Loretta ponders Truth & Beauty

Barbie_40th_ann_1_1           
      Last night, my husband entered the room while I was watching What Not to Wear.  Carmindy was advising three recent or about to be mothers on make up.  As she applied eye liner to one of them, my husband said, “Why do women do that to themselves?”
      I rolled my eyes but he didn’t notice, being too busy wresting the remote control from my hand.
      He’s a guy.  He forgets.
      He even forgets important wisdom he’s offered me about guys.
      Let me start by saying this is one smart man.  He’s currently in a business so high tech that I have only a vague, small clue what it is.  He could be building a time machine for all I know.  Maybe he is.  This is my go-to guy not only when I have need of guy talents such as Move, Fix, Kill, but when I need answers to questions in a hurry.  This is my Mr. Science and my computer guru.
      He has told me–and many other women–repeatedly, “Men are simple.  Women are complicated.”  I have theorized from this wisdom that because women are so complicated we cannot comprehend how simple men are.  Or, if we sort of comprehend it, we can’t believe it.
      When I was young, I assumed men thought more or less as women did.  I had no brothers to introduce me to the gross disgustingness that is the youthful male, or clue me in on their uncanny ability to discover new and exciting ways to injure, maim, or kill themselves.  This usually starts out with, “I have an idea.  Why don’t I/we_______?”  You fill in the blank.  Let’s jump off a roof.  Let’s tease the pit bull.  Let’s see who gets across the railroad tracks first when the train is 18 seconds away.
      Cynthia_1 My sister Cynthia will point out that this insanity is not necessarily exclusive to males.  She will be happy to report that I performed several death-defying feats on railroad tracks.  She will say that I was the one who suggested we travel down that steep hill–with the big rocks and trees down at the bottom–standing up on a toboggan.  I will be happy to answer, in return, that it isn’t my fault she suffered a concussion.  She didn’t have to do it.  She could have been a sissy.
      But I digress.
      With age comes wisdom.  With wisdom one perceives that if guys weren’t gross and disgusting they wouldn’t have survived those long sea voyages, say, back in the late 1400s.  If they weren’t eager to discover new and exciting ways to injure, maim, or kill themselves, they wouldn’t do daring things like cross an ocean when everyone knew it was flat and they’d fall off the edge–if they didn’t get eaten by monsters before they reached the edge.
      So far be it from me to wish guys were other than they are, even if they are at times clueless.  However that simple brain works exactly, I appreciate it.
      I’m just an observer here.  It’s my job to observe, because that’s one of the tools for making interesting characters:  studying human nature.
      Anyway, back to the make-up lesson.  Why do women do that?
      Well, among the other simple truths my spouse has offered me is the fact that men see better than they think.  Actually, someone offered me this as the punchline or moral of a joke (Mary Jo, IIRC), but my husband confirmed it.
      So some of us make ourselves as beautiful as possible in order to attract and keep mates, and make other men we encounter wish they were our mates, etc. etc. 
      But we don’t all of us set out to please men.  We like to please other women, too.  And ourselves, when we look in the mirror.  Some of us are happy without makeup.  Some of us are happier with it.  We wear or don’t wear it for a number of reasons.  European women, for instance, tend to dress some degrees more formally than we Yanks.  In France, an actual heterosexual man would feel free to compliment a woman on her makeup. Barbie_armani_1  In one culture, facial tattoos would be considered de rigueur.  In another culture, some elaborate form of body piercing or the elongation of lips or ears might be deemed a beauty aid or necessity.
      If you look at the big picture, the reasons for applying cosmetic aids are as complicated as women themselves:  individual, sexual, cultural, psychological, sociological.  Way too complicated to try to explain to a guy.
      So I just let my husband have the remote and let it go.
      Today I went to have a passport photo taken.
      Of all the exercises in futility, one would think that putting on makeup for a license or passport photo would rank in the top three.
      I did it anyway.  And while I did it, I thought about the women in the BBC/PBS reality show, Regency House Party, mourning, among other things, their forbidden makeup.  There was a lot of whining on that show with which I had no patience.  But this part I understood.  The guys, of course, had no clue.  They were off doing manly things, shooting off guns that might explode in their hands and wagering on boxing matches and getting very, very drunk.
      That show alone was a prime example of the Men are Simple; Women are Complicated rule.
      I can cite other examples but I’ve got a passport application to fill out.
      What about you?  Are men simple?  Is makeup necessary? Fun? A waste of time?  Disgusting?

