Happy Tartan Day from Lady M!

Lovat Happy April 6th!

It's Tartan Day in the USA, when Scotland and the Scots are honored and celebrated for their legacy and heritage and their longstanding and continuing contributions to world culture. My own Scottish roots are through the Fraser clan — some Highland ancestors came over here during the latter part of the Clearances — and shown here is one of the main Fraser tartans. There are several of them, but this sett is based on some of the oldest records (in turn based on some of the oldest portraits), and is used by the Frasers of Lovat, one of the lines of the chief (Clan Fraser traditionally has two chiefs, Lovat and Saltoun by designation).

 

So here's to the Scots among us, and here's to bonny Scotland!

And this wee person of Fraser heritage has more than one reason to celebrate her Scottish heritage today …

 

LADY MACBETH is now available in paperback!  Let's all dance a quick jig, or more appropriately, a gille chaluim if you happen to have two swords at the ready — cross them on the ground and go to!  

Lady macbeth trade

Tuesday, April 7, is the release date for the new trade paperback edition of Lady Macbeth from Three Rivers Press. When you're out and about this week, please look for it on bookstore display tables – the new cover design will jump there, I think!

 

I am granddaughter to a king and daughter to a prince, a wife twice over, a queen as well. I have fought with sword and bow, and struggled fierce to bear my babes into this world. I have loved deeply and hated deeply, too….

 

"King manages to challenge all our preconceptions without turning the strongest female character in literature into a pantywaist. Her footwork on this fictional ground is sure and graceful."  — Bookpage

Check out the very cool flash video for LADY MACBETH that Crown created for the paperback campaign, which can be seen on my website.

The new edition contains Reader's Guide questions to give book groups a running start on discussions. Also, the prologue and first chapter of my next book for Crown, QUEEN HEREAFTER: A Novel of Margaret of Scotland, are included as well.

Here's an excerpt of the new book, about the Saxon princess who married Malcolm Canmore and became Queen of Scots…the story is partially told by a female bard in Malcolm's court…

Queen Hereafter: A Novel of Margaret of Scotland

Prologue

Anno Domini 1078

 

     Caught between two willful queens, I am, and should have taken more care to tread lightly—like crossing a stream over slippery stones when the current is strong and cold. Now that I have stumbled deep, who can say whether my two queens will forgive me or condemn me for what I have done at each one’s bidding. No servant, I am free to do as I please; they disagree.

      I am called Eva the Bard, daughter of a short-lived king. I am also a devoted student of Dermot, once chief bard in Macbeth’s court. Dermot trained me in the ways of a seanachaidh: a thousand songs, a thousand tales, a thousand heroes keenly remembered through ancient ways of diligence, and more. Though I do not know my fate, I know my calling—to tell the old tales and coax melodies from the harp strings to soothe or excite the spirit. Some now accuse me of scheming, but my aim has ever been my craft, and honor. So say I.

      The king and queen would order some monk with ink-stained fingers to record my betrayal on parchment, which would crumble over time; the lady in the north would order the account destroyed much sooner. Yet I would compose a song-poem to tell it whole, then take up my harp and sing it to some, who would teach it to others, so it would never be lost.

      One queen might call it treason, the other tradition; and I might call it vengeance. . . .

 

To celebrate the release of the trade paperback of LADY M, I'm giving away an autographed copy of the spectacular new edition! To enter the contest, please leave a comment over the next two days, and answer one or more of these questions:

 

Do you read medieval-set historicals, and if so, what do you love about that era?  Do you read Scottish-set medievals (and for those of you who don't read either – what don't you like about them) ?

 

We'll choose a random contest winner for the free signed copy of LADY M IN PAPERBACK!   😀

 

Slainte!

 

Susan

 

p.s. here's another fun way to celebrate your Scottish heritage today: Homecoming Scotland's  advert and tribute to Scotland… (that's two links, site and video!)

 

60 thoughts on “Happy Tartan Day from Lady M!”

  1. I bought Lady Macbeth in hardcover and enjoyed it very much. I do love scottish historicals, partly because of my own roots. I haven’t done the work to find out which clan but one of my cousins says we have Murray in at least one line. I like Medievals. I love the descriptions of the social groups and customs and especially how a person worked in the system to get things done. One thing I often find difficult is scottish dialect. There has to be a delicate balance of giving the flavor and rhythm of the speech with incomprehensable accuracy.

