Lost in the Ether!


ComputerCara/Andrea here
,

As you know, we Wenches occasionally talking about the craft of writing here. The creative process has its highs and lows, as the Muse can be moody. And sometimes author must contend with more than Inner Demons—the distractions and challenges to the story come from the tools of the trade


Technology.
For the modern scribe, it’s both a blessing and a curse. As you might have guessed, I had a Major Disaster yesterday. My desktop i-mac, the repository of all my data, files, book manuscripts, calendars, address books, etc. suddenly gave up the ghost. The hard drive just went kaput.
Stone readerPanicked, I called my IT friend, who was out of town but didn’t like the sound of what I was seeing on the screen when trying to reboot. I suggested I hoof it to the nearest Apple store and have it checked out. So up I trek to New Haven, when a very nice person at the Genius Bar confirmed that it was dead as a doornail. No hope of getting any data retrieved.

Well, thankfully, due to my tech guy’s constant warning that Bad Stuff happens without warning, I have most of the files backed up on CDs. A major pain to rebuild a new computer with them, but it could be worse.

Quill penSo, since I’m there in the store, I start to peruse the latest generation high tech desktop wonders with a twenty-some salesperson. As we’re looking, I start musing on how I will have to upload all my data manually from my storage CDs—which draws a bemused look. "Oh, these models aren't built with CD ports anymore. No one uses that technology these days." I take a deep breath as I'm told I will have to buy an external drive to hook up to the computer.

Then I mention my InDesign and Photoshop programs. Another pitying look. "Oh, those versions don't run on this operating system. You're going to have to buy all new versions. (Note: the programs are very expensive.)

At this point I ask him whether they sell quill pens and paper. That elicits a blank stare. At least he laughs when I ask whether the Genius Bar served double martinis.

JanusAs you can imagine, I left the store muttering a number of very unladylike words. I decided to think over my options before rushing into a purchase . . . but it also got me to thinking about a lecture I recently attended by Susan Gibbons, the Head Librarian of Yale University, which addressed just this topic of technology as both a blessing and a curse.

The talk was all about libraries needing to be “Janus”— that is, they must look both at the past and at the future, and what challenges have to be met in the mission to preserve original material, and therefore history.

BeineckeBooks, manuscripts, codices, scrolls—most of us are familiar with the need for vigilant conservation to preserve papyrus, paper, vellum, leather, old inks and the like for posterity. But it was fascinating—and a little frightening—to hear her talk about the challenges of looking ahead. Libraries are faced with some really tough tasks, she went on to explain. History, original thoughts, which once were passed on mostly as words written on paper, are now being collected in a myriad of different
Owlforms. For example, many oral accounts of genocide in Africa or ethnic cleasing in the balkans have been made on variety of tape recorders and video cameras that are totally obsolete.  Aside from the stability of those forms (who really knows how long floppy disks, CDs, digital USB drives will last) an ancillary worry is how one will “play” them back in the future because the machines that run them disappear so fast. Think about it—rapid obsolescence seems programmed into computers, CD drives, flash drives, televisions, etc.  It seems that every two years we are expected to throw away one technology and upgrade to another. And those obsolete machines get thrown in the trash.

For libraries it’s a huge worry because they can’t plan for how to preserve, because forms of data seem ever changing, and the ways to access them are even more unstable. This, said Gibbons, is a huge issue. And as less and less material is being put on paper, we run the risk that future generations may lose decades—or centuries—of information and knowledge. It’s really quite sobering, isn’t it?

JA's desk 1In the next few days, I will probably upgrade to the latest i-mac . . . which will be ancient history in a year or two. Truly, I am thinking twice about quill and paper.

So what about you? Has technology taken over your life? Have you had any disasters? And are you as worried as I am about the preservation of knowledge and ideas—and books!—in this digital age?

140 thoughts on “Lost in the Ether!”

  1. Cara/Andrea – condolences on the death of your i.mac. Technology!!! At least quill pens and ink lasted a bit longer than some of todays machines. But then, the ink faded over time so it wasn’t really for all time either. I suppose the best over the decades and centuries has been the printing press, but then the paper crumbles away and pages or bits of pages disappear into dust. Nothing lasts for ever it seems. Anyway, good luck getting a replacement, and downloading all your stuff onto the new one.
    I’m not a fan of technology, but have to use it because otherwise life would be very isolated. I worry about todays society not writing letters, to be read and enjoyed by descendants in years to come.

    Reply
  2. Cara/Andrea – condolences on the death of your i.mac. Technology!!! At least quill pens and ink lasted a bit longer than some of todays machines. But then, the ink faded over time so it wasn’t really for all time either. I suppose the best over the decades and centuries has been the printing press, but then the paper crumbles away and pages or bits of pages disappear into dust. Nothing lasts for ever it seems. Anyway, good luck getting a replacement, and downloading all your stuff onto the new one.
    I’m not a fan of technology, but have to use it because otherwise life would be very isolated. I worry about todays society not writing letters, to be read and enjoyed by descendants in years to come.

    Reply
  3. Cara/Andrea – condolences on the death of your i.mac. Technology!!! At least quill pens and ink lasted a bit longer than some of todays machines. But then, the ink faded over time so it wasn’t really for all time either. I suppose the best over the decades and centuries has been the printing press, but then the paper crumbles away and pages or bits of pages disappear into dust. Nothing lasts for ever it seems. Anyway, good luck getting a replacement, and downloading all your stuff onto the new one.
    I’m not a fan of technology, but have to use it because otherwise life would be very isolated. I worry about todays society not writing letters, to be read and enjoyed by descendants in years to come.

    Reply
  4. Cara/Andrea – condolences on the death of your i.mac. Technology!!! At least quill pens and ink lasted a bit longer than some of todays machines. But then, the ink faded over time so it wasn’t really for all time either. I suppose the best over the decades and centuries has been the printing press, but then the paper crumbles away and pages or bits of pages disappear into dust. Nothing lasts for ever it seems. Anyway, good luck getting a replacement, and downloading all your stuff onto the new one.
    I’m not a fan of technology, but have to use it because otherwise life would be very isolated. I worry about todays society not writing letters, to be read and enjoyed by descendants in years to come.

    Reply
  5. Cara/Andrea – condolences on the death of your i.mac. Technology!!! At least quill pens and ink lasted a bit longer than some of todays machines. But then, the ink faded over time so it wasn’t really for all time either. I suppose the best over the decades and centuries has been the printing press, but then the paper crumbles away and pages or bits of pages disappear into dust. Nothing lasts for ever it seems. Anyway, good luck getting a replacement, and downloading all your stuff onto the new one.
    I’m not a fan of technology, but have to use it because otherwise life would be very isolated. I worry about todays society not writing letters, to be read and enjoyed by descendants in years to come.

    Reply
  6. Cara/Andrea, I can SO relate to your technology woes. Last December, literally on the eve of the release of my third novel, “Playing For Keeps,” I fried my motherboard. Just as I was preparing for a week-long release party on my blog!!! Thankfully my laptop was still under warranty, and I had my husband’s desktop to fall back on, and everything was backed up to a flash drive, but it was the longest two days of my life while I awaited the repair man!

    Reply
  7. Cara/Andrea, I can SO relate to your technology woes. Last December, literally on the eve of the release of my third novel, “Playing For Keeps,” I fried my motherboard. Just as I was preparing for a week-long release party on my blog!!! Thankfully my laptop was still under warranty, and I had my husband’s desktop to fall back on, and everything was backed up to a flash drive, but it was the longest two days of my life while I awaited the repair man!

