla that shoots friction sparks out of its mouth as it walks across the desk
    –formerly boring tape dispenser and two staplers that I spray painted in 2 colors to match the decor of the room
    –stereo and speakers
    –ibuprofen because sitting all day at a computer hurts my back
    –numerous hernia-inducing dictionaries
    –a squirt bottle with an awesome distance range, set on “stream” (not spray) so I can nail the dog or cats without getting out of my chair when they misbehave. Diabolically funny when I sneak a squirt at them when they aren’t looking
    –ceramic Tang Dynasty horse–in blue! (a blue horse!)
    –clear glass bowl filled with clear irridescent marbles
    –statuette of Bastet, the Egyptian cat goddess
    –small white bowl filled with irridescent Paua shell fragments (haliotis iris)
    –dried wheat-like grass tied in a small bunch with a pink ribbon
    –bouquet of rhododendrons, some pink, some purple
    Computer:
    –“words” taped to my monitor that I cut from magazines, postcards, etc.: “To sleep, perchance to dream, perchance to mess with reality,” “The heart has reasons which Reason does not know,” “The dream is coming true,” and for when I’m feeling like I am too busy to write: “No excuse!” I also have a small sticky that has the 5 senses to remind me to use these when writing: “see, hear, smell, taste, touch.”
    Wall decorations, and other:
    large pastoral oil painting, huge wreath made out of pinecones and baby’s breath that I got at a garage sale for 50 cents; 10 framed certificates from winning writing contests; a grouping of framed pictures of people or children reading books; map of U.S. on hutch door because I’m geographically challenged; picture on other hutch door of chewed stub of pencil with the word “persistence” beneath it.
    –several hanging plants
    –grouping of 4 tall skinny wicker baskets of various heights in the corner, filled with: (1) dried pampas grass, (2) tall red twigs, (3) dried palm fronds, and (4) weird dried grass that looks like broom straw
    As a writer, I thrive on visual stimulation, and pretty things make me feel happy. Which is probably why I have so MANY pretty things! (embarrassed grin)

    Reply
  25. Susan Sarah, I love the idea of a patron saint of romance, and St. George should be it!
    I also agree about Edward the Confessor. Blech. If he’d actually sired some children, we could have avoided the Norman Conquest.
    (Says she, whose ancestors were in Irish mud huts back then.*G*)
    I’m not really into good luck charms, but I love to have nice bells around the house to please the chi. And my icon for endurance is the musk ox. So I was a bit put out a couple of nights ago when I was at a dinner party and people were taking about eating musk ox.
    No, no, say it isn’t so!
    (When the English say we’re a bit put out, it’s like, we were a bit put out about Napoleon trying to invade. The cheek of it!)
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  26. Susan Sarah, I love the idea of a patron saint of romance, and St. George should be it!
    I also agree about Edward the Confessor. Blech. If he’d actually sired some children, we could have avoided the Norman Conquest.
    (Says she, whose ancestors were in Irish mud huts back then.*G*)
    I’m not really into good luck charms, but I love to have nice bells around the house to please the chi. And my icon for endurance is the musk ox. So I was a bit put out a couple of nights ago when I was at a dinner party and people were taking about eating musk ox.
    No, no, say it isn’t so!
    (When the English say we’re a bit put out, it’s like, we were a bit put out about Napoleon trying to invade. The cheek of it!)
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  27. Susan Sarah, I love the idea of a patron saint of romance, and St. George should be it!
    I also agree about Edward the Confessor. Blech. If he’d actually sired some children, we could have avoided the Norman Conquest.
    (Says she, whose ancestors were in Irish mud huts back then.*G*)
    I’m not really into good luck charms, but I love to have nice bells around the house to please the chi. And my icon for endurance is the musk ox. So I was a bit put out a couple of nights ago when I was at a dinner party and people were taking about eating musk ox.
    No, no, say it isn’t so!
    (When the English say we’re a bit put out, it’s like, we were a bit put out about Napoleon trying to invade. The cheek of it!)
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  28. Susan Sarah, I love the idea of a patron saint of romance, and St. George should be it!
    I also agree about Edward the Confessor. Blech. If he’d actually sired some children, we could have avoided the Norman Conquest.
    (Says she, whose ancestors were in Irish mud huts back then.*G*)
    I’m not really into good luck charms, but I love to have nice bells around the house to please the chi. And my icon for endurance is the musk ox. So I was a bit put out a couple of nights ago when I was at a dinner party and people were taking about eating musk ox.
    No, no, say it isn’t so!
    (When the English say we’re a bit put out, it’s like, we were a bit put out about Napoleon trying to invade. The cheek of it!)
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  29. Ooh, love bells too. I’ve hung a bunch with glass balls attached in the tree outside my home office window.
    No good luck trinkets per se. I have my altar in one corner of the room and colored directional candles in the others. But other than that it’s mostly my toys.
    I collect fun stuff from The Nightmare Before Christmas, and have shelves full of what really amounts to toys. For instance, on my desk is a NBC calendar made of wooden blocks that you turn around for the month and day. Very fun.

