Literary Pilgrimages

Anne here, pondering the idea of literary pilgrimages.  I've just flown a thousand miles north, to Brisbane, to attend a multi-author book signing, but though it's a book event, it's not a literary pilgrimage.
The kind of pilgrimage I mean is one to a place where either a beloved author wrote, or wrote about. I'm more in favor of the place written about, than the place where someone wrote. This post was what got me thinking about it. Avignon

One day I'd love to do a series of trips based on some of Mary Stewart's books. I've been to Corfu, where Mary Stewart and also Gerald Durrell were very much in my mind, but I'd love to recreate the journey her character Charity made in Madam Will You Talk, which starts in Avignon in Provence. I've been to Avignon (but did not dance on the bridge) but what I'd like to do is take a car, as her heroine did, or better still hire a driver to take me to all the places she visited. While rereading the book. Or possibly listening to an audio version while I gazed at the scenery. 

Naturally I would need to go to a wonderful restaurant to recreate the meal she had when Richard Byron finally caught up with her and ordered dinner.

I remember still those exquisite fluted silver dishes, each with its load of dainty colours . . . there were anchovies and tiny gleaming silver fish in red sauce, and savoury butter in curled strips of fresh lettuce; there were caviare and tomato and olives green and black, and small golden-pink mushrooms and cresses and beans. The waiter heaped my plate, and filled another glass with white wine. I drank half a glassful without a word, and began to eat. I was conscious of Richard Byron’s eyes on me, but he did not speak.

The waiters hovered beside us, the courses came, delicious and appetizing, and the empty plates vanished as if by magic. I remember red mullet, done somehow with lemons, and a succulent golden-brown fowl bursting with truffles and flanked by tiny peas, then a froth of ice and whipped cream dashed with kirsch, and the fine smooth caress of the wine through it all. Then, finally, apricots and big black grapes, and coffee. The waiter removed the little silver filtres, and vanished, leaving us alone in our alcove.

And possibly I would travel with a copy of Elizabeth David's French Provincial Cooking as well. . .

Mary Stewart's books would provide the background to some wonderful trips — she did loactions so well — Thunder on the Right and Spain, The Gabriel Hounds, Damascus, Airs Above the Ground and Austria, the list goes on. It's an idea for a tour company, I think — the Mary Stewart Tour company . . . I'd sign up like a shot.

MermaidStreetRyeBut there are so many other places I'd visit. I would love to go once more to Rye, in England, where so many of EF Benson's wonderful "Lucia" books were written. And his fictional town of Tilling is, in fact, Rye, and you can walk the cobbled streets past the Mermaid Inn, and visit the church, and look at Lamb house where he wrote, and which is first Mapp's and later Lucia's house, and find all the locations mentioned in the books. 

When I first vitited Rye, many years ago, I met an American girl staying at the same B&B, and of course were talked books and she said, "So you've come here because of EF Benson." 
"Who?" I said.

She was horrified, and dragged me up to the local bookshop and forced me to buy the first "Lucia" books. I enjoyed it, but wasn't a devotee until a few months later when I was on Corfu and found some books in English, The little shop had all the Lucia books by EF Benson. I bought another one — simply because it was in English and I was out of reading matter. I devoured it that night and went back and bought the rest of the series.  And instantly wanted to go back to Rye and look at the town properly. Delphi

That same year I travelled through Greece and was awe-inspired standing in the ruins of Delphi, and looking down the valley where Sophocles' Oedipus drove after consulting the Oracle who predicted he'd kill his father and marry his mother. I wasn't long out of university and all those ancient Greek tales were vivid in my mind everywhere I went in Greece. 

Jane Austen is an author who inspires a lot of literary pilgrimages. I've been to Bath several times, and had a lovely time exploring, but I was inspired as much by Georgette Heyer's Bath-set novels as Jane Austen and her books and history there. And I confess, I've never been to Bath and Chawton, the house where she lived and wrote. But I will one day.

Speaking of Georgette Heyer, I've done the Georgette Heyer Walk with the wonderful Jenny Haddon (who invented it.) It was a true joy to walk the London streets and have Jenny point out this location and that, while we reminisced about the books and various characters. I blogged about it here

Map_of_the_Hundred_Acre_WoodI grew up on AA Milne's poetry and Winnie the Pooh, and I had a rush of blood to the head some years back when I saw that his house was for sale. It's right beside all the places in the stories — the forest that became the Hundred Acre Wood, the bridge where Christopher Robin played Pooh sticks and more. Sadly I couldn't buy it, but a visit to the district is definitely on the list next time I go the the UK.

A place in the USA I'd love to visit is the Outer Banks of North Carolina. In that, I'm inspired by a historical romance called the Warfield Bride by Bronwyn Williams, which evokes that environment beautifully. I once shocked an author who I learned lived in that area by saying to her "Tell me about where you live." She thought I meant her to descibe her house, but once I explained she laughed. She knew Bronwyn Williams (the name Dixie Browning and her sister wrote historicals under) and happily obliged me.