    Reply
  8. Cara/Andrea, I can SO relate to your technology woes. Last December, literally on the eve of the release of my third novel, “Playing For Keeps,” I fried my motherboard. Just as I was preparing for a week-long release party on my blog!!! Thankfully my laptop was still under warranty, and I had my husband’s desktop to fall back on, and everything was backed up to a flash drive, but it was the longest two days of my life while I awaited the repair man!

    Reply
  9. Cara/Andrea, I can SO relate to your technology woes. Last December, literally on the eve of the release of my third novel, “Playing For Keeps,” I fried my motherboard. Just as I was preparing for a week-long release party on my blog!!! Thankfully my laptop was still under warranty, and I had my husband’s desktop to fall back on, and everything was backed up to a flash drive, but it was the longest two days of my life while I awaited the repair man!

    Reply
  10. Cara/Andrea, I can SO relate to your technology woes. Last December, literally on the eve of the release of my third novel, “Playing For Keeps,” I fried my motherboard. Just as I was preparing for a week-long release party on my blog!!! Thankfully my laptop was still under warranty, and I had my husband’s desktop to fall back on, and everything was backed up to a flash drive, but it was the longest two days of my life while I awaited the repair man!

    Reply
  11. Jenny, true, nothing lasts forever, though conservation efforts on the written word has made great headway. The old papers, vellum, papyrus are just good quality (no chemical/pulp like modern papers) that they don’t break down as fast. The digital stuff is just so iffy right now. No one really knows what will happen with it.
    I think the loss of letters isvery sd for history. Researchers learn so much about past life from first hand accounts. The e-mails of “How R U”just don’t cut it!

    Reply
  12. Jenny, true, nothing lasts forever, though conservation efforts on the written word has made great headway. The old papers, vellum, papyrus are just good quality (no chemical/pulp like modern papers) that they don’t break down as fast. The digital stuff is just so iffy right now. No one really knows what will happen with it.
    I think the loss of letters isvery sd for history. Researchers learn so much about past life from first hand accounts. The e-mails of “How R U”just don’t cut it!

    Reply
  13. Jenny, true, nothing lasts forever, though conservation efforts on the written word has made great headway. The old papers, vellum, papyrus are just good quality (no chemical/pulp like modern papers) that they don’t break down as fast. The digital stuff is just so iffy right now. No one really knows what will happen with it.
    I think the loss of letters isvery sd for history. Researchers learn so much about past life from first hand accounts. The e-mails of “How R U”just don’t cut it!

    Reply
  14. Jenny, true, nothing lasts forever, though conservation efforts on the written word has made great headway. The old papers, vellum, papyrus are just good quality (no chemical/pulp like modern papers) that they don’t break down as fast. The digital stuff is just so iffy right now. No one really knows what will happen with it.
    I think the loss of letters isvery sd for history. Researchers learn so much about past life from first hand accounts. The e-mails of “How R U”just don’t cut it!

    Reply
  15. Jenny, true, nothing lasts forever, though conservation efforts on the written word has made great headway. The old papers, vellum, papyrus are just good quality (no chemical/pulp like modern papers) that they don’t break down as fast. The digital stuff is just so iffy right now. No one really knows what will happen with it.
    I think the loss of letters isvery sd for history. Researchers learn so much about past life from first hand accounts. The e-mails of “How R U”just don’t cut it!

    Reply
  16. Oh, Cynthia, big hugswhat a horrible time to happen! It’s just a major PITA. The ida f having to spend days bebuilding passwords and links to favorite sites, reloading data, etc. is NO fun. Plus I know I’ve lost lots of bookmarks, and samll stuff I tucked away in folders for the next back-up session. Have to figure out a more seaamless way . . .probably an external hard drive. Sigh. Yet another piece of machinery!

    Reply
  17. Oh, Cynthia, big hugswhat a horrible time to happen! It’s just a major PITA. The ida f having to spend days bebuilding passwords and links to favorite sites, reloading data, etc. is NO fun. Plus I know I’ve lost lots of bookmarks, and samll stuff I tucked away in folders for the next back-up session. Have to figure out a more seaamless way . . .probably an external hard drive. Sigh. Yet another piece of machinery!

    Reply
  18. Oh, Cynthia, big hugswhat a horrible time to happen! It’s just a major PITA. The ida f having to spend days bebuilding passwords and links to favorite sites, reloading data, etc. is NO fun. Plus I know I’ve lost lots of bookmarks, and samll stuff I tucked away in folders for the next back-up session. Have to figure out a more seaamless way . . .probably an external hard drive. Sigh. Yet another piece of machinery!

    Reply
  19. Oh, Cynthia, big hugswhat a horrible time to happen! It’s just a major PITA. The ida f having to spend days bebuilding passwords and links to favorite sites, reloading data, etc. is NO fun. Plus I know I’ve lost lots of bookmarks, and samll stuff I tucked away in folders for the next back-up session. Have to figure out a more seaamless way . . .probably an external hard drive. Sigh. Yet another piece of machinery!

    Reply
  20. Oh, Cynthia, big hugswhat a horrible time to happen! It’s just a major PITA. The ida f having to spend days bebuilding passwords and links to favorite sites, reloading data, etc. is NO fun. Plus I know I’ve lost lots of bookmarks, and samll stuff I tucked away in folders for the next back-up session. Have to figure out a more seaamless way . . .probably an external hard drive. Sigh. Yet another piece of machinery!

    Reply
  21. I know how you feel, My external drive just died, and now I will have to update my operating system before I can get a new one. I HATE the way any update requires a dozen other updates, all of which are painfully expensive. (As far as I’m concerned, the Word program I used 20 years ago was just fine, and I’d be perfectly happy to skip all the bells and whistles that have been added since.)
    Meanwhile, do you use Dropbox? I keep a lot of stuff backed up there. And it’s free.

    Reply
  22. I know how you feel, My external drive just died, and now I will have to update my operating system before I can get a new one. I HATE the way any update requires a dozen other updates, all of which are painfully expensive. (As far as I’m concerned, the Word program I used 20 years ago was just fine, and I’d be perfectly happy to skip all the bells and whistles that have been added since.)
    Meanwhile, do you use Dropbox? I keep a lot of stuff backed up there. And it’s free.

    Reply
  23. I know how you feel, My external drive just died, and now I will have to update my operating system before I can get a new one. I HATE the way any update requires a dozen other updates, all of which are painfully expensive. (As far as I’m concerned, the Word program I used 20 years ago was just fine, and I’d be perfectly happy to skip all the bells and whistles that have been added since.)
    Meanwhile, do you use Dropbox? I keep a lot of stuff backed up there. And it’s free.

    Reply
  24. I know how you feel, My external drive just died, and now I will have to update my operating system before I can get a new one. I HATE the way any update requires a dozen other updates, all of which are painfully expensive. (As far as I’m concerned, the Word program I used 20 years ago was just fine, and I’d be perfectly happy to skip all the bells and whistles that have been added since.)
    Meanwhile, do you use Dropbox? I keep a lot of stuff backed up there. And it’s free.

    Reply
  25. I know how you feel, My external drive just died, and now I will have to update my operating system before I can get a new one. I HATE the way any update requires a dozen other updates, all of which are painfully expensive. (As far as I’m concerned, the Word program I used 20 years ago was just fine, and I’d be perfectly happy to skip all the bells and whistles that have been added since.)
    Meanwhile, do you use Dropbox? I keep a lot of stuff backed up there. And it’s free.

