Lady of Fortune

Cat_243_dover_34 by Mary Jo

Okay, last week was my turn to sit on a shady porch on a sunny island, reading and watching the waves roll in.  This week is Pat’s turn, so I’m filling in for her.  But while Pat invited you to a beach party with virtual drinks, good books, and buff beach boys, I’ll be doing some promo.  Feel free to jump back to Pat’s post. <g>Fdrinkspatio_2

I’ve had an unusual run of reissues in the months since we started the WordWenches—something like four if you include the Faery Magic anthology, which I most certainly do.  Now it’s five.  Lady of Fortune is unusual in that it’s the only one of my books that has never been reissued, not even once.  And it’s not a major release now—it’s coming out in a hardcover large print edition from Thorndike Press, so it will mostly show up in libraries. 

But I’m happy that it is indeed available.  Partly this is general authorly love for all our book children.  Plus, the book is now available for completists who want to have copies of all my books.  (If you’re interested, here’s the Books A Million URL:  http://tinyurl.com/2wkh9x  )

So what about the book itself?  Lady of Fortune was my second book, so it has all the early Regencyisms of semi-omniscient points of view that are on display in The Diabolical Baron, my first book.  (Which was reissued earlier this month in the Dangerous to Know compendium.)  LoF was also written when Signet defined a Regency as anywhere from the French Revolution to 1830.

Candicefashion_print_1 There were fewer rules in those days, and I had a very tolerant editor who didn’t mind that my book was set in the 1790s.  I plunged in merrily—and ground to a screeching halt when I realized how little I knew about the French Revolution.  The generalized knowledge I had wasn’t much use when it came to writing a book, so it was research time, and a good lesson in writing was learned.  In all subsequent books, I’ve had a research phase before starting to write the actual story. 

My heroine, Marie-Christine D’Estelle–Christa to her friends–is a young French countess who has taken refuge in Britain after losing her mother and brother as the family attempted to escape the Reign of Terror.  Christa’s older half-brother was an English earl, so she is taken in by his uncle, the new earl.  But when she comes out of mourning, she find that her step-uncle has a distinctly unavuncular interest in her, so she flees to London and finds work as a lady’s maid.

Annabelle, the young lady who hires her, happens to have a handsome naval captain brother called Alex, and any good romance reader can probably figure out roughly what happens from there.  <G>  But there’s a cast of thousands—scheming young social climbers, cowardly fops, temperamental French chefs, and so many secondary romances that an exasperated RWA contest judge told me that I didn’t have to pair off everyone.

Lady of Fortune is about as close to a romp as I’ve ever gotten.  And the book was long.  My 75,000 word Signet Regency was sent around 120K words.  (You might have noticed that brevity is not one of my virtues.)  I was trying to figure out how to cut a hundred plus pages when my beloved editor decided to put LoF into the new Signet SuperRegency program for books that were historical romance length but traditional Regency voice.  So every one of my rambling sentences and redundancies is there, preserved for posterity. <G>

LoveindisguiseIncidentally, one of the launch SuperRegencies was Edith’s wonderful Love in Disguise, the first in a terrific trilogy.  I was in great company!

Lady_of_fortuneoriginalI didn’t like my original cover.  The hero looked like a hunchbacked vampire and the couple are about to receive grievous injuries as they topple the bench over.  No one had heard of me at that point, so the book didn’t sell well.  It vanished into the ranks of Ghostly Books past.  (Though I did send a faux galley version to a Wenchling who recently celebrated a Round Number Birthday.)  Which is why I’m tickled that Lady of Fortune is available again.  Authors love all of our children, after all!  Even the clumsy, verbose ones. 

If you’re still with me, I’ll make it worth your while by giving away a signed copy Lady_of_fortune_lp of the new large print hardcover.  To qualify, leave a comment about this blog between now and Thursday night, midnight Pacific Coast time.

Mary Jo

136 thoughts on “Lady of Fortune”

  1. I often wonder, when authors have a ton of books out, what they think of their earlier works and how they differ today.
    Oh, and please enter me in the drawing. I haven’t read this one and it would be good to read when I’m on the treadmill trying desperately to lose a few pounds and get some energy back. lol

    Reply
  2. I often wonder, when authors have a ton of books out, what they think of their earlier works and how they differ today.
    Oh, and please enter me in the drawing. I haven’t read this one and it would be good to read when I’m on the treadmill trying desperately to lose a few pounds and get some energy back. lol

    Reply
  3. I often wonder, when authors have a ton of books out, what they think of their earlier works and how they differ today.
    Oh, and please enter me in the drawing. I haven’t read this one and it would be good to read when I’m on the treadmill trying desperately to lose a few pounds and get some energy back. lol

    Reply
  4. I often wonder, when authors have a ton of books out, what they think of their earlier works and how they differ today.
    Oh, and please enter me in the drawing. I haven’t read this one and it would be good to read when I’m on the treadmill trying desperately to lose a few pounds and get some energy back. lol

    Reply
  5. I love to read an established author’s early books. It’s a pleasure to see the way they’ve grown (or changed) in their career. And sometimes, the early books are so fresh. While I would NEVER claim this about you Wenches, some writers seem to be on autopilot after a while.
    I know when I look at the stuff I first started writing, all I see is back story, info-dumping and head-hopping. How many pages can you think as you stare at yourself in a mirror, LOL? If I ever get ambitious, I could go back and revise, but something tells me it’s best if I just put those babies to bed and never wake them up!
    Congratulations on the reissues. I finished (and loved) Angel Rogue recently, so afraid at first I had read it before but happy to find it was new to me. I have a terrible time with reissues because I read so much and CRS.I give away most of the books I read, so the title on the spine is not calling to me daily on my bookshelf. But I find myself unable now to part with Wench books, so I’ll be safe in the future.