    Reply
  30. Ooh, love bells too. I’ve hung a bunch with glass balls attached in the tree outside my home office window.
    No good luck trinkets per se. I have my altar in one corner of the room and colored directional candles in the others. But other than that it’s mostly my toys.
    I collect fun stuff from The Nightmare Before Christmas, and have shelves full of what really amounts to toys. For instance, on my desk is a NBC calendar made of wooden blocks that you turn around for the month and day. Very fun.

    Reply
  31. Ooh, love bells too. I’ve hung a bunch with glass balls attached in the tree outside my home office window.
    No good luck trinkets per se. I have my altar in one corner of the room and colored directional candles in the others. But other than that it’s mostly my toys.
    I collect fun stuff from The Nightmare Before Christmas, and have shelves full of what really amounts to toys. For instance, on my desk is a NBC calendar made of wooden blocks that you turn around for the month and day. Very fun.

    Reply
  32. Ooh, love bells too. I’ve hung a bunch with glass balls attached in the tree outside my home office window.
    No good luck trinkets per se. I have my altar in one corner of the room and colored directional candles in the others. But other than that it’s mostly my toys.
    I collect fun stuff from The Nightmare Before Christmas, and have shelves full of what really amounts to toys. For instance, on my desk is a NBC calendar made of wooden blocks that you turn around for the month and day. Very fun.

    Reply
  33. My “real” desk is too big to fit in my new house’s little writing room, so I’ve got nothing on a borrowed-from-my-daughter desk except the computer and my “God rock”, which has a cross through it. But above the desk is my bulletin board with all sorts of odd images. Right now I’m collecting fortunes from fortune cookies, which better come true! I have two little pigs who watch me wash dishes on the kitchen windowsill. I wear my mother’s double diamond engagement ring.I have lots of family stuff in my house I’d have trouble relinquishing…don’t know how “lucky” they are but I’m sentimentally attached.

    Reply
  34. My “real” desk is too big to fit in my new house’s little writing room, so I’ve got nothing on a borrowed-from-my-daughter desk except the computer and my “God rock”, which has a cross through it. But above the desk is my bulletin board with all sorts of odd images. Right now I’m collecting fortunes from fortune cookies, which better come true! I have two little pigs who watch me wash dishes on the kitchen windowsill. I wear my mother’s double diamond engagement ring.I have lots of family stuff in my house I’d have trouble relinquishing…don’t know how “lucky” they are but I’m sentimentally attached.

    Reply
  35. My “real” desk is too big to fit in my new house’s little writing room, so I’ve got nothing on a borrowed-from-my-daughter desk except the computer and my “God rock”, which has a cross through it. But above the desk is my bulletin board with all sorts of odd images. Right now I’m collecting fortunes from fortune cookies, which better come true! I have two little pigs who watch me wash dishes on the kitchen windowsill. I wear my mother’s double diamond engagement ring.I have lots of family stuff in my house I’d have trouble relinquishing…don’t know how “lucky” they are but I’m sentimentally attached.

    Reply
  36. My “real” desk is too big to fit in my new house’s little writing room, so I’ve got nothing on a borrowed-from-my-daughter desk except the computer and my “God rock”, which has a cross through it. But above the desk is my bulletin board with all sorts of odd images. Right now I’m collecting fortunes from fortune cookies, which better come true! I have two little pigs who watch me wash dishes on the kitchen windowsill. I wear my mother’s double diamond engagement ring.I have lots of family stuff in my house I’d have trouble relinquishing…don’t know how “lucky” they are but I’m sentimentally attached.

    Reply
  37. I have six metal Egyptian figures, about 1-1/2″ high–which Susan/Miranda persuaded me to buy at the Boston MFA some years ago. I also have 2 gifts from my spouse. These are some of those Mexican Day of the Dead figures with grinning skull faces, wearing mostly painted-on costumes. One is a bride and groom with wedding musicians. The other is simply a bride and groom. Both brides have little net veils. OK, this is funny: Death figures watch over me as I work–and the calendar above the desk is open to an interior shot of the temple of Abu Simbel. Gallows humor, anybody?