    Reply
  26. Oh, Cara, I am so very sorry! This post was at the same time funny and heartbreaking. And for me also timely in that I’ve been thinking about this issue quite a lot lately. Not only the concern with books and libraries, but also music as I just had a stereo die (Mercury retrograde!). I’ve got hundreds of CD’s, many of which replaced the same music that had been on cassette tapes, which had replaced the same music on records… I find it very frustrating, not to mention expensive! I don’t want to put all of my music on my computer (for obvious reasons!) to download to an iPod. What happens when one or the other dies? Again, no hard copy.
    I made this comment recently on the post about e-readers, but it’s also appropriate here: what happens to my hundreds of e-books when/if Amazon changes the Kindle hardware or software? And we KNOW that it will happen eventually.
    And finally, there have been some interesting articles about recently about how the brain learns and retains much better from handwriting something rather than typing it on a computer, tablet, etc.! So yes! Use that quill and paper. BTW, my favorite source for those is levenger.com. (not affiliated)

    Reply
  27. Oh, Cara, I am so very sorry! This post was at the same time funny and heartbreaking. And for me also timely in that I’ve been thinking about this issue quite a lot lately. Not only the concern with books and libraries, but also music as I just had a stereo die (Mercury retrograde!). I’ve got hundreds of CD’s, many of which replaced the same music that had been on cassette tapes, which had replaced the same music on records… I find it very frustrating, not to mention expensive! I don’t want to put all of my music on my computer (for obvious reasons!) to download to an iPod. What happens when one or the other dies? Again, no hard copy.
    I made this comment recently on the post about e-readers, but it’s also appropriate here: what happens to my hundreds of e-books when/if Amazon changes the Kindle hardware or software? And we KNOW that it will happen eventually.
    And finally, there have been some interesting articles about recently about how the brain learns and retains much better from handwriting something rather than typing it on a computer, tablet, etc.! So yes! Use that quill and paper. BTW, my favorite source for those is levenger.com. (not affiliated)

    Reply
  28. Oh, Cara, I am so very sorry! This post was at the same time funny and heartbreaking. And for me also timely in that I’ve been thinking about this issue quite a lot lately. Not only the concern with books and libraries, but also music as I just had a stereo die (Mercury retrograde!). I’ve got hundreds of CD’s, many of which replaced the same music that had been on cassette tapes, which had replaced the same music on records… I find it very frustrating, not to mention expensive! I don’t want to put all of my music on my computer (for obvious reasons!) to download to an iPod. What happens when one or the other dies? Again, no hard copy.
    I made this comment recently on the post about e-readers, but it’s also appropriate here: what happens to my hundreds of e-books when/if Amazon changes the Kindle hardware or software? And we KNOW that it will happen eventually.
    And finally, there have been some interesting articles about recently about how the brain learns and retains much better from handwriting something rather than typing it on a computer, tablet, etc.! So yes! Use that quill and paper. BTW, my favorite source for those is levenger.com. (not affiliated)

    Reply
  29. Oh, Cara, I am so very sorry! This post was at the same time funny and heartbreaking. And for me also timely in that I’ve been thinking about this issue quite a lot lately. Not only the concern with books and libraries, but also music as I just had a stereo die (Mercury retrograde!). I’ve got hundreds of CD’s, many of which replaced the same music that had been on cassette tapes, which had replaced the same music on records… I find it very frustrating, not to mention expensive! I don’t want to put all of my music on my computer (for obvious reasons!) to download to an iPod. What happens when one or the other dies? Again, no hard copy.
    I made this comment recently on the post about e-readers, but it’s also appropriate here: what happens to my hundreds of e-books when/if Amazon changes the Kindle hardware or software? And we KNOW that it will happen eventually.
    And finally, there have been some interesting articles about recently about how the brain learns and retains much better from handwriting something rather than typing it on a computer, tablet, etc.! So yes! Use that quill and paper. BTW, my favorite source for those is levenger.com. (not affiliated)

    Reply
  30. Oh, Cara, I am so very sorry! This post was at the same time funny and heartbreaking. And for me also timely in that I’ve been thinking about this issue quite a lot lately. Not only the concern with books and libraries, but also music as I just had a stereo die (Mercury retrograde!). I’ve got hundreds of CD’s, many of which replaced the same music that had been on cassette tapes, which had replaced the same music on records… I find it very frustrating, not to mention expensive! I don’t want to put all of my music on my computer (for obvious reasons!) to download to an iPod. What happens when one or the other dies? Again, no hard copy.
    I made this comment recently on the post about e-readers, but it’s also appropriate here: what happens to my hundreds of e-books when/if Amazon changes the Kindle hardware or software? And we KNOW that it will happen eventually.
    And finally, there have been some interesting articles about recently about how the brain learns and retains much better from handwriting something rather than typing it on a computer, tablet, etc.! So yes! Use that quill and paper. BTW, my favorite source for those is levenger.com. (not affiliated)

    Reply
  31. Dn onna, you raise the same points that the Yale Head Librarian worries about. Data forms are changing so rapidly—what happens to our files that become obsolete? No one has a good answer! You’re so right to wonder about Amazon and e-books. They will probably tell us we have to buy all the books again, grrrr. Just like my design software.
    I’ve also heard that brain thing about learning better with handwriting, and have actually started carrying a notebook to write write when I am traveling or on a train. We’ll see how it goes!

    Reply
  32. Dn onna, you raise the same points that the Yale Head Librarian worries about. Data forms are changing so rapidly—what happens to our files that become obsolete? No one has a good answer! You’re so right to wonder about Amazon and e-books. They will probably tell us we have to buy all the books again, grrrr. Just like my design software.
    I’ve also heard that brain thing about learning better with handwriting, and have actually started carrying a notebook to write write when I am traveling or on a train. We’ll see how it goes!

    Reply
  33. Dn onna, you raise the same points that the Yale Head Librarian worries about. Data forms are changing so rapidly—what happens to our files that become obsolete? No one has a good answer! You’re so right to wonder about Amazon and e-books. They will probably tell us we have to buy all the books again, grrrr. Just like my design software.
    I’ve also heard that brain thing about learning better with handwriting, and have actually started carrying a notebook to write write when I am traveling or on a train. We’ll see how it goes!

    Reply
  34. Dn onna, you raise the same points that the Yale Head Librarian worries about. Data forms are changing so rapidly—what happens to our files that become obsolete? No one has a good answer! You’re so right to wonder about Amazon and e-books. They will probably tell us we have to buy all the books again, grrrr. Just like my design software.
    I’ve also heard that brain thing about learning better with handwriting, and have actually started carrying a notebook to write write when I am traveling or on a train. We’ll see how it goes!

    Reply
  35. Dn onna, you raise the same points that the Yale Head Librarian worries about. Data forms are changing so rapidly—what happens to our files that become obsolete? No one has a good answer! You’re so right to wonder about Amazon and e-books. They will probably tell us we have to buy all the books again, grrrr. Just like my design software.
    I’ve also heard that brain thing about learning better with handwriting, and have actually started carrying a notebook to write write when I am traveling or on a train. We’ll see how it goes!

    Reply
  36. Lil, I totally agree with the old Word version. I had a really one which was just fine. But now have to upgrade. Really hate all the deliberate obsolescence.
    I’ve used Dropbox for sending photos, etc. Will think of it for data—thanks for the tip!

    Reply
  37. Lil, I totally agree with the old Word version. I had a really one which was just fine. But now have to upgrade. Really hate all the deliberate obsolescence.
    I’ve used Dropbox for sending photos, etc. Will think of it for data—thanks for the tip!