    Reply
  2. I bought Lady Macbeth in hardcover and enjoyed it very much. I do love scottish historicals, partly because of my own roots. I haven’t done the work to find out which clan but one of my cousins says we have Murray in at least one line. I like Medievals. I love the descriptions of the social groups and customs and especially how a person worked in the system to get things done. One thing I often find difficult is scottish dialect. There has to be a delicate balance of giving the flavor and rhythm of the speech with incomprehensable accuracy.

    Reply
  3. I bought Lady Macbeth in hardcover and enjoyed it very much. I do love scottish historicals, partly because of my own roots. I haven’t done the work to find out which clan but one of my cousins says we have Murray in at least one line. I like Medievals. I love the descriptions of the social groups and customs and especially how a person worked in the system to get things done. One thing I often find difficult is scottish dialect. There has to be a delicate balance of giving the flavor and rhythm of the speech with incomprehensable accuracy.

    Reply
  4. I bought Lady Macbeth in hardcover and enjoyed it very much. I do love scottish historicals, partly because of my own roots. I haven’t done the work to find out which clan but one of my cousins says we have Murray in at least one line. I like Medievals. I love the descriptions of the social groups and customs and especially how a person worked in the system to get things done. One thing I often find difficult is scottish dialect. There has to be a delicate balance of giving the flavor and rhythm of the speech with incomprehensable accuracy.

    Reply
  5. I bought Lady Macbeth in hardcover and enjoyed it very much. I do love scottish historicals, partly because of my own roots. I haven’t done the work to find out which clan but one of my cousins says we have Murray in at least one line. I like Medievals. I love the descriptions of the social groups and customs and especially how a person worked in the system to get things done. One thing I often find difficult is scottish dialect. There has to be a delicate balance of giving the flavor and rhythm of the speech with incomprehensable accuracy.

    Reply
  6. Oh, wow, Susan, the excerpt for the new book makes my toes curl! Just like the beginning of Lady Rue when I first read it.
    Having a strong fondness for bold barbaric jewelry, I love the new cover for Lady Macbeth. I love tartans, too, but though I can name English, Welsh, and Cornish ancestors (and Alsatian, too), I don’t know of any Scottish names in the family tree, though there are bound to be some.
    I guess if I get a tartan, I’ll have to pick it by colors I like. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  7. Oh, wow, Susan, the excerpt for the new book makes my toes curl! Just like the beginning of Lady Rue when I first read it.
    Having a strong fondness for bold barbaric jewelry, I love the new cover for Lady Macbeth. I love tartans, too, but though I can name English, Welsh, and Cornish ancestors (and Alsatian, too), I don’t know of any Scottish names in the family tree, though there are bound to be some.
    I guess if I get a tartan, I’ll have to pick it by colors I like. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  8. Oh, wow, Susan, the excerpt for the new book makes my toes curl! Just like the beginning of Lady Rue when I first read it.
    Having a strong fondness for bold barbaric jewelry, I love the new cover for Lady Macbeth. I love tartans, too, but though I can name English, Welsh, and Cornish ancestors (and Alsatian, too), I don’t know of any Scottish names in the family tree, though there are bound to be some.
    I guess if I get a tartan, I’ll have to pick it by colors I like. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  9. Oh, wow, Susan, the excerpt for the new book makes my toes curl! Just like the beginning of Lady Rue when I first read it.
    Having a strong fondness for bold barbaric jewelry, I love the new cover for Lady Macbeth. I love tartans, too, but though I can name English, Welsh, and Cornish ancestors (and Alsatian, too), I don’t know of any Scottish names in the family tree, though there are bound to be some.
    I guess if I get a tartan, I’ll have to pick it by colors I like. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  10. Oh, wow, Susan, the excerpt for the new book makes my toes curl! Just like the beginning of Lady Rue when I first read it.
    Having a strong fondness for bold barbaric jewelry, I love the new cover for Lady Macbeth. I love tartans, too, but though I can name English, Welsh, and Cornish ancestors (and Alsatian, too), I don’t know of any Scottish names in the family tree, though there are bound to be some.
    I guess if I get a tartan, I’ll have to pick it by colors I like. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  11. I read a lot of historical fiction but its mostly Wars of the Roses and Tudor history.
    Lady Macbeth looks great! Please enter my in the giveaway!

    Reply
  12. I read a lot of historical fiction but its mostly Wars of the Roses and Tudor history.
    Lady Macbeth looks great! Please enter my in the giveaway!

    Reply
  13. I read a lot of historical fiction but its mostly Wars of the Roses and Tudor history.
    Lady Macbeth looks great! Please enter my in the giveaway!

    Reply
  14. I read a lot of historical fiction but its mostly Wars of the Roses and Tudor history.
    Lady Macbeth looks great! Please enter my in the giveaway!

    Reply
  15. I read a lot of historical fiction but its mostly Wars of the Roses and Tudor history.
    Lady Macbeth looks great! Please enter my in the giveaway!

    Reply
  16. Oh, I love the female bard! You definitely hooked this reader, Susan.
    I rarely read Medievals. I’m not sure why. I have always loved teaching Dante, Chaucer, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan. Maybe my reluctance is connected to the Old English course I took in grad school, which was the most difficult course I ever took. 🙂
    But I did read Lady Macbeth and was captivated by a character so different from my Shakespeare-derived image. I’ve told several friends about the paper release and recommended Lady M highly. 🙂
    I claim ties to two clans: MacDonald on the maternal side and Lindsay on the paternal.

    Reply
  17. Oh, I love the female bard! You definitely hooked this reader, Susan.
    I rarely read Medievals. I’m not sure why. I have always loved teaching Dante, Chaucer, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan. Maybe my reluctance is connected to the Old English course I took in grad school, which was the most difficult course I ever took. 🙂
    But I did read Lady Macbeth and was captivated by a character so different from my Shakespeare-derived image. I’ve told several friends about the paper release and recommended Lady M highly. 🙂
    I claim ties to two clans: MacDonald on the maternal side and Lindsay on the paternal.

    Reply
  18. Oh, I love the female bard! You definitely hooked this reader, Susan.
    I rarely read Medievals. I’m not sure why. I have always loved teaching Dante, Chaucer, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan. Maybe my reluctance is connected to the Old English course I took in grad school, which was the most difficult course I ever took. 🙂
    But I did read Lady Macbeth and was captivated by a character so different from my Shakespeare-derived image. I’ve told several friends about the paper release and recommended Lady M highly. 🙂
    I claim ties to two clans: MacDonald on the maternal side and Lindsay on the paternal.

    Reply
  19. Oh, I love the female bard! You definitely hooked this reader, Susan.
    I rarely read Medievals. I’m not sure why. I have always loved teaching Dante, Chaucer, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan. Maybe my reluctance is connected to the Old English course I took in grad school, which was the most difficult course I ever took. 🙂
    But I did read Lady Macbeth and was captivated by a character so different from my Shakespeare-derived image. I’ve told several friends about the paper release and recommended Lady M highly. 🙂
    I claim ties to two clans: MacDonald on the maternal side and Lindsay on the paternal.

    Reply
  20. Oh, I love the female bard! You definitely hooked this reader, Susan.
    I rarely read Medievals. I’m not sure why. I have always loved teaching Dante, Chaucer, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan. Maybe my reluctance is connected to the Old English course I took in grad school, which was the most difficult course I ever took. 🙂
    But I did read Lady Macbeth and was captivated by a character so different from my Shakespeare-derived image. I’ve told several friends about the paper release and recommended Lady M highly. 🙂
    I claim ties to two clans: MacDonald on the maternal side and Lindsay on the paternal.

    Reply
  21. Today is also my birthday, so I’m very happy to learn that it is Tartan day. I am Scots from my father. He was a Dowell, and the Dowells are of the Clan MacDougall. I loved Lady MacBeth, and still need to write a review of it for my blog. I really like that new cover for the paperback edition. Looking forward to the novel about Queen Margaret.
    Yes, I do read medieval-set historicals. I guess I love the beauty and pageantry that a good writer can make me see and feel from that era. Even if the novel isn’t historically correct (and, of course, I’m NOT talking about yours!), I still delight in the speech, the customs, and the flourishing spectacle of the knights and their squires, the ladies and their maids, the castles, the sieges, and the reality that a lot of history was being made in that era — countries and kingdoms were being divided and conquered, new names were coming to power, borders were shifting. I love Scottish medieval novels very much, probably because of my Scots heritage, but possibly also because there is something in them, when well-written, that stirs my blood — something a bit barbaric and raw and basic. Yep, I DO enjoy a good Scottish medieval historical novel!

    Reply
  22. Today is also my birthday, so I’m very happy to learn that it is Tartan day. I am Scots from my father. He was a Dowell, and the Dowells are of the Clan MacDougall. I loved Lady MacBeth, and still need to write a review of it for my blog. I really like that new cover for the paperback edition. Looking forward to the novel about Queen Margaret.
    Yes, I do read medieval-set historicals. I guess I love the beauty and pageantry that a good writer can make me see and feel from that era. Even if the novel isn’t historically correct (and, of course, I’m NOT talking about yours!), I still delight in the speech, the customs, and the flourishing spectacle of the knights and their squires, the ladies and their maids, the castles, the sieges, and the reality that a lot of history was being made in that era — countries and kingdoms were being divided and conquered, new names were coming to power, borders were shifting. I love Scottish medieval novels very much, probably because of my Scots heritage, but possibly also because there is something in them, when well-written, that stirs my blood — something a bit barbaric and raw and basic. Yep, I DO enjoy a good Scottish medieval historical novel!

    Reply
  23. Today is also my birthday, so I’m very happy to learn that it is Tartan day. I am Scots from my father. He was a Dowell, and the Dowells are of the Clan MacDougall. I loved Lady MacBeth, and still need to write a review of it for my blog. I really like that new cover for the paperback edition. Looking forward to the novel about Queen Margaret.
    Yes, I do read medieval-set historicals. I guess I love the beauty and pageantry that a good writer can make me see and feel from that era. Even if the novel isn’t historically correct (and, of course, I’m NOT talking about yours!), I still delight in the speech, the customs, and the flourishing spectacle of the knights and their squires, the ladies and their maids, the castles, the sieges, and the reality that a lot of history was being made in that era — countries and kingdoms were being divided and conquered, new names were coming to power, borders were shifting. I love Scottish medieval novels very much, probably because of my Scots heritage, but possibly also because there is something in them, when well-written, that stirs my blood — something a bit barbaric and raw and basic. Yep, I DO enjoy a good Scottish medieval historical novel!

    Reply
  24. Today is also my birthday, so I’m very happy to learn that it is Tartan day. I am Scots from my father. He was a Dowell, and the Dowells are of the Clan MacDougall. I loved Lady MacBeth, and still need to write a review of it for my blog. I really like that new cover for the paperback edition. Looking forward to the novel about Queen Margaret.
    Yes, I do read medieval-set historicals. I guess I love the beauty and pageantry that a good writer can make me see and feel from that era. Even if the novel isn’t historically correct (and, of course, I’m NOT talking about yours!), I still delight in the speech, the customs, and the flourishing spectacle of the knights and their squires, the ladies and their maids, the castles, the sieges, and the reality that a lot of history was being made in that era — countries and kingdoms were being divided and conquered, new names were coming to power, borders were shifting. I love Scottish medieval novels very much, probably because of my Scots heritage, but possibly also because there is something in them, when well-written, that stirs my blood — something a bit barbaric and raw and basic. Yep, I DO enjoy a good Scottish medieval historical novel!

    Reply
  25. Today is also my birthday, so I’m very happy to learn that it is Tartan day. I am Scots from my father. He was a Dowell, and the Dowells are of the Clan MacDougall. I loved Lady MacBeth, and still need to write a review of it for my blog. I really like that new cover for the paperback edition. Looking forward to the novel about Queen Margaret.
    Yes, I do read medieval-set historicals. I guess I love the beauty and pageantry that a good writer can make me see and feel from that era. Even if the novel isn’t historically correct (and, of course, I’m NOT talking about yours!), I still delight in the speech, the customs, and the flourishing spectacle of the knights and their squires, the ladies and their maids, the castles, the sieges, and the reality that a lot of history was being made in that era — countries and kingdoