Last of the Red Hot Bad Boys

Cat_243_dover by Mary Jo

Romance novels have their share of bad boys–usually men who are exciting, a little wild, but capable of being redeemed into sexy monogamy.  When a man writes a bad boy hero, it’s quite another matter.  Hence, Harry Flashman–hero, or perhaps anti-hero, of the Flashman historical novels by George MacDonald Fraser.  (Possibly a relative of our own Susan Fraser King?  Could be!)

GMF was clearly a rebellious schoolboy, because when he read Tom Brown’s School Days, that Victorian paean to virtuous boys becoming honorable gentleman, he couldn’t stand the goody-goody Tom Brown.  The only character he liked was Harry Flashman, the distinctly unvirtuous older boy who bullied Tom.  (By the way, this book, written by Thomas Hughes and based on his own school days at Rugby, was influential in creating the whole genre of British School Novels, running all the way down to Harry Potter.  Who Tom_browns_school_days was probably not named after Harry Flashman. <g>)

Flashman is a magnificent character creation.  The first book, named simply Flashman, came out in 1969.  I read it when I was a mere child, but I was fascinated by the humor, excitement, and history.  A villainous hero makes history very accessible.  As I read the earlier books, I wondered how a writer could make the stories so rich in detail.  GMF didn’t just mention real historical figures—he knew what they looked like, what their foibles were, and in some cases took real words from their mouths.

Now that I’m a historical novelist myself, I know now how MacDonald Fraser did it—tons of research, reading memoirs and histories until he was saturated with the time, people, and places he wrote about.  That’s the basic technique—but few writers have ever done it as well. 

Flashman In that first book, Flashman is tossed out of  Rugby at age 17 and joins the army, thereby setting himself up for a lifetime of adventures.  He is a indeed a coward, liar, cheat, and bully, but with a couple of talents that will serve him well: he’s a first class rider (useful for escaping from people who wanted to chop him into Flashy hash).  He’s dark in coloring and he has a real knack for languages, which will come in handy when he has to disguise himself as a Hindu sepoy or some such.  Plus, when he’s terrified, which is often, his face turns red as if he’s angry rather than getting pale.  This enables him to hide his fear pretty effectively.

He’s also a fine, handsome fellow with bushy sidewhiskers, very attractive to the ladies.  Which is good, considering what a relentless womanizer Harry is.  He’s first class at detecting a rowdy gleam in female eyes, and this being a male fantasy, an amazing number of women lust for his hot, manly form. 

The books are structured as mock memoirs written by General Sir Harry Flashman, and not discovered until long after he has died at an advanced age, rich and ripe with honors.  Each book is presented as another packet of “the Flashman Papers,” edited by a somewhat prissy George MacDonald Fraser, complete with footnotes which point out where Flashy’s memory seems to have failed him.  On the whole, though, the old guy had a pretty good memory, and ruthless honesty about his own shortcomings. 

As he says himself, “This story will be completely truthful; I am breaking the habit of eighty years. Why shouldn’t I?  When a man is as old as I am, and knows himself thoroughly for what he was and is, he doesn’t care much. I’m not ashamed, you see; never was….So I can look at the picture above my desk, of the young officer in Cardigan’s Hussars; tall, masterful, and roughly handsome as I was in those days….and say that it is the portrait of a scoundrel, a liar, a cheat, a thief….But I am concerned with facts, and since many of them are discreditable to me, you can rest assured they are true.”

Flashman_and_the_redskins Flashman turns up smack in the middle of any number of military engagements and terrifying cultures over a long span of the 19th century, including the Indian Mutiny, the Charge of the Light Brigade, the American Civil War, and he even survived Custer’s Last Stand.  Not to mention inspiring the “Eliza on the ice” episode in Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Since India was such an important part of the British Empire, Flashy lands there again and again, invariably in trouble.  Each book covers multiple far-flung adventures and dangers, so Flashman at the Charge starts out in the Crimean War, then waltzes on through Russian and Central Asia.  The books can be read in any order, since they jump around in time, and in some cases, such as Flashman and the Indians, they cover related incidents widely separated by time.