    Reply
  38. Lil, I totally agree with the old Word version. I had a really one which was just fine. But now have to upgrade. Really hate all the deliberate obsolescence.
    I’ve used Dropbox for sending photos, etc. Will think of it for data—thanks for the tip!

    Reply
  39. Lil, I totally agree with the old Word version. I had a really one which was just fine. But now have to upgrade. Really hate all the deliberate obsolescence.
    I’ve used Dropbox for sending photos, etc. Will think of it for data—thanks for the tip!

    Reply
  40. Lil, I totally agree with the old Word version. I had a really one which was just fine. But now have to upgrade. Really hate all the deliberate obsolescence.
    I’ve used Dropbox for sending photos, etc. Will think of it for data—thanks for the tip!

    Reply
  41. This is all so painfully relevant. I back up to both Dropbox and Carbonite so I’m probably okay for the professional here and now, but long term? Technology is so fragile. My early books were all written on 5 1/4″ floppies, a technology that has long since vanished. For indie pubbing my backlist, I was able to have the original print books scanned, but it was a clumsy way to do things–and it was print that made this possible.

    Reply
  42. This is all so painfully relevant. I back up to both Dropbox and Carbonite so I’m probably okay for the professional here and now, but long term? Technology is so fragile. My early books were all written on 5 1/4″ floppies, a technology that has long since vanished. For indie pubbing my backlist, I was able to have the original print books scanned, but it was a clumsy way to do things–and it was print that made this possible.

    Reply
  43. This is all so painfully relevant. I back up to both Dropbox and Carbonite so I’m probably okay for the professional here and now, but long term? Technology is so fragile. My early books were all written on 5 1/4″ floppies, a technology that has long since vanished. For indie pubbing my backlist, I was able to have the original print books scanned, but it was a clumsy way to do things–and it was print that made this possible.

    Reply
  44. This is all so painfully relevant. I back up to both Dropbox and Carbonite so I’m probably okay for the professional here and now, but long term? Technology is so fragile. My early books were all written on 5 1/4″ floppies, a technology that has long since vanished. For indie pubbing my backlist, I was able to have the original print books scanned, but it was a clumsy way to do things–and it was print that made this possible.

    Reply
  45. This is all so painfully relevant. I back up to both Dropbox and Carbonite so I’m probably okay for the professional here and now, but long term? Technology is so fragile. My early books were all written on 5 1/4″ floppies, a technology that has long since vanished. For indie pubbing my backlist, I was able to have the original print books scanned, but it was a clumsy way to do things–and it was print that made this possible.

    Reply
  46. I feel for you. Besides reading all the wonderful books from the Word Wenches, my “other” hobby (of three) is genealogy. We talk about this all the time. There is a Facebook page called “Technology for Genealogists” that could be of great interest to writers who need to cope with rapid Technology change. I recommend it to anyone who writes.
    Sue

    Reply
  47. I feel for you. Besides reading all the wonderful books from the Word Wenches, my “other” hobby (of three) is genealogy. We talk about this all the time. There is a Facebook page called “Technology for Genealogists” that could be of great interest to writers who need to cope with rapid Technology change. I recommend it to anyone who writes.
    Sue

    Reply
  48. I feel for you. Besides reading all the wonderful books from the Word Wenches, my “other” hobby (of three) is genealogy. We talk about this all the time. There is a Facebook page called “Technology for Genealogists” that could be of great interest to writers who need to cope with rapid Technology change. I recommend it to anyone who writes.
    Sue

    Reply
  49. I feel for you. Besides reading all the wonderful books from the Word Wenches, my “other” hobby (of three) is genealogy. We talk about this all the time. There is a Facebook page called “Technology for Genealogists” that could be of great interest to writers who need to cope with rapid Technology change. I recommend it to anyone who writes.
    Sue

    Reply
  50. I feel for you. Besides reading all the wonderful books from the Word Wenches, my “other” hobby (of three) is genealogy. We talk about this all the time. There is a Facebook page called “Technology for Genealogists” that could be of great interest to writers who need to cope with rapid Technology change. I recommend it to anyone who writes.
    Sue

    Reply
  51. Sue, the problem for most writers is that we’re creatives. Technology baffles us. We simply want to create our stories and know that they’ll exist where we can retrieve them. Even though it’s become painfully obvious that this is a futile wish, we’re dreamers.
    Andrea, I feel your pain. I learned back in the dark ages to keep multiple backups, but even then, I had to resurrect Heiress and Duchess from corrupted disks and ancient paper. All we can do is learn and go on.

    Reply
  52. Sue, the problem for most writers is that we’re creatives. Technology baffles us. We simply want to create our stories and know that they’ll exist where we can retrieve them. Even though it’s become painfully obvious that this is a futile wish, we’re dreamers.
    Andrea, I feel your pain. I learned back in the dark ages to keep multiple backups, but even then, I had to resurrect Heiress and Duchess from corrupted disks and ancient paper. All we can do is learn and go on.

    Reply
  53. Sue, the problem for most writers is that we’re creatives. Technology baffles us. We simply want to create our stories and know that they’ll exist where we can retrieve them. Even though it’s become painfully obvious that this is a futile wish, we’re dreamers.
    Andrea, I feel your pain. I learned back in the dark ages to keep multiple backups, but even then, I had to resurrect Heiress and Duchess from corrupted disks and ancient paper. All we can do is learn and go on.

    Reply
  54. Sue, the problem for most writers is that we’re creatives. Technology baffles us. We simply want to create our stories and know that they’ll exist where we can retrieve them. Even though it’s become painfully obvious that this is a futile wish, we’re dreamers.
    Andrea, I feel your pain. I learned back in the dark ages to keep multiple backups, but even then, I had to resurrect Heiress and Duchess from corrupted disks and ancient paper. All we can do is learn and go on.

    Reply
  55. Sue, the problem for most writers is that we’re creatives. Technology baffles us. We simply want to create our stories and know that they’ll exist where we can retrieve them. Even though it’s become painfully obvious that this is a futile wish, we’re dreamers.
    Andrea, I feel your pain. I learned back in the dark ages to keep multiple backups, but even then, I had to resurrect Heiress and Duchess from corrupted disks and ancient paper. All we can do is learn and go on.

    Reply
  56. When you buy the new iMac, it would serve you well to buy a back up drive (they’re really inexpensive these days) and make sure Time Capsule is set up on the iMac. That gives you a back up done regularly, and in addition there are lots of options for Cloud back ups (Dropbox is probably the most well known).
    Good luck!

    Reply
  57. When you buy the new iMac, it would serve you well to buy a back up drive (they’re really inexpensive these days) and make sure Time Capsule is set up on the iMac. That gives you a back up done regularly, and in addition there are lots of options for Cloud back ups (Dropbox is probably the most well known).
    Good luck!

    Reply
  58. When you buy the new iMac, it would serve you well to buy a back up drive (they’re really inexpensive these days) and make sure Time Capsule is set up on the iMac. That gives you a back up done regularly, and in addition there are lots of options for Cloud back ups (Dropbox is probably the most well known).
    Good luck!

    Reply
  59. When you buy the new iMac, it would serve you well to buy a back up drive (they’re really inexpensive these days) and make sure Time Capsule is set up on the iMac. That gives you a back up done regularly, and in addition there are lots of options for Cloud back ups (Dropbox is probably the most well known).
    Good luck!

    Reply
  60. When you buy the new iMac, it would serve you well to buy a back up drive (they’re really inexpensive these days) and make sure Time Capsule is set up on the iMac. That gives you a back up done regularly, and in addition there are lots of options for Cloud back ups (Dropbox is probably the most well known).
    Good luck!

