Lady Beware! A Chat with Jo Beverley

Cat_243_dover Hi, Jo!

This particular interview is on the occasion of your book Lady Beware being released, so we’ll start there.  I’ve read the story and can certify that it’s a roaring good read, with a hero who is perhaps your darkest and most tormented.  Can you tell us a bit about the genesis of the story?

JB: I keep meaning to keep a diary of the genesis of a book, but somehow I’m part way into them before I remember. If I remember correctly, I was playing with a story for Thea as I was finishing To Rescue A Rogue. (That features her brother, Lord Darius Debenham.) A scene came to me of her meeting a mysterious, threatening stranger in the private parts of her home during a ball. It was a vignette, but I hadn’t the slightest idea what was going on.

At the same time, I was in the final stretches of To Rescue a Rogue and had a military officer turn up to offer proof that Dare hadn’t fled the fighting at Waterloo. I wasn’t happy with a deus ex machina, but that seemed to be how it was shaping up – until the walk-on military officer gave off vibes, and I realized he knew Dare and had issues with him. And somehow, it all spun out from there.

That’s what writing by the flying into the mist madness means, folks! It’s always exciting when a character becomes instantly vivid and assertive, but I had all sorts of problems, starting with Lord Darien and Lord Darius in the same book. Come on! I tried to persuade Darien that wasn’t really his name, but he’s not the most persuadable person, as Thea finds out. Fortunately Dare’s soon off-stage, so it’s not too silly.

Lbgoodsm But it was clear that the man in the corridor was Darien, and it all began to take on a life of its own. For example, I didn’t expect the instant sparks between Thea and Darien. I thought she was much more reserved. I was angling toward a forced marriage, but she did the, "You’ve got to be joking!" and I rolled my eyes and went with it. It was pretty well like that all the way through the book.

MJPLady Beware is the 14th book in your long running Company of Rogues Regency historical series.  Ten are about Rogues proper, and other stories are about friends and connections.  (And there’s a novella, too!  Here’s more information:  http://www.jobev.com/booklist.html ) Will you tell us the premise of the series, and how it grew? 

JB: Slowly.*G* I wrote the first draft (my title then was A Regency Rape, which tells you how much I knew) in 1977. I created the Company of Rogues (then the Harrow Band) because Nicholas needed friends, but I already had the idea of doing spin-off stories.

Most of the Rogues were in place then, except Lucien, Marquess of Arden. I created him separately around 1989 when I wanted to try my hand at a harder, more physical sort of hero. When I dug out the old Regency Rape, I realized I could add him to the Rogues, and I ended up selling the two books together. My titles then were The Delaney Bride and The Pride of the de Vaux. Better, but I still didn’t get it about titles.*G* They ended up, of course, as An Arranged Marriage and An Unwilling Bride.

Amold An Arranged Marriage came out in 1991, and as you say, you wrote the first draft of that in 1977.  What is it like to write a series over so many years? 

These days, with the popularity of series books coming out close together, it probably does seem strange, but in the early nineties, it didn’t seem so to me. Nor did moving between different periods;  I was interleaving Rogues books with medievals and the Georgian Mallorens. I’m very grateful to my readers for their patience.

The length of time and the number of books has been a very special experience, creating a deep relationship with these men, especially the original Rogues. After all, Nicholas, Lucien, and the ones in An Arranged Marriage have been alive in my brain for thirty years, even though their stories have only spread over three years from 1814 to 1817.

MJP: You and I were first published at almost exactly the same time, and we were both drawn to writing series from the beginning, but I cut my Fallen Angels trilogy off at seven books because I felt longer would get out of hand. <g> How do you keep track of so many characters and not clog the stories with them?

JB: I don’t include them all in every book, because that would become ridiculous, I New_covers think. And they do have lives to live. They can’t all be in Melton hunting, or in London for the season, or in Ireland, Dorset, or especially Canada. Sometimes readers complain that they haven’t heard what’s happening to so-and-so, and I do try to slip in a bit of gossip now and then, but I try to let reality trump.

I enjoy bringing in whichever seem to have true roles to play, however, and then we see how their lives are going, and also how they’ve changed. We’ve seen them all go through major life events and some serious challenges. They’ve married, taken up new responsibilities, had or acquired children. Even more interesting to me has been the way relationships between them have shifted as a result.

Also, of course, an equal number of women have joined the Company of Rogues, becoming full members, of course. No sexual inequality allowed. They’ve brought their own characters and expertise, such as Susan’s familiarity with smugglers, and Blanche’s with the seamy side of life.

The trouble is, the Rogues and the Mallorens have spoiled me for writing simply one-offs or even shorter series. I want worlds – big, complex, ever-changing worlds with Unsuitable_man large, interlocked casts. And just at a time when some readers are getting fed up with series, and are not willing to wait a decade or two for them to spin out. (Quite reasonably, I must say, if I put my reader hat on.)

MJP: How do you keep all the details straight?

JB: I keep thinking computers are made for a task like this, but I haven’t found them to be much use yet. I’ve tried various databases, but somehow they don’t sync with the way my mind works, and still, the human brain can do things that computers can’t, so that’s the key element. I have put all the principal characters into a genealogy program to try to keep track of the babies and known relatives.

I started with file cards and now I have a massive three-ring binder, but there are so many scraps of information that don’t fit neatly into any one place, so I stuff them somewhere and hope.  Then there are the things I never knew I’d want to know. How was I supposed to realize ten years ago that the name of the neighbour’s dog would be important? (That’s a made-up example, just in case anyone’s mentally searching.)

In truth, some of my readers are probably clearer about some details than I am. I had an e-mail a couple of weeks ago from a reader who’d just discovered me and read all the Rogues in order, one after the other.

MJP: What conclusions have you reached about writing long series?

JB: That it’s the ideal way to go if an author enjoys world building, but daunting if one thinks about it. (But then so is writing a novel. It took me years to get the guts to sit down and start work on something that might not be finished for a year.) Even just writing a story for each Rogue meant ten novels (though in the end I didn’t write one about Hal, but wove his story in with the rest.) Ten novels is a life’s work to some authors. So I’m not sure anyone could or should set out to do it.

Rogues_return Put like that, I suppose my whole writing life is flying into the mist!

It was great to move into the post-Rogues phase, to not have threads to tie up anymore. Even though there are Rogues in Lady Beware and a Rogue connection, all the pivotal events rise from Darien’s family and history. That was writerly fun.

MJP:  You also have a much loved Georgian series about the Malloren family, which is headed by the dark and irresistibly sexy Marquess of Rothgar.  After the Mallorens were married off, you wrote two connected books, Winter Fire and A Most Unsuitable Man.  Will you be doing more stories in that world?

JB: Talking of writerly fun, that’s what I’m working on now. 🙂

The MIP (Manuscript, Mess, and/or Masterpiece In Progress) starts from scratch, which is fun when most of my recent stories have been building on others.  Thus far has the young, rakish Earl of Huntersdown is helping the mysterious Sister Immaculata from Italy (but is she really a nun?) by giving her a lift through northern France toward England. Then there’s a thunderstorm and creepy peasant women, and that’s just the beginning of their problems. Wench Susan Scott tagged this story, “The rake on the make, and the nun on the run.” *G*

MJP: What are the differences you find between writing Regencies and Georgians?

JB:  Oh, lots. Any change of period changes everything, even if only in subtle ways. The two generations between the 1760s and the 1810s cover the developments of the agricultural and industrial revolutions, the Enlightenment and then the closing in as a reaction to the American and French Revolutions. These things had powerful effects on people’s thoughts, values, and morality.

Changes in costume and travel were radical and there was even a move from a stylized aristocratic culture which was almost theatrical in its etiquette to something we see as much more “natural,” though in fact it was often structured just as much.

Hydepark All this affects the tone of a novel and also the logistics of the plot. I can’t have people racing around in 1760 as they could in 1816. As an example, my first doodles of the rake/nun book (which had neither a rake nor a nun) were Regency and set in England. I was having a lot of trouble finding a rational route that would be slow, chancy, and likely to land them in trouble.

As soon as I thought of it being a Georgian, however, it was easy. Nearly every road in England was slow, chancy, and likely to land them in trouble. Then I put them in France, which makes everything even more unpredictable.

Though the Regency wasn’t nearly as pure and prissy as some people like to think, the Georgian was much more disorderly, racy, and in some ways quite amoral. This makes sexual adventures more plausible, because society truly was less censorious.

The other major difference is that in 1760 the royal Court was still central to the lives of the aristocracy. One simply can’t have characters ignoring it, especially if they’re in London. (And if not, why not? For part of the year, at least.) The king was a person of considerable power still.

By the Regency, the king’s insanity had pretty well killed the Court and though the Regent assumed many of the royal functions, he couldn’t create the same sort of aura. Society spun off into a social whirl largely apart from royalty and rigid court formality.

Jackson In Lady Beware I had fun using that social whirl. I don’t always use a lot of Regency Society in my books, in part because it’s so easy to fall into a rut of cliches, but as Darien’s purpose is to be accepted by the ton during the Season, that was the setting. I romped merrily through balls, routs, Almack’s, theatres, and parks, and included some manly stuff such as Jackson’s, Tatt’s, and horse races. I even remembered to mention that Darien got the royal nod, because that was still important. Can’t ignore court entirely.

I tried to get them to an Opera House masquerade, as described in Pierce Egan’s Life in London, but again Thea put her foot down. She’s one tough chick in her own well-bred, daughter of a duke, way.

That’s when I remembered Lady Harroving’s masquerade. In my first book, Jane and Lord Wraybourne have adventures at his aunt, Lady Harroving’s risque masquerade ball. I’d already used the now Lord and Lady Wraybourne in an earlier scene, so I gleefully dragged out this, too. It worked just as well, and was much more believable. Much though I’d have enjoyed it, Thea Debenham was not going to sneak Trarchapout of her house to attend a thoroughly scandalous event. As I said, I love it when characters truly come to life. And I loved what we learned about her parents during the approved preparations for her to attend a masquerade.

I just came across this painting of a young Regency hussar officer. As Darien
was in the hussars and mentions the ridiculously ornate uniform, I thought you
might enjoy it. And that Michael Bartlett is not a bad looking fellow, either!
Could almost be Canem Cave at about eighteen… But no, he’s too unshadowed. In
an alternate dimension, perhaps.

http://www.amillionbrushstrokes.co.uk/miniature/bartlettmofficer10hussars1808.jpg
 
I hope everyone’s going to have as much fun with Lady Beware as I had writing it.

Jo, thanks so much for sharing your writing process, and all those delicious little historical tidbits!  I hope other readers enjoy Lady Beware as much as I did. 

Mary Jo

185 thoughts on “Lady Beware! A Chat with Jo Beverley”

  1. Thanks for a great interview, ladies.
    This sounds like a delightful book. And visiting your world(s) with you, Jo, is always a wild ride of discovery. The idea of that many books in a series has actually kept me from reading it so far though I believe I have all the books. Once I get started, I really want to revel in that world, remember tidbits from other novels (getting too old to remember details from years ago, e.g., Wraybourne masquerade). Now I just have to find all those books in the Abyss, which is what I’m calling my basement storage area from now on. Luckily, the boxes are mostly marked alphabetically (Yes, most of the boxes contain books.) and the closest boxes are the beginning of the alphabet.
    So “Lady Beware” is out now? I must look for it the next time I’m out shopping, not so easy when you have to go by bus with a walker.