    Reply
  6. I love to read an established author’s early books. It’s a pleasure to see the way they’ve grown (or changed) in their career. And sometimes, the early books are so fresh. While I would NEVER claim this about you Wenches, some writers seem to be on autopilot after a while.
    I know when I look at the stuff I first started writing, all I see is back story, info-dumping and head-hopping. How many pages can you think as you stare at yourself in a mirror, LOL? If I ever get ambitious, I could go back and revise, but something tells me it’s best if I just put those babies to bed and never wake them up!
    Congratulations on the reissues. I finished (and loved) Angel Rogue recently, so afraid at first I had read it before but happy to find it was new to me. I have a terrible time with reissues because I read so much and CRS.I give away most of the books I read, so the title on the spine is not calling to me daily on my bookshelf. But I find myself unable now to part with Wench books, so I’ll be safe in the future.

    Reply
  7. I love to read an established author’s early books. It’s a pleasure to see the way they’ve grown (or changed) in their career. And sometimes, the early books are so fresh. While I would NEVER claim this about you Wenches, some writers seem to be on autopilot after a while.
    I know when I look at the stuff I first started writing, all I see is back story, info-dumping and head-hopping. How many pages can you think as you stare at yourself in a mirror, LOL? If I ever get ambitious, I could go back and revise, but something tells me it’s best if I just put those babies to bed and never wake them up!
    Congratulations on the reissues. I finished (and loved) Angel Rogue recently, so afraid at first I had read it before but happy to find it was new to me. I have a terrible time with reissues because I read so much and CRS.I give away most of the books I read, so the title on the spine is not calling to me daily on my bookshelf. But I find myself unable now to part with Wench books, so I’ll be safe in the future.

    Reply
  8. I love to read an established author’s early books. It’s a pleasure to see the way they’ve grown (or changed) in their career. And sometimes, the early books are so fresh. While I would NEVER claim this about you Wenches, some writers seem to be on autopilot after a while.
    I know when I look at the stuff I first started writing, all I see is back story, info-dumping and head-hopping. How many pages can you think as you stare at yourself in a mirror, LOL? If I ever get ambitious, I could go back and revise, but something tells me it’s best if I just put those babies to bed and never wake them up!
    Congratulations on the reissues. I finished (and loved) Angel Rogue recently, so afraid at first I had read it before but happy to find it was new to me. I have a terrible time with reissues because I read so much and CRS.I give away most of the books I read, so the title on the spine is not calling to me daily on my bookshelf. But I find myself unable now to part with Wench books, so I’ll be safe in the future.

    Reply
  9. Mary Jo,
    Welcome back from your vacation!
    I look forward to reading LoF as I’ve been glomming all your back list over the past couple of months.
    Also, I have to respectfully disagree with the RWA judge – you cannot have too much pairing off in a romance novel. After all, that is what they are all about!
    – Beth

    Reply
  10. Mary Jo,
    Welcome back from your vacation!
    I look forward to reading LoF as I’ve been glomming all your back list over the past couple of months.
    Also, I have to respectfully disagree with the RWA judge – you cannot have too much pairing off in a romance novel. After all, that is what they are all about!
    – Beth

    Reply
  11. Mary Jo,
    Welcome back from your vacation!
    I look forward to reading LoF as I’ve been glomming all your back list over the past couple of months.
    Also, I have to respectfully disagree with the RWA judge – you cannot have too much pairing off in a romance novel. After all, that is what they are all about!
    – Beth

    Reply
  12. Mary Jo,
    Welcome back from your vacation!
    I look forward to reading LoF as I’ve been glomming all your back list over the past couple of months.
    Also, I have to respectfully disagree with the RWA judge – you cannot have too much pairing off in a romance novel. After all, that is what they are all about!
    – Beth

    Reply
  13. I am delighted that Lady of Fortune is being reissued since it is the only MJP that I do not own. The last time I checked ABE books, asking prices ranged from $25-$75.
    Like Maggie, I enjoy comparing earlier and later books by my favorite writers. The writing may become more polished, but I generally find the voice consistent, a good thing since voice is a large part of what moved the writer to my favorites list in the first place.
    (My original copies of Edith’s Love trilogy has been on my keeper shelf for close to two decades now, and I am still in love with Arden.)

    Reply
  14. I am delighted that Lady of Fortune is being reissued since it is the only MJP that I do not own. The last time I checked ABE books, asking prices ranged from $25-$75.
    Like Maggie, I enjoy comparing earlier and later books by my favorite writers. The writing may become more polished, but I generally find the voice consistent, a good thing since voice is a large part of what moved the writer to my favorites list in the first place.
    (My original copies of Edith’s Love trilogy has been on my keeper shelf for close to two decades now, and I am still in love with Arden.)

    Reply
  15. I am delighted that Lady of Fortune is being reissued since it is the only MJP that I do not own. The last time I checked ABE books, asking prices ranged from $25-$75.
    Like Maggie, I enjoy comparing earlier and later books by my favorite writers. The writing may become more polished, but I generally find the voice consistent, a good thing since voice is a large part of what moved the writer to my favorites list in the first place.
    (My original copies of Edith’s Love trilogy has been on my keeper shelf for close to two decades now, and I am still in love with Arden.)

    Reply
  16. I am delighted that Lady of Fortune is being reissued since it is the only MJP that I do not own. The last time I checked ABE books, asking prices ranged from $25-$75.
    Like Maggie, I enjoy comparing earlier and later books by my favorite writers. The writing may become more polished, but I generally find the voice consistent, a good thing since voice is a large part of what moved the writer to my favorites list in the first place.
    (My original copies of Edith’s Love trilogy has been on my keeper shelf for close to two decades now, and I am still in love with Arden.)