    Reply
  61. Hi Karenmc —
    I tried and tried to make the Time Capsule work for my mac.
    (jo hangs head)
    I never did get the technology to work and eventually passed it along to somebody who could make it all work.
    I use backblaze. So far it has done what I need doing and served me well and is not too complicate.
    Things don’t have to be very complicated before they are too complicated for me.

    Reply
  62. Hi Karenmc —
    I tried and tried to make the Time Capsule work for my mac.
    (jo hangs head)
    I never did get the technology to work and eventually passed it along to somebody who could make it all work.
    I use backblaze. So far it has done what I need doing and served me well and is not too complicate.
    Things don’t have to be very complicated before they are too complicated for me.

    Reply
  63. Hi Karenmc —
    I tried and tried to make the Time Capsule work for my mac.
    (jo hangs head)
    I never did get the technology to work and eventually passed it along to somebody who could make it all work.
    I use backblaze. So far it has done what I need doing and served me well and is not too complicate.
    Things don’t have to be very complicated before they are too complicated for me.

    Reply
  64. Hi Karenmc —
    I tried and tried to make the Time Capsule work for my mac.
    (jo hangs head)
    I never did get the technology to work and eventually passed it along to somebody who could make it all work.
    I use backblaze. So far it has done what I need doing and served me well and is not too complicate.
    Things don’t have to be very complicated before they are too complicated for me.

    Reply
  65. Hi Karenmc —
    I tried and tried to make the Time Capsule work for my mac.
    (jo hangs head)
    I never did get the technology to work and eventually passed it along to somebody who could make it all work.
    I use backblaze. So far it has done what I need doing and served me well and is not too complicate.
    Things don’t have to be very complicated before they are too complicated for me.

    Reply
  66. “there have been some interesting articles recently about how the brain learns and retains much better from handwriting something rather than typing it”
    Donna, this is so true. I used to be an excellent speller, but I have found that since I began using a computer, my spelling has gone south. Spellcheck has made me a bad speller!
    As far as improvements in technology, I am in agreement with the hordes of users who find that these so-called improvements often do not make life easier, but harder (and more expensive). I hate to sound like an old fogey, but planned obsolescence makes me totally crazy. We are a throw-away society, and that mindset affects all aspects of our lives, especially in the computer world.

    Reply
  67. “there have been some interesting articles recently about how the brain learns and retains much better from handwriting something rather than typing it”
    Donna, this is so true. I used to be an excellent speller, but I have found that since I began using a computer, my spelling has gone south. Spellcheck has made me a bad speller!
    As far as improvements in technology, I am in agreement with the hordes of users who find that these so-called improvements often do not make life easier, but harder (and more expensive). I hate to sound like an old fogey, but planned obsolescence makes me totally crazy. We are a throw-away society, and that mindset affects all aspects of our lives, especially in the computer world.

    Reply
  68. “there have been some interesting articles recently about how the brain learns and retains much better from handwriting something rather than typing it”
    Donna, this is so true. I used to be an excellent speller, but I have found that since I began using a computer, my spelling has gone south. Spellcheck has made me a bad speller!
    As far as improvements in technology, I am in agreement with the hordes of users who find that these so-called improvements often do not make life easier, but harder (and more expensive). I hate to sound like an old fogey, but planned obsolescence makes me totally crazy. We are a throw-away society, and that mindset affects all aspects of our lives, especially in the computer world.

    Reply
  69. “there have been some interesting articles recently about how the brain learns and retains much better from handwriting something rather than typing it”
    Donna, this is so true. I used to be an excellent speller, but I have found that since I began using a computer, my spelling has gone south. Spellcheck has made me a bad speller!
    As far as improvements in technology, I am in agreement with the hordes of users who find that these so-called improvements often do not make life easier, but harder (and more expensive). I hate to sound like an old fogey, but planned obsolescence makes me totally crazy. We are a throw-away society, and that mindset affects all aspects of our lives, especially in the computer world.

    Reply
  70. “there have been some interesting articles recently about how the brain learns and retains much better from handwriting something rather than typing it”
    Donna, this is so true. I used to be an excellent speller, but I have found that since I began using a computer, my spelling has gone south. Spellcheck has made me a bad speller!
    As far as improvements in technology, I am in agreement with the hordes of users who find that these so-called improvements often do not make life easier, but harder (and more expensive). I hate to sound like an old fogey, but planned obsolescence makes me totally crazy. We are a throw-away society, and that mindset affects all aspects of our lives, especially in the computer world.

    Reply
  71. Patricia (and the rest of the Word Wenches), it’s BECAUSE of the creativity that I suggested the Technology for Genealogists page. Many genealogists are creative also. We write, we try to bring former generations into life (only the disreputable write fiction). We also do research very similar to yours, because we wish to know about the times our ancestors lived in, not just their names and dates. Many of us don’t truly understand the technology, although we use computers and search the internet (as well as libraries, courthouse, and museums). I think you writers will feel at home there and will be able to ask questions as to what’s next in technology and what do I need for storage, etc., and receive answers in terms you will understand. Look at the page (group?) and see if it doesn’t help you.
    Sue

    Reply
  72. Patricia (and the rest of the Word Wenches), it’s BECAUSE of the creativity that I suggested the Technology for Genealogists page. Many genealogists are creative also. We write, we try to bring former generations into life (only the disreputable write fiction). We also do research very similar to yours, because we wish to know about the times our ancestors lived in, not just their names and dates. Many of us don’t truly understand the technology, although we use computers and search the internet (as well as libraries, courthouse, and museums). I think you writers will feel at home there and will be able to ask questions as to what’s next in technology and what do I need for storage, etc., and receive answers in terms you will understand. Look at the page (group?) and see if it doesn’t help you.
    Sue

    Reply
  73. Patricia (and the rest of the Word Wenches), it’s BECAUSE of the creativity that I suggested the Technology for Genealogists page. Many genealogists are creative also. We write, we try to bring former generations into life (only the disreputable write fiction). We also do research very similar to yours, because we wish to know about the times our ancestors lived in, not just their names and dates. Many of us don’t truly understand the technology, although we use computers and search the internet (as well as libraries, courthouse, and museums). I think you writers will feel at home there and will be able to ask questions as to what’s next in technology and what do I need for storage, etc., and receive answers in terms you will understand. Look at the page (group?) and see if it doesn’t help you.
    Sue

    Reply
  74. Patricia (and the rest of the Word Wenches), it’s BECAUSE of the creativity that I suggested the Technology for Genealogists page. Many genealogists are creative also. We write, we try to bring former generations into life (only the disreputable write fiction). We also do research very similar to yours, because we wish to know about the times our ancestors lived in, not just their names and dates. Many of us don’t truly understand the technology, although we use computers and search the internet (as well as libraries, courthouse, and museums). I think you writers will feel at home there and will be able to ask questions as to what’s next in technology and what do I need for storage, etc., and receive answers in terms you will understand. Look at the page (group?) and see if it doesn’t help you.
    Sue

    Reply
  75. Patricia (and the rest of the Word Wenches), it’s BECAUSE of the creativity that I suggested the Technology for Genealogists page. Many genealogists are creative also. We write, we try to bring former generations into life (only the disreputable write fiction). We also do research very similar to yours, because we wish to know about the times our ancestors lived in, not just their names and dates. Many of us don’t truly understand the technology, although we use computers and search the internet (as well as libraries, courthouse, and museums). I think you writers will feel at home there and will be able to ask questions as to what’s next in technology and what do I need for storage, etc., and receive answers in terms you will understand. Look at the page (group?) and see if it doesn’t help you.
    Sue

    Reply
  76. Oh, Cara! How awful. I had a total computer crash – lsot everything and what I thought was a backup system failed totally. Through my own ignorance, unfortunately.
    I now use an external hard drive and it is great so far.
    I have heard people save to the cloud also – a bit too freaky for my quill pen tastes 😀

    Reply
  77. Oh, Cara! How awful. I had a total computer crash – lsot everything and what I thought was a backup system failed totally. Through my own ignorance, unfortunately.
    I now use an external hard drive and it is great so far.
    I have heard people save to the cloud also – a bit too freaky for my quill pen tastes 😀

    Reply
  78. Oh, Cara! How awful. I had a total computer crash – lsot everything and what I thought was a backup system failed totally. Through my own ignorance, unfortunately.
    I now use an external hard drive and it is great so far.
    I have heard people save to the cloud also – a bit too freaky for my quill pen tastes 😀

    Reply
  79. Oh, Cara! How awful. I had a total computer crash – lsot everything and what I thought was a backup system failed totally. Through my own ignorance, unfortunately.
    I now use an external hard drive and it is great so far.
    I have heard people save to the cloud also – a bit too freaky for my quill pen tastes 😀

    Reply
  80. Oh, Cara! How awful. I had a total computer crash – lsot everything and what I thought was a backup system failed totally. Through my own ignorance, unfortunately.
    I now use an external hard drive and it is great so far.
    I have heard people save to the cloud also – a bit too freaky for my quill pen tastes 😀

    Reply
  81. Ms. Elliott,
    I must contend that I’m a bit anti-technologic in that I’m the writer pushing back the advances of gadgetry and opting instead for more traditional methods! I do have a notebook computer that is nearly 13 years old yet it runs as if it’s brand new {the blessing of limited use! mostly as I learnt a hard lesson in hualing it around everywhere! give me pen and a {paper} notebook any day!}, as much as I use a desktop, though mine is beyond outdated!
    I hadn’t even realised they phased out cd drives, as I was just ‘starting’ to warm up to them! Oy! I still have a regular stereo radio {it was ahead of it’s time over 20 years ago!}, a discman, and a walkman {hopefully I’m not the only writer who likes to write to music?!},… but as far as the rest of the gadgets!? I save those for the kitchen to make cooking less stressful! 🙂 🙂 Big smiles.
    Personally,… my biggest dream!? Is to nearly chuck my use of computers completely when it comes to writing,…because I started out writing on notepaper and transferred it to draft copies by typewriter! I loved the flucidity of the process as it was very organic and familiar… I’ve been researching vintage and restored typewriters for several years now, and when my budget allows I want to pick up a workhorse from the 1940s {although I’ll concede to the 50s if need be}, as much as I want to get a college edition from the 1930s I believe which runs completely silent! The makes/models all run together in my head so forgive me not mentioning them! 🙂
    As already noted, my eyes cannot handle the screens for longer spurts of time, so by transitioning backwards I find myself more at ease to let the muse flow and the words to spilt back onto the page! Inasmuch as a project I’ve been working on is leading me back to my writing(s) which I left abandoned for a few years,…
    Now then, whose up for a long day wandering the stacks of a University library, ordering books via their international ILL service, and querying our thoughts and characters together to actual paper, whilst bemusing each other about the research we’re gathering!? Cheers!

    Reply
  82. Ms. Elliott,
    I must contend that I’m a bit anti-technologic in that I’m the writer pushing back the advances of gadgetry and opting instead for more traditional methods! I do have a notebook computer that is nearly 13 years old yet it runs as if it’s brand new {the blessing of limited use! mostly as I learnt a hard lesson in hualing it around everywhere! give me pen and a {paper} notebook any day!}, as much as I use a desktop, though mine is beyond outdated!
    I hadn’t even realised they phased out cd drives, as I was just ‘starting’ to warm up to them! Oy! I still have a regular stereo radio {it was ahead of it’s time over 20 years ago!}, a discman, and a walkman {hopefully I’m not the only writer who likes to write to music?!},… but as far as the rest of the gadgets!? I save those for the kitchen to make cooking less stressful! 🙂 🙂 Big smiles.
    Personally,… my biggest dream!? Is to nearly chuck my use of computers completely when it comes to writing,…because I started out writing on notepaper and transferred it to draft copies by typewriter! I loved the flucidity of the process as it was very organic and familiar… I’ve been researching vintage and restored typewriters for several years now, and when my budget allows I want to pick up a workhorse from the 1940s {although I’ll concede to the 50s if need be}, as much as I want to get a college edition from the 1930s I believe which runs completely silent! The makes/models all run together in my head so forgive me not mentioning them! 🙂
    As already noted, my eyes cannot handle the screens for longer spurts of time, so by transitioning backwards I find myself more at ease to let the muse flow and the words to spilt back onto the page! Inasmuch as a project I’ve been working on is leading me back to my writing(s) which I left abandoned for a few years,…
    Now then, whose up for a long day wandering the stacks of a University library, ordering books via their international ILL service, and querying our thoughts and characters together to actual paper, whilst bemusing each other about the research we’re gathering!? Cheers!

    Reply
  83. Ms. Elliott,
    I must contend that I’m a bit anti-technologic in that I’m the writer pushing back the advances of gadgetry and opting instead for more traditional methods! I do have a notebook computer that is nearly 13 years old yet it runs as if it’s brand new {the blessing of limited use! mostly as I learnt a hard lesson in hualing it around everywhere! give me pen and a {paper} notebook any day!}, as much as I use a desktop, though mine is beyond outdated!
    I hadn’t even realised they phased out cd drives, as I was just ‘starting’ to warm up to them! Oy! I still have a regular stereo radio {it was ahead of it’s time over 20 years ago!}, a discman, and a walkman {hopefully I’m not the only writer who likes to write to music?!},… but as far as the rest of the gadgets!? I save those for the kitchen to make cooking less stressful! 🙂 🙂 Big smiles.
    Personally,… my biggest dream!? Is to nearly chuck my use of computers completely when it comes to writing,…because I started out writing on notepaper and transferred it to draft copies by typewriter! I loved the flucidity of the process as it was very organic and familiar… I’ve been researching vintage and restored typewriters for several years now, and when my budget allows I want to pick up a workhorse from the 1940s {although I’ll concede to the 50s if need be}, as much as I want to get a college edition from the 1930s I believe which runs completely silent! The makes/models all run together in my head so forgive me not mentioning them! 🙂
    As already noted, my eyes cannot handle the screens for longer spurts of time, so by transitioning backwards I find myself more at ease to let the muse flow and the words to spilt back onto the page! Inasmuch as a project I’ve been working on is leading me back to my writing(s) which I left abandoned for a few years,…
    Now then, whose up for a long day wandering the stacks of a University library, ordering books via their international ILL service, and querying our thoughts and characters together to actual paper, whilst bemusing each other about the research we’re gathering!? Cheers!