    Reply
  38. I have six metal Egyptian figures, about 1-1/2″ high–which Susan/Miranda persuaded me to buy at the Boston MFA some years ago. I also have 2 gifts from my spouse. These are some of those Mexican Day of the Dead figures with grinning skull faces, wearing mostly painted-on costumes. One is a bride and groom with wedding musicians. The other is simply a bride and groom. Both brides have little net veils. OK, this is funny: Death figures watch over me as I work–and the calendar above the desk is open to an interior shot of the temple of Abu Simbel. Gallows humor, anybody?

    Reply
  39. I have six metal Egyptian figures, about 1-1/2″ high–which Susan/Miranda persuaded me to buy at the Boston MFA some years ago. I also have 2 gifts from my spouse. These are some of those Mexican Day of the Dead figures with grinning skull faces, wearing mostly painted-on costumes. One is a bride and groom with wedding musicians. The other is simply a bride and groom. Both brides have little net veils. OK, this is funny: Death figures watch over me as I work–and the calendar above the desk is open to an interior shot of the temple of Abu Simbel. Gallows humor, anybody?

    Reply
  40. I have six metal Egyptian figures, about 1-1/2″ high–which Susan/Miranda persuaded me to buy at the Boston MFA some years ago. I also have 2 gifts from my spouse. These are some of those Mexican Day of the Dead figures with grinning skull faces, wearing mostly painted-on costumes. One is a bride and groom with wedding musicians. The other is simply a bride and groom. Both brides have little net veils. OK, this is funny: Death figures watch over me as I work–and the calendar above the desk is open to an interior shot of the temple of Abu Simbel. Gallows humor, anybody?

    Reply
  41. Just a word on the elegant *triskele* (triple spiral) device. It is not exclusively, nor even particularly, Irish, though it certainly occurs in early Medieval Irish art, for example some of the illuminated manuscripts – as do many other motifs that were already very ancient by the early Middle Ages.
    It is found in just that form in Continental so-called ‘Celtic’ art of the Iron Age (that is, Central European, of the 6th to 1st centuries BC), and is also at home in Romano-British designs, such as bronze brooches.
    Other spiral motifs, though not triskeles as such, go back to the northern European Neolithic and Bronze Age, and are particularly common in megalithic art, decoration on stone tombs of the later Neolithic period, including New Grange in Ireland.
    St. Bridget (however one spells her!) was one of those Irish saints probably converted from pre-Christian Irish pagan goddess to saint.
    🙂

    Reply
  42. Just a word on the elegant *triskele* (triple spiral) device. It is not exclusively, nor even particularly, Irish, though it certainly occurs in early Medieval Irish art, for example some of the illuminated manuscripts – as do many other motifs that were already very ancient by the early Middle Ages.
    It is found in just that form in Continental so-called ‘Celtic’ art of the Iron Age (that is, Central European, of the 6th to 1st centuries BC), and is also at home in Romano-British designs, such as bronze brooches.
    Other spiral motifs, though not triskeles as such, go back to the northern European Neolithic and Bronze Age, and are particularly common in megalithic art, decoration on stone tombs of the later Neolithic period, including New Grange in Ireland.
    St. Bridget (however one spells her!) was one of those Irish saints probably converted from pre-Christian Irish pagan goddess to saint.
    🙂

    Reply
  43. Just a word on the elegant *triskele* (triple spiral) device. It is not exclusively, nor even particularly, Irish, though it certainly occurs in early Medieval Irish art, for example some of the illuminated manuscripts – as do many other motifs that were already very ancient by the early Middle Ages.
    It is found in just that form in Continental so-called ‘Celtic’ art of the Iron Age (that is, Central European, of the 6th to 1st centuries BC), and is also at home in Romano-British designs, such as bronze brooches.
    Other spiral motifs, though not triskeles as such, go back to the northern European Neolithic and Bronze Age, and are particularly common in megalithic art, decoration on stone tombs of the later Neolithic period, including New Grange in Ireland.
    St. Bridget (however one spells her!) was one of those Irish saints probably converted from pre-Christian Irish pagan goddess to saint.
    🙂

    Reply
  44. Just a word on the elegant *triskele* (triple spiral) device. It is not exclusively, nor even particularly, Irish, though it certainly occurs in early Medieval Irish art, for example some of the illuminated manuscripts – as do many other motifs that were already very ancient by the early Middle Ages.
    It is found in just that form in Continental so-called ‘Celtic’ art of the Iron Age (that is, Central European, of the 6th to 1st centuries BC), and is also at home in Romano-British designs, such as bronze brooches.
    Other spiral motifs, though not triskeles as such, go back to the northern European Neolithic and Bronze Age, and are particularly common in megalithic art, decoration on stone tombs of the later Neolithic period, including New Grange in Ireland.
    St. Bridget (however one spells her!) was one of those Irish saints probably converted from pre-Christian Irish pagan goddess to saint.
    🙂

    Reply

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