My mother grew up reading the books of Zane Grey, and when I told her I was visiting Montana, she was so thrilled. She'd always wanted to go.  I came home with a big book of photos and she pored over them again and again.

I could continue listing the many places I'd love to visit, inspired by books and writers I love, but maybe it's time I stopped, and let you wenchly readers tell me about some of the literary pilgrimages you've made or would like to make.

110 thoughts on “Literary Pilgrimages”

  1. A Mary Stewart Tour–Sign me up! I want not only the dinner you described, but the herb omelet and glass of wine Charity drank at the roadside bistro when she was hiding from Richard’s pursuit and the proprietor thought she was hiding from a husband while rushing to meet a lover. *G*
    And the Georgette Heyer tour: that one I want to do sooner rather than later!

    Reply
  2. A Mary Stewart Tour–Sign me up! I want not only the dinner you described, but the herb omelet and glass of wine Charity drank at the roadside bistro when she was hiding from Richard’s pursuit and the proprietor thought she was hiding from a husband while rushing to meet a lover. *G*
    And the Georgette Heyer tour: that one I want to do sooner rather than later!

    Reply
  3. A Mary Stewart Tour–Sign me up! I want not only the dinner you described, but the herb omelet and glass of wine Charity drank at the roadside bistro when she was hiding from Richard’s pursuit and the proprietor thought she was hiding from a husband while rushing to meet a lover. *G*
    And the Georgette Heyer tour: that one I want to do sooner rather than later!

    Reply
  4. A Mary Stewart Tour–Sign me up! I want not only the dinner you described, but the herb omelet and glass of wine Charity drank at the roadside bistro when she was hiding from Richard’s pursuit and the proprietor thought she was hiding from a husband while rushing to meet a lover. *G*
    And the Georgette Heyer tour: that one I want to do sooner rather than later!

    Reply
  5. A Mary Stewart Tour–Sign me up! I want not only the dinner you described, but the herb omelet and glass of wine Charity drank at the roadside bistro when she was hiding from Richard’s pursuit and the proprietor thought she was hiding from a husband while rushing to meet a lover. *G*
    And the Georgette Heyer tour: that one I want to do sooner rather than later!

    Reply
  6. I have a dear friend who has just returned from Shrewsbury. She and her husband took lots of photos for me and I am so grateful – as I am a big Ellis Peters and Brother Cadfael fan. I did not know that there is a stained glass window in the abbey dedicated to Peters and to her Cadfael books. How I would love to go, but alas! I am in doubt that I will ever get there but thanks to a good friend, I have the photos and she also bought me a book about Shrewsbury Abbey.

    Reply
  7. I have a dear friend who has just returned from Shrewsbury. She and her husband took lots of photos for me and I am so grateful – as I am a big Ellis Peters and Brother Cadfael fan. I did not know that there is a stained glass window in the abbey dedicated to Peters and to her Cadfael books. How I would love to go, but alas! I am in doubt that I will ever get there but thanks to a good friend, I have the photos and she also bought me a book about Shrewsbury Abbey.

    Reply
  8. I have a dear friend who has just returned from Shrewsbury. She and her husband took lots of photos for me and I am so grateful – as I am a big Ellis Peters and Brother Cadfael fan. I did not know that there is a stained glass window in the abbey dedicated to Peters and to her Cadfael books. How I would love to go, but alas! I am in doubt that I will ever get there but thanks to a good friend, I have the photos and she also bought me a book about Shrewsbury Abbey.

    Reply
  9. I have a dear friend who has just returned from Shrewsbury. She and her husband took lots of photos for me and I am so grateful – as I am a big Ellis Peters and Brother Cadfael fan. I did not know that there is a stained glass window in the abbey dedicated to Peters and to her Cadfael books. How I would love to go, but alas! I am in doubt that I will ever get there but thanks to a good friend, I have the photos and she also bought me a book about Shrewsbury Abbey.

    Reply
  10. I have a dear friend who has just returned from Shrewsbury. She and her husband took lots of photos for me and I am so grateful – as I am a big Ellis Peters and Brother Cadfael fan. I did not know that there is a stained glass window in the abbey dedicated to Peters and to her Cadfael books. How I would love to go, but alas! I am in doubt that I will ever get there but thanks to a good friend, I have the photos and she also bought me a book about Shrewsbury Abbey.

    Reply
  11. I’ve been to some i the U. S. I’ve been to Hannibal, Missouri several times (Molly Brown, but more vividly Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn and AND Mark Twain; I’ve also been to the cave. But Tom Sawyer’s cave is a description of Carlsbad rather than the cave at Hannibal). I’ve also been to Mark Twain’s home in Hartford (which is neighbor to the home of Harriet Beecher Stowe). I have also seen the Alcott, Emerson, and Hawthorne homes around Concord.
    The American Winston Spenser Churchill wrote a Richard Carvel, set in Annapolis, but more important to me The Crisis, which is set in St. Louis and in the part of St. Louis where I grew up. (Patricia: Compton Heights park or South Grand and the battle ground at St. Louis University north of the park, also on Grand.)
    I think there are others, but these are the ones I am emotionally closest to.
    I t

    Reply
  12. I’ve been to some i the U. S. I’ve been to Hannibal, Missouri several times (Molly Brown, but more vividly Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn and AND Mark Twain; I’ve also been to the cave. But Tom Sawyer’s cave is a description of Carlsbad rather than the cave at Hannibal). I’ve also been to Mark Twain’s home in Hartford (which is neighbor to the home of Harriet Beecher Stowe). I have also seen the Alcott, Emerson, and Hawthorne homes around Concord.
    The American Winston Spenser Churchill wrote a Richard Carvel, set in Annapolis, but more important to me The Crisis, which is set in St. Louis and in the part of St. Louis where I grew up. (Patricia: Compton Heights park or South Grand and the battle ground at St. Louis University north of the park, also on Grand.)
    I think there are others, but these are the ones I am emotionally closest to.
    I t

    Reply
  13. I’ve been to some i the U. S. I’ve been to Hannibal, Missouri several times (Molly Brown, but more vividly Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn and AND Mark Twain; I’ve also been to the cave. But Tom Sawyer’s cave is a description of Carlsbad rather than the cave at Hannibal). I’ve also been to Mark Twain’s home in Hartford (which is neighbor to the home of Harriet Beecher Stowe). I have also seen the Alcott, Emerson, and Hawthorne homes around Concord.
    The American Winston Spenser Churchill wrote a Richard Carvel, set in Annapolis, but more important to me The Crisis, which is set in St. Louis and in the part of St. Louis where I grew up. (Patricia: Compton Heights park or South Grand and the battle ground at St. Louis University north of the park, also on Grand.)
    I think there are others, but these are the ones I am emotionally closest to.
    I t

    Reply
  14. I’ve been to some i the U. S. I’ve been to Hannibal, Missouri several times (Molly Brown, but more vividly Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn and AND Mark Twain; I’ve also been to the cave. But Tom Sawyer’s cave is a description of Carlsbad rather than the cave at Hannibal). I’ve also been to Mark Twain’s home in Hartford (which is neighbor to the home of Harriet Beecher Stowe). I have also seen the Alcott, Emerson, and Hawthorne homes around Concord.
    The American Winston Spenser Churchill wrote a Richard Carvel, set in Annapolis, but more important to me The Crisis, which is set in St. Louis and in the part of St. Louis where I grew up. (Patricia: Compton Heights park or South Grand and the battle ground at St. Louis University north of the park, also on Grand.)
    I think there are others, but these are the ones I am emotionally closest to.
    I t

    Reply
  15. I’ve been to some i the U. S. I’ve been to Hannibal, Missouri several times (Molly Brown, but more vividly Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn and AND Mark Twain; I’ve also been to the cave. But Tom Sawyer’s cave is a description of Carlsbad rather than the cave at Hannibal). I’ve also been to Mark Twain’s home in Hartford (which is neighbor to the home of Harriet Beecher Stowe). I have also seen the Alcott, Emerson, and Hawthorne homes around Concord.
    The American Winston Spenser Churchill wrote a Richard Carvel, set in Annapolis, but more important to me The Crisis, which is set in St. Louis and in the part of St. Louis where I grew up. (Patricia: Compton Heights park or South Grand and the battle ground at St. Louis University north of the park, also on Grand.)
    I think there are others, but these are the ones I am emotionally closest to.
    I t

    Reply
  16. The Isle of Skye went on my bucket list after I read about it in a book. Not Mary Stewart, although I did read Wildfire at Midnight before I got there. The Isle of Skye was as wonderful as I hoped. Not a true pilgrimage though.
    My mom and I have been saying for a few years that we really want to go to Prince Edward Island for some Anne of Green Gables fun. I really need to make it happen.

    Reply
  17. The Isle of Skye went on my bucket list after I read about it in a book. Not Mary Stewart, although I did read Wildfire at Midnight before I got there. The Isle of Skye was as wonderful as I hoped. Not a true pilgrimage though.
    My mom and I have been saying for a few years that we really want to go to Prince Edward Island for some Anne of Green Gables fun. I really need to make it happen.

    Reply
  18. The Isle of Skye went on my bucket list after I read about it in a book. Not Mary Stewart, although I did read Wildfire at Midnight before I got there. The Isle of Skye was as wonderful as I hoped. Not a true pilgrimage though.
    My mom and I have been saying for a few years that we really want to go to Prince Edward Island for some Anne of Green Gables fun. I really need to make it happen.

    Reply
  19. The Isle of Skye went on my bucket list after I read about it in a book. Not Mary Stewart, although I did read Wildfire at Midnight before I got there. The Isle of Skye was as wonderful as I hoped. Not a true pilgrimage though.
    My mom and I have been saying for a few years that we really want to go to Prince Edward Island for some Anne of Green Gables fun. I really need to make it happen.