    Reply
  17. I don’t believe I’ve read your earlier works, so it would be nice to have the opportunity. I shall definitely look for your back list to fill in a collection.
    BTW, I went to your website and didn’t find a list of all your publications, just recent ones. Is there one somewhere and I missed it? It would help to know something other than the author’s name. 😉

    Reply
  18. I don’t believe I’ve read your earlier works, so it would be nice to have the opportunity. I shall definitely look for your back list to fill in a collection.
    BTW, I went to your website and didn’t find a list of all your publications, just recent ones. Is there one somewhere and I missed it? It would help to know something other than the author’s name. 😉

    Reply
  19. I don’t believe I’ve read your earlier works, so it would be nice to have the opportunity. I shall definitely look for your back list to fill in a collection.
    BTW, I went to your website and didn’t find a list of all your publications, just recent ones. Is there one somewhere and I missed it? It would help to know something other than the author’s name. 😉

    Reply
  20. I don’t believe I’ve read your earlier works, so it would be nice to have the opportunity. I shall definitely look for your back list to fill in a collection.
    BTW, I went to your website and didn’t find a list of all your publications, just recent ones. Is there one somewhere and I missed it? It would help to know something other than the author’s name. 😉

    Reply
  21. I made it through and did find the blog interesting and informative. so much so that I want to go out and get the book, be it ever so verbose :)!

    Reply
  22. I made it through and did find the blog interesting and informative. so much so that I want to go out and get the book, be it ever so verbose :)!

    Reply
  23. I made it through and did find the blog interesting and informative. so much so that I want to go out and get the book, be it ever so verbose :)!

    Reply
  24. I made it through and did find the blog interesting and informative. so much so that I want to go out and get the book, be it ever so verbose :)!

    Reply
  25. Ohmygosh, Mary Jo! Your original cover is SO like my second Supet Regency: the sequel to LOVE IN DISGUISE, that it’s chilling. True, the cover of THE GAME OF LOVE doesn’t have that RIchard Third thing going for my hero, nor is he going for the heroine’s neck, but it’s ultra weird that they look so alike. (Take a look Janga, and you’ll see it.)
    I didn’t remember that. What was going on in the art department then?
    Congrats for the ultra lovely cover on the reissue!

    Reply
  26. Ohmygosh, Mary Jo! Your original cover is SO like my second Supet Regency: the sequel to LOVE IN DISGUISE, that it’s chilling. True, the cover of THE GAME OF LOVE doesn’t have that RIchard Third thing going for my hero, nor is he going for the heroine’s neck, but it’s ultra weird that they look so alike. (Take a look Janga, and you’ll see it.)
    I didn’t remember that. What was going on in the art department then?
    Congrats for the ultra lovely cover on the reissue!

    Reply
  27. Ohmygosh, Mary Jo! Your original cover is SO like my second Supet Regency: the sequel to LOVE IN DISGUISE, that it’s chilling. True, the cover of THE GAME OF LOVE doesn’t have that RIchard Third thing going for my hero, nor is he going for the heroine’s neck, but it’s ultra weird that they look so alike. (Take a look Janga, and you’ll see it.)
    I didn’t remember that. What was going on in the art department then?
    Congrats for the ultra lovely cover on the reissue!

    Reply
  28. Ohmygosh, Mary Jo! Your original cover is SO like my second Supet Regency: the sequel to LOVE IN DISGUISE, that it’s chilling. True, the cover of THE GAME OF LOVE doesn’t have that RIchard Third thing going for my hero, nor is he going for the heroine’s neck, but it’s ultra weird that they look so alike. (Take a look Janga, and you’ll see it.)
    I didn’t remember that. What was going on in the art department then?
    Congrats for the ultra lovely cover on the reissue!

    Reply
  29. I will have to read this, since I read Jo Beverley’s “Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed” in large print some years ago, and thus was introduced to her work. Just think! I might never have picked up any of her work without finding that LP volume in my public library! A thought too horrible to contemplate! I would never have known the Rogues!

    Reply
  30. I will have to read this, since I read Jo Beverley’s “Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed” in large print some years ago, and thus was introduced to her work. Just think! I might never have picked up any of her work without finding that LP volume in my public library! A thought too horrible to contemplate! I would never have known the Rogues!

    Reply
  31. I will have to read this, since I read Jo Beverley’s “Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed” in large print some years ago, and thus was introduced to her work. Just think! I might never have picked up any of her work without finding that LP volume in my public library! A thought too horrible to contemplate! I would never have known the Rogues!

    Reply
  32. I will have to read this, since I read Jo Beverley’s “Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed” in large print some years ago, and thus was introduced to her work. Just think! I might never have picked up any of her work without finding that LP volume in my public library! A thought too horrible to contemplate! I would never have known the Rogues!

    Reply
  33. Mary Jo, welcome back! I’m sure your island holiday was refreshing.
    I have fond memories of Lady of Fortune. I prefer (don’t tell!) the 1790’s to the “real” Regency era. I devoured those Super Regencies, no matter what the covers were like.
    I vividly remember scenes from LoF. Readers who are about to discover this early work for the first time are very fortunate!

    Reply
  34. Mary Jo, welcome back! I’m sure your island holiday was refreshing.
    I have fond memories of Lady of Fortune. I prefer (don’t tell!) the 1790’s to the “real” Regency era. I devoured those Super Regencies, no matter what the covers were like.
    I vividly remember scenes from LoF. Readers who are about to discover this early work for the first time are very fortunate!

    Reply
  35. Mary Jo, welcome back! I’m sure your island holiday was refreshing.
    I have fond memories of Lady of Fortune. I prefer (don’t tell!) the 1790’s to the “real” Regency era. I devoured those Super Regencies, no matter what the covers were like.
    I vividly remember scenes from LoF. Readers who are about to discover this early work for the first time are very fortunate!