    Reply
  2. Thanks for a great interview, ladies.
    This sounds like a delightful book. And visiting your world(s) with you, Jo, is always a wild ride of discovery. The idea of that many books in a series has actually kept me from reading it so far though I believe I have all the books. Once I get started, I really want to revel in that world, remember tidbits from other novels (getting too old to remember details from years ago, e.g., Wraybourne masquerade). Now I just have to find all those books in the Abyss, which is what I’m calling my basement storage area from now on. Luckily, the boxes are mostly marked alphabetically (Yes, most of the boxes contain books.) and the closest boxes are the beginning of the alphabet.
    So “Lady Beware” is out now? I must look for it the next time I’m out shopping, not so easy when you have to go by bus with a walker.

    Reply
  3. Thanks for a great interview, ladies.
    This sounds like a delightful book. And visiting your world(s) with you, Jo, is always a wild ride of discovery. The idea of that many books in a series has actually kept me from reading it so far though I believe I have all the books. Once I get started, I really want to revel in that world, remember tidbits from other novels (getting too old to remember details from years ago, e.g., Wraybourne masquerade). Now I just have to find all those books in the Abyss, which is what I’m calling my basement storage area from now on. Luckily, the boxes are mostly marked alphabetically (Yes, most of the boxes contain books.) and the closest boxes are the beginning of the alphabet.
    So “Lady Beware” is out now? I must look for it the next time I’m out shopping, not so easy when you have to go by bus with a walker.

    Reply
  4. Thanks for a great interview, ladies.
    This sounds like a delightful book. And visiting your world(s) with you, Jo, is always a wild ride of discovery. The idea of that many books in a series has actually kept me from reading it so far though I believe I have all the books. Once I get started, I really want to revel in that world, remember tidbits from other novels (getting too old to remember details from years ago, e.g., Wraybourne masquerade). Now I just have to find all those books in the Abyss, which is what I’m calling my basement storage area from now on. Luckily, the boxes are mostly marked alphabetically (Yes, most of the boxes contain books.) and the closest boxes are the beginning of the alphabet.
    So “Lady Beware” is out now? I must look for it the next time I’m out shopping, not so easy when you have to go by bus with a walker.

    Reply
  5. Thanks for a great interview, ladies.
    This sounds like a delightful book. And visiting your world(s) with you, Jo, is always a wild ride of discovery. The idea of that many books in a series has actually kept me from reading it so far though I believe I have all the books. Once I get started, I really want to revel in that world, remember tidbits from other novels (getting too old to remember details from years ago, e.g., Wraybourne masquerade). Now I just have to find all those books in the Abyss, which is what I’m calling my basement storage area from now on. Luckily, the boxes are mostly marked alphabetically (Yes, most of the boxes contain books.) and the closest boxes are the beginning of the alphabet.
    So “Lady Beware” is out now? I must look for it the next time I’m out shopping, not so easy when you have to go by bus with a walker.

    Reply
  6. Jo, I love your edgy heroes and heroines! I methodically munched my way through your earlier books, and thought I’d read them all, and then discovered all our recent books.
    I am currently reading A Most Unsuitable Man and enjoying it very much. My critique group heard me raving about the cover (Fitzroger’s dreamy eyes!) *g* and one of the critique members bought the book for me! I’m at the halfway mark and loving it!
    New subject: ANNE H, ARE YOU OUT THERE? You’ve won a book, and we don’t have your e-mail address! Please contact me at sholmes@holmesedit.com. We originally drew Kalen Hughes’ name as the winner of Loretta’s Not Quite a Lady, but Kalen already has the book and voluntarily forfeited her win so that another name could be drawn–and you’re it! ***End of highjacked message*** I now return you to Jo Beverley’s interview!

    Reply
  7. Jo, I love your edgy heroes and heroines! I methodically munched my way through your earlier books, and thought I’d read them all, and then discovered all our recent books.
    I am currently reading A Most Unsuitable Man and enjoying it very much. My critique group heard me raving about the cover (Fitzroger’s dreamy eyes!) *g* and one of the critique members bought the book for me! I’m at the halfway mark and loving it!
    New subject: ANNE H, ARE YOU OUT THERE? You’ve won a book, and we don’t have your e-mail address! Please contact me at sholmes@holmesedit.com. We originally drew Kalen Hughes’ name as the winner of Loretta’s Not Quite a Lady, but Kalen already has the book and voluntarily forfeited her win so that another name could be drawn–and you’re it! ***End of highjacked message*** I now return you to Jo Beverley’s interview!

    Reply
  8. Jo, I love your edgy heroes and heroines! I methodically munched my way through your earlier books, and thought I’d read them all, and then discovered all our recent books.
    I am currently reading A Most Unsuitable Man and enjoying it very much. My critique group heard me raving about the cover (Fitzroger’s dreamy eyes!) *g* and one of the critique members bought the book for me! I’m at the halfway mark and loving it!
    New subject: ANNE H, ARE YOU OUT THERE? You’ve won a book, and we don’t have your e-mail address! Please contact me at sholmes@holmesedit.com. We originally drew Kalen Hughes’ name as the winner of Loretta’s Not Quite a Lady, but Kalen already has the book and voluntarily forfeited her win so that another name could be drawn–and you’re it! ***End of highjacked message*** I now return you to Jo Beverley’s interview!

    Reply
  9. Jo, I love your edgy heroes and heroines! I methodically munched my way through your earlier books, and thought I’d read them all, and then discovered all our recent books.
    I am currently reading A Most Unsuitable Man and enjoying it very much. My critique group heard me raving about the cover (Fitzroger’s dreamy eyes!) *g* and one of the critique members bought the book for me! I’m at the halfway mark and loving it!
    New subject: ANNE H, ARE YOU OUT THERE? You’ve won a book, and we don’t have your e-mail address! Please contact me at sholmes@holmesedit.com. We originally drew Kalen Hughes’ name as the winner of Loretta’s Not Quite a Lady, but Kalen already has the book and voluntarily forfeited her win so that another name could be drawn–and you’re it! ***End of highjacked message*** I now return you to Jo Beverley’s interview!

    Reply
  10. Jo, I love your edgy heroes and heroines! I methodically munched my way through your earlier books, and thought I’d read them all, and then discovered all our recent books.
    I am currently reading A Most Unsuitable Man and enjoying it very much. My critique group heard me raving about the cover (Fitzroger’s dreamy eyes!) *g* and one of the critique members bought the book for me! I’m at the halfway mark and loving it!
    New subject: ANNE H, ARE YOU OUT THERE? You’ve won a book, and we don’t have your e-mail address! Please contact me at sholmes@holmesedit.com. We originally drew Kalen Hughes’ name as the winner of Loretta’s Not Quite a Lady, but Kalen already has the book and voluntarily forfeited her win so that another name could be drawn–and you’re it! ***End of highjacked message*** I now return you to Jo Beverley’s interview!

    Reply
  11. Do you know this Michael Bartlett? I wonder how he does his research for the uniforms? Are they really correct for the period?
    All three of them look wonderful to me, but I know nothing about uniforms.

    Reply
  12. Do you know this Michael Bartlett? I wonder how he does his research for the uniforms? Are they really correct for the period?
    All three of them look wonderful to me, but I know nothing about uniforms.

    Reply
  13. Do you know this Michael Bartlett? I wonder how he does his research for the uniforms? Are they really correct for the period?
    All three of them look wonderful to me, but I know nothing about uniforms.

    Reply
  14. Do you know this Michael Bartlett? I wonder how he does his research for the uniforms? Are they really correct for the period?
    All three of them look wonderful to me, but I know nothing about uniforms.

    Reply
  15. Do you know this Michael Bartlett? I wonder how he does his research for the uniforms? Are they really correct for the period?
    All three of them look wonderful to me, but I know nothing about uniforms.

    Reply
  16. Jo and Mary Jo, a wonderful interview!
    I stayed up way too late Monday night finishing Lady Beware. I was completely caught up in the story and could not bear to stop reading. I loved so much about this book–a heartbreaking hero, a strong but imperfect heroine, a wonderful view of family relationships, and delightful bits about other characters. I especially loved seeing Maria and Van’s happiness.
    I have been reading your Rogues’ world books from the beginning, and they are always worth waiting for. And a Malloren-connected book to look forward to now. Oh, joy!

    Reply
  17. Jo and Mary Jo, a wonderful interview!
    I stayed up way too late Monday night finishing Lady Beware. I was completely caught up in the story and could not bear to stop reading. I loved so much about this book–a heartbreaking hero, a strong but imperfect heroine, a wonderful view of family relationships, and delightful bits about other characters. I especially loved seeing Maria and Van’s happiness.
    I have been reading your Rogues’ world books from the beginning, and they are always worth waiting for. And a Malloren-connected book to look forward to now. Oh, joy!

    Reply
  18. Jo and Mary Jo, a wonderful interview!
    I stayed up way too late Monday night finishing Lady Beware. I was completely caught up in the story and could not bear to stop reading. I loved so much about this book–a heartbreaking hero, a strong but imperfect heroine, a wonderful view of family relationships, and delightful bits about other characters. I especially loved seeing Maria and Van’s happiness.
    I have been reading your Rogues’ world books from the beginning, and they are always worth waiting for. And a Malloren-connected book to look forward to now. Oh, joy!

    Reply
  19. Jo and Mary Jo, a wonderful interview!
    I stayed up way too late Monday night finishing Lady Beware. I was completely caught up in the story and could not bear to stop reading. I loved so much about this book–a heartbreaking hero, a strong but imperfect heroine, a wonderful view of family relationships, and delightful bits about other characters. I especially loved seeing Maria and Van’s happiness.
    I have been reading your Rogues’ world books from the beginning, and they are always worth waiting for. And a Malloren-connected book to look forward to now. Oh, joy!

    Reply
  20. Jo and Mary Jo, a wonderful interview!
    I stayed up way too late Monday night finishing Lady Beware. I was completely caught up in the story and could not bear to stop reading. I loved so much about this book–a heartbreaking hero, a strong but imperfect heroine, a wonderful view of family relationships, and delightful bits about other characters. I especially loved seeing Maria and Van’s happiness.
    I have been reading your Rogues’ world books from the beginning, and they are always worth waiting for. And a Malloren-connected book to look forward to now. Oh, joy!

    Reply
  21. Thanks much for the sneak peek at your WIP….I’l looking forward to it. (Love that tag line, too!)
    I’m anxiously awaiting my long-ago ordered copy of Lady Beware (this time it didn’t come early… whine whine)

    Reply
  22. Thanks much for the sneak peek at your WIP….I’l looking forward to it. (Love that tag line, too!)
    I’m anxiously awaiting my long-ago ordered copy of Lady Beware (this time it didn’t come early… whine whine)

    Reply
  23. Thanks much for the sneak peek at your WIP….I’l looking forward to it. (Love that tag line, too!)
    I’m anxiously awaiting my long-ago ordered copy of Lady Beware (this time it didn’t come early… whine whine)

    Reply
  24. Thanks much for the sneak peek at your WIP….I’l looking forward to it. (Love that tag line, too!)
    I’m anxiously awaiting my long-ago ordered copy of Lady Beware (this time it didn’t come early… whine whine)

    Reply
  25. Thanks much for the sneak peek at your WIP….I’l looking forward to it. (Love that tag line, too!)
    I’m anxiously awaiting my long-ago ordered copy of Lady Beware (this time it didn’t come early… whine whine)

    Reply
  26. A quick comment before breakfast. (Yes, I’m running late here. Well, not exactly running… Oh, never mind.*G*)
    There will, as usual, be a book giveaway here. In fact, I’ll give two. One will go to a randomly picked winner from among the posters.
    The other will go to the person (or a random pick among the persons) who comes up with the best adjective for that hussar uniform.
    My decision is final. 🙂
    Ingrid, do you think Michael Bartlett is the artist? I think that’s the name of the officer. I had another picture of him, not nearly so dashing. But that could be a modern interpretation of the other. Need to do more research.
    Jo

    Reply
  27. A quick comment before breakfast. (Yes, I’m running late here. Well, not exactly running… Oh, never mind.*G*)
    There will, as usual, be a book giveaway here. In fact, I’ll give two. One will go to a randomly picked winner from among the posters.
    The other will go to the person (or a random pick among the persons) who comes up with the best adjective for that hussar uniform.
    My decision is final. 🙂
    Ingrid, do you think Michael Bartlett is the artist? I think that’s the name of the officer. I had another picture of him, not nearly so dashing. But that could be a modern interpretation of the other. Need to do more research.
    Jo

    Reply
  28. A quick comment before breakfast. (Yes, I’m running late here. Well, not exactly running… Oh, never mind.*G*)
    There will, as usual, be a book giveaway here. In fact, I’ll give two. One will go to a randomly picked winner from among the posters.
    The other will go to the person (or a random pick among the persons) who comes up with the best adjective for that hussar uniform.
    My decision is final. 🙂
    Ingrid, do you think Michael Bartlett is the artist? I think that’s the name of the officer. I had another picture of him, not nearly so dashing. But that could be a modern interpretation of the other. Need to do more research.
    Jo

    Reply
  29. A quick comment before breakfast. (Yes, I’m running late here. Well, not exactly running… Oh, never mind.*G*)
    There will, as usual, be a book giveaway here. In fact, I’ll give two. One will go to a randomly picked winner from among the posters.
    The other will go to the person (or a random pick among the persons) who comes up with the best adjective for that hussar uniform.
    My decision is final. 🙂
    Ingrid, do you think Michael Bartlett is the artist? I think that’s the name of the officer. I had another picture of him, not nearly so dashing. But that could be a modern interpretation of the other. Need to do more research.
    Jo

    Reply
  30. A quick comment before breakfast. (Yes, I’m running late here. Well, not exactly running… Oh, never mind.*G*)
    There will, as usual, be a book giveaway here. In fact, I’ll give two. One will go to a randomly picked winner from among the posters.
    The other will go to the person (or a random pick among the persons) who comes up with the best adjective for that hussar uniform.
    My decision is final. 🙂
    Ingrid, do you think Michael Bartlett is the artist? I think that’s the name of the officer. I had another picture of him, not nearly so dashing. But that could be a modern interpretation of the other. Need to do more research.
    Jo

    Reply
  31. Just received my copy of Lady Beware today…Can’t wait. And by the way Jo, I still have one of your Waiting for Rothgar buttons tacked to my bookshelf.

    Reply
  32. Just received my copy of Lady Beware today…Can’t wait. And by the way Jo, I still have one of your Waiting for Rothgar buttons tacked to my bookshelf.

    Reply
  33. Just received my copy of Lady Beware today…Can’t wait. And by the way Jo, I still have one of your Waiting for Rothgar buttons tacked to my bookshelf.

    Reply
  34. Just received my copy of Lady Beware today…Can’t wait. And by the way Jo, I still have one of your Waiting for Rothgar buttons tacked to my bookshelf.

    Reply
  35. Just received my copy of Lady Beware today…Can’t wait. And by the way Jo, I still have one of your Waiting for Rothgar buttons tacked to my bookshelf.

    Reply
  36. My goodness, Ranurgis, you have more willpower than I have!
    As you have trouble getting around, why not phone to be sure your bookstore has Lady Beware out. The official pub date is next Tuesday and some places are sticking to it.
    Janga, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. I became very fond of Pup.
    Ah, Waiting For Rothgar, Kay. Those buttons were fun. 🙂
    Jo

    Reply
  37. My goodness, Ranurgis, you have more willpower than I have!
    As you have trouble getting around, why not phone to be sure your bookstore has Lady Beware out. The official pub date is next Tuesday and some places are sticking to it.
    Janga, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. I became very fond of Pup.
    Ah, Waiting For Rothgar, Kay. Those buttons were fun. 🙂
    Jo

    Reply
  38. My goodness, Ranurgis, you have more willpower than I have!
    As you have trouble getting around, why not phone to be sure your bookstore has Lady Beware out. The official pub date is next Tuesday and some places are sticking to it.
    Janga, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. I became very fond of Pup.
    Ah, Waiting For Rothgar, Kay. Those buttons were fun. 🙂
    Jo

    Reply
  39. My goodness, Ranurgis, you have more willpower than I have!
    As you have trouble getting around, why not phone to be sure your bookstore has Lady Beware out. The official pub date is next Tuesday and some places are sticking to it.
    Janga, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. I became very fond of Pup.
    Ah, Waiting For Rothgar, Kay. Those buttons were fun. 🙂
    Jo

    Reply
  40. My goodness, Ranurgis, you have more willpower than I have!
    As you have trouble getting around, why not phone to be sure your bookstore has Lady Beware out. The official pub date is next Tuesday and some places are sticking to it.
    Janga, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. I became very fond of Pup.
    Ah, Waiting For Rothgar, Kay. Those buttons were fun. 🙂
    Jo

    Reply
  41. About Michael Bartlett. I’ve just clued in that he’s the artist, which certainly explains a lot. Thanks!
    I found a picture a while ago, which looked much more period so I wrote to ask if I could use it for promo. I thought I was dealing with a gallery so I was startled by how much money they wanted and decided not to bother.
    I thought I could link to it, though, and searched. I couldn’t find it, but I found this one. It did look much more modern,and rather imprecise for a miniature, but I thought perhaps that was something to do with the on-line reproduction.
    No wonder I couldn’t find any bio info on the real Robert Bartlett of the hussars. I need to pay more attention while skimming the ‘net.
    Here’s a link to a true period pic of a Hussar, and you can see the difference in artistic technique, even though it’s a wierd looking gent.
    http://www.cashman-antiques.co.uk/min-2-5.htm
    But I do like the look of that Robert Bartlett one. I think that is Canem Cave at about 18, when he’s worked his way past his dark youth and is feeling good about himself,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  42. About Michael Bartlett. I’ve just clued in that he’s the artist, which certainly explains a lot. Thanks!
    I found a picture a while ago, which looked much more period so I wrote to ask if I could use it for promo. I thought I was dealing with a gallery so I was startled by how much money they wanted and decided not to bother.
    I thought I could link to it, though, and searched. I couldn’t find it, but I found this one. It did look much more modern,and rather imprecise for a miniature, but I thought perhaps that was something to do with the on-line reproduction.
    No wonder I couldn’t find any bio info on the real Robert Bartlett of the hussars. I need to pay more attention while skimming the ‘net.
    Here’s a link to a true period pic of a Hussar, and you can see the difference in artistic technique, even though it’s a wierd looking gent.
    http://www.cashman-antiques.co.uk/min-2-5.htm
    But I do like the look of that Robert Bartlett one. I think that is Canem Cave at about 18, when he’s worked his way past his dark youth and is feeling good about himself,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  43. About Michael Bartlett. I’ve just clued in that he’s the artist, which certainly explains a lot. Thanks!
    I found a picture a while ago, which looked much more period so I wrote to ask if I could use it for promo. I thought I was dealing with a gallery so I was startled by how much money they wanted and decided not to bother.
    I thought I could link to it, though, and searched. I couldn’t find it, but I found this one. It did look much more modern,and rather imprecise for a miniature, but I thought perhaps that was something to do with the on-line reproduction.
    No wonder I couldn’t find any bio info on the real Robert Bartlett of the hussars. I need to pay more attention while skimming the ‘net.
    Here’s a link to a true period pic of a Hussar, and you can see the difference in artistic technique, even though it’s a wierd looking gent.
    http://www.cashman-antiques.co.uk/min-2-5.htm
    But I do like the look of that Robert Bartlett one. I think that is Canem Cave at about 18, when he’s worked his way past his dark youth and is feeling good about himself,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  44. About Michael Bartlett. I’ve just clued in that he’s the artist, which certainly explains a lot. Thanks!
    I found a picture a while ago, which looked much more period so I wrote to ask if I could use it for promo. I thought I was dealing with a gallery so I was startled by how much money they wanted and decided not to bother.
    I thought I could link to it, though, and searched. I couldn’t find it, but I found this one. It did look much more modern,and rather imprecise for a miniature, but I thought perhaps that was something to do with the on-line reproduction.
    No wonder I couldn’t find any bio info on the real Robert Bartlett of the hussars. I need to pay more attention while skimming the ‘net.
    Here’s a link to a true period pic of a Hussar, and you can see the difference in artistic technique, even though it’s a wierd looking gent.
    http://www.cashman-antiques.co.uk/min-2-5.htm
    But I do like the look of that Robert Bartlett one. I think that is Canem Cave at about 18, when he’s worked his way past his dark youth and is feeling good about himself,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  45. About Michael Bartlett. I’ve just clued in that he’s the artist, which certainly explains a lot. Thanks!
    I found a picture a while ago, which looked much more period so I wrote to ask if I could use it for promo. I thought I was dealing with a gallery so I was startled by how much money they wanted and decided not to bother.
    I thought I could link to it, though, and searched. I couldn’t find it, but I found this one. It did look much more modern,and rather imprecise for a miniature, but I thought perhaps that was something to do with the on-line reproduction.
    No wonder I couldn’t find any bio info on the real Robert Bartlett of the hussars. I need to pay more attention while skimming the ‘net.
    Here’s a link to a true period pic of a Hussar, and you can see the difference in artistic technique, even though it’s a wierd looking gent.
    http://www.cashman-antiques.co.uk/min-2-5.htm
    But I do like the look of that Robert Bartlett one. I think that is Canem Cave at about 18, when he’s worked his way past his dark youth and is feeling good about himself,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  46. I can’t wait to read about Darien, he definitely caught my interest at the end, Jo.
    Sooo happy to hear you are working on another Malloren story.

    Reply
  47. I can’t wait to read about Darien, he definitely caught my interest at the end, Jo.
    Sooo happy to hear you are working on another Malloren story.

    Reply
  48. I can’t wait to read about Darien, he definitely caught my interest at the end, Jo.
    Sooo happy to hear you are working on another Malloren story.

    Reply
  49. I can’t wait to read about Darien, he definitely caught my interest at the end, Jo.
    Sooo happy to hear you are working on another Malloren story.

    Reply
  50. I can’t wait to read about Darien, he definitely caught my interest at the end, Jo.
    Sooo happy to hear you are working on another Malloren story.

    Reply
  51. Grandiloquent. Interesting, Pam.
    Who else has a candidate word?
    I’m off tomorrow, mid-morning for the weekend, but I may be able to check in. In any case, the two prizes will be allocated according to posts made up to midnight Pacific time on Thursday. 🙂
    As things are quiet, I’ll toss out a question. How do you like to see soldiers potrayed in historical novels? Do you think war and soldiers were different in the past? (Apart from the tendency to wear weird uniforms. Or, does that say something about differences?)
    Jo

    Reply
  52. Grandiloquent. Interesting, Pam.
    Who else has a candidate word?
    I’m off tomorrow, mid-morning for the weekend, but I may be able to check in. In any case, the two prizes will be allocated according to posts made up to midnight Pacific time on Thursday. 🙂
    As things are quiet, I’ll toss out a question. How do you like to see soldiers potrayed in historical novels? Do you think war and soldiers were different in the past? (Apart from the tendency to wear weird uniforms. Or, does that say something about differences?)
    Jo

    Reply
  53. Grandiloquent. Interesting, Pam.
    Who else has a candidate word?
    I’m off tomorrow, mid-morning for the weekend, but I may be able to check in. In any case, the two prizes will be allocated according to posts made up to midnight Pacific time on Thursday. 🙂
    As things are quiet, I’ll toss out a question. How do you like to see soldiers potrayed in historical novels? Do you think war and soldiers were different in the past? (Apart from the tendency to wear weird uniforms. Or, does that say something about differences?)
    Jo

    Reply
  54. Grandiloquent. Interesting, Pam.
    Who else has a candidate word?
    I’m off tomorrow, mid-morning for the weekend, but I may be able to check in. In any case, the two prizes will be allocated according to posts made up to midnight Pacific time on Thursday. 🙂
    As things are quiet, I’ll toss out a question. How do you like to see soldiers potrayed in historical novels? Do you think war and soldiers were different in the past? (Apart from the tendency to wear weird uniforms. Or, does that say something about differences?)
    Jo

    Reply
  55. Grandiloquent. Interesting, Pam.
    Who else has a candidate word?
    I’m off tomorrow, mid-morning for the weekend, but I may be able to check in. In any case, the two prizes will be allocated according to posts made up to midnight Pacific time on Thursday. 🙂
    As things are quiet, I’ll toss out a question. How do you like to see soldiers potrayed in historical novels? Do you think war and soldiers were different in the past? (Apart from the tendency to wear weird uniforms. Or, does that say something about differences?)
    Jo

    Reply
  56. Where I work, I have had access to some Civil War diaries (United States). In fact, one of the diaries, I was lucky enough to scan and try to do some digital enhancement on, which allowed me to really read this particular one. There were also letters that this young man had written to his brother. His letters were full of charm, homesickness and money woes. There was one letter in particular that he wrote about being on guard duty and sitting on top of a hill watching the sun go down and thinking of home. That letter was a tear jerker. Anyway, his diaries on the other hand were full of patriotism (common among the other diaries), a lot of boredom and a lot of things that he did that involved drinking. In fact I oftened wondered how his regiment made it through the war. In the beginning of the diaries he really wanted to be in a battle, toward the end of the diaries he finally was in some battles and he describes the shells going over head. He mentions his friends that are mortally wounded in a rather detached manner. Once in the diary his unit was forced to witness a deserter being hung, it must have been a horrible sight, because he states that it was something he never wanted to see again. And, he signs off with a weather report at the end of each entry. I became so fascinated with this young man (he was 20 at the beginning), by the time I was done with this project I had to do a search to make sure he made it out of the war and he did. From what I can tell from reading these diaries, the soldiers then and soldiers now suffer from long periods of boredom interspersed with intense moments of adrenalin rushes caused by being in battles. What I think might be different for one thing is the manner of speaking/writing that is so different from the young soldiers of today. The diaries I have read are full of wonderful descriptive words. There also seems to be something very innocent about the young men in the diaries I’ve read.

    Reply
  57. Where I work, I have had access to some Civil War diaries (United States). In fact, one of the diaries, I was lucky enough to scan and try to do some digital enhancement on, which allowed me to really read this particular one. There were also letters that this young man had written to his brother. His letters were full of charm, homesickness and money woes. There was one letter in particular that he wrote about being on guard duty and sitting on top of a hill watching the sun go down and thinking of home. That letter was a tear jerker. Anyway, his diaries on the other hand were full of patriotism (common among the other diaries), a lot of boredom and a lot of things that he did that involved drinking. In fact I oftened wondered how his regiment made it through the war. In the beginning of the diaries he really wanted to be in a battle, toward the end of the diaries he finally was in some battles and he describes the shells going over head. He mentions his friends that are mortally wounded in a rather detached manner. Once in the diary his unit was forced to witness a deserter being hung, it must have been a horrible sight, because he states that it was something he never wanted to see again. And, he signs off with a weather report at the end of each entry. I became so fascinated with this young man (he was 20 at the beginning), by the time I was done with this project I had to do a search to make sure he made it out of the war and he did. From what I can tell from reading these diaries, the soldiers then and soldiers now suffer from long periods of boredom interspersed with intense moments of adrenalin rushes caused by being in battles. What I think might be different for one thing is the manner of speaking/writing that is so different from the young soldiers of today. The diaries I have read are full of wonderful descriptive words. There also seems to be something very innocent about the young men in the diaries I’ve read.

    Reply
  58. Where I work, I have had access to some Civil War diaries (United States). In fact, one of the diaries, I was lucky enough to scan and try to do some digital enhancement on, which allowed me to really read this particular one. There were also letters that this young man had written to his brother. His letters were full of charm, homesickness and money woes. There was one letter in particular that he wrote about being on guard duty and sitting on top of a hill watching the sun go down and thinking of home. That letter was a tear jerker. Anyway, his diaries on the other hand were full of patriotism (common among the other diaries), a lot of boredom and a lot of things that he did that involved drinking. In fact I oftened wondered how his regiment made it through the war. In the beginning of the diaries he really wanted to be in a battle, toward the end of the diaries he finally was in some battles and he describes the shells going over head. He mentions his friends that are mortally wounded in a rather detached manner. Once in the diary his unit was forced to witness a deserter being hung, it must have been a horrible sight, because he states that it was something he never wanted to see again. And, he signs off with a weather report at the end of each entry. I became so fascinated with this young man (he was 20 at the beginning), by the time I was done with this project I had to do a search to make sure he made it out of the war and he did. From what I can tell from reading these diaries, the soldiers then and soldiers now suffer from long periods of boredom interspersed with intense moments of adrenalin rushes caused by being in battles. What I think might be different for one thing is the manner of speaking/writing that is so different from the young soldiers of today. The diaries I have read are full of wonderful descriptive words. There also seems to be something very innocent about the young men in the diaries I’ve read.

    Reply
  59. Where I work, I have had access to some Civil War diaries (United States). In fact, one of the diaries, I was lucky enough to scan and try to do some digital enhancement on, which allowed me to really read this particular one. There were also letters that this young man had written to his brother. His letters were full of charm, homesickness and money woes. There was one letter in particular that he wrote about being on guard duty and sitting on top of a hill watching the sun go down and thinking of home. That letter was a tear jerker. Anyway, his diaries on the other hand were full of patriotism (common among the other diaries), a lot of boredom and a lot of things that he did that involved drinking. In fact I oftened wondered how his regiment made it through the war. In the beginning of the diaries he really wanted to be in a battle, toward the end of the diaries he finally was in some battles and he describes the shells going over head. He mentions his friends that are mortally wounded in a rather detached manner. Once in the diary his unit was forced to witness a deserter being hung, it must have been a horrible sight, because he states that it was something he never wanted to see again. And, he signs off with a weather report at the end of each entry. I became so fascinated with this young man (he was 20 at the beginning), by the time I was done with this project I had to do a search to make sure he made it out of the war and he did. From what I can tell from reading these diaries, the soldiers then and soldiers now suffer from long periods of boredom interspersed with intense moments of adrenalin rushes caused by being in battles. What I think might be different for one thing is the manner of speaking/writing that is so different from the young soldiers of today. The diaries I have read are full of wonderful descriptive words. There also seems to be something very innocent about the young men in the diaries I’ve read.

    Reply
  60. Where I work, I have had access to some Civil War diaries (United States). In fact, one of the diaries, I was lucky enough to scan and try to do some digital enhancement on, which allowed me to really read this particular one. There were also letters that this young man had written to his brother. His letters were full of charm, homesickness and money woes. There was one letter in particular that he wrote about being on guard duty and sitting on top of a hill watching the sun go down and thinking of home. That letter was a tear jerker. Anyway, his diaries on the other hand were full of patriotism (common among the other diaries), a lot of boredom and a lot of things that he did that involved drinking. In fact I oftened wondered how his regiment made it through the war. In the beginning of the diaries he really wanted to be in a battle, toward the end of the diaries he finally was in some battles and he describes the shells going over head. He mentions his friends that are mortally wounded in a rather detached manner. Once in the diary his unit was forced to witness a deserter being hung, it must have been a horrible sight, because he states that it was something he never wanted to see again. And, he signs off with a weather report at the end of each entry. I became so fascinated with this young man (he was 20 at the beginning), by the time I was done with this project I had to do a search to make sure he made it out of the war and he did. From what I can tell from reading these diaries, the soldiers then and soldiers now suffer from long periods of boredom interspersed with intense moments of adrenalin rushes caused by being in battles. What I think might be different for one thing is the manner of speaking/writing that is so different from the young soldiers of today. The diaries I have read are full of wonderful descriptive words. There also seems to be something very innocent about the young men in the diaries I’ve read.