    Reply
  84. Ms. Elliott,
    I must contend that I’m a bit anti-technologic in that I’m the writer pushing back the advances of gadgetry and opting instead for more traditional methods! I do have a notebook computer that is nearly 13 years old yet it runs as if it’s brand new {the blessing of limited use! mostly as I learnt a hard lesson in hualing it around everywhere! give me pen and a {paper} notebook any day!}, as much as I use a desktop, though mine is beyond outdated!
    I hadn’t even realised they phased out cd drives, as I was just ‘starting’ to warm up to them! Oy! I still have a regular stereo radio {it was ahead of it’s time over 20 years ago!}, a discman, and a walkman {hopefully I’m not the only writer who likes to write to music?!},… but as far as the rest of the gadgets!? I save those for the kitchen to make cooking less stressful! 🙂 🙂 Big smiles.
    Personally,… my biggest dream!? Is to nearly chuck my use of computers completely when it comes to writing,…because I started out writing on notepaper and transferred it to draft copies by typewriter! I loved the flucidity of the process as it was very organic and familiar… I’ve been researching vintage and restored typewriters for several years now, and when my budget allows I want to pick up a workhorse from the 1940s {although I’ll concede to the 50s if need be}, as much as I want to get a college edition from the 1930s I believe which runs completely silent! The makes/models all run together in my head so forgive me not mentioning them! 🙂
    As already noted, my eyes cannot handle the screens for longer spurts of time, so by transitioning backwards I find myself more at ease to let the muse flow and the words to spilt back onto the page! Inasmuch as a project I’ve been working on is leading me back to my writing(s) which I left abandoned for a few years,…
    Now then, whose up for a long day wandering the stacks of a University library, ordering books via their international ILL service, and querying our thoughts and characters together to actual paper, whilst bemusing each other about the research we’re gathering!? Cheers!

    Reply
  85. Ms. Elliott,
    I must contend that I’m a bit anti-technologic in that I’m the writer pushing back the advances of gadgetry and opting instead for more traditional methods! I do have a notebook computer that is nearly 13 years old yet it runs as if it’s brand new {the blessing of limited use! mostly as I learnt a hard lesson in hualing it around everywhere! give me pen and a {paper} notebook any day!}, as much as I use a desktop, though mine is beyond outdated!
    I hadn’t even realised they phased out cd drives, as I was just ‘starting’ to warm up to them! Oy! I still have a regular stereo radio {it was ahead of it’s time over 20 years ago!}, a discman, and a walkman {hopefully I’m not the only writer who likes to write to music?!},… but as far as the rest of the gadgets!? I save those for the kitchen to make cooking less stressful! 🙂 🙂 Big smiles.
    Personally,… my biggest dream!? Is to nearly chuck my use of computers completely when it comes to writing,…because I started out writing on notepaper and transferred it to draft copies by typewriter! I loved the flucidity of the process as it was very organic and familiar… I’ve been researching vintage and restored typewriters for several years now, and when my budget allows I want to pick up a workhorse from the 1940s {although I’ll concede to the 50s if need be}, as much as I want to get a college edition from the 1930s I believe which runs completely silent! The makes/models all run together in my head so forgive me not mentioning them! 🙂
    As already noted, my eyes cannot handle the screens for longer spurts of time, so by transitioning backwards I find myself more at ease to let the muse flow and the words to spilt back onto the page! Inasmuch as a project I’ve been working on is leading me back to my writing(s) which I left abandoned for a few years,…
    Now then, whose up for a long day wandering the stacks of a University library, ordering books via their international ILL service, and querying our thoughts and characters together to actual paper, whilst bemusing each other about the research we’re gathering!? Cheers!

    Reply
  86. Jorie, I love the idea of the ’40s typewriter. Those old models were beautiful and sturdy. (I am fuming over the planned obsolescence of much of the tech stuff.)
    And I agree that paper and pen is becoming more and more appealing!

    Reply
  87. Jorie, I love the idea of the ’40s typewriter. Those old models were beautiful and sturdy. (I am fuming over the planned obsolescence of much of the tech stuff.)
    And I agree that paper and pen is becoming more and more appealing!

    Reply
  88. Jorie, I love the idea of the ’40s typewriter. Those old models were beautiful and sturdy. (I am fuming over the planned obsolescence of much of the tech stuff.)
    And I agree that paper and pen is becoming more and more appealing!

    Reply
  89. Jorie, I love the idea of the ’40s typewriter. Those old models were beautiful and sturdy. (I am fuming over the planned obsolescence of much of the tech stuff.)
    And I agree that paper and pen is becoming more and more appealing!

    Reply
  90. Jorie, I love the idea of the ’40s typewriter. Those old models were beautiful and sturdy. (I am fuming over the planned obsolescence of much of the tech stuff.)
    And I agree that paper and pen is becoming more and more appealing!

    Reply
  91. Ms. Holmes,
    Your quite true indeed, about how quickly society is to shirk away an item or a bit of gadgetry to replace it for something newly released! We held out for a flat screen tv until our old one actually died! It was approx. 22 years of age, and the new tv, ironically was already obsolete when purchased! Oy! The insanity of it all!
    I grew up with an appreciation for the timelessness of things we acquire. It’s one thing to need to replace something that is broken beyond repair but it’s quite another to always buy when your current model will make do just fine! And, this is not just computers, mind you! 🙂 I love wandering around antique emporiums or attending antique auctions,… the sheer possibility of what you can find and bring home invigorates me! I find more of a calming balm in living with a foothold to the past, than to always forsake the future by overconsumption of the present.
    Even computers can be purchased second-hand, as my parents will be doing soon, as it’s quite hard to buy a new one as steep as they are priced at the moment, so we’re going to welcome home a refurbished computer with all the fixings! They were quite aghast realising the cost savings!
    It’s a mindset for sure, but anyone can change how they choose to live and perceive what is possible. It might mean taking a hard look at your life, and seeing what you’ve missed,… or what you didn’t consider doing, but the rewards of making changes to live locally, eat like a locavore at the markets, be a bit frugal and mindful, will enrich you in the long run.

    Reply
  92. Ms. Holmes,
    Your quite true indeed, about how quickly society is to shirk away an item or a bit of gadgetry to replace it for something newly released! We held out for a flat screen tv until our old one actually died! It was approx. 22 years of age, and the new tv, ironically was already obsolete when purchased! Oy! The insanity of it all!
    I grew up with an appreciation for the timelessness of things we acquire. It’s one thing to need to replace something that is broken beyond repair but it’s quite another to always buy when your current model will make do just fine! And, this is not just computers, mind you! 🙂 I love wandering around antique emporiums or attending antique auctions,… the sheer possibility of what you can find and bring home invigorates me! I find more of a calming balm in living with a foothold to the past, than to always forsake the future by overconsumption of the present.
    Even computers can be purchased second-hand, as my parents will be doing soon, as it’s quite hard to buy a new one as steep as they are priced at the moment, so we’re going to welcome home a refurbished computer with all the fixings! They were quite aghast realising the cost savings!
    It’s a mindset for sure, but anyone can change how they choose to live and perceive what is possible. It might mean taking a hard look at your life, and seeing what you’ve missed,… or what you didn’t consider doing, but the rewards of making changes to live locally, eat like a locavore at the markets, be a bit frugal and mindful, will enrich you in the long run.

    Reply
  93. Ms. Holmes,
    Your quite true indeed, about how quickly society is to shirk away an item or a bit of gadgetry to replace it for something newly released! We held out for a flat screen tv until our old one actually died! It was approx. 22 years of age, and the new tv, ironically was already obsolete when purchased! Oy! The insanity of it all!
    I grew up with an appreciation for the timelessness of things we acquire. It’s one thing to need to replace something that is broken beyond repair but it’s quite another to always buy when your current model will make do just fine! And, this is not just computers, mind you! 🙂 I love wandering around antique emporiums or attending antique auctions,… the sheer possibility of what you can find and bring home invigorates me! I find more of a calming balm in living with a foothold to the past, than to always forsake the future by overconsumption of the present.
    Even computers can be purchased second-hand, as my parents will be doing soon, as it’s quite hard to buy a new one as steep as they are priced at the moment, so we’re going to welcome home a refurbished computer with all the fixings! They were quite aghast realising the cost savings!
    It’s a mindset for sure, but anyone can change how they choose to live and perceive what is possible. It might mean taking a hard look at your life, and seeing what you’ve missed,… or what you didn’t consider doing, but the rewards of making changes to live locally, eat like a locavore at the markets, be a bit frugal and mindful, will enrich you in the long run.

    Reply
  94. Ms. Holmes,
    Your quite true indeed, about how quickly society is to shirk away an item or a bit of gadgetry to replace it for something newly released! We held out for a flat screen tv until our old one actually died! It was approx. 22 years of age, and the new tv, ironically was already obsolete when purchased! Oy! The insanity of it all!
    I grew up with an appreciation for the timelessness of things we acquire. It’s one thing to need to replace something that is broken beyond repair but it’s quite another to always buy when your current model will make do just fine! And, this is not just computers, mind you! 🙂 I love wandering around antique emporiums or attending antique auctions,… the sheer possibility of what you can find and bring home invigorates me! I find more of a calming balm in living with a foothold to the past, than to always forsake the future by overconsumption of the present.
    Even computers can be purchased second-hand, as my parents will be doing soon, as it’s quite hard to buy a new one as steep as they are priced at the moment, so we’re going to welcome home a refurbished computer with all the fixings! They were quite aghast realising the cost savings!
    It’s a mindset for sure, but anyone can change how they choose to live and perceive what is possible. It might mean taking a hard look at your life, and seeing what you’ve missed,… or what you didn’t consider doing, but the rewards of making changes to live locally, eat like a locavore at the markets, be a bit frugal and mindful, will enrich you in the long run.

    Reply
  95. Ms. Holmes,
    Your quite true indeed, about how quickly society is to shirk away an item or a bit of gadgetry to replace it for something newly released! We held out for a flat screen tv until our old one actually died! It was approx. 22 years of age, and the new tv, ironically was already obsolete when purchased! Oy! The insanity of it all!
    I grew up with an appreciation for the timelessness of things we acquire. It’s one thing to need to replace something that is broken beyond repair but it’s quite another to always buy when your current model will make do just fine! And, this is not just computers, mind you! 🙂 I love wandering around antique emporiums or attending antique auctions,… the sheer possibility of what you can find and bring home invigorates me! I find more of a calming balm in living with a foothold to the past, than to always forsake the future by overconsumption of the present.
    Even computers can be purchased second-hand, as my parents will be doing soon, as it’s quite hard to buy a new one as steep as they are priced at the moment, so we’re going to welcome home a refurbished computer with all the fixings! They were quite aghast realising the cost savings!
    It’s a mindset for sure, but anyone can change how they choose to live and perceive what is possible. It might mean taking a hard look at your life, and seeing what you’ve missed,… or what you didn’t consider doing, but the rewards of making changes to live locally, eat like a locavore at the markets, be a bit frugal and mindful, will enrich you in the long run.

    Reply
  96. Ms. Elliott,
    I know, right!? It’s the same with modern verse older homes,… Thanks for bringing up such a hearty topic! 🙂 I enjoyed this thread! And, I forgot to mention that I hope your new iMac runs blissfully well without any further causes of stress!!

    Reply
  97. Ms. Elliott,
    I know, right!? It’s the same with modern verse older homes,… Thanks for bringing up such a hearty topic! 🙂 I enjoyed this thread! And, I forgot to mention that I hope your new iMac runs blissfully well without any further causes of stress!!

    Reply
  98. Ms. Elliott,
    I know, right!? It’s the same with modern verse older homes,… Thanks for bringing up such a hearty topic! 🙂 I enjoyed this thread! And, I forgot to mention that I hope your new iMac runs blissfully well without any further causes of stress!!

    Reply
  99. Ms. Elliott,
    I know, right!? It’s the same with modern verse older homes,… Thanks for bringing up such a hearty topic! 🙂 I enjoyed this thread! And, I forgot to mention that I hope your new iMac runs blissfully well without any further causes of stress!!

    Reply
  100. Ms. Elliott,
    I know, right!? It’s the same with modern verse older homes,… Thanks for bringing up such a hearty topic! 🙂 I enjoyed this thread! And, I forgot to mention that I hope your new iMac runs blissfully well without any further causes of stress!!

    Reply
  101. I use a Clickfree external backup drive. Comes in a neat little case, attaches by USB cable, does daily backup in a couple of minutes, stick it in its case in the drawer when I’m done. Simple enough to be a daily habit at shutdown. It’s as idiotproof as these things get. It has seen me through two hard drive crashes and when I’ve inadvertently deleted an individual file I’ve restored it easily.
    The new version also works on smartphones – think of all the pix you would regret losing.
    Of course, it’s not offsite, so if my apartment burns down, I’m out of luck … but that would probably be the least of my griefs in such an event.
    All that said, I miss typewriters. If I had more space, I’d have one again. I just like them. I think the Kremlin has a point there.

    Reply
  102. I use a Clickfree external backup drive. Comes in a neat little case, attaches by USB cable, does daily backup in a couple of minutes, stick it in its case in the drawer when I’m done. Simple enough to be a daily habit at shutdown. It’s as idiotproof as these things get. It has seen me through two hard drive crashes and when I’ve inadvertently deleted an individual file I’ve restored it easily.
    The new version also works on smartphones – think of all the pix you would regret losing.
    Of course, it’s not offsite, so if my apartment burns down, I’m out of luck … but that would probably be the least of my griefs in such an event.
    All that said, I miss typewriters. If I had more space, I’d have one again. I just like them. I think the Kremlin has a point there.

    Reply
  103. I use a Clickfree external backup drive. Comes in a neat little case, attaches by USB cable, does daily backup in a couple of minutes, stick it in its case in the drawer when I’m done. Simple enough to be a daily habit at shutdown. It’s as idiotproof as these things get. It has seen me through two hard drive crashes and when I’ve inadvertently deleted an individual file I’ve restored it easily.
    The new version also works on smartphones – think of all the pix you would regret losing.
    Of course, it’s not offsite, so if my apartment burns down, I’m out of luck … but that would probably be the least of my griefs in such an event.
    All that said, I miss typewriters. If I had more space, I’d have one again. I just like them. I think the Kremlin has a point there.

    Reply
  104. I use a Clickfree external backup drive. Comes in a neat little case, attaches by USB cable, does daily backup in a couple of minutes, stick it in its case in the drawer when I’m done. Simple enough to be a daily habit at shutdown. It’s as idiotproof as these things get. It has seen me through two hard drive crashes and when I’ve inadvertently deleted an individual file I’ve restored it easily.
    The new version also works on smartphones – think of all the pix you would regret losing.
    Of course, it’s not offsite, so if my apartment burns down, I’m out of luck … but that would probably be the least of my griefs in such an event.
    All that said, I miss typewriters. If I had more space, I’d have one again. I just like them. I think the Kremlin has a point there.

    Reply
  105. I use a Clickfree external backup drive. Comes in a neat little case, attaches by USB cable, does daily backup in a couple of minutes, stick it in its case in the drawer when I’m done. Simple enough to be a daily habit at shutdown. It’s as idiotproof as these things get. It has seen me through two hard drive crashes and when I’ve inadvertently deleted an individual file I’ve restored it easily.
    The new version also works on smartphones – think of all the pix you would regret losing.
    Of course, it’s not offsite, so if my apartment burns down, I’m out of luck … but that would probably be the least of my griefs in such an event.
    All that said, I miss typewriters. If I had more space, I’d have one again. I just like them. I think the Kremlin has a point there.

    Reply

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