    Reply
  36. Mary Jo, welcome back! I’m sure your island holiday was refreshing.
    I have fond memories of Lady of Fortune. I prefer (don’t tell!) the 1790’s to the “real” Regency era. I devoured those Super Regencies, no matter what the covers were like.
    I vividly remember scenes from LoF. Readers who are about to discover this early work for the first time are very fortunate!

    Reply
  37. From MJP:
    Sherrie, you are SO right about the red lacquered talons on the heroine! Illustrators often have a blithe disregard for historical accuracy.
    Kim, you’re in the drawing, and large print books are particularly easy to read when on the treadmill. 🙂
    Maggie–though I’m very aware that I’ve learned a lot about writing since the early days, every book I turned in was the best I knew how to do at the time, so mostly I’m at peace with my backlist. When I rewrote Regencies into historicals, it was more to make them fit the different genre expectations–though I did clean up the writing at the same time!
    Janga, I checked abe.com last night and they did have original copies of Lady of Fortune for as low as $15, which is cheaper than the hardcover LP edition, and it would fit better with other paperbacks. 🙂 You’re right, though, that basic voice remains much the same even though style might change. The subtexts and values I had when I started writing are much the same as when I started writing.
    Kathy, I do have complete booklists on my site. Try:
    http://maryjoputney.com/blistpr.htm
    I need to figure out a better way to organize the data. (It’s a constant struggle!)
    Edith, as I look at your SuperRegency covers and mine, it’s obvious that the art department shot a whole lot of poses at once, then Pino put in vegetation and fingernail polish. 🙂 If they were going for A Look with those early books, they certainly succeeded!
    Margaret, I’m glad you enjoyed those early SuperRegencies! There were some great books published. And the 1790s were a lively era for sure. Ah, those were the days when we had more freedom!
    Mary Jo, nostalgically

    Reply
  38. From MJP:
    Sherrie, you are SO right about the red lacquered talons on the heroine! Illustrators often have a blithe disregard for historical accuracy.
    Kim, you’re in the drawing, and large print books are particularly easy to read when on the treadmill. 🙂
    Maggie–though I’m very aware that I’ve learned a lot about writing since the early days, every book I turned in was the best I knew how to do at the time, so mostly I’m at peace with my backlist. When I rewrote Regencies into historicals, it was more to make them fit the different genre expectations–though I did clean up the writing at the same time!
    Janga, I checked abe.com last night and they did have original copies of Lady of Fortune for as low as $15, which is cheaper than the hardcover LP edition, and it would fit better with other paperbacks. 🙂 You’re right, though, that basic voice remains much the same even though style might change. The subtexts and values I had when I started writing are much the same as when I started writing.
    Kathy, I do have complete booklists on my site. Try:
    http://maryjoputney.com/blistpr.htm
    I need to figure out a better way to organize the data. (It’s a constant struggle!)
    Edith, as I look at your SuperRegency covers and mine, it’s obvious that the art department shot a whole lot of poses at once, then Pino put in vegetation and fingernail polish. 🙂 If they were going for A Look with those early books, they certainly succeeded!
    Margaret, I’m glad you enjoyed those early SuperRegencies! There were some great books published. And the 1790s were a lively era for sure. Ah, those were the days when we had more freedom!
    Mary Jo, nostalgically

    Reply
  39. From MJP:
    Sherrie, you are SO right about the red lacquered talons on the heroine! Illustrators often have a blithe disregard for historical accuracy.
    Kim, you’re in the drawing, and large print books are particularly easy to read when on the treadmill. 🙂
    Maggie–though I’m very aware that I’ve learned a lot about writing since the early days, every book I turned in was the best I knew how to do at the time, so mostly I’m at peace with my backlist. When I rewrote Regencies into historicals, it was more to make them fit the different genre expectations–though I did clean up the writing at the same time!
    Janga, I checked abe.com last night and they did have original copies of Lady of Fortune for as low as $15, which is cheaper than the hardcover LP edition, and it would fit better with other paperbacks. 🙂 You’re right, though, that basic voice remains much the same even though style might change. The subtexts and values I had when I started writing are much the same as when I started writing.
    Kathy, I do have complete booklists on my site. Try:
    http://maryjoputney.com/blistpr.htm
    I need to figure out a better way to organize the data. (It’s a constant struggle!)
    Edith, as I look at your SuperRegency covers and mine, it’s obvious that the art department shot a whole lot of poses at once, then Pino put in vegetation and fingernail polish. 🙂 If they were going for A Look with those early books, they certainly succeeded!
    Margaret, I’m glad you enjoyed those early SuperRegencies! There were some great books published. And the 1790s were a lively era for sure. Ah, those were the days when we had more freedom!
    Mary Jo, nostalgically

    Reply
  40. From MJP:
    Sherrie, you are SO right about the red lacquered talons on the heroine! Illustrators often have a blithe disregard for historical accuracy.
    Kim, you’re in the drawing, and large print books are particularly easy to read when on the treadmill. 🙂
    Maggie–though I’m very aware that I’ve learned a lot about writing since the early days, every book I turned in was the best I knew how to do at the time, so mostly I’m at peace with my backlist. When I rewrote Regencies into historicals, it was more to make them fit the different genre expectations–though I did clean up the writing at the same time!
    Janga, I checked abe.com last night and they did have original copies of Lady of Fortune for as low as $15, which is cheaper than the hardcover LP edition, and it would fit better with other paperbacks. 🙂 You’re right, though, that basic voice remains much the same even though style might change. The subtexts and values I had when I started writing are much the same as when I started writing.
    Kathy, I do have complete booklists on my site. Try:
    http://maryjoputney.com/blistpr.htm
    I need to figure out a better way to organize the data. (It’s a constant struggle!)
    Edith, as I look at your SuperRegency covers and mine, it’s obvious that the art department shot a whole lot of poses at once, then Pino put in vegetation and fingernail polish. 🙂 If they were going for A Look with those early books, they certainly succeeded!
    Margaret, I’m glad you enjoyed those early SuperRegencies! There were some great books published. And the 1790s were a lively era for sure. Ah, those were the days when we had more freedom!
    Mary Jo, nostalgically

    Reply
  41. I haven’t read LADY OF FORTUNE, but it sounds fascinating enough to put up with large print, which for some odd reason I find distracting. (I’m sure I’ll be glad it’s there in another 30 years or so, assuming we’re still reading actual paper books by then!)