51 thoughts on “Loretta ponders Truth & Beauty”

  1. ROFL, Loretta! I read this and think of wonderful Rupert in Mr. Impossible. Rupert, the poster boy for Men Are Simple, But We Like Them That Way. 🙂
    I do hope the passport application indicates something interesting coming up.
    As to make-up, I’m in the “Do I HAVE to?” category. A little lipstick, maybe. Perhaps some blush. But while I think eye make up can look very nice, I hate putting it on and hate wearing it and hate taking it off. Needless to say, I almost never wear it and should probably throw out what I have since it is doubtless so old that it’s swimming in bacterial contamination.
    I have thought about the fact that tattooed eyeliner would look nice and never have to be applied again, but a friend had it done and the word “excruciating” figured repeatedly in her description of the process. I don’t do excruciating by choice.
    Plus, I’ve since heard that as we age and various bit of anatomy start surrendering to gravity, tattooed make-up can start taking strange shapes. Clarence the Clown? Let’s not.
    So I will continue to blink my pale, rabbit-like, un-made-up eyes, and admire friends like Loretta who always look sharp and well turned out.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  2. ROFL, Loretta! I read this and think of wonderful Rupert in Mr. Impossible. Rupert, the poster boy for Men Are Simple, But We Like Them That Way. 🙂
    I do hope the passport application indicates something interesting coming up.
    As to make-up, I’m in the “Do I HAVE to?” category. A little lipstick, maybe. Perhaps some blush. But while I think eye make up can look very nice, I hate putting it on and hate wearing it and hate taking it off. Needless to say, I almost never wear it and should probably throw out what I have since it is doubtless so old that it’s swimming in bacterial contamination.
    I have thought about the fact that tattooed eyeliner would look nice and never have to be applied again, but a friend had it done and the word “excruciating” figured repeatedly in her description of the process. I don’t do excruciating by choice.
    Plus, I’ve since heard that as we age and various bit of anatomy start surrendering to gravity, tattooed make-up can start taking strange shapes. Clarence the Clown? Let’s not.
    So I will continue to blink my pale, rabbit-like, un-made-up eyes, and admire friends like Loretta who always look sharp and well turned out.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  3. ROFL, Loretta! I read this and think of wonderful Rupert in Mr. Impossible. Rupert, the poster boy for Men Are Simple, But We Like Them That Way. 🙂
    I do hope the passport application indicates something interesting coming up.
    As to make-up, I’m in the “Do I HAVE to?” category. A little lipstick, maybe. Perhaps some blush. But while I think eye make up can look very nice, I hate putting it on and hate wearing it and hate taking it off. Needless to say, I almost never wear it and should probably throw out what I have since it is doubtless so old that it’s swimming in bacterial contamination.
    I have thought about the fact that tattooed eyeliner would look nice and never have to be applied again, but a friend had it done and the word “excruciating” figured repeatedly in her description of the process. I don’t do excruciating by choice.
    Plus, I’ve since heard that as we age and various bit of anatomy start surrendering to gravity, tattooed make-up can start taking strange shapes. Clarence the Clown? Let’s not.
    So I will continue to blink my pale, rabbit-like, un-made-up eyes, and admire friends like Loretta who always look sharp and well turned out.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  4. I think both genders are equally, unfathomably complicated to the other, Loretta. Nature planned it that way, or else we’d all be squabbling over the eyeliner brush instead of just the remote.
    But you’re totally right about women dressing up for other women. What is worn at RWA national (a virtually all-female event) is planned, plotted, and worried over far more than what is worn for men. For most men, approval seems in direct proportion to the amount of spandex in the fabric, ie, if it’s tight, it’s good. Only another woman will appreciate the degrees of subltety between shades of black.
    Regarding “Regency House Party”: I shared your desire to shake many of the participants, though overall I got a real kick out of it. But my absolute favorite moment was the last one, when the gates opened, and there was modern life. Whew!

    Reply
  5. I think both genders are equally, unfathomably complicated to the other, Loretta. Nature planned it that way, or else we’d all be squabbling over the eyeliner brush instead of just the remote.
    But you’re totally right about women dressing up for other women. What is worn at RWA national (a virtually all-female event) is planned, plotted, and worried over far more than what is worn for men. For most men, approval seems in direct proportion to the amount of spandex in the fabric, ie, if it’s tight, it’s good. Only another woman will appreciate the degrees of subltety between shades of black.
    Regarding “Regency House Party”: I shared your desire to shake many of the participants, though overall I got a real kick out of it. But my absolute favorite moment was the last one, when the gates opened, and there was modern life. Whew!

    Reply
  6. I think both genders are equally, unfathomably complicated to the other, Loretta. Nature planned it that way, or else we’d all be squabbling over the eyeliner brush instead of just the remote.
    But you’re totally right about women dressing up for other women. What is worn at RWA national (a virtually all-female event) is planned, plotted, and worried over far more than what is worn for men. For most men, approval seems in direct proportion to the amount of spandex in the fabric, ie, if it’s tight, it’s good. Only another woman will appreciate the degrees of subltety between shades of black.
    Regarding “Regency House Party”: I shared your desire to shake many of the participants, though overall I got a real kick out of it. But my absolute favorite moment was the last one, when the gates opened, and there was modern life. Whew!

    Reply
  7. Bad enough that men are stupid and women are crazy, but one’s left-brained and the other is right-brained, we may as well communicate in grunts and hand gestures.
    I think of make-up as a play toy that I pull out when I’m bored and want to play dress up. Or if I’m heading out somewhere that makes me nervous, I’ll use it as a confidence builder. By no means do I fool myself into thinking it will turn me into a beauty queen or a rat facsimile thereof, but it’s got to make me better than I was, right?
    don’t answer that, any of you wenches!

    Reply
  8. Bad enough that men are stupid and women are crazy, but one’s left-brained and the other is right-brained, we may as well communicate in grunts and hand gestures.
    I think of make-up as a play toy that I pull out when I’m bored and want to play dress up. Or if I’m heading out somewhere that makes me nervous, I’ll use it as a confidence builder. By no means do I fool myself into thinking it will turn me into a beauty queen or a rat facsimile thereof, but it’s got to make me better than I was, right?
    don’t answer that, any of you wenches!

    Reply
  9. Bad enough that men are stupid and women are crazy, but one’s left-brained and the other is right-brained, we may as well communicate in grunts and hand gestures.
    I think of make-up as a play toy that I pull out when I’m bored and want to play dress up. Or if I’m heading out somewhere that makes me nervous, I’ll use it as a confidence builder. By no means do I fool myself into thinking it will turn me into a beauty queen or a rat facsimile thereof, but it’s got to make me better than I was, right?
    don’t answer that, any of you wenches!

    Reply
  10. My experience is that men are different from each other, just as women are different from each other. And I’ve got a theory that people are like onions. They’ve got layers. Peeling through the layers can make you cry 😉 If you just look at one layer, it can look simple, but once you look a bit deeper, everyone gets more complex.
    I don’t wear makeup. I know I’d make myself look like a clown if I tried.
    When you say that ‘European women, for instance, tend to dress some degrees more formally than we Yanks’, are you including the UK in Europe? Because the UK is part of Europe, but I think we tend to dress quite a lot less formally than in Spain or Italy, for example.

    Reply
  11. My experience is that men are different from each other, just as women are different from each other. And I’ve got a theory that people are like onions. They’ve got layers. Peeling through the layers can make you cry 😉 If you just look at one layer, it can look simple, but once you look a bit deeper, everyone gets more complex.
    I don’t wear makeup. I know I’d make myself look like a clown if I tried.
    When you say that ‘European women, for instance, tend to dress some degrees more formally than we Yanks’, are you including the UK in Europe? Because the UK is part of Europe, but I think we tend to dress quite a lot less formally than in Spain or Italy, for example.

    Reply
  12. My experience is that men are different from each other, just as women are different from each other. And I’ve got a theory that people are like onions. They’ve got layers. Peeling through the layers can make you cry 😉 If you just look at one layer, it can look simple, but once you look a bit deeper, everyone gets more complex.
    I don’t wear makeup. I know I’d make myself look like a clown if I tried.
    When you say that ‘European women, for instance, tend to dress some degrees more formally than we Yanks’, are you including the UK in Europe? Because the UK is part of Europe, but I think we tend to dress quite a lot less formally than in Spain or Italy, for example.

    Reply
  13. I’m surprised that no one has mentioned that this is a comparatively recent development. In the eighteenth century, men powdered, painted, and patched with the best of them, and their fashions were as peacocky as women’s fashions.
    Speaking of peacocks–In nature, in general, the male is more conspicuous and colorful than the female, because males compete with each other to attract mates. Among us homo saps, OTOH, these days women compete for the best males–hence WE are the ones who dress up and apply makeup.
    I don’t wear much makeup, because I perspire heavily and I live in a desert. Also, I wear glasses, so there’s not much point to eye makeup. I used to use eyebrow powder, but I seldom bother anymore. Lipstick, maybe some tinted moisturizer, and earrings and necklace to distract people from my face.
    Let us all give thanks that we were not born Ubangis.

    Reply
  14. I’m surprised that no one has mentioned that this is a comparatively recent development. In the eighteenth century, men powdered, painted, and patched with the best of them, and their fashions were as peacocky as women’s fashions.
    Speaking of peacocks–In nature, in general, the male is more conspicuous and colorful than the female, because males compete with each other to attract mates. Among us homo saps, OTOH, these days women compete for the best males–hence WE are the ones who dress up and apply makeup.
    I don’t wear much makeup, because I perspire heavily and I live in a desert. Also, I wear glasses, so there’s not much point to eye makeup. I used to use eyebrow powder, but I seldom bother anymore. Lipstick, maybe some tinted moisturizer, and earrings and necklace to distract people from my face.
    Let us all give thanks that we were not born Ubangis.

    Reply
  15. I’m surprised that no one has mentioned that this is a comparatively recent development. In the eighteenth century, men powdered, painted, and patched with the best of them, and their fashions were as peacocky as women’s fashions.
    Speaking of peacocks–In nature, in general, the male is more conspicuous and colorful than the female, because males compete with each other to attract mates. Among us homo saps, OTOH, these days women compete for the best males–hence WE are the ones who dress up and apply makeup.
    I don’t wear much makeup, because I perspire heavily and I live in a desert. Also, I wear glasses, so there’s not much point to eye makeup. I used to use eyebrow powder, but I seldom bother anymore. Lipstick, maybe some tinted moisturizer, and earrings and necklace to distract people from my face.
    Let us all give thanks that we were not born Ubangis.

    Reply
  16. I go through phases where I wear makeup daily, then not at all for months. I like it, and I like how I look with it on, but I get rushed and it’s the first casualty. I’ve never been one to wear much even during the times I do wear it. I have fair skin and pale eyelashes, so my eyes disappear when I don’t wear makeup.
    Right now I’m not wearing it because the a/c in my car doesn’t work and it’s August in Alabama. Can you say “sauna”? I drive 45 min each way to and from work, so my naturally wavy hair looks like a frizz bomb and my face is pale and shiny when I arrive, doesn’t matter if I started out with makeup on and hair neat. I’m a big fan of ponytail holders.
    I would rather wear makeup every single day including Saturday rather than ever put pantyhose on my body again. I’d just about rather have the soles of my feet beaten with bamboo rods than wear pantyhose. And as much as I love historicals and Regencies, I can’t begin to tell you how grateful I am to live now, in a world of light cottons, few undergarments, and ubiqitous air conditioning. I have a (genuine) lovely silk going-away suit from about 1890, with a heavy hoop sewn in the skirt hem, and that sucker is heavy! The waist is teeny, so I know the weight of the skirt had to be a burden to her. The silk has shattered under the arms where the owner sweated and it wasn’t cleaned and stored properly. Did I mention being grateful for deodorant and anti-perspirant? (Imagine being in a room full of men pre-deodorant and air conditioning.)

    Reply
  17. I go through phases where I wear makeup daily, then not at all for months. I like it, and I like how I look with it on, but I get rushed and it’s the first casualty. I’ve never been one to wear much even during the times I do wear it. I have fair skin and pale eyelashes, so my eyes disappear when I don’t wear makeup.
    Right now I’m not wearing it because the a/c in my car doesn’t work and it’s August in Alabama. Can you say “sauna”? I drive 45 min each way to and from work, so my naturally wavy hair looks like a frizz bomb and my face is pale and shiny when I arrive, doesn’t matter if I started out with makeup on and hair neat. I’m a big fan of ponytail holders.
    I would rather wear makeup every single day including Saturday rather than ever put pantyhose on my body again. I’d just about rather have the soles of my feet beaten with bamboo rods than wear pantyhose. And as much as I love historicals and Regencies, I can’t begin to tell you how grateful I am to live now, in a world of light cottons, few undergarments, and ubiqitous air conditioning. I have a (genuine) lovely silk going-away suit from about 1890, with a heavy hoop sewn in the skirt hem, and that sucker is heavy! The waist is teeny, so I know the weight of the skirt had to be a burden to her. The silk has shattered under the arms where the owner sweated and it wasn’t cleaned and stored properly. Did I mention being grateful for deodorant and anti-perspirant? (Imagine being in a room full of men pre-deodorant and air conditioning.)

    Reply
  18. I go through phases where I wear makeup daily, then not at all for months. I like it, and I like how I look with it on, but I get rushed and it’s the first casualty. I’ve never been one to wear much even during the times I do wear it. I have fair skin and pale eyelashes, so my eyes disappear when I don’t wear makeup.
    Right now I’m not wearing it because the a/c in my car doesn’t work and it’s August in Alabama. Can you say “sauna”? I drive 45 min each way to and from work, so my naturally wavy hair looks like a frizz bomb and my face is pale and shiny when I arrive, doesn’t matter if I started out with makeup on and hair neat. I’m a big fan of ponytail holders.
    I would rather wear makeup every single day including Saturday rather than ever put pantyhose on my body again. I’d just about rather have the soles of my feet beaten with bamboo rods than wear pantyhose. And as much as I love historicals and Regencies, I can’t begin to tell you how grateful I am to live now, in a world of light cottons, few undergarments, and ubiqitous air conditioning. I have a (genuine) lovely silk going-away suit from about 1890, with a heavy hoop sewn in the skirt hem, and that sucker is heavy! The waist is teeny, so I know the weight of the skirt had to be a burden to her. The silk has shattered under the arms where the owner sweated and it wasn’t cleaned and stored properly. Did I mention being grateful for deodorant and anti-perspirant? (Imagine being in a room full of men pre-deodorant and air conditioning.)

    Reply
  19. I wear makeup, heels and pantyhose four or five days out of the week. It’s part of who I am and what I do for a living. Truth be told, I’ve been doing it since ninth grade (private school). So, I’m use to it.
    As for the wisdom and intelligence of men… my gallant knight of 20 years has always held to the opinion that he is a simple thinker, requiring little. Although it always amazes me how often he waxes philosophical about everything from roller coasters to war. He cooks and cleans, makes dinner and lets me have the TV remote. But he doesn’t wear a suit, fuss with his hair, squeeze his feet into uncomfortable dress shoes or apply makeup every morning. The contrast has left me wondering just who is the smarter of the two.

    Reply
  20. I wear makeup, heels and pantyhose four or five days out of the week. It’s part of who I am and what I do for a living. Truth be told, I’ve been doing it since ninth grade (private school). So, I’m use to it.
    As for the wisdom and intelligence of men… my gallant knight of 20 years has always held to the opinion that he is a simple thinker, requiring little. Although it always amazes me how often he waxes philosophical about everything from roller coasters to war. He cooks and cleans, makes dinner and lets me have the TV remote. But he doesn’t wear a suit, fuss with his hair, squeeze his feet into uncomfortable dress shoes or apply makeup every morning. The contrast has left me wondering just who is the smarter of the two.

    Reply
  21. I wear makeup, heels and pantyhose four or five days out of the week. It’s part of who I am and what I do for a living. Truth be told, I’ve been doing it since ninth grade (private school). So, I’m use to it.
    As for the wisdom and intelligence of men… my gallant knight of 20 years has always held to the opinion that he is a simple thinker, requiring little. Although it always amazes me how often he waxes philosophical about everything from roller coasters to war. He cooks and cleans, makes dinner and lets me have the TV remote. But he doesn’t wear a suit, fuss with his hair, squeeze his feet into uncomfortable dress shoes or apply makeup every morning. The contrast has left me wondering just who is the smarter of the two.

    Reply
  22. I’m married to an audio/video engineer. Last Christmas, I asked him for a list of the DVDs he wanted for Christmas. Here is his reply:
    “DVD: should be original aspect ratio, usually labeled “widescreen anamorphic enhanced for 16:9,” sometimes labeled “2.35 or 1.78 or 1.85.” NOT full screen, pan&scan, or 4:3 or 1.33, unless that is the original aspect ratio. NOT letterboxed, unless it is 2.35 enhanced for 16:9 in which case it will be partially letterboxed although it may not be labeled as such.”
    I just wanted to buy him a movie.

    Reply
  23. I’m married to an audio/video engineer. Last Christmas, I asked him for a list of the DVDs he wanted for Christmas. Here is his reply:
    “DVD: should be original aspect ratio, usually labeled “widescreen anamorphic enhanced for 16:9,” sometimes labeled “2.35 or 1.78 or 1.85.” NOT full screen, pan&scan, or 4:3 or 1.33, unless that is the original aspect ratio. NOT letterboxed, unless it is 2.35 enhanced for 16:9 in which case it will be partially letterboxed although it may not be labeled as such.”
    I just wanted to buy him a movie.

    Reply
  24. I’m married to an audio/video engineer. Last Christmas, I asked him for a list of the DVDs he wanted for Christmas. Here is his reply:
    “DVD: should be original aspect ratio, usually labeled “widescreen anamorphic enhanced for 16:9,” sometimes labeled “2.35 or 1.78 or 1.85.” NOT full screen, pan&scan, or 4:3 or 1.33, unless that is the original aspect ratio. NOT letterboxed, unless it is 2.35 enhanced for 16:9 in which case it will be partially letterboxed although it may not be labeled as such.”
    I just wanted to buy him a movie.

    Reply
  25. I don’t wear make up except for special occasions, which include going out at nights because I don’t really go out except to eat.
    In my last job I used to have my girl bosses telling me to wear make up all the time. I was never a girly girl, and they always would finish up by saying, “You look so much better with make up on” and I always thought, well I don’t care. (I understood the bit about how I had to brush my hair tho, I never do that either) I believe that you don’t have to wear make up to feel good about yourself, but if it makes you feel better, then do it, which I suppose is what I should have said to them in the first place.

    Reply
  26. I don’t wear make up except for special occasions, which include going out at nights because I don’t really go out except to eat.
    In my last job I used to have my girl bosses telling me to wear make up all the time. I was never a girly girl, and they always would finish up by saying, “You look so much better with make up on” and I always thought, well I don’t care. (I understood the bit about how I had to brush my hair tho, I never do that either) I believe that you don’t have to wear make up to feel good about yourself, but if it makes you feel better, then do it, which I suppose is what I should have said to them in the first place.

    Reply
  27. I don’t wear make up except for special occasions, which include going out at nights because I don’t really go out except to eat.
    In my last job I used to have my girl bosses telling me to wear make up all the time. I was never a girly girl, and they always would finish up by saying, “You look so much better with make up on” and I always thought, well I don’t care. (I understood the bit about how I had to brush my hair tho, I never do that either) I believe that you don’t have to wear make up to feel good about yourself, but if it makes you feel better, then do it, which I suppose is what I should have said to them in the first place.

    Reply
  28. If I leave my forest, I’m always wearing make-up. Maybe not a lot, maybe only a dusting of powder and some slapdash macara and lip gloss. Even if I haven’t bothered to comb my hair or button my shirt properly, there are cosmetics on my face.
    My husband doesn’t really notice…or care. He just doesn’t get make-up, or understand the necessity but he accepts it now. Maybe once every 5 years, he’ll comment that my lips look “luscious” or something like that. And when we get all done up for a big occasion, a black-tie event or something, he’s appropriately admiring–but probably only because he thinks such homage is expected of him!

    Reply
  29. If I leave my forest, I’m always wearing make-up. Maybe not a lot, maybe only a dusting of powder and some slapdash macara and lip gloss. Even if I haven’t bothered to comb my hair or button my shirt properly, there are cosmetics on my face.
    My husband doesn’t really notice…or care. He just doesn’t get make-up, or understand the necessity but he accepts it now. Maybe once every 5 years, he’ll comment that my lips look “luscious” or something like that. And when we get all done up for a big occasion, a black-tie event or something, he’s appropriately admiring–but probably only because he thinks such homage is expected of him!