    Reply
  61. Interesting, Kay.
    In some ways many people in the past were more innocent than most today simply because of communications. People could easily grow up without traveling far from a rural home and with only a limited selection of books to read, stories to hear.
    Now we’re all awash with images and information, but most of us pay less attention to any of it than a young man like that paid to life around him.
    Blogs are the closest to old diaries and letters, and they can be very powerful if the blogger is in the middle of crisis or action.
    But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?
    Jo

    Reply
  62. Interesting, Kay.
    In some ways many people in the past were more innocent than most today simply because of communications. People could easily grow up without traveling far from a rural home and with only a limited selection of books to read, stories to hear.
    Now we’re all awash with images and information, but most of us pay less attention to any of it than a young man like that paid to life around him.
    Blogs are the closest to old diaries and letters, and they can be very powerful if the blogger is in the middle of crisis or action.
    But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?
    Jo

    Reply
  63. Interesting, Kay.
    In some ways many people in the past were more innocent than most today simply because of communications. People could easily grow up without traveling far from a rural home and with only a limited selection of books to read, stories to hear.
    Now we’re all awash with images and information, but most of us pay less attention to any of it than a young man like that paid to life around him.
    Blogs are the closest to old diaries and letters, and they can be very powerful if the blogger is in the middle of crisis or action.
    But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?
    Jo

    Reply
  64. Interesting, Kay.
    In some ways many people in the past were more innocent than most today simply because of communications. People could easily grow up without traveling far from a rural home and with only a limited selection of books to read, stories to hear.
    Now we’re all awash with images and information, but most of us pay less attention to any of it than a young man like that paid to life around him.
    Blogs are the closest to old diaries and letters, and they can be very powerful if the blogger is in the middle of crisis or action.
    But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?
    Jo

    Reply
  65. Interesting, Kay.
    In some ways many people in the past were more innocent than most today simply because of communications. People could easily grow up without traveling far from a rural home and with only a limited selection of books to read, stories to hear.
    Now we’re all awash with images and information, but most of us pay less attention to any of it than a young man like that paid to life around him.
    Blogs are the closest to old diaries and letters, and they can be very powerful if the blogger is in the middle of crisis or action.
    But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?
    Jo

    Reply
  66. I’m never good with words, Jo, lol. Outlandish?
    Even with all the info today, I think still soldiers are as “innocent” as those in the past until they first face those battles and all the atrocities of war. The main diference I think today with some soldiers, despite their patriotism, is wondering about the cause they are fighting for in some wars.

    Reply
  67. I’m never good with words, Jo, lol. Outlandish?
    Even with all the info today, I think still soldiers are as “innocent” as those in the past until they first face those battles and all the atrocities of war. The main diference I think today with some soldiers, despite their patriotism, is wondering about the cause they are fighting for in some wars.

    Reply
  68. I’m never good with words, Jo, lol. Outlandish?
    Even with all the info today, I think still soldiers are as “innocent” as those in the past until they first face those battles and all the atrocities of war. The main diference I think today with some soldiers, despite their patriotism, is wondering about the cause they are fighting for in some wars.

    Reply
  69. I’m never good with words, Jo, lol. Outlandish?
    Even with all the info today, I think still soldiers are as “innocent” as those in the past until they first face those battles and all the atrocities of war. The main diference I think today with some soldiers, despite their patriotism, is wondering about the cause they are fighting for in some wars.

    Reply
  70. I’m never good with words, Jo, lol. Outlandish?
    Even with all the info today, I think still soldiers are as “innocent” as those in the past until they first face those battles and all the atrocities of war. The main diference I think today with some soldiers, despite their patriotism, is wondering about the cause they are fighting for in some wars.

    Reply
  71. I have to leave to catch the ferry to Vancouver. One of the most beautiful ferry rides anywhere — an hour and a half for $12. Poor me.
    Please keep talking if you wish and post questions. I’ll pick it all up when I get home.
    Cheers,
    Jo

    Reply
  72. I have to leave to catch the ferry to Vancouver. One of the most beautiful ferry rides anywhere — an hour and a half for $12. Poor me.
    Please keep talking if you wish and post questions. I’ll pick it all up when I get home.
    Cheers,
    Jo

    Reply
  73. I have to leave to catch the ferry to Vancouver. One of the most beautiful ferry rides anywhere — an hour and a half for $12. Poor me.
    Please keep talking if you wish and post questions. I’ll pick it all up when I get home.
    Cheers,
    Jo

    Reply
  74. I have to leave to catch the ferry to Vancouver. One of the most beautiful ferry rides anywhere — an hour and a half for $12. Poor me.
    Please keep talking if you wish and post questions. I’ll pick it all up when I get home.
    Cheers,
    Jo

    Reply
  75. I have to leave to catch the ferry to Vancouver. One of the most beautiful ferry rides anywhere — an hour and a half for $12. Poor me.
    Please keep talking if you wish and post questions. I’ll pick it all up when I get home.
    Cheers,
    Jo

    Reply
  76. Wonderful interview Mary Jo!
    And Jo, I am so looking forward to Lady Beware. I love the title. And Thea sounds like a handful for both writer and hero. Thank you for sharing about your writing process. It helps me deal with my own, including a few characters that are proving more bull-headed than me. If you can believe it. 🙂
    On to your questions…
    “Do you think war and soldiers were different in the past?”
    Yes, and No.
    IMHO, warfare was conducted much differently “back then” as weapons possessed neither the long range nor accuracy of today. Not to mention the lack of communication on the field. Imagine what Wellington could have done had he a PDA with satellite imagery and every ADC packed a cell phone.
    Another challenge was motivation as the troops straggled along (often on foot) to or from battle — requiring, again IMHO, for officers to hold greater power over their men. Thus corporal punishment. (I’ve read vivid accounts that have caused me to flash the hash.) I don’t believe the men and women of today’s military need to fear such things as floggings, hangings or eviscerations from their COs. No should they.
    OTOH, there are a number of similarities between then and now – death being one. Both the doing of it and the watching. There also seems to be an internal drive to maintain some sense of normalcy. I find these constant reminders written between the lines of weather reports, simple purchases and the color of a never-before-seen flower. Their personal self reminders that there is more to life than war.
    Which leads me to your second question Jo — how do I like to see soldiers portrayed in historical romance? Real would be my response. Honor their service, their pain, their need to heal and their desire to be very philosophical about it. I love stories about war heroes, though they are often the most difficult to read.
    As to the uniform of your very handsome hussar… how about… spangledashed?
    Nina, back to her misty MIP.

    Reply
  77. Wonderful interview Mary Jo!
    And Jo, I am so looking forward to Lady Beware. I love the title. And Thea sounds like a handful for both writer and hero. Thank you for sharing about your writing process. It helps me deal with my own, including a few characters that are proving more bull-headed than me. If you can believe it. 🙂
    On to your questions…
    “Do you think war and soldiers were different in the past?”
    Yes, and No.
    IMHO, warfare was conducted much differently “back then” as weapons possessed neither the long range nor accuracy of today. Not to mention the lack of communication on the field. Imagine what Wellington could have done had he a PDA with satellite imagery and every ADC packed a cell phone.
    Another challenge was motivation as the troops straggled along (often on foot) to or from battle — requiring, again IMHO, for officers to hold greater power over their men. Thus corporal punishment. (I’ve read vivid accounts that have caused me to flash the hash.) I don’t believe the men and women of today’s military need to fear such things as floggings, hangings or eviscerations from their COs. No should they.
    OTOH, there are a number of similarities between then and now – death being one. Both the doing of it and the watching. There also seems to be an internal drive to maintain some sense of normalcy. I find these constant reminders written between the lines of weather reports, simple purchases and the color of a never-before-seen flower. Their personal self reminders that there is more to life than war.
    Which leads me to your second question Jo — how do I like to see soldiers portrayed in historical romance? Real would be my response. Honor their service, their pain, their need to heal and their desire to be very philosophical about it. I love stories about war heroes, though they are often the most difficult to read.
    As to the uniform of your very handsome hussar… how about… spangledashed?
    Nina, back to her misty MIP.

    Reply
  78. Wonderful interview Mary Jo!
    And Jo, I am so looking forward to Lady Beware. I love the title. And Thea sounds like a handful for both writer and hero. Thank you for sharing about your writing process. It helps me deal with my own, including a few characters that are proving more bull-headed than me. If you can believe it. 🙂
    On to your questions…
    “Do you think war and soldiers were different in the past?”
    Yes, and No.
    IMHO, warfare was conducted much differently “back then” as weapons possessed neither the long range nor accuracy of today. Not to mention the lack of communication on the field. Imagine what Wellington could have done had he a PDA with satellite imagery and every ADC packed a cell phone.
    Another challenge was motivation as the troops straggled along (often on foot) to or from battle — requiring, again IMHO, for officers to hold greater power over their men. Thus corporal punishment. (I’ve read vivid accounts that have caused me to flash the hash.) I don’t believe the men and women of today’s military need to fear such things as floggings, hangings or eviscerations from their COs. No should they.
    OTOH, there are a number of similarities between then and now – death being one. Both the doing of it and the watching. There also seems to be an internal drive to maintain some sense of normalcy. I find these constant reminders written between the lines of weather reports, simple purchases and the color of a never-before-seen flower. Their personal self reminders that there is more to life than war.
    Which leads me to your second question Jo — how do I like to see soldiers portrayed in historical romance? Real would be my response. Honor their service, their pain, their need to heal and their desire to be very philosophical about it. I love stories about war heroes, though they are often the most difficult to read.
    As to the uniform of your very handsome hussar… how about… spangledashed?
    Nina, back to her misty MIP.

    Reply
  79. Wonderful interview Mary Jo!
    And Jo, I am so looking forward to Lady Beware. I love the title. And Thea sounds like a handful for both writer and hero. Thank you for sharing about your writing process. It helps me deal with my own, including a few characters that are proving more bull-headed than me. If you can believe it. 🙂
    On to your questions…
    “Do you think war and soldiers were different in the past?”
    Yes, and No.
    IMHO, warfare was conducted much differently “back then” as weapons possessed neither the long range nor accuracy of today. Not to mention the lack of communication on the field. Imagine what Wellington could have done had he a PDA with satellite imagery and every ADC packed a cell phone.
    Another challenge was motivation as the troops straggled along (often on foot) to or from battle — requiring, again IMHO, for officers to hold greater power over their men. Thus corporal punishment. (I’ve read vivid accounts that have caused me to flash the hash.) I don’t believe the men and women of today’s military need to fear such things as floggings, hangings or eviscerations from their COs. No should they.
    OTOH, there are a number of similarities between then and now – death being one. Both the doing of it and the watching. There also seems to be an internal drive to maintain some sense of normalcy. I find these constant reminders written between the lines of weather reports, simple purchases and the color of a never-before-seen flower. Their personal self reminders that there is more to life than war.
    Which leads me to your second question Jo — how do I like to see soldiers portrayed in historical romance? Real would be my response. Honor their service, their pain, their need to heal and their desire to be very philosophical about it. I love stories about war heroes, though they are often the most difficult to read.
    As to the uniform of your very handsome hussar… how about… spangledashed?
    Nina, back to her misty MIP.

    Reply
  80. Wonderful interview Mary Jo!
    And Jo, I am so looking forward to Lady Beware. I love the title. And Thea sounds like a handful for both writer and hero. Thank you for sharing about your writing process. It helps me deal with my own, including a few characters that are proving more bull-headed than me. If you can believe it. 🙂
    On to your questions…
    “Do you think war and soldiers were different in the past?”
    Yes, and No.
    IMHO, warfare was conducted much differently “back then” as weapons possessed neither the long range nor accuracy of today. Not to mention the lack of communication on the field. Imagine what Wellington could have done had he a PDA with satellite imagery and every ADC packed a cell phone.
    Another challenge was motivation as the troops straggled along (often on foot) to or from battle — requiring, again IMHO, for officers to hold greater power over their men. Thus corporal punishment. (I’ve read vivid accounts that have caused me to flash the hash.) I don’t believe the men and women of today’s military need to fear such things as floggings, hangings or eviscerations from their COs. No should they.
    OTOH, there are a number of similarities between then and now – death being one. Both the doing of it and the watching. There also seems to be an internal drive to maintain some sense of normalcy. I find these constant reminders written between the lines of weather reports, simple purchases and the color of a never-before-seen flower. Their personal self reminders that there is more to life than war.
    Which leads me to your second question Jo — how do I like to see soldiers portrayed in historical romance? Real would be my response. Honor their service, their pain, their need to heal and their desire to be very philosophical about it. I love stories about war heroes, though they are often the most difficult to read.
    As to the uniform of your very handsome hussar… how about… spangledashed?
    Nina, back to her misty MIP.