    Reply
  42. I haven’t read LADY OF FORTUNE, but it sounds fascinating enough to put up with large print, which for some odd reason I find distracting. (I’m sure I’ll be glad it’s there in another 30 years or so, assuming we’re still reading actual paper books by then!)

    Reply
  43. I haven’t read LADY OF FORTUNE, but it sounds fascinating enough to put up with large print, which for some odd reason I find distracting. (I’m sure I’ll be glad it’s there in another 30 years or so, assuming we’re still reading actual paper books by then!)

    Reply
  44. I haven’t read LADY OF FORTUNE, but it sounds fascinating enough to put up with large print, which for some odd reason I find distracting. (I’m sure I’ll be glad it’s there in another 30 years or so, assuming we’re still reading actual paper books by then!)

    Reply
  45. I remember the launch of those Super Regencies, and reading a short article on them in Romantic Times. I think that was an early step toward the Regency Historical as we know it today.
    Wouldn’t a three in one version of Edith’s trilogy be delightful?

    Reply
  46. I remember the launch of those Super Regencies, and reading a short article on them in Romantic Times. I think that was an early step toward the Regency Historical as we know it today.
    Wouldn’t a three in one version of Edith’s trilogy be delightful?

    Reply
  47. I remember the launch of those Super Regencies, and reading a short article on them in Romantic Times. I think that was an early step toward the Regency Historical as we know it today.
    Wouldn’t a three in one version of Edith’s trilogy be delightful?

    Reply
  48. I remember the launch of those Super Regencies, and reading a short article on them in Romantic Times. I think that was an early step toward the Regency Historical as we know it today.
    Wouldn’t a three in one version of Edith’s trilogy be delightful?

    Reply
  49. Hi Mary Jo! Welcome back to the frigid mid-Atlantic.
    I am so glad LoF is being reissued. Even though it is one of your earliest efforts and thus a touch different from your current work, it still possesses all of your signature elements.
    To those who have not read LoF, hang on tight. It’s a wild ride loaded with laugher, adventure and unexpected plot twists.
    Nina

    Reply
  50. Hi Mary Jo! Welcome back to the frigid mid-Atlantic.
    I am so glad LoF is being reissued. Even though it is one of your earliest efforts and thus a touch different from your current work, it still possesses all of your signature elements.
    To those who have not read LoF, hang on tight. It’s a wild ride loaded with laugher, adventure and unexpected plot twists.
    Nina

    Reply
  51. Hi Mary Jo! Welcome back to the frigid mid-Atlantic.
    I am so glad LoF is being reissued. Even though it is one of your earliest efforts and thus a touch different from your current work, it still possesses all of your signature elements.
    To those who have not read LoF, hang on tight. It’s a wild ride loaded with laugher, adventure and unexpected plot twists.
    Nina

    Reply
  52. Hi Mary Jo! Welcome back to the frigid mid-Atlantic.
    I am so glad LoF is being reissued. Even though it is one of your earliest efforts and thus a touch different from your current work, it still possesses all of your signature elements.
    To those who have not read LoF, hang on tight. It’s a wild ride loaded with laugher, adventure and unexpected plot twists.
    Nina

    Reply
  53. The book sounds really good. I’m glad it is available again, because I haven’t read this book of yours yet! Like so many other readers here, I love reading the earlier books of my favorite authors.

    Reply
  54. The book sounds really good. I’m glad it is available again, because I haven’t read this book of yours yet! Like so many other readers here, I love reading the earlier books of my favorite authors.

    Reply
  55. The book sounds really good. I’m glad it is available again, because I haven’t read this book of yours yet! Like so many other readers here, I love reading the earlier books of my favorite authors.

    Reply
  56. The book sounds really good. I’m glad it is available again, because I haven’t read this book of yours yet! Like so many other readers here, I love reading the earlier books of my favorite authors.

    Reply
  57. I love romps! I can’t wait to read this. Right now I just happen to be reading The Bargain and enjoying it immensely. Thank you for all the hours of enjoyment you have provided.

    Reply
  58. I love romps! I can’t wait to read this. Right now I just happen to be reading The Bargain and enjoying it immensely. Thank you for all the hours of enjoyment you have provided.

    Reply
  59. I love romps! I can’t wait to read this. Right now I just happen to be reading The Bargain and enjoying it immensely. Thank you for all the hours of enjoyment you have provided.

    Reply
  60. I love romps! I can’t wait to read this. Right now I just happen to be reading The Bargain and enjoying it immensely. Thank you for all the hours of enjoyment you have provided.

    Reply
  61. I’m very happy that you have reissues happening because that’s how I’m getting all the Fallen Angels. . . still have two I believe, and since I have a gift certificate for B&N, hopefully I’ll be getting those really soon! 🙂
    I wouldn’t mind being added to the list for this contest too. . . 😉
    Lois

    Reply
  62. I’m very happy that you have reissues happening because that’s how I’m getting all the Fallen Angels. . . still have two I believe, and since I have a gift certificate for B&N, hopefully I’ll be getting those really soon! 🙂
    I wouldn’t mind being added to the list for this contest too. . . 😉
    Lois

    Reply
  63. I’m very happy that you have reissues happening because that’s how I’m getting all the Fallen Angels. . . still have two I believe, and since I have a gift certificate for B&N, hopefully I’ll be getting those really soon! 🙂
    I wouldn’t mind being added to the list for this contest too. . . 😉
    Lois

    Reply
  64. I’m very happy that you have reissues happening because that’s how I’m getting all the Fallen Angels. . . still have two I believe, and since I have a gift certificate for B&N, hopefully I’ll be getting those really soon! 🙂
    I wouldn’t mind being added to the list for this contest too. . . 😉
    Lois

    Reply
  65. Since I adore The Diabolical Baron, the prospect of reading another of your early books is quite exciting- I’m glad your work is getting easier to get ahold of.
    Merry

    Reply
  66. Since I adore The Diabolical Baron, the prospect of reading another of your early books is quite exciting- I’m glad your work is getting easier to get ahold of.
    Merry

    Reply
  67. Since I adore The Diabolical Baron, the prospect of reading another of your early books is quite exciting- I’m glad your work is getting easier to get ahold of.
    Merry

    Reply
  68. Since I adore The Diabolical Baron, the prospect of reading another of your early books is quite exciting- I’m glad your work is getting easier to get ahold of.
    Merry

    Reply
  69. Hi Mary Jo,
    Please enter me in the drawing–the book sounds fabulous, just the right antidote to the lingering darkness and gloom of our Northwest winter! I’m reading your Diabolical Baron now and it’s so charming and delightful–it reminds me why I fell in love with Regency romance in the first place.
    Melinda

    Reply
  70. Hi Mary Jo,
    Please enter me in the drawing–the book sounds fabulous, just the right antidote to the lingering darkness and gloom of our Northwest winter! I’m reading your Diabolical Baron now and it’s so charming and delightful–it reminds me why I fell in love with Regency romance in the first place.
    Melinda

    Reply
  71. Hi Mary Jo,
    Please enter me in the drawing–the book sounds fabulous, just the right antidote to the lingering darkness and gloom of our Northwest winter! I’m reading your Diabolical Baron now and it’s so charming and delightful–it reminds me why I fell in love with Regency romance in the first place.
    Melinda

    Reply
  72. Hi Mary Jo,
    Please enter me in the drawing–the book sounds fabulous, just the right antidote to the lingering darkness and gloom of our Northwest winter! I’m reading your Diabolical Baron now and it’s so charming and delightful–it reminds me why I fell in love with Regency romance in the first place.
    Melinda

    Reply
  73. From MJP:
    Teresa, by all means encourage your library to buy a copy of Lady of Fortune. That way you get to read it free, and others can, too.
    As part of the changes in the market in 20 years–today I went to pull an excerpt from the story to go on my website. I like to do ‘first meet’ scenes rather than prologues and first chapters–and the hero and heroine don’t meet until Chapter 6. And my chapters were longer in those days, too!
    Lois, all of my Fallen Angels books have been reissued, the last in November 2006. If you can’t fine two of the books, you might ask your local bookstore to order copies for you. Books do slip out of print again, and usually we authors don’t know when that happens. (And yes, you’re automatically eligible for the drawing. :))
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  74. From MJP:
    Teresa, by all means encourage your library to buy a copy of Lady of Fortune. That way you get to read it free, and others can, too.
    As part of the changes in the market in 20 years–today I went to pull an excerpt from the story to go on my website. I like to do ‘first meet’ scenes rather than prologues and first chapters–and the hero and heroine don’t meet until Chapter 6. And my chapters were longer in those days, too!
    Lois, all of my Fallen Angels books have been reissued, the last in November 2006. If you can’t fine two of the books, you might ask your local bookstore to order copies for you. Books do slip out of print again, and usually we authors don’t know when that happens. (And yes, you’re automatically eligible for the drawing. :))
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  75. From MJP:
    Teresa, by all means encourage your library to buy a copy of Lady of Fortune. That way you get to read it free, and others can, too.
    As part of the changes in the market in 20 years–today I went to pull an excerpt from the story to go on my website. I like to do ‘first meet’ scenes rather than prologues and first chapters–and the hero and heroine don’t meet until Chapter 6. And my chapters were longer in those days, too!
    Lois, all of my Fallen Angels books have been reissued, the last in November 2006. If you can’t fine two of the books, you might ask your local bookstore to order copies for you. Books do slip out of print again, and usually we authors don’t know when that happens. (And yes, you’re automatically eligible for the drawing. :))
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  76. From MJP:
    Teresa, by all means encourage your library to buy a copy of Lady of Fortune. That way you get to read it free, and others can, too.
    As part of the changes in the market in 20 years–today I went to pull an excerpt from the story to go on my website. I like to do ‘first meet’ scenes rather than prologues and first chapters–and the hero and heroine don’t meet until Chapter 6. And my chapters were longer in those days, too!
    Lois, all of my Fallen Angels books have been reissued, the last in November 2006. If you can’t fine two of the books, you might ask your local bookstore to order copies for you. Books do slip out of print again, and usually we authors don’t know when that happens. (And yes, you’re automatically eligible for the drawing. :))
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  77. Welcome back,
    I haven’t read your early books. It would be fun to read a good story and see the progress of a good writer at the same time.

    Reply
  78. Welcome back,
    I haven’t read your early books. It would be fun to read a good story and see the progress of a good writer at the same time.

    Reply
  79. Welcome back,
    I haven’t read your early books. It would be fun to read a good story and see the progress of a good writer at the same time.

    Reply
  80. Welcome back,
    I haven’t read your early books. It would be fun to read a good story and see the progress of a good writer at the same time.

    Reply
  81. What part of the northwest are you in, RevMelinda? We’ve been having a refreshing run of sunshine here in Seattle, though I’ll be glad when the days get long enough that I don’t have to haul myself out of bed in the dark and there’s some daylight left to enjoy after work.

    Reply
  82. What part of the northwest are you in, RevMelinda? We’ve been having a refreshing run of sunshine here in Seattle, though I’ll be glad when the days get long enough that I don’t have to haul myself out of bed in the dark and there’s some daylight left to enjoy after work.

    Reply
  83. What part of the northwest are you in, RevMelinda? We’ve been having a refreshing run of sunshine here in Seattle, though I’ll be glad when the days get long enough that I don’t have to haul myself out of bed in the dark and there’s some daylight left to enjoy after work.

    Reply
  84. What part of the northwest are you in, RevMelinda? We’ve been having a refreshing run of sunshine here in Seattle, though I’ll be glad when the days get long enough that I don’t have to haul myself out of bed in the dark and there’s some daylight left to enjoy after work.

    Reply
  85. Susan,
    You’re right of course–we have been having crisp and sunny days here in Portland, too. I will sheepishly admit to feeling sorry for myself this winter because it’s (practically) dark when I arrive at work and (practically) dark when I get home and I’m indoors with no windows much of the day. Of course, you’re further north so it’s worse for you! I think all of us in the Northern climes get a little Seasonal Affective Disorder this time of year (along with not enough Vitamin D!) (Maybe we should have a little “Word Wenches Northwest” margarita party/book discussion one of these days in Tacoma or Centralia–smile).
    Melinda

    Reply
  86. Susan,
    You’re right of course–we have been having crisp and sunny days here in Portland, too. I will sheepishly admit to feeling sorry for myself this winter because it’s (practically) dark when I arrive at work and (practically) dark when I get home and I’m indoors with no windows much of the day. Of course, you’re further north so it’s worse for you! I think all of us in the Northern climes get a little Seasonal Affective Disorder this time of year (along with not enough Vitamin D!) (Maybe we should have a little “Word Wenches Northwest” margarita party/book discussion one of these days in Tacoma or Centralia–smile).
    Melinda

    Reply
  87. Susan,
    You’re right of course–we have been having crisp and sunny days here in Portland, too. I will sheepishly admit to feeling sorry for myself this winter because it’s (practically) dark when I arrive at work and (practically) dark when I get home and I’m indoors with no windows much of the day. Of course, you’re further north so it’s worse for you! I think all of us in the Northern climes get a little Seasonal Affective Disorder this time of year (along with not enough Vitamin D!) (Maybe we should have a little “Word Wenches Northwest” margarita party/book discussion one of these days in Tacoma or Centralia–smile).
    Melinda

    Reply
  88. Susan,
    You’re right of course–we have been having crisp and sunny days here in Portland, too. I will sheepishly admit to feeling sorry for myself this winter because it’s (practically) dark when I arrive at work and (practically) dark when I get home and I’m indoors with no windows much of the day. Of course, you’re further north so it’s worse for you! I think all of us in the Northern climes get a little Seasonal Affective Disorder this time of year (along with not enough Vitamin D!) (Maybe we should have a little “Word Wenches Northwest” margarita party/book discussion one of these days in Tacoma or Centralia–smile).
    Melinda

    Reply
  89. Sounds like a good book to read on a cold winter day cuddled up in my chair. I like a good long story to read. We are getting hit with ice and snow again tomorrow after just seeing the last ice melt away today from a storm three weeks ago. Spring can’t come too soon for me.

    Reply
  90. Sounds like a good book to read on a cold winter day cuddled up in my chair. I like a good long story to read. We are getting hit with ice and snow again tomorrow after just seeing the last ice melt away today from a storm three weeks ago. Spring can’t come too soon for me.

    Reply
  91. Sounds like a good book to read on a cold winter day cuddled up in my chair. I like a good long story to read. We are getting hit with ice and snow again tomorrow after just seeing the last ice melt away today from a storm three weeks ago. Spring can’t come too soon for me.

    Reply
  92. Sounds like a good book to read on a cold winter day cuddled up in my chair. I like a good long story to read. We are getting hit with ice and snow again tomorrow after just seeing the last ice melt away today from a storm three weeks ago. Spring can’t come too soon for me.

    Reply
  93. I’d love to have a WordWenches NW gathering one of these days. We try to get down to Portland every so often for a Powell’s run, though it’s happened less frequently since my daughter was born.
    And I agree that we all get a touch of SAD this time of year up here. Last night as I was driving home in twilight around 5:30, I consoled myself by thinking of how long the days will be in June and July, when I’ll be leaving baseball games by twilight at 10:00.

    Reply
  94. I’d love to have a WordWenches NW gathering one of these days. We try to get down to Portland every so often for a Powell’s run, though it’s happened less frequently since my daughter was born.
    And I agree that we all get a touch of SAD this time of year up here. Last night as I was driving home in twilight around 5:30, I consoled myself by thinking of how long the days will be in June and July, when I’ll be leaving baseball games by twilight at 10:00.

    Reply
  95. I’d love to have a WordWenches NW gathering one of these days. We try to get down to Portland every so often for a Powell’s run, though it’s happened less frequently since my daughter was born.
    And I agree that we all get a touch of SAD this time of year up here. Last night as I was driving home in twilight around 5:30, I consoled myself by thinking of how long the days will be in June and July, when I’ll be leaving baseball games by twilight at 10:00.

    Reply
  96. I’d love to have a WordWenches NW gathering one of these days. We try to get down to Portland every so often for a Powell’s run, though it’s happened less frequently since my daughter was born.
    And I agree that we all get a touch of SAD this time of year up here. Last night as I was driving home in twilight around 5:30, I consoled myself by thinking of how long the days will be in June and July, when I’ll be leaving baseball games by twilight at 10:00.