    Reply
  20. The Isle of Skye went on my bucket list after I read about it in a book. Not Mary Stewart, although I did read Wildfire at Midnight before I got there. The Isle of Skye was as wonderful as I hoped. Not a true pilgrimage though.
    My mom and I have been saying for a few years that we really want to go to Prince Edward Island for some Anne of Green Gables fun. I really need to make it happen.

    Reply
  21. My traveling days are over. I have always regretted the fact that I never made it to the British Isles. As when I go anywhere, I wanted to see as many historical sites as possible and soak up the culture of whichever country I was in.
    However, since I have become such a fan of Historical Romance (most of which are set in Regency England) I would have to add a whole lot more to the trip itinerary. I think I would need a couple of months (at least). I read so many of these books, it would be like returning home (smile).

    Reply
  22. My traveling days are over. I have always regretted the fact that I never made it to the British Isles. As when I go anywhere, I wanted to see as many historical sites as possible and soak up the culture of whichever country I was in.
    However, since I have become such a fan of Historical Romance (most of which are set in Regency England) I would have to add a whole lot more to the trip itinerary. I think I would need a couple of months (at least). I read so many of these books, it would be like returning home (smile).

    Reply
  23. My traveling days are over. I have always regretted the fact that I never made it to the British Isles. As when I go anywhere, I wanted to see as many historical sites as possible and soak up the culture of whichever country I was in.
    However, since I have become such a fan of Historical Romance (most of which are set in Regency England) I would have to add a whole lot more to the trip itinerary. I think I would need a couple of months (at least). I read so many of these books, it would be like returning home (smile).

    Reply
  24. My traveling days are over. I have always regretted the fact that I never made it to the British Isles. As when I go anywhere, I wanted to see as many historical sites as possible and soak up the culture of whichever country I was in.
    However, since I have become such a fan of Historical Romance (most of which are set in Regency England) I would have to add a whole lot more to the trip itinerary. I think I would need a couple of months (at least). I read so many of these books, it would be like returning home (smile).

    Reply
  25. My traveling days are over. I have always regretted the fact that I never made it to the British Isles. As when I go anywhere, I wanted to see as many historical sites as possible and soak up the culture of whichever country I was in.
    However, since I have become such a fan of Historical Romance (most of which are set in Regency England) I would have to add a whole lot more to the trip itinerary. I think I would need a couple of months (at least). I read so many of these books, it would be like returning home (smile).

    Reply
  26. Oh yes, Mary Jo, I love that scene. So many good scenes, in fact. Wouldn’t a mary Stewart tour with all the side bits be fun. And you’re going to the Uk soon and I’m sure you’ll be able to talk Jenny into a Heyer Tour. Such fun. Wish I could go with you.

    Reply
  27. Oh yes, Mary Jo, I love that scene. So many good scenes, in fact. Wouldn’t a mary Stewart tour with all the side bits be fun. And you’re going to the Uk soon and I’m sure you’ll be able to talk Jenny into a Heyer Tour. Such fun. Wish I could go with you.

    Reply
  28. Oh yes, Mary Jo, I love that scene. So many good scenes, in fact. Wouldn’t a mary Stewart tour with all the side bits be fun. And you’re going to the Uk soon and I’m sure you’ll be able to talk Jenny into a Heyer Tour. Such fun. Wish I could go with you.

    Reply
  29. Oh yes, Mary Jo, I love that scene. So many good scenes, in fact. Wouldn’t a mary Stewart tour with all the side bits be fun. And you’re going to the Uk soon and I’m sure you’ll be able to talk Jenny into a Heyer Tour. Such fun. Wish I could go with you.

    Reply
  30. Oh yes, Mary Jo, I love that scene. So many good scenes, in fact. Wouldn’t a mary Stewart tour with all the side bits be fun. And you’re going to the Uk soon and I’m sure you’ll be able to talk Jenny into a Heyer Tour. Such fun. Wish I could go with you.

    Reply
  31. Donna I didn’t know about that stained glass window either. What a wonderful thing. I love the Brother Cadfael books — all of Ellis Peters’ books, in fact including the ones she wrote under another name (which eludes me at the moment – Elizabeth Pargeter maybe?) Certainly a good reason to visit Shrewsbury Cathedral — not that you need a reason.

    Reply
  32. Donna I didn’t know about that stained glass window either. What a wonderful thing. I love the Brother Cadfael books — all of Ellis Peters’ books, in fact including the ones she wrote under another name (which eludes me at the moment – Elizabeth Pargeter maybe?) Certainly a good reason to visit Shrewsbury Cathedral — not that you need a reason.

    Reply
  33. Donna I didn’t know about that stained glass window either. What a wonderful thing. I love the Brother Cadfael books — all of Ellis Peters’ books, in fact including the ones she wrote under another name (which eludes me at the moment – Elizabeth Pargeter maybe?) Certainly a good reason to visit Shrewsbury Cathedral — not that you need a reason.

    Reply
  34. Donna I didn’t know about that stained glass window either. What a wonderful thing. I love the Brother Cadfael books — all of Ellis Peters’ books, in fact including the ones she wrote under another name (which eludes me at the moment – Elizabeth Pargeter maybe?) Certainly a good reason to visit Shrewsbury Cathedral — not that you need a reason.

    Reply
  35. Donna I didn’t know about that stained glass window either. What a wonderful thing. I love the Brother Cadfael books — all of Ellis Peters’ books, in fact including the ones she wrote under another name (which eludes me at the moment – Elizabeth Pargeter maybe?) Certainly a good reason to visit Shrewsbury Cathedral — not that you need a reason.

    Reply
  36. “Over the sea to Skye” — yes, Skye has always sounded like a romantic destination ever since I learned the “Speed bonnie boat” song as a child. And yes, I’d happily join you on the Prince Edward Island Anne of Green Gables tour. It was a real disappointment to me when I was traveling in Canada, that I couldn’t fit it in. Next time . . .

    Reply
  37. “Over the sea to Skye” — yes, Skye has always sounded like a romantic destination ever since I learned the “Speed bonnie boat” song as a child. And yes, I’d happily join you on the Prince Edward Island Anne of Green Gables tour. It was a real disappointment to me when I was traveling in Canada, that I couldn’t fit it in. Next time . . .

    Reply
  38. “Over the sea to Skye” — yes, Skye has always sounded like a romantic destination ever since I learned the “Speed bonnie boat” song as a child. And yes, I’d happily join you on the Prince Edward Island Anne of Green Gables tour. It was a real disappointment to me when I was traveling in Canada, that I couldn’t fit it in. Next time . . .

    Reply
  39. “Over the sea to Skye” — yes, Skye has always sounded like a romantic destination ever since I learned the “Speed bonnie boat” song as a child. And yes, I’d happily join you on the Prince Edward Island Anne of Green Gables tour. It was a real disappointment to me when I was traveling in Canada, that I couldn’t fit it in. Next time . . .

    Reply
  40. “Over the sea to Skye” — yes, Skye has always sounded like a romantic destination ever since I learned the “Speed bonnie boat” song as a child. And yes, I’d happily join you on the Prince Edward Island Anne of Green Gables tour. It was a real disappointment to me when I was traveling in Canada, that I couldn’t fit it in. Next time . . .

    Reply
  41. Mary, the brilliant thing is while we can still read and while we have an imagination and books we can still travel wherever we want. And, you know, sometimes the best locations are completely made up and can ONLY be visited in the imagination.

    Reply
  42. Mary, the brilliant thing is while we can still read and while we have an imagination and books we can still travel wherever we want. And, you know, sometimes the best locations are completely made up and can ONLY be visited in the imagination.

    Reply
  43. Mary, the brilliant thing is while we can still read and while we have an imagination and books we can still travel wherever we want. And, you know, sometimes the best locations are completely made up and can ONLY be visited in the imagination.

    Reply
  44. Mary, the brilliant thing is while we can still read and while we have an imagination and books we can still travel wherever we want. And, you know, sometimes the best locations are completely made up and can ONLY be visited in the imagination.

    Reply
  45. Mary, the brilliant thing is while we can still read and while we have an imagination and books we can still travel wherever we want. And, you know, sometimes the best locations are completely made up and can ONLY be visited in the imagination.

    Reply
  46. Anne – I loved your homage to Mary Stewart and especially, Madam, Will You Talk? I’m with Mary Jo – maybe someday I’ll create and herb omelette, but I’d never be able to recreate that magnificent dinner Charity had with Richard Byron when he finally caught up to her. (Chateau D’If? – Shades of the Count of Monte Cristo, as well.) And then there was the green frock and the silver bracelet to cover up the bruises on her wrist and the question he asks for the fourth time: Who is Johnny? Did I mention that I loved that book? If I ever got to Avignon and environs, I wouldn’t need a map or nowadays, a GPS. I’d just have my copy of Madam, Will You Talk? Great column! Thanks again.

    Reply
  47. Anne – I loved your homage to Mary Stewart and especially, Madam, Will You Talk? I’m with Mary Jo – maybe someday I’ll create and herb omelette, but I’d never be able to recreate that magnificent dinner Charity had with Richard Byron when he finally caught up to her. (Chateau D’If? – Shades of the Count of Monte Cristo, as well.) And then there was the green frock and the silver bracelet to cover up the bruises on her wrist and the question he asks for the fourth time: Who is Johnny? Did I mention that I loved that book? If I ever got to Avignon and environs, I wouldn’t need a map or nowadays, a GPS. I’d just have my copy of Madam, Will You Talk? Great column! Thanks again.

    Reply
  48. Anne – I loved your homage to Mary Stewart and especially, Madam, Will You Talk? I’m with Mary Jo – maybe someday I’ll create and herb omelette, but I’d never be able to recreate that magnificent dinner Charity had with Richard Byron when he finally caught up to her. (Chateau D’If? – Shades of the Count of Monte Cristo, as well.) And then there was the green frock and the silver bracelet to cover up the bruises on her wrist and the question he asks for the fourth time: Who is Johnny? Did I mention that I loved that book? If I ever got to Avignon and environs, I wouldn’t need a map or nowadays, a GPS. I’d just have my copy of Madam, Will You Talk? Great column! Thanks again.

    Reply
  49. Anne – I loved your homage to Mary Stewart and especially, Madam, Will You Talk? I’m with Mary Jo – maybe someday I’ll create and herb omelette, but I’d never be able to recreate that magnificent dinner Charity had with Richard Byron when he finally caught up to her. (Chateau D’If? – Shades of the Count of Monte Cristo, as well.) And then there was the green frock and the silver bracelet to cover up the bruises on her wrist and the question he asks for the fourth time: Who is Johnny? Did I mention that I loved that book? If I ever got to Avignon and environs, I wouldn’t need a map or nowadays, a GPS. I’d just have my copy of Madam, Will You Talk? Great column! Thanks again.

    Reply
  50. Anne – I loved your homage to Mary Stewart and especially, Madam, Will You Talk? I’m with Mary Jo – maybe someday I’ll create and herb omelette, but I’d never be able to recreate that magnificent dinner Charity had with Richard Byron when he finally caught up to her. (Chateau D’If? – Shades of the Count of Monte Cristo, as well.) And then there was the green frock and the silver bracelet to cover up the bruises on her wrist and the question he asks for the fourth time: Who is Johnny? Did I mention that I loved that book? If I ever got to Avignon and environs, I wouldn’t need a map or nowadays, a GPS. I’d just have my copy of Madam, Will You Talk? Great column! Thanks again.

    Reply
  51. I want to thank everyone. I am no longer able to travel and y’all have taken me in your pockets to see and feel and enjoy distant places.

    Reply
  52. I want to thank everyone. I am no longer able to travel and y’all have taken me in your pockets to see and feel and enjoy distant places.

    Reply
  53. I want to thank everyone. I am no longer able to travel and y’all have taken me in your pockets to see and feel and enjoy distant places.

    Reply
  54. I want to thank everyone. I am no longer able to travel and y’all have taken me in your pockets to see and feel and enjoy distant places.

    Reply
  55. I want to thank everyone. I am no longer able to travel and y’all have taken me in your pockets to see and feel and enjoy distant places.

    Reply
  56. What a lovely post full of traveling dreams. But I travel in the books I read as do others do, the only way so many of us can. It makes your stories that much more compelling. When reading different books over the years there are places nearly everywhere in the world I wished I could go. But Britain has always been #1 and far above all the other, and there are so many places there I’d have to spend a year at the least to see them all. But her’s a small list: Austen’s Derbyshire, Beatrix Potter’s Lake District, Mary Balogh’s Cornwall, Mary Jo Putney’s fictitious San Gabriel, Tracy Chevalier’s Lyme Rgis, Gabaldon’s Scotland. Oh, and so so many more. I started collecting Mary Stewart last year but haven’t read them yet, now I just have to, post haste. Thank you Anne and fellow blog followers.

    Reply
  57. What a lovely post full of traveling dreams. But I travel in the books I read as do others do, the only way so many of us can. It makes your stories that much more compelling. When reading different books over the years there are places nearly everywhere in the world I wished I could go. But Britain has always been #1 and far above all the other, and there are so many places there I’d have to spend a year at the least to see them all. But her’s a small list: Austen’s Derbyshire, Beatrix Potter’s Lake District, Mary Balogh’s Cornwall, Mary Jo Putney’s fictitious San Gabriel, Tracy Chevalier’s Lyme Rgis, Gabaldon’s Scotland. Oh, and so so many more. I started collecting Mary Stewart last year but haven’t read them yet, now I just have to, post haste. Thank you Anne and fellow blog followers.

    Reply
  58. What a lovely post full of traveling dreams. But I travel in the books I read as do others do, the only way so many of us can. It makes your stories that much more compelling. When reading different books over the years there are places nearly everywhere in the world I wished I could go. But Britain has always been #1 and far above all the other, and there are so many places there I’d have to spend a year at the least to see them all. But her’s a small list: Austen’s Derbyshire, Beatrix Potter’s Lake District, Mary Balogh’s Cornwall, Mary Jo Putney’s fictitious San Gabriel, Tracy Chevalier’s Lyme Rgis, Gabaldon’s Scotland. Oh, and so so many more. I started collecting Mary Stewart last year but haven’t read them yet, now I just have to, post haste. Thank you Anne and fellow blog followers.

    Reply
  59. What a lovely post full of traveling dreams. But I travel in the books I read as do others do, the only way so many of us can. It makes your stories that much more compelling. When reading different books over the years there are places nearly everywhere in the world I wished I could go. But Britain has always been #1 and far above all the other, and there are so many places there I’d have to spend a year at the least to see them all. But her’s a small list: Austen’s Derbyshire, Beatrix Potter’s Lake District, Mary Balogh’s Cornwall, Mary Jo Putney’s fictitious San Gabriel, Tracy Chevalier’s Lyme Rgis, Gabaldon’s Scotland. Oh, and so so many more. I started collecting Mary Stewart last year but haven’t read them yet, now I just have to, post haste. Thank you Anne and fellow blog followers.

    Reply
  60. What a lovely post full of traveling dreams. But I travel in the books I read as do others do, the only way so many of us can. It makes your stories that much more compelling. When reading different books over the years there are places nearly everywhere in the world I wished I could go. But Britain has always been #1 and far above all the other, and there are so many places there I’d have to spend a year at the least to see them all. But her’s a small list: Austen’s Derbyshire, Beatrix Potter’s Lake District, Mary Balogh’s Cornwall, Mary Jo Putney’s fictitious San Gabriel, Tracy Chevalier’s Lyme Rgis, Gabaldon’s Scotland. Oh, and so so many more. I started collecting Mary Stewart last year but haven’t read them yet, now I just have to, post haste. Thank you Anne and fellow blog followers.

    Reply
  61. Oh Binnie, you certainly need to be on that Mary Stewart trip with us. And yes, the copy of Madam Will You Talk needs to be with us at all times. The only thing I’ll happily skip is all the smoking that was so much part of that era. Madam Will You Talk was my first Mary Stewart book and is still my favorite.

    Reply
  62. Oh Binnie, you certainly need to be on that Mary Stewart trip with us. And yes, the copy of Madam Will You Talk needs to be with us at all times. The only thing I’ll happily skip is all the smoking that was so much part of that era. Madam Will You Talk was my first Mary Stewart book and is still my favorite.

    Reply
  63. Oh Binnie, you certainly need to be on that Mary Stewart trip with us. And yes, the copy of Madam Will You Talk needs to be with us at all times. The only thing I’ll happily skip is all the smoking that was so much part of that era. Madam Will You Talk was my first Mary Stewart book and is still my favorite.

    Reply
  64. Oh Binnie, you certainly need to be on that Mary Stewart trip with us. And yes, the copy of Madam Will You Talk needs to be with us at all times. The only thing I’ll happily skip is all the smoking that was so much part of that era. Madam Will You Talk was my first Mary Stewart book and is still my favorite.

    Reply
  65. Oh Binnie, you certainly need to be on that Mary Stewart trip with us. And yes, the copy of Madam Will You Talk needs to be with us at all times. The only thing I’ll happily skip is all the smoking that was so much part of that era. Madam Will You Talk was my first Mary Stewart book and is still my favorite.

    Reply
  66. So many wonderful book places to travel, Michelle. And each time someone suggests another one it sends me down another side-trip. I was telling friends about this at breakfast yesterday — I’m away from home, at a book event, and we’re all authors and readers — and we decided a Keri Arthur walking tour should be on the agenda. Keri was at breakfast — she’s a dark urban fantasy author, with many books set in Melbourne, our mutual home town. We had fun mentally planning it. One day we might even do it.

    Reply
  67. So many wonderful book places to travel, Michelle. And each time someone suggests another one it sends me down another side-trip. I was telling friends about this at breakfast yesterday — I’m away from home, at a book event, and we’re all authors and readers — and we decided a Keri Arthur walking tour should be on the agenda. Keri was at breakfast — she’s a dark urban fantasy author, with many books set in Melbourne, our mutual home town. We had fun mentally planning it. One day we might even do it.

    Reply
  68. So many wonderful book places to travel, Michelle. And each time someone suggests another one it sends me down another side-trip. I was telling friends about this at breakfast yesterday — I’m away from home, at a book event, and we’re all authors and readers — and we decided a Keri Arthur walking tour should be on the agenda. Keri was at breakfast — she’s a dark urban fantasy author, with many books set in Melbourne, our mutual home town. We had fun mentally planning it. One day we might even do it.

    Reply
  69. So many wonderful book places to travel, Michelle. And each time someone suggests another one it sends me down another side-trip. I was telling friends about this at breakfast yesterday — I’m away from home, at a book event, and we’re all authors and readers — and we decided a Keri Arthur walking tour should be on the agenda. Keri was at breakfast — she’s a dark urban fantasy author, with many books set in Melbourne, our mutual home town. We had fun mentally planning it. One day we might even do it.

    Reply
  70. So many wonderful book places to travel, Michelle. And each time someone suggests another one it sends me down another side-trip. I was telling friends about this at breakfast yesterday — I’m away from home, at a book event, and we’re all authors and readers — and we decided a Keri Arthur walking tour should be on the agenda. Keri was at breakfast — she’s a dark urban fantasy author, with many books set in Melbourne, our mutual home town. We had fun mentally planning it. One day we might even do it.

    Reply
  71. Like everyone else, I’d do a Mary Stewart tour (though I have been to Skye, I was only twelve, and hadn’t started reading her books yet), or a Georgette Heyer tour. But some of the other places I’d like to go include New Zealand, after reading Essie Summers’ books set there; any of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little Houses; and Prince Edward Island, scene of L.M. Montgomery’s books. And Shrewsbury, too, for Ellis Peters’ mysteries.