    Reply
  30. If I leave my forest, I’m always wearing make-up. Maybe not a lot, maybe only a dusting of powder and some slapdash macara and lip gloss. Even if I haven’t bothered to comb my hair or button my shirt properly, there are cosmetics on my face.
    My husband doesn’t really notice…or care. He just doesn’t get make-up, or understand the necessity but he accepts it now. Maybe once every 5 years, he’ll comment that my lips look “luscious” or something like that. And when we get all done up for a big occasion, a black-tie event or something, he’s appropriately admiring–but probably only because he thinks such homage is expected of him!

    Reply
  31. I came into this discussion rather late… Monday morning!
    I’m married to a go-to guy, too! He’s an ergonomic engineer with Mercedes-Benz, and a prime example of a Rennaissance man. He’s brilliant.
    For as smart as he is, he’s not complicted. To know some basic truths about the man is all anyone needs to keep him happy.
    I have two brothers, but was not raised with them. I was raised by my grandparents. My grandfather, who was patient, never cursed and never acted like a boy, as some men do. He’d already learned all his lessons, so it’s not a stretch to imagine I did not marry until I met a MAN. All the others seemed juvenile to me.
    Makeup… enlightening, Loretta. I’m a fan of makeup, though I’ve never considered why.

    Reply
  32. I came into this discussion rather late… Monday morning!
    I’m married to a go-to guy, too! He’s an ergonomic engineer with Mercedes-Benz, and a prime example of a Rennaissance man. He’s brilliant.
    For as smart as he is, he’s not complicted. To know some basic truths about the man is all anyone needs to keep him happy.
    I have two brothers, but was not raised with them. I was raised by my grandparents. My grandfather, who was patient, never cursed and never acted like a boy, as some men do. He’d already learned all his lessons, so it’s not a stretch to imagine I did not marry until I met a MAN. All the others seemed juvenile to me.
    Makeup… enlightening, Loretta. I’m a fan of makeup, though I’ve never considered why.

    Reply
  33. I came into this discussion rather late… Monday morning!
    I’m married to a go-to guy, too! He’s an ergonomic engineer with Mercedes-Benz, and a prime example of a Rennaissance man. He’s brilliant.
    For as smart as he is, he’s not complicted. To know some basic truths about the man is all anyone needs to keep him happy.
    I have two brothers, but was not raised with them. I was raised by my grandparents. My grandfather, who was patient, never cursed and never acted like a boy, as some men do. He’d already learned all his lessons, so it’s not a stretch to imagine I did not marry until I met a MAN. All the others seemed juvenile to me.
    Makeup… enlightening, Loretta. I’m a fan of makeup, though I’ve never considered why.

    Reply
  34. MJP tell big fat lie about her eyes, which are beautiful. May I also mention that she has perfect skin? Putting makeup on it would be criminal. I totally identify with Margaret. While I’ve had brief phases of skipping makeup, I cannot go out in public without at least a smidgen of eyeliner, maybe some shadow & blush. Meanwhile, go to her blog & check out the natural beauty–and again, perfect skin. If these were not my friends and I didn’t love them so much I would have to kill them.

    Reply
  35. MJP tell big fat lie about her eyes, which are beautiful. May I also mention that she has perfect skin? Putting makeup on it would be criminal. I totally identify with Margaret. While I’ve had brief phases of skipping makeup, I cannot go out in public without at least a smidgen of eyeliner, maybe some shadow & blush. Meanwhile, go to her blog & check out the natural beauty–and again, perfect skin. If these were not my friends and I didn’t love them so much I would have to kill them.

    Reply
  36. MJP tell big fat lie about her eyes, which are beautiful. May I also mention that she has perfect skin? Putting makeup on it would be criminal. I totally identify with Margaret. While I’ve had brief phases of skipping makeup, I cannot go out in public without at least a smidgen of eyeliner, maybe some shadow & blush. Meanwhile, go to her blog & check out the natural beauty–and again, perfect skin. If these were not my friends and I didn’t love them so much I would have to kill them.

    Reply
  37. I have to agree that whether or not it’s factually true that men are simple and women complicated, we are very much mysteries to each other. And sometimes it does seem we might as well be communicating with grunts & hand gestures. I do find it interesting that men who grasp deeply complex things–and yes, my spouse would have had a clue about those DVD specs–seem not to be quite so complex psychologically. Or is it simply the difference between them and women who, generally speaking, have a vast vocabulary for describing feeling and motive? He is attuned to mechanical complexity instead? Like how to sail a ship with 300 men aboard from England to India…during wartime.
    Re peacocks past and present: The pre-Regency era is not my area of expertise. I believe both men and women painted and elaborately adorned themselves, but I would defer to the greater knowledge of the Wenches who’ve researched the earlier periods. As to being drab in nature, isn’t this is a good way to hide?–from predators as well as unwanted suitors. I do like male display: it can be highly entertaining, among other things. Cathy, thanks for coming in late with such great insights. I do agree.

    Reply
  38. I have to agree that whether or not it’s factually true that men are simple and women complicated, we are very much mysteries to each other. And sometimes it does seem we might as well be communicating with grunts & hand gestures. I do find it interesting that men who grasp deeply complex things–and yes, my spouse would have had a clue about those DVD specs–seem not to be quite so complex psychologically. Or is it simply the difference between them and women who, generally speaking, have a vast vocabulary for describing feeling and motive? He is attuned to mechanical complexity instead? Like how to sail a ship with 300 men aboard from England to India…during wartime.
    Re peacocks past and present: The pre-Regency era is not my area of expertise. I believe both men and women painted and elaborately adorned themselves, but I would defer to the greater knowledge of the Wenches who’ve researched the earlier periods. As to being drab in nature, isn’t this is a good way to hide?–from predators as well as unwanted suitors. I do like male display: it can be highly entertaining, among other things. Cathy, thanks for coming in late with such great insights. I do agree.

    Reply
  39. I have to agree that whether or not it’s factually true that men are simple and women complicated, we are very much mysteries to each other. And sometimes it does seem we might as well be communicating with grunts & hand gestures. I do find it interesting that men who grasp deeply complex things–and yes, my spouse would have had a clue about those DVD specs–seem not to be quite so complex psychologically. Or is it simply the difference between them and women who, generally speaking, have a vast vocabulary for describing feeling and motive? He is attuned to mechanical complexity instead? Like how to sail a ship with 300 men aboard from England to India…during wartime.
    Re peacocks past and present: The pre-Regency era is not my area of expertise. I believe both men and women painted and elaborately adorned themselves, but I would defer to the greater knowledge of the Wenches who’ve researched the earlier periods. As to being drab in nature, isn’t this is a good way to hide?–from predators as well as unwanted suitors. I do like male display: it can be highly entertaining, among other things. Cathy, thanks for coming in late with such great insights. I do agree.

    Reply
  40. Oops, one more thing. Yes, I should have specified Continental Europe…and even then, it’s not necessarily true of every culture in Europe. Gee, now I’m thinking of continuing the discussion next Saturday: I just came across some more interesting cultural info.

    Reply
  41. Oops, one more thing. Yes, I should have specified Continental Europe…and even then, it’s not necessarily true of every culture in Europe. Gee, now I’m thinking of continuing the discussion next Saturday: I just came across some more interesting cultural info.

    Reply
  42. Oops, one more thing. Yes, I should have specified Continental Europe…and even then, it’s not necessarily true of every culture in Europe. Gee, now I’m thinking of continuing the discussion next Saturday: I just came across some more interesting cultural info.

    Reply
  43. Hi Loretta,
    I’m coming late to the party as usual. Not really a makeup story per se, but. . .when my sister-in-law had her first baby she woke up in the morning in hard labor and had to put her hair up on the hot rollers and style it before going to the hospital. She was at 8 cm when she got there and missed out on her epidural as a result.
    I guess she had to look pretty while pushing that baby out!

    Reply
  44. Hi Loretta,
    I’m coming late to the party as usual. Not really a makeup story per se, but. . .when my sister-in-law had her first baby she woke up in the morning in hard labor and had to put her hair up on the hot rollers and style it before going to the hospital. She was at 8 cm when she got there and missed out on her epidural as a result.
    I guess she had to look pretty while pushing that baby out!

    Reply
  45. Hi Loretta,
    I’m coming late to the party as usual. Not really a makeup story per se, but. . .when my sister-in-law had her first baby she woke up in the morning in hard labor and had to put her hair up on the hot rollers and style it before going to the hospital. She was at 8 cm when she got there and missed out on her epidural as a result.
    I guess she had to look pretty while pushing that baby out!

    Reply

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