    Reply
  97. I think LoF is the only book of yours I have not read. I also think I might need the large print version; although holding a book out at arms length in order to see the print can be a sort of exercise.

    Reply
  98. I think LoF is the only book of yours I have not read. I also think I might need the large print version; although holding a book out at arms length in order to see the print can be a sort of exercise.

    Reply
  99. I think LoF is the only book of yours I have not read. I also think I might need the large print version; although holding a book out at arms length in order to see the print can be a sort of exercise.

    Reply
  100. I think LoF is the only book of yours I have not read. I also think I might need the large print version; although holding a book out at arms length in order to see the print can be a sort of exercise.

    Reply
  101. I am delighted there is another MJP to discover. I particularly enjoy the regencies and thought I owned all of them. Congratulations on the reissue. Hopefully the editor will realize it is worth issuing also in paperback.

    Reply
  102. I am delighted there is another MJP to discover. I particularly enjoy the regencies and thought I owned all of them. Congratulations on the reissue. Hopefully the editor will realize it is worth issuing also in paperback.

    Reply
  103. I am delighted there is another MJP to discover. I particularly enjoy the regencies and thought I owned all of them. Congratulations on the reissue. Hopefully the editor will realize it is worth issuing also in paperback.

    Reply
  104. I am delighted there is another MJP to discover. I particularly enjoy the regencies and thought I owned all of them. Congratulations on the reissue. Hopefully the editor will realize it is worth issuing also in paperback.

    Reply
  105. The LOF contortionist cover is almost as good (bad?) as the famous Castles in the Air 3-armed cover! Since LOF is out of print, I would be thrilled to be placed in the drawing for the reissue, especially since it is LARGE PRINT! I have enjoyed your books over the years, Mary Jo, especially the Fallen Angel series.

    Reply
  106. The LOF contortionist cover is almost as good (bad?) as the famous Castles in the Air 3-armed cover! Since LOF is out of print, I would be thrilled to be placed in the drawing for the reissue, especially since it is LARGE PRINT! I have enjoyed your books over the years, Mary Jo, especially the Fallen Angel series.

    Reply
  107. The LOF contortionist cover is almost as good (bad?) as the famous Castles in the Air 3-armed cover! Since LOF is out of print, I would be thrilled to be placed in the drawing for the reissue, especially since it is LARGE PRINT! I have enjoyed your books over the years, Mary Jo, especially the Fallen Angel series.

    Reply
  108. The LOF contortionist cover is almost as good (bad?) as the famous Castles in the Air 3-armed cover! Since LOF is out of print, I would be thrilled to be placed in the drawing for the reissue, especially since it is LARGE PRINT! I have enjoyed your books over the years, Mary Jo, especially the Fallen Angel series.

    Reply
  109. From MJP:
    It definitely sounds like the Northwest Wenchlings should organize a gathering! A tea party at a bookstore would be ideal.
    Thanks to all of you who express willingness to try a very early book. I didn’t know so much about writing in those days, but I did write with much enthusiasm, so I hope those of you who try the book enjoy it.
    Sarah, a mass market reissue of Lady of Fortune would have to come from a different publisher–Thorndike only does the large print (though sometimes they do them in a trade paper version.) Perhaps if DANGEROUS TO KNOW, the recent combination of The Diabolical Baron and a novella, does well, there might be interest in doing another such volumen. I have two books, and two novellas, that could be packaged thusly.
    I’ll do the Lady of Fortune drawing tonight and post in the morning–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  110. From MJP:
    It definitely sounds like the Northwest Wenchlings should organize a gathering! A tea party at a bookstore would be ideal.
    Thanks to all of you who express willingness to try a very early book. I didn’t know so much about writing in those days, but I did write with much enthusiasm, so I hope those of you who try the book enjoy it.
    Sarah, a mass market reissue of Lady of Fortune would have to come from a different publisher–Thorndike only does the large print (though sometimes they do them in a trade paper version.) Perhaps if DANGEROUS TO KNOW, the recent combination of The Diabolical Baron and a novella, does well, there might be interest in doing another such volumen. I have two books, and two novellas, that could be packaged thusly.
    I’ll do the Lady of Fortune drawing tonight and post in the morning–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  111. From MJP:
    It definitely sounds like the Northwest Wenchlings should organize a gathering! A tea party at a bookstore would be ideal.
    Thanks to all of you who express willingness to try a very early book. I didn’t know so much about writing in those days, but I did write with much enthusiasm, so I hope those of you who try the book enjoy it.
    Sarah, a mass market reissue of Lady of Fortune would have to come from a different publisher–Thorndike only does the large print (though sometimes they do them in a trade paper version.) Perhaps if DANGEROUS TO KNOW, the recent combination of The Diabolical Baron and a novella, does well, there might be interest in doing another such volumen. I have two books, and two novellas, that could be packaged thusly.
    I’ll do the Lady of Fortune drawing tonight and post in the morning–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  112. From MJP:
    It definitely sounds like the Northwest Wenchlings should organize a gathering! A tea party at a bookstore would be ideal.
    Thanks to all of you who express willingness to try a very early book. I didn’t know so much about writing in those days, but I did write with much enthusiasm, so I hope those of you who try the book enjoy it.
    Sarah, a mass market reissue of Lady of Fortune would have to come from a different publisher–Thorndike only does the large print (though sometimes they do them in a trade paper version.) Perhaps if DANGEROUS TO KNOW, the recent combination of The Diabolical Baron and a novella, does well, there might be interest in doing another such volumen. I have two books, and two novellas, that could be packaged thusly.
    I’ll do the Lady of Fortune drawing tonight and post in the morning–
    Mary Jo

    Reply

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