    Reply
  81. “Resplendent” is the word that pops to mind looking at that uniform. Wouldn’t it be impressive on a doorman? (Is anyone else old enough to remember that Sid Caesar skit?)
    As for warfare, I think probably the biggest difference is how much we, the civilians back home, know about the reality of war. Ever since VIetnam was daily fare on the evening news, it has been difficult to think of terms like “glory” in relation to war. We don’t even think of war heroes any more. So soldiers who have been wounded psychologically as well as physically probably seem more real to us.

    Reply
  82. “Resplendent” is the word that pops to mind looking at that uniform. Wouldn’t it be impressive on a doorman? (Is anyone else old enough to remember that Sid Caesar skit?)
    As for warfare, I think probably the biggest difference is how much we, the civilians back home, know about the reality of war. Ever since VIetnam was daily fare on the evening news, it has been difficult to think of terms like “glory” in relation to war. We don’t even think of war heroes any more. So soldiers who have been wounded psychologically as well as physically probably seem more real to us.

    Reply
  83. “Resplendent” is the word that pops to mind looking at that uniform. Wouldn’t it be impressive on a doorman? (Is anyone else old enough to remember that Sid Caesar skit?)
    As for warfare, I think probably the biggest difference is how much we, the civilians back home, know about the reality of war. Ever since VIetnam was daily fare on the evening news, it has been difficult to think of terms like “glory” in relation to war. We don’t even think of war heroes any more. So soldiers who have been wounded psychologically as well as physically probably seem more real to us.

    Reply
  84. “Resplendent” is the word that pops to mind looking at that uniform. Wouldn’t it be impressive on a doorman? (Is anyone else old enough to remember that Sid Caesar skit?)
    As for warfare, I think probably the biggest difference is how much we, the civilians back home, know about the reality of war. Ever since VIetnam was daily fare on the evening news, it has been difficult to think of terms like “glory” in relation to war. We don’t even think of war heroes any more. So soldiers who have been wounded psychologically as well as physically probably seem more real to us.

    Reply
  85. “Resplendent” is the word that pops to mind looking at that uniform. Wouldn’t it be impressive on a doorman? (Is anyone else old enough to remember that Sid Caesar skit?)
    As for warfare, I think probably the biggest difference is how much we, the civilians back home, know about the reality of war. Ever since VIetnam was daily fare on the evening news, it has been difficult to think of terms like “glory” in relation to war. We don’t even think of war heroes any more. So soldiers who have been wounded psychologically as well as physically probably seem more real to us.

    Reply
  86. Describe the Hussar’s uniform? Very pretty. I imagine that when facing a field of them in a war it would look impressive. I can see why all the ladies would think they were something special -especially given the over the top style of dress at the time.
    I checked with Chapters and I have preordered the book, so now I must sit and wait patiently. I don’t do that very well.

    Reply
  87. Describe the Hussar’s uniform? Very pretty. I imagine that when facing a field of them in a war it would look impressive. I can see why all the ladies would think they were something special -especially given the over the top style of dress at the time.
    I checked with Chapters and I have preordered the book, so now I must sit and wait patiently. I don’t do that very well.

    Reply
  88. Describe the Hussar’s uniform? Very pretty. I imagine that when facing a field of them in a war it would look impressive. I can see why all the ladies would think they were something special -especially given the over the top style of dress at the time.
    I checked with Chapters and I have preordered the book, so now I must sit and wait patiently. I don’t do that very well.

    Reply
  89. Describe the Hussar’s uniform? Very pretty. I imagine that when facing a field of them in a war it would look impressive. I can see why all the ladies would think they were something special -especially given the over the top style of dress at the time.
    I checked with Chapters and I have preordered the book, so now I must sit and wait patiently. I don’t do that very well.

    Reply
  90. Describe the Hussar’s uniform? Very pretty. I imagine that when facing a field of them in a war it would look impressive. I can see why all the ladies would think they were something special -especially given the over the top style of dress at the time.
    I checked with Chapters and I have preordered the book, so now I must sit and wait patiently. I don’t do that very well.

    Reply
  91. I went to my local B & N today and couldn’t find “Lady Beware” (lower lip pooched out sadly). What is the official release date? Also, the only one of your back list they had was about Rothgar. You’d think they’d do better than that! I’ll have to hit the library and UBS to read the whole saga.

    Reply
  92. I went to my local B & N today and couldn’t find “Lady Beware” (lower lip pooched out sadly). What is the official release date? Also, the only one of your back list they had was about Rothgar. You’d think they’d do better than that! I’ll have to hit the library and UBS to read the whole saga.

    Reply
  93. I went to my local B & N today and couldn’t find “Lady Beware” (lower lip pooched out sadly). What is the official release date? Also, the only one of your back list they had was about Rothgar. You’d think they’d do better than that! I’ll have to hit the library and UBS to read the whole saga.

    Reply
  94. I went to my local B & N today and couldn’t find “Lady Beware” (lower lip pooched out sadly). What is the official release date? Also, the only one of your back list they had was about Rothgar. You’d think they’d do better than that! I’ll have to hit the library and UBS to read the whole saga.

    Reply
  95. I went to my local B & N today and couldn’t find “Lady Beware” (lower lip pooched out sadly). What is the official release date? Also, the only one of your back list they had was about Rothgar. You’d think they’d do better than that! I’ll have to hit the library and UBS to read the whole saga.

    Reply
  96. I have a chance to check in — free, even at the universitye But there’s one snag. I use a Dvorak keyboard layout, not qwerty,so this is about all you’ll get out of me, I’m afraid.
    Cheerful hunt-and-peck waves,
    Jo

    Reply
  97. I have a chance to check in — free, even at the universitye But there’s one snag. I use a Dvorak keyboard layout, not qwerty,so this is about all you’ll get out of me, I’m afraid.
    Cheerful hunt-and-peck waves,
    Jo

    Reply
  98. I have a chance to check in — free, even at the universitye But there’s one snag. I use a Dvorak keyboard layout, not qwerty,so this is about all you’ll get out of me, I’m afraid.
    Cheerful hunt-and-peck waves,
    Jo

    Reply
  99. I have a chance to check in — free, even at the universitye But there’s one snag. I use a Dvorak keyboard layout, not qwerty,so this is about all you’ll get out of me, I’m afraid.
    Cheerful hunt-and-peck waves,
    Jo

    Reply
  100. I have a chance to check in — free, even at the universitye But there’s one snag. I use a Dvorak keyboard layout, not qwerty,so this is about all you’ll get out of me, I’m afraid.
    Cheerful hunt-and-peck waves,
    Jo

    Reply
  101. Mary Jo here. I believe the official release date of LADY BEWARE is June 5th, so it may not be readily available until next week. (Stores vary on when they put books out.)
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  102. Mary Jo here. I believe the official release date of LADY BEWARE is June 5th, so it may not be readily available until next week. (Stores vary on when they put books out.)
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  103. Mary Jo here. I believe the official release date of LADY BEWARE is June 5th, so it may not be readily available until next week. (Stores vary on when they put books out.)
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  104. Mary Jo here. I believe the official release date of LADY BEWARE is June 5th, so it may not be readily available until next week. (Stores vary on when they put books out.)
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  105. Mary Jo here. I believe the official release date of LADY BEWARE is June 5th, so it may not be readily available until next week. (Stores vary on when they put books out.)
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  106. Jo, how about “ebullient” ?
    LADY BEWARE is the centerpiece of the Giant Birthday Box I have ordered myself from Amazon (the box also includes Eloisa James’s “Desperate Duchesses,” Mary Jo’s “Marriage Spell,” and Kalen’s “Lord Sin”. . . ) I am feeling pretty impatient (for the books, if not the birthday, LOL).
    (Fangirl alert)
    I love, love, love your books! All of them! A lot! (The Mallorens are particular favorites. . .)
    As I think I’ve said before on this blog, “Devilish” and Rothgar have a place in my Earthquake Survival Kit. . .

    Reply
  107. Jo, how about “ebullient” ?
    LADY BEWARE is the centerpiece of the Giant Birthday Box I have ordered myself from Amazon (the box also includes Eloisa James’s “Desperate Duchesses,” Mary Jo’s “Marriage Spell,” and Kalen’s “Lord Sin”. . . ) I am feeling pretty impatient (for the books, if not the birthday, LOL).
    (Fangirl alert)
    I love, love, love your books! All of them! A lot! (The Mallorens are particular favorites. . .)
    As I think I’ve said before on this blog, “Devilish” and Rothgar have a place in my Earthquake Survival Kit. . .

    Reply
  108. Jo, how about “ebullient” ?
    LADY BEWARE is the centerpiece of the Giant Birthday Box I have ordered myself from Amazon (the box also includes Eloisa James’s “Desperate Duchesses,” Mary Jo’s “Marriage Spell,” and Kalen’s “Lord Sin”. . . ) I am feeling pretty impatient (for the books, if not the birthday, LOL).
    (Fangirl alert)
    I love, love, love your books! All of them! A lot! (The Mallorens are particular favorites. . .)
    As I think I’ve said before on this blog, “Devilish” and Rothgar have a place in my Earthquake Survival Kit. . .

    Reply
  109. Jo, how about “ebullient” ?
    LADY BEWARE is the centerpiece of the Giant Birthday Box I have ordered myself from Amazon (the box also includes Eloisa James’s “Desperate Duchesses,” Mary Jo’s “Marriage Spell,” and Kalen’s “Lord Sin”. . . ) I am feeling pretty impatient (for the books, if not the birthday, LOL).
    (Fangirl alert)
    I love, love, love your books! All of them! A lot! (The Mallorens are particular favorites. . .)
    As I think I’ve said before on this blog, “Devilish” and Rothgar have a place in my Earthquake Survival Kit. . .

    Reply
  110. Jo, how about “ebullient” ?
    LADY BEWARE is the centerpiece of the Giant Birthday Box I have ordered myself from Amazon (the box also includes Eloisa James’s “Desperate Duchesses,” Mary Jo’s “Marriage Spell,” and Kalen’s “Lord Sin”. . . ) I am feeling pretty impatient (for the books, if not the birthday, LOL).
    (Fangirl alert)
    I love, love, love your books! All of them! A lot! (The Mallorens are particular favorites. . .)
    As I think I’ve said before on this blog, “Devilish” and Rothgar have a place in my Earthquake Survival Kit. . .

    Reply
  111. Jo, I’m going to say the man in hussar uniform is effulgent. Because otherwise I doubt I’ll ever get to use that word!
    But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?
    From what I’ve heard, there were war blogs from Iraq and Afghanistan, but the Pentagon has recently either abolished or severely restricted them.

    Reply
  112. Jo, I’m going to say the man in hussar uniform is effulgent. Because otherwise I doubt I’ll ever get to use that word!
    But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?
    From what I’ve heard, there were war blogs from Iraq and Afghanistan, but the Pentagon has recently either abolished or severely restricted them.

    Reply
  113. Jo, I’m going to say the man in hussar uniform is effulgent. Because otherwise I doubt I’ll ever get to use that word!
    But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?
    From what I’ve heard, there were war blogs from Iraq and Afghanistan, but the Pentagon has recently either abolished or severely restricted them.

    Reply
  114. Jo, I’m going to say the man in hussar uniform is effulgent. Because otherwise I doubt I’ll ever get to use that word!
    But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?
    From what I’ve heard, there were war blogs from Iraq and Afghanistan, but the Pentagon has recently either abolished or severely restricted them.

    Reply
  115. Jo, I’m going to say the man in hussar uniform is effulgent. Because otherwise I doubt I’ll ever get to use that word!
    But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?
    From what I’ve heard, there were war blogs from Iraq and Afghanistan, but the Pentagon has recently either abolished or severely restricted them.

    Reply
  116. “But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?”
    The above should’ve been in quotations in the previous post. I keep forgetting that I can’t italicize here.

    Reply
  117. “But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?”
    The above should’ve been in quotations in the previous post. I keep forgetting that I can’t italicize here.

    Reply
  118. “But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?”
    The above should’ve been in quotations in the previous post. I keep forgetting that I can’t italicize here.

    Reply
  119. “But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?”
    The above should’ve been in quotations in the previous post. I keep forgetting that I can’t italicize here.

    Reply
  120. “But I’m not sure if soldiers in modern wars are allowed to blog. Anyone know?”
    The above should’ve been in quotations in the previous post. I keep forgetting that I can’t italicize here.

    Reply
  121. My son just finished reading All Quiet on the Western Front in high school. He also studies German. Riding home in the car the other day, he told me that the only way a soldier can square himself with what he’s doing is to dehumanize the enemy.
    I think *that* knowledge is different than in wars prior to the Twentieth century. But then again, maybe not, perhaps those were thoughts a soldier kept to himself then.
    On a lighter note, I’m quite pleased Jo has written off into the mists once more with Lady Beware.

    Reply
  122. My son just finished reading All Quiet on the Western Front in high school. He also studies German. Riding home in the car the other day, he told me that the only way a soldier can square himself with what he’s doing is to dehumanize the enemy.
    I think *that* knowledge is different than in wars prior to the Twentieth century. But then again, maybe not, perhaps those were thoughts a soldier kept to himself then.
    On a lighter note, I’m quite pleased Jo has written off into the mists once more with Lady Beware.

    Reply
  123. My son just finished reading All Quiet on the Western Front in high school. He also studies German. Riding home in the car the other day, he told me that the only way a soldier can square himself with what he’s doing is to dehumanize the enemy.
    I think *that* knowledge is different than in wars prior to the Twentieth century. But then again, maybe not, perhaps those were thoughts a soldier kept to himself then.
    On a lighter note, I’m quite pleased Jo has written off into the mists once more with Lady Beware.

    Reply
  124. My son just finished reading All Quiet on the Western Front in high school. He also studies German. Riding home in the car the other day, he told me that the only way a soldier can square himself with what he’s doing is to dehumanize the enemy.
    I think *that* knowledge is different than in wars prior to the Twentieth century. But then again, maybe not, perhaps those were thoughts a soldier kept to himself then.
    On a lighter note, I’m quite pleased Jo has written off into the mists once more with Lady Beware.

    Reply
  125. My son just finished reading All Quiet on the Western Front in high school. He also studies German. Riding home in the car the other day, he told me that the only way a soldier can square himself with what he’s doing is to dehumanize the enemy.
    I think *that* knowledge is different than in wars prior to the Twentieth century. But then again, maybe not, perhaps those were thoughts a soldier kept to himself then.
    On a lighter note, I’m quite pleased Jo has written off into the mists once more with Lady Beware.

    Reply
  126. Yes, the soldiers can blog and email while they are in Iraq. I know because my S-I-L recently returned, whole and unahrmed (thank God!) However, they must be circumspect in what they say, as any blogger whose work comes under unfavorable review from the superiors may be pressured to moderate the contents or tone. And, of course, they cannot give away information which may be detrimental to the safety of the troops.

    Reply
  127. Yes, the soldiers can blog and email while they are in Iraq. I know because my S-I-L recently returned, whole and unahrmed (thank God!) However, they must be circumspect in what they say, as any blogger whose work comes under unfavorable review from the superiors may be pressured to moderate the contents or tone. And, of course, they cannot give away information which may be detrimental to the safety of the troops.

    Reply
  128. Yes, the soldiers can blog and email while they are in Iraq. I know because my S-I-L recently returned, whole and unahrmed (thank God!) However, they must be circumspect in what they say, as any blogger whose work comes under unfavorable review from the superiors may be pressured to moderate the contents or tone. And, of course, they cannot give away information which may be detrimental to the safety of the troops.

    Reply
  129. Yes, the soldiers can blog and email while they are in Iraq. I know because my S-I-L recently returned, whole and unahrmed (thank God!) However, they must be circumspect in what they say, as any blogger whose work comes under unfavorable review from the superiors may be pressured to moderate the contents or tone. And, of course, they cannot give away information which may be detrimental to the safety of the troops.

    Reply
  130. Yes, the soldiers can blog and email while they are in Iraq. I know because my S-I-L recently returned, whole and unahrmed (thank God!) However, they must be circumspect in what they say, as any blogger whose work comes under unfavorable review from the superiors may be pressured to moderate the contents or tone. And, of course, they cannot give away information which may be detrimental to the safety of the troops.

    Reply
  131. Jo, I really love your books and the Mallorens in particular. They’re the best out there, IMO, when it comes to a series. I’m so glad to know that your WIP or MIP as you call it is set in the Malloren World again. I hope we get to see a glimpse of Rothgar again, maybe as a father, this time?
    I’m eagerly waiting for the release of Lady Beware. As for the Hussars, everytime I see a picture of them resplendent in their uniform, I always think of “peacocks”, which are equally resplendent, strutting about in a vainglorious display of their plumage.

    Reply
  132. Jo, I really love your books and the Mallorens in particular. They’re the best out there, IMO, when it comes to a series. I’m so glad to know that your WIP or MIP as you call it is set in the Malloren World again. I hope we get to see a glimpse of Rothgar again, maybe as a father, this time?
    I’m eagerly waiting for the release of Lady Beware. As for the Hussars, everytime I see a picture of them resplendent in their uniform, I always think of “peacocks”, which are equally resplendent, strutting about in a vainglorious display of their plumage.

    Reply
  133. Jo, I really love your books and the Mallorens in particular. They’re the best out there, IMO, when it comes to a series. I’m so glad to know that your WIP or MIP as you call it is set in the Malloren World again. I hope we get to see a glimpse of Rothgar again, maybe as a father, this time?
    I’m eagerly waiting for the release of Lady Beware. As for the Hussars, everytime I see a picture of them resplendent in their uniform, I always think of “peacocks”, which are equally resplendent, strutting about in a vainglorious display of their plumage.

    Reply
  134. Jo, I really love your books and the Mallorens in particular. They’re the best out there, IMO, when it comes to a series. I’m so glad to know that your WIP or MIP as you call it is set in the Malloren World again. I hope we get to see a glimpse of Rothgar again, maybe as a father, this time?
    I’m eagerly waiting for the release of Lady Beware. As for the Hussars, everytime I see a picture of them resplendent in their uniform, I always think of “peacocks”, which are equally resplendent, strutting about in a vainglorious display of their plumage.

    Reply
  135. Jo, I really love your books and the Mallorens in particular. They’re the best out there, IMO, when it comes to a series. I’m so glad to know that your WIP or MIP as you call it is set in the Malloren World again. I hope we get to see a glimpse of Rothgar again, maybe as a father, this time?
    I’m eagerly waiting for the release of Lady Beware. As for the Hussars, everytime I see a picture of them resplendent in their uniform, I always think of “peacocks”, which are equally resplendent, strutting about in a vainglorious display of their plumage.

    Reply
  136. Hi everyone,
    I’m back home, which means back with my Dvorak keyboard, thank heavens. I’m pretty tired, so I’ll be looking over the adjectives and picking the random winner tomorrow.
    I’d say Lady Beware is out in about 50% of places in the US and it’s turned up in a few in Canada, so if not yet, any day.
    Thanks,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  137. Hi everyone,
    I’m back home, which means back with my Dvorak keyboard, thank heavens. I’m pretty tired, so I’ll be looking over the adjectives and picking the random winner tomorrow.
    I’d say Lady Beware is out in about 50% of places in the US and it’s turned up in a few in Canada, so if not yet, any day.
    Thanks,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  138. Hi everyone,
    I’m back home, which means back with my Dvorak keyboard, thank heavens. I’m pretty tired, so I’ll be looking over the adjectives and picking the random winner tomorrow.
    I’d say Lady Beware is out in about 50% of places in the US and it’s turned up in a few in Canada, so if not yet, any day.
    Thanks,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  139. Hi everyone,
    I’m back home, which means back with my Dvorak keyboard, thank heavens. I’m pretty tired, so I’ll be looking over the adjectives and picking the random winner tomorrow.
    I’d say Lady Beware is out in about 50% of places in the US and it’s turned up in a few in Canada, so if not yet, any day.
    Thanks,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  140. Hi everyone,
    I’m back home, which means back with my Dvorak keyboard, thank heavens. I’m pretty tired, so I’ll be looking over the adjectives and picking the random winner tomorrow.
    I’d say Lady Beware is out in about 50% of places in the US and it’s turned up in a few in Canada, so if not yet, any day.
    Thanks,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  141. The interview was fantastic. Thank you for all the insight into your world. You have one of the six drawers in my bookcase. I have all of your books and reread them in order usually. I love the Rogues and the Malloreens equally. For so many of each series (no compaints), you keep everything in cinc. Thank you for these series and I for one hope you continue with more. It is so nice to read about the characters lives after their own book. And thank you for being the writer you are because I have all those great books to reread and get away from the everyday drudges for a little while.

    Reply
  142. The interview was fantastic. Thank you for all the insight into your world. You have one of the six drawers in my bookcase. I have all of your books and reread them in order usually. I love the Rogues and the Malloreens equally. For so many of each series (no compaints), you keep everything in cinc. Thank you for these series and I for one hope you continue with more. It is so nice to read about the characters lives after their own book. And thank you for being the writer you are because I have all those great books to reread and get away from the everyday drudges for a little while.

    Reply
  143. The interview was fantastic. Thank you for all the insight into your world. You have one of the six drawers in my bookcase. I have all of your books and reread them in order usually. I love the Rogues and the Malloreens equally. For so many of each series (no compaints), you keep everything in cinc. Thank you for these series and I for one hope you continue with more. It is so nice to read about the characters lives after their own book. And thank you for being the writer you are because I have all those great books to reread and get away from the everyday drudges for a little while.

    Reply
  144. The interview was fantastic. Thank you for all the insight into your world. You have one of the six drawers in my bookcase. I have all of your books and reread them in order usually. I love the Rogues and the Malloreens equally. For so many of each series (no compaints), you keep everything in cinc. Thank you for these series and I for one hope you continue with more. It is so nice to read about the characters lives after their own book. And thank you for being the writer you are because I have all those great books to reread and get away from the everyday drudges for a little while.

    Reply
  145. The interview was fantastic. Thank you for all the insight into your world. You have one of the six drawers in my bookcase. I have all of your books and reread them in order usually. I love the Rogues and the Malloreens equally. For so many of each series (no compaints), you keep everything in cinc. Thank you for these series and I for one hope you continue with more. It is so nice to read about the characters lives after their own book. And thank you for being the writer you are because I have all those great books to reread and get away from the everyday drudges for a little while.

    Reply
  146. This was a marvelous interview & I’d like to thank both of you for creating this piece.
    As for that hussar uniform…
    rococo & baroque are more for architecture/furniture & ornate’s not enough. Perhaps excessively flamboyant? Whatever it’s called no soldier with a sense of pres- ervation would wear such a thing on a battlefield. He would be nothing but a steady target!
    Jo, I admire your research & how you work it into your books. My thanks, too, for those Rogue & Malloren books; they are a sweet read and keepers. Haven’t yet found Lady Beware, but I’ll keep looking!
    Keep writing…both of you!

    Reply
  147. This was a marvelous interview & I’d like to thank both of you for creating this piece.
    As for that hussar uniform…
    rococo & baroque are more for architecture/furniture & ornate’s not enough. Perhaps excessively flamboyant? Whatever it’s called no soldier with a sense of pres- ervation would wear such a thing on a battlefield. He would be nothing but a steady target!
    Jo, I admire your research & how you work it into your books. My thanks, too, for those Rogue & Malloren books; they are a sweet read and keepers. Haven’t yet found Lady Beware, but I’ll keep looking!
    Keep writing…both of you!

    Reply
  148. This was a marvelous interview & I’d like to thank both of you for creating this piece.
    As for that hussar uniform…
    rococo & baroque are more for architecture/furniture & ornate’s not enough. Perhaps excessively flamboyant? Whatever it’s called no soldier with a sense of pres- ervation would wear such a thing on a battlefield. He would be nothing but a steady target!
    Jo, I admire your research & how you work it into your books. My thanks, too, for those Rogue & Malloren books; they are a sweet read and keepers. Haven’t yet found Lady Beware, but I’ll keep looking!
    Keep writing…both of you!

    Reply
  149. This was a marvelous interview & I’d like to thank both of you for creating this piece.
    As for that hussar uniform…
    rococo & baroque are more for architecture/furniture & ornate’s not enough. Perhaps excessively flamboyant? Whatever it’s called no soldier with a sense of pres- ervation would wear such a thing on a battlefield. He would be nothing but a steady target!
    Jo, I admire your research & how you work it into your books. My thanks, too, for those Rogue & Malloren books; they are a sweet read and keepers. Haven’t yet found Lady Beware, but I’ll keep looking!
    Keep writing…both of you!

    Reply
  150. This was a marvelous interview & I’d like to thank both of you for creating this piece.
    As for that hussar uniform…
    rococo & baroque are more for architecture/furniture & ornate’s not enough. Perhaps excessively flamboyant? Whatever it’s called no soldier with a sense of pres- ervation would wear such a thing on a battlefield. He would be nothing but a steady target!
    Jo, I admire your research & how you work it into your books. My thanks, too, for those Rogue & Malloren books; they are a sweet read and keepers. Haven’t yet found Lady Beware, but I’ll keep looking!
    Keep writing…both of you!

    Reply
  151. Thanks for the comments, Mary and Kay.
    I hope you all realize how important readers are to authors. Apart from the obvious ways, hearing that people are enjoying our work really feeds our creative souls.
    Best,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  152. Thanks for the comments, Mary and Kay.
    I hope you all realize how important readers are to authors. Apart from the obvious ways, hearing that people are enjoying our work really feeds our creative souls.
    Best,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  153. Thanks for the comments, Mary and Kay.
    I hope you all realize how important readers are to authors. Apart from the obvious ways, hearing that people are enjoying our work really feeds our creative souls.
    Best,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  154. Thanks for the comments, Mary and Kay.
    I hope you all realize how important readers are to authors. Apart from the obvious ways, hearing that people are enjoying our work really feeds our creative souls.
    Best,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  155. Thanks for the comments, Mary and Kay.
    I hope you all realize how important readers are to authors. Apart from the obvious ways, hearing that people are enjoying our work really feeds our creative souls.
    Best,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  156. Iv just read Lady bewear and i thought it was fab. i could’nt put it down. Darien is so dark and sexy. and i loved it when Thea stept out of his cave home to prove he hadn’t killed her. i was thinking “you go for it”. well as normal i started reading it and relised that it’s part of a whole world of novels. cant wait to go back and find out how it all started. iv been a historical romance reader for 6 years now i cant read anything other than those books i try and read 1 a week and cant bear to chuck anyout so the pile of amazing stories have bilt up over the years. i’m a artist so have always had a creative mind. and now have put my skills into starting a novel. iv always written short stories but have been to nevous to start a novel due to being dyslexic. but it has never stopped me reading it just affects my spelling so im having to rely on silly spell check microsoft words. hahaha well thank you. if it wasn’t for you guys and others putting your minds into historical romance novels i would’nt have the imagination i have today.

    Reply
  157. Iv just read Lady bewear and i thought it was fab. i could’nt put it down. Darien is so dark and sexy. and i loved it when Thea stept out of his cave home to prove he hadn’t killed her. i was thinking “you go for it”. well as normal i started reading it and relised that it’s part of a whole world of novels. cant wait to go back and find out how it all started. iv been a historical romance reader for 6 years now i cant read anything other than those books i try and read 1 a week and cant bear to chuck anyout so the pile of amazing stories have bilt up over the years. i’m a artist so have always had a creative mind. and now have put my skills into starting a novel. iv always written short stories but have been to nevous to start a novel due to being dyslexic. but it has never stopped me reading it just affects my spelling so im having to rely on silly spell check microsoft words. hahaha well thank you. if it wasn’t for you guys and others putting your minds into historical romance novels i would’nt have the imagination i have today.

    Reply
  158. Iv just read Lady bewear and i thought it was fab. i could’nt put it down. Darien is so dark and sexy. and i loved it when Thea stept out of his cave home to prove he hadn’t killed her. i was thinking “you go for it”. well as normal i started reading it and relised that it’s part of a whole world of novels. cant wait to go back and find out how it all started. iv been a historical romance reader for 6 years now i cant read anything other than those books i try and read 1 a week and cant bear to chuck anyout so the pile of amazing stories have bilt up over the years. i’m a artist so have always had a creative mind. and now have put my skills into starting a novel. iv always written short stories but have been to nevous to start a novel due to being dyslexic. but it has never stopped me reading it just affects my spelling so im having to rely on silly spell check microsoft words. hahaha well thank you. if it wasn’t for you guys and others putting your minds into historical romance novels i would’nt have the imagination i have today.

    Reply
  159. Iv just read Lady bewear and i thought it was fab. i could’nt put it down. Darien is so dark and sexy. and i loved it when Thea stept out of his cave home to prove he hadn’t killed her. i was thinking “you go for it”. well as normal i started reading it and relised that it’s part of a whole world of novels. cant wait to go back and find out how it all started. iv been a historical romance reader for 6 years now i cant read anything other than those books i try and read 1 a week and cant bear to chuck anyout so the pile of amazing stories have bilt up over the years. i’m a artist so have always had a creative mind. and now have put my skills into starting a novel. iv always written short stories but have been to nevous to start a novel due to being dyslexic. but it has never stopped me reading it just affects my spelling so im having to rely on silly spell check microsoft words. hahaha well thank you. if it wasn’t for you guys and others putting your minds into historical romance novels i would’nt have the imagination i have today.

    Reply
  160. Iv just read Lady bewear and i thought it was fab. i could’nt put it down. Darien is so dark and sexy. and i loved it when Thea stept out of his cave home to prove he hadn’t killed her. i was thinking “you go for it”. well as normal i started reading it and relised that it’s part of a whole world of novels. cant wait to go back and find out how it all started. iv been a historical romance reader for 6 years now i cant read anything other than those books i try and read 1 a week and cant bear to chuck anyout so the pile of amazing stories have bilt up over the years. i’m a artist so have always had a creative mind. and now have put my skills into starting a novel. iv always written short stories but have been to nevous to start a novel due to being dyslexic. but it has never stopped me reading it just affects my spelling so im having to rely on silly spell check microsoft words. hahaha well thank you. if it wasn’t for you guys and others putting your minds into historical romance novels i would’nt have the imagination i have today.

    Reply
  161. Jemma, thanks for that. I’m delighted you enjoyed Lady Beware so much. There’s another book fresh on the shelves now — A Lady’s Secret.
    That’s part of another series, my Malloren series, but it’s new characters etc etc so it’s an easy one to read without having read the rest.
    Thanks for the comments about all writers. We love to hear that people appreciate our labours.
    Best wishes,
    Jo

    Reply
  162. Jemma, thanks for that. I’m delighted you enjoyed Lady Beware so much. There’s another book fresh on the shelves now — A Lady’s Secret.
    That’s part of another series, my Malloren series, but it’s new characters etc etc so it’s an easy one to read without having read the rest.
    Thanks for the comments about all writers. We love to hear that people appreciate our labours.
    Best wishes,
    Jo

    Reply
  163. Jemma, thanks for that. I’m delighted you enjoyed Lady Beware so much. There’s another book fresh on the shelves now — A Lady’s Secret.
    That’s part of another series, my Malloren series, but it’s new characters etc etc so it’s an easy one to read without having read the rest.
    Thanks for the comments about all writers. We love to hear that people appreciate our labours.
    Best wishes,
    Jo

    Reply
  164. Jemma, thanks for that. I’m delighted you enjoyed Lady Beware so much. There’s another book fresh on the shelves now — A Lady’s Secret.
    That’s part of another series, my Malloren series, but it’s new characters etc etc so it’s an easy one to read without having read the rest.
    Thanks for the comments about all writers. We love to hear that people appreciate our labours.
    Best wishes,
    Jo

    Reply
  165. Jemma, thanks for that. I’m delighted you enjoyed Lady Beware so much. There’s another book fresh on the shelves now — A Lady’s Secret.
    That’s part of another series, my Malloren series, but it’s new characters etc etc so it’s an easy one to read without having read the rest.
    Thanks for the comments about all writers. We love to hear that people appreciate our labours.
    Best wishes,
    Jo

    Reply

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