So how does a devout coward end up in trouble so often?  Bad behavior that backfires, restless feet, and enormous vanity.  In the very first book, he wins a Victoria Cross, the British equivalent of the Flashman_at_the_charge Congressional Medal of Honor.  He doesn’t deserve it, of course, but from then on, the tabloids consider him a noble hero of the British Army, and he is very proud of that reputation.  So when he’s part of a council of war privately thinking, “Are these chaps CRAZY?”, out loud he’s goading on the war hawks to uphold his reputation so as a fire eater.  You can see how this can get a man into trouble. <g> 

Naturally, as a romance novelist, I’m interested in his relationships with women.  We’ll put aside the fact that he probably should have died of venereal disease before the age of forty—this is a male fantasy, after all. 

Great_gameamerican Despite his craven nature, he’s not stupid, and he learns as he goes along.  The only time he commits rape is in the first book, when he’s given a dancing girl for the night and she proves unwilling.  Not only does this prove disastrous since it turns out she’s the mistress of a dangerous man, but he also decides that it wasn’t that much fun, so in the future he sticks to willing women, of which there are no shortage.  (Over time, he does get more mellow in general.  But never fear–he can be counted on to do something dastardly whenever the reader is in danger of thinking too well of him.)

There are some women that are special to him, but what makes his romantic life fun is his marriage to the beauteous and dim Elspeth, a Scottish heiress.  He seduces her in the first book and is forced to marry her, but what makes this so satisfying is that she is probably as promiscuous as he is—but he never really knows for sure. 

Flashmans_lady Her beauty, sweetness, adoration (and father’s money) make her appealing, but it’s the uncertainty that drives him crazy, and provides Flashy with his just desserts.  In the book Flashman’s Lady, he rescues her from pirates and captivity on the brutal island of Madagascar, though he claims that that’s just instinct to protect one’s mate.  But I find it endearing that through all the outrageous adventures and rogering of Flashman’s life, he has a true love that he keeps coming home to—and she’s about as trustworthy as he is. <G>

I could talk about the Flashman books indefinitely, but there’s no substitute for reading them.  If you haven’t, give yourself a treat.  The website http://www.harryflashman.org/  has lots of information about the books and the character.  (The site’s motto is “Enlightening Educating Entertaining, And Damning your eyes!”)

George MacDonald Fraser served in the British Army during WWII and for a couple of years after, in Burma, so he knows the military.  Later he became a journalist and editor, and after his success as a novelist, spent some years in Hollywood as a scriptwriter, working on projects such as Royal Flash, based on his own second Flashman novel (GMF’s riff on The Prisoner of Zenda), The Three Musketeers, The Four Musketeers, et al.  He also wrote other novels, a memoir, a history of the Scottish reavers, and more. For a full bio, go to:   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_MacDonald_Fraser   But it’s Flashman who made him famous. 

In memory of George MacDonald Fraser:

Born April 2nd, 1925
Died January 2nd, 2008.

Hail and farewell, Flashy.

Flashman_and_the_mountain_of_light From Mary Jo, one of several Wenchly fans of Flashman

70 thoughts on “Last of the Red Hot Bad Boys”

  1. Ahh, Mary Jo, you did so do our old Flashy proud! *g*
    Sad to think there will be no more books to chronicle his glorious misdeeds, but what a wonderful legacy remains in Fraser’s books. Let’s hope they’re all reissued, for a whole new crop of readers to discover.
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  2. Ahh, Mary Jo, you did so do our old Flashy proud! *g*
    Sad to think there will be no more books to chronicle his glorious misdeeds, but what a wonderful legacy remains in Fraser’s books. Let’s hope they’re all reissued, for a whole new crop of readers to discover.
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  3. Ahh, Mary Jo, you did so do our old Flashy proud! *g*
    Sad to think there will be no more books to chronicle his glorious misdeeds, but what a wonderful legacy remains in Fraser’s books. Let’s hope they’re all reissued, for a whole new crop of readers to discover.
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  4. Ahh, Mary Jo, you did so do our old Flashy proud! *g*
    Sad to think there will be no more books to chronicle his glorious misdeeds, but what a wonderful legacy remains in Fraser’s books. Let’s hope they’re all reissued, for a whole new crop of readers to discover.
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  5. Ahh, Mary Jo, you did so do our old Flashy proud! *g*
    Sad to think there will be no more books to chronicle his glorious misdeeds, but what a wonderful legacy remains in Fraser’s books. Let’s hope they’re all reissued, for a whole new crop of readers to discover.
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  6. I remember reading Flashman when I was just a teen. What a hoot! I should read some more, I suppose….
    Your write up of them reminds me of the “Bandy Papers” There too was a man in the thick of it (usually by accident) who always seemed to come out unscathed.

    Reply
  7. I remember reading Flashman when I was just a teen. What a hoot! I should read some more, I suppose….
    Your write up of them reminds me of the “Bandy Papers” There too was a man in the thick of it (usually by accident) who always seemed to come out unscathed.

    Reply
  8. I remember reading Flashman when I was just a teen. What a hoot! I should read some more, I suppose….
    Your write up of them reminds me of the “Bandy Papers” There too was a man in the thick of it (usually by accident) who always seemed to come out unscathed.

    Reply
  9. I remember reading Flashman when I was just a teen. What a hoot! I should read some more, I suppose….
    Your write up of them reminds me of the “Bandy Papers” There too was a man in the thick of it (usually by accident) who always seemed to come out unscathed.

    Reply
  10. I remember reading Flashman when I was just a teen. What a hoot! I should read some more, I suppose….
    Your write up of them reminds me of the “Bandy Papers” There too was a man in the thick of it (usually by accident) who always seemed to come out unscathed.

    Reply
  11. Thank you for writing about one of my favorite series. I came across some Flashman books in a vacation rental some 25 years ago, and I’ve loved them ever since.
    I read someplace that when the first book came out, some academic reviewer, misled no doubt by the footnotes, thought it was an actual memoir, not fiction. I don’t know if that is true or not, but my snarky side hopes it is.

    Reply
  12. Thank you for writing about one of my favorite series. I came across some Flashman books in a vacation rental some 25 years ago, and I’ve loved them ever since.
    I read someplace that when the first book came out, some academic reviewer, misled no doubt by the footnotes, thought it was an actual memoir, not fiction. I don’t know if that is true or not, but my snarky side hopes it is.

    Reply
  13. Thank you for writing about one of my favorite series. I came across some Flashman books in a vacation rental some 25 years ago, and I’ve loved them ever since.
    I read someplace that when the first book came out, some academic reviewer, misled no doubt by the footnotes, thought it was an actual memoir, not fiction. I don’t know if that is true or not, but my snarky side hopes it is.

    Reply
  14. Thank you for writing about one of my favorite series. I came across some Flashman books in a vacation rental some 25 years ago, and I’ve loved them ever since.
    I read someplace that when the first book came out, some academic reviewer, misled no doubt by the footnotes, thought it was an actual memoir, not fiction. I don’t know if that is true or not, but my snarky side hopes it is.

    Reply
  15. Thank you for writing about one of my favorite series. I came across some Flashman books in a vacation rental some 25 years ago, and I’ve loved them ever since.
    I read someplace that when the first book came out, some academic reviewer, misled no doubt by the footnotes, thought it was an actual memoir, not fiction. I don’t know if that is true or not, but my snarky side hopes it is.

    Reply
  16. What a wonderful tribute, Mary Jo, to one of my favorite authors and all-time favorite characters. Happily, I have not yet read all the Flashman books, so there’s still plenty of Really, Really Bad Boy to look forward to. And even if there were not, the books are well worth re-reading. What a brilliant writer Fraser was!

    Reply
  17. What a wonderful tribute, Mary Jo, to one of my favorite authors and all-time favorite characters. Happily, I have not yet read all the Flashman books, so there’s still plenty of Really, Really Bad Boy to look forward to. And even if there were not, the books are well worth re-reading. What a brilliant writer Fraser was!

    Reply
  18. What a wonderful tribute, Mary Jo, to one of my favorite authors and all-time favorite characters. Happily, I have not yet read all the Flashman books, so there’s still plenty of Really, Really Bad Boy to look forward to. And even if there were not, the books are well worth re-reading. What a brilliant writer Fraser was!

    Reply
  19. What a wonderful tribute, Mary Jo, to one of my favorite authors and all-time favorite characters. Happily, I have not yet read all the Flashman books, so there’s still plenty of Really, Really Bad Boy to look forward to. And even if there were not, the books are well worth re-reading. What a brilliant writer Fraser was!

    Reply
  20. What a wonderful tribute, Mary Jo, to one of my favorite authors and all-time favorite characters. Happily, I have not yet read all the Flashman books, so there’s still plenty of Really, Really Bad Boy to look forward to. And even if there were not, the books are well worth re-reading. What a brilliant writer Fraser was!

    Reply
  21. Wonderful tribute, Mary Jo! Flashy is one of my favorite continuing characters, too (the baddest, and the most fun, of bad boys everywhere), and George MacDonald Fraser was one of my favorite writers.
    I love not only the Flashman series, but his other books too, from his work on Border reivers to his WWII stuff. The Steel Bonnets was my first introduction to GMF, years ago. A couple of chapters into that, and I was looking around for everything I could find by him! His voice was strong and spicy, whether he was writing fiction or non fiction, and a good crisp, sassy and intelligent non-fiction voice like that is so rare.
    And rare, too, that he could handle fiction and nonfiction equally brilliantly.
    I have no idea if we’re related, but I’d like to think so. My family shares the spelling of the name — the Highland F-r-a-s-e-r, rather than other variations, so maybe there’s a possibility, many generations ago!
    It’s so sad to lose such a great talent.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  22. Wonderful tribute, Mary Jo! Flashy is one of my favorite continuing characters, too (the baddest, and the most fun, of bad boys everywhere), and George MacDonald Fraser was one of my favorite writers.
    I love not only the Flashman series, but his other books too, from his work on Border reivers to his WWII stuff. The Steel Bonnets was my first introduction to GMF, years ago. A couple of chapters into that, and I was looking around for everything I could find by him! His voice was strong and spicy, whether he was writing fiction or non fiction, and a good crisp, sassy and intelligent non-fiction voice like that is so rare.
    And rare, too, that he could handle fiction and nonfiction equally brilliantly.
    I have no idea if we’re related, but I’d like to think so. My family shares the spelling of the name — the Highland F-r-a-s-e-r, rather than other variations, so maybe there’s a possibility, many generations ago!
    It’s so sad to lose such a great talent.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  23. Wonderful tribute, Mary Jo! Flashy is one of my favorite continuing characters, too (the baddest, and the most fun, of bad boys everywhere), and George MacDonald Fraser was one of my favorite writers.
    I love not only the Flashman series, but his other books too, from his work on Border reivers to his WWII stuff. The Steel Bonnets was my first introduction to GMF, years ago. A couple of chapters into that, and I was looking around for everything I could find by him! His voice was strong and spicy, whether he was writing fiction or non fiction, and a good crisp, sassy and intelligent non-fiction voice like that is so rare.
    And rare, too, that he could handle fiction and nonfiction equally brilliantly.
    I have no idea if we’re related, but I’d like to think so. My family shares the spelling of the name — the Highland F-r-a-s-e-r, rather than other variations, so maybe there’s a possibility, many generations ago!
    It’s so sad to lose such a great talent.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  24. Wonderful tribute, Mary Jo! Flashy is one of my favorite continuing characters, too (the baddest, and the most fun, of bad boys everywhere), and George MacDonald Fraser was one of my favorite writers.
    I love not only the Flashman series, but his other books too, from his work on Border reivers to his WWII stuff. The Steel Bonnets was my first introduction to GMF, years ago. A couple of chapters into that, and I was looking around for everything I could find by him! His voice was strong and spicy, whether he was writing fiction or non fiction, and a good crisp, sassy and intelligent non-fiction voice like that is so rare.
    And rare, too, that he could handle fiction and nonfiction equally brilliantly.
    I have no idea if we’re related, but I’d like to think so. My family shares the spelling of the name — the Highland F-r-a-s-e-r, rather than other variations, so maybe there’s a possibility, many generations ago!
    It’s so sad to lose such a great talent.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  25. Wonderful tribute, Mary Jo! Flashy is one of my favorite continuing characters, too (the baddest, and the most fun, of bad boys everywhere), and George MacDonald Fraser was one of my favorite writers.
    I love not only the Flashman series, but his other books too, from his work on Border reivers to his WWII stuff. The Steel Bonnets was my first introduction to GMF, years ago. A couple of chapters into that, and I was looking around for everything I could find by him! His voice was strong and spicy, whether he was writing fiction or non fiction, and a good crisp, sassy and intelligent non-fiction voice like that is so rare.
    And rare, too, that he could handle fiction and nonfiction equally brilliantly.
    I have no idea if we’re related, but I’d like to think so. My family shares the spelling of the name — the Highland F-r-a-s-e-r, rather than other variations, so maybe there’s a possibility, many generations ago!
    It’s so sad to lose such a great talent.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  26. From MJP:
    I’m glad the other Flashman fans enjoyed this retrospective–and for those who haven’t read him, by all means, try! I think most of the books are in print still. If not, they’re probably in libraries.
    And yes, apparently it’s true that when the first book came out here, there were people who thought it was non-fiction. 🙂
    Mary Jo, who finds Flashman worth reading, rereading, and rereading yet again.

    Reply
  27. From MJP:
    I’m glad the other Flashman fans enjoyed this retrospective–and for those who haven’t read him, by all means, try! I think most of the books are in print still. If not, they’re probably in libraries.
    And yes, apparently it’s true that when the first book came out here, there were people who thought it was non-fiction. 🙂
    Mary Jo, who finds Flashman worth reading, rereading, and rereading yet again.

    Reply
  28. From MJP:
    I’m glad the other Flashman fans enjoyed this retrospective–and for those who haven’t read him, by all means, try! I think most of the books are in print still. If not, they’re probably in libraries.
    And yes, apparently it’s true that when the first book came out here, there were people who thought it was non-fiction. 🙂
    Mary Jo, who finds Flashman worth reading, rereading, and rereading yet again.

    Reply
  29. From MJP:
    I’m glad the other Flashman fans enjoyed this retrospective–and for those who haven’t read him, by all means, try! I think most of the books are in print still. If not, they’re probably in libraries.
    And yes, apparently it’s true that when the first book came out here, there were people who thought it was non-fiction. 🙂
    Mary Jo, who finds Flashman worth reading, rereading, and rereading yet again.

    Reply
  30. From MJP:
    I’m glad the other Flashman fans enjoyed this retrospective–and for those who haven’t read him, by all means, try! I think most of the books are in print still. If not, they’re probably in libraries.
    And yes, apparently it’s true that when the first book came out here, there were people who thought it was non-fiction. 🙂
    Mary Jo, who finds Flashman worth reading, rereading, and rereading yet again.

    Reply
  31. Thank you for a tribute and review of GMF. I first got hooked on the Regency by you guys, then my factual needs took over and I got hooked on Sean Bean as the honorable Rifleman Sharp. The books are just as fantastic. They are by Bernard Cornwell. Am I weird or are there others out there who like footnote/endnotes in historical novels? Thanks for the entertainment and enlightenment. I will continue to enjoy what my son refers to as Mom’s historical porn. (PS Jo Beverly’s Medieval series led me to read Norton’s Byzantium and now I am going to tackle Runciman.)

    Reply
  32. Thank you for a tribute and review of GMF. I first got hooked on the Regency by you guys, then my factual needs took over and I got hooked on Sean Bean as the honorable Rifleman Sharp. The books are just as fantastic. They are by Bernard Cornwell. Am I weird or are there others out there who like footnote/endnotes in historical novels? Thanks for the entertainment and enlightenment. I will continue to enjoy what my son refers to as Mom’s historical porn. (PS Jo Beverly’s Medieval series led me to read Norton’s Byzantium and now I am going to tackle Runciman.)

    Reply
  33. Thank you for a tribute and review of GMF. I first got hooked on the Regency by you guys, then my factual needs took over and I got hooked on Sean Bean as the honorable Rifleman Sharp. The books are just as fantastic. They are by Bernard Cornwell. Am I weird or are there others out there who like footnote/endnotes in historical novels? Thanks for the entertainment and enlightenment. I will continue to enjoy what my son refers to as Mom’s historical porn. (PS Jo Beverly’s Medieval series led me to read Norton’s Byzantium and now I am going to tackle Runciman.)

    Reply
  34. Thank you for a tribute and review of GMF. I first got hooked on the Regency by you guys, then my factual needs took over and I got hooked on Sean Bean as the honorable Rifleman Sharp. The books are just as fantastic. They are by Bernard Cornwell. Am I weird or are there others out there who like footnote/endnotes in historical novels? Thanks for the entertainment and enlightenment. I will continue to enjoy what my son refers to as Mom’s historical porn. (PS Jo Beverly’s Medieval series led me to read Norton’s Byzantium and now I am going to tackle Runciman.)

    Reply
  35. Thank you for a tribute and review of GMF. I first got hooked on the Regency by you guys, then my factual needs took over and I got hooked on Sean Bean as the honorable Rifleman Sharp. The books are just as fantastic. They are by Bernard Cornwell. Am I weird or are there others out there who like footnote/endnotes in historical novels? Thanks for the entertainment and enlightenment. I will continue to enjoy what my son refers to as Mom’s historical porn. (PS Jo Beverly’s Medieval series led me to read Norton’s Byzantium and now I am going to tackle Runciman.)