    Reply
  72. Like everyone else, I’d do a Mary Stewart tour (though I have been to Skye, I was only twelve, and hadn’t started reading her books yet), or a Georgette Heyer tour. But some of the other places I’d like to go include New Zealand, after reading Essie Summers’ books set there; any of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little Houses; and Prince Edward Island, scene of L.M. Montgomery’s books. And Shrewsbury, too, for Ellis Peters’ mysteries.

    Reply
  73. Like everyone else, I’d do a Mary Stewart tour (though I have been to Skye, I was only twelve, and hadn’t started reading her books yet), or a Georgette Heyer tour. But some of the other places I’d like to go include New Zealand, after reading Essie Summers’ books set there; any of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little Houses; and Prince Edward Island, scene of L.M. Montgomery’s books. And Shrewsbury, too, for Ellis Peters’ mysteries.

    Reply
  74. Like everyone else, I’d do a Mary Stewart tour (though I have been to Skye, I was only twelve, and hadn’t started reading her books yet), or a Georgette Heyer tour. But some of the other places I’d like to go include New Zealand, after reading Essie Summers’ books set there; any of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little Houses; and Prince Edward Island, scene of L.M. Montgomery’s books. And Shrewsbury, too, for Ellis Peters’ mysteries.

    Reply
  75. Like everyone else, I’d do a Mary Stewart tour (though I have been to Skye, I was only twelve, and hadn’t started reading her books yet), or a Georgette Heyer tour. But some of the other places I’d like to go include New Zealand, after reading Essie Summers’ books set there; any of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little Houses; and Prince Edward Island, scene of L.M. Montgomery’s books. And Shrewsbury, too, for Ellis Peters’ mysteries.

    Reply
  76. The problem with literary pilgrimages is that they take place in the present. I want to go on a Sherlock Holmes tour complete with gaslights, hansom cabs, and thick, heavy fog. Unfortunately, I fear the residents of modern London might object—especially to that killer fog.

    Reply
  77. The problem with literary pilgrimages is that they take place in the present. I want to go on a Sherlock Holmes tour complete with gaslights, hansom cabs, and thick, heavy fog. Unfortunately, I fear the residents of modern London might object—especially to that killer fog.

    Reply
  78. The problem with literary pilgrimages is that they take place in the present. I want to go on a Sherlock Holmes tour complete with gaslights, hansom cabs, and thick, heavy fog. Unfortunately, I fear the residents of modern London might object—especially to that killer fog.

    Reply
  79. The problem with literary pilgrimages is that they take place in the present. I want to go on a Sherlock Holmes tour complete with gaslights, hansom cabs, and thick, heavy fog. Unfortunately, I fear the residents of modern London might object—especially to that killer fog.

    Reply
  80. The problem with literary pilgrimages is that they take place in the present. I want to go on a Sherlock Holmes tour complete with gaslights, hansom cabs, and thick, heavy fog. Unfortunately, I fear the residents of modern London might object—especially to that killer fog.

    Reply
  81. Back in the day I once spent a weekend by myself in San Francisco. I walked the city, looking for places that Dashiell Hammett could have (or did) write about. I did find a building that had a plaque to the Maltese Falcon on the wall.
    In those years San Francisco still looked much like a 1930s city, very New Yorkish, very different from Los Angeles. At night, in the fog, it was the noirest of cities. A pity what it’s become now.

    Reply
  82. Back in the day I once spent a weekend by myself in San Francisco. I walked the city, looking for places that Dashiell Hammett could have (or did) write about. I did find a building that had a plaque to the Maltese Falcon on the wall.
    In those years San Francisco still looked much like a 1930s city, very New Yorkish, very different from Los Angeles. At night, in the fog, it was the noirest of cities. A pity what it’s become now.

    Reply
  83. Back in the day I once spent a weekend by myself in San Francisco. I walked the city, looking for places that Dashiell Hammett could have (or did) write about. I did find a building that had a plaque to the Maltese Falcon on the wall.
    In those years San Francisco still looked much like a 1930s city, very New Yorkish, very different from Los Angeles. At night, in the fog, it was the noirest of cities. A pity what it’s become now.

    Reply
  84. Back in the day I once spent a weekend by myself in San Francisco. I walked the city, looking for places that Dashiell Hammett could have (or did) write about. I did find a building that had a plaque to the Maltese Falcon on the wall.
    In those years San Francisco still looked much like a 1930s city, very New Yorkish, very different from Los Angeles. At night, in the fog, it was the noirest of cities. A pity what it’s become now.

    Reply
  85. Back in the day I once spent a weekend by myself in San Francisco. I walked the city, looking for places that Dashiell Hammett could have (or did) write about. I did find a building that had a plaque to the Maltese Falcon on the wall.
    In those years San Francisco still looked much like a 1930s city, very New Yorkish, very different from Los Angeles. At night, in the fog, it was the noirest of cities. A pity what it’s become now.

    Reply

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