    Reply
  36. From MJP:
    Sean Bean as Sharpe, YES! I think a fair number of historical readers enjoy the notes, because if they like history in the first place, they probably want to know more. Certainly as a reader, I want to know what part of a story is true and what part invented.
    As for historical porn–at least you can read it in public.
    Judi, I’m glad your husband enjoyed my ode to George MacDonald Fraser. And -I’M- glad you enjoy my books! If you haven’t hit up your husband’s cache of Flashmans, you might give them a try some day.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  37. From MJP:
    Sean Bean as Sharpe, YES! I think a fair number of historical readers enjoy the notes, because if they like history in the first place, they probably want to know more. Certainly as a reader, I want to know what part of a story is true and what part invented.
    As for historical porn–at least you can read it in public.
    Judi, I’m glad your husband enjoyed my ode to George MacDonald Fraser. And -I’M- glad you enjoy my books! If you haven’t hit up your husband’s cache of Flashmans, you might give them a try some day.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  38. From MJP:
    Sean Bean as Sharpe, YES! I think a fair number of historical readers enjoy the notes, because if they like history in the first place, they probably want to know more. Certainly as a reader, I want to know what part of a story is true and what part invented.
    As for historical porn–at least you can read it in public.
    Judi, I’m glad your husband enjoyed my ode to George MacDonald Fraser. And -I’M- glad you enjoy my books! If you haven’t hit up your husband’s cache of Flashmans, you might give them a try some day.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  39. From MJP:
    Sean Bean as Sharpe, YES! I think a fair number of historical readers enjoy the notes, because if they like history in the first place, they probably want to know more. Certainly as a reader, I want to know what part of a story is true and what part invented.
    As for historical porn–at least you can read it in public.
    Judi, I’m glad your husband enjoyed my ode to George MacDonald Fraser. And -I’M- glad you enjoy my books! If you haven’t hit up your husband’s cache of Flashmans, you might give them a try some day.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  40. From MJP:
    Sean Bean as Sharpe, YES! I think a fair number of historical readers enjoy the notes, because if they like history in the first place, they probably want to know more. Certainly as a reader, I want to know what part of a story is true and what part invented.
    As for historical porn–at least you can read it in public.
    Judi, I’m glad your husband enjoyed my ode to George MacDonald Fraser. And -I’M- glad you enjoy my books! If you haven’t hit up your husband’s cache of Flashmans, you might give them a try some day.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  41. We inherited my father-in-laws library (HS history teacher) and just had 300 boxes of books delivered. (that is where I found Runciman) I found the BBC VCR tapes of Tom Brown’s Schooldays. I am overwhelmed. Anyone want it?

    Reply
  42. We inherited my father-in-laws library (HS history teacher) and just had 300 boxes of books delivered. (that is where I found Runciman) I found the BBC VCR tapes of Tom Brown’s Schooldays. I am overwhelmed. Anyone want it?

    Reply
  43. We inherited my father-in-laws library (HS history teacher) and just had 300 boxes of books delivered. (that is where I found Runciman) I found the BBC VCR tapes of Tom Brown’s Schooldays. I am overwhelmed. Anyone want it?

    Reply
  44. We inherited my father-in-laws library (HS history teacher) and just had 300 boxes of books delivered. (that is where I found Runciman) I found the BBC VCR tapes of Tom Brown’s Schooldays. I am overwhelmed. Anyone want it?

    Reply
  45. We inherited my father-in-laws library (HS history teacher) and just had 300 boxes of books delivered. (that is where I found Runciman) I found the BBC VCR tapes of Tom Brown’s Schooldays. I am overwhelmed. Anyone want it?

    Reply
  46. I’ll have to try some Flashman! I enjoyed Kipling’s “Stalky & Co.”, and always wished he had filled in the gap between the schoolboy stories and the epilogue showing them all back from service in India.

    Reply
  47. I’ll have to try some Flashman! I enjoyed Kipling’s “Stalky & Co.”, and always wished he had filled in the gap between the schoolboy stories and the epilogue showing them all back from service in India.

    Reply
  48. I’ll have to try some Flashman! I enjoyed Kipling’s “Stalky & Co.”, and always wished he had filled in the gap between the schoolboy stories and the epilogue showing them all back from service in India.

    Reply
  49. I’ll have to try some Flashman! I enjoyed Kipling’s “Stalky & Co.”, and always wished he had filled in the gap between the schoolboy stories and the epilogue showing them all back from service in India.

    Reply
  50. I’ll have to try some Flashman! I enjoyed Kipling’s “Stalky & Co.”, and always wished he had filled in the gap between the schoolboy stories and the epilogue showing them all back from service in India.

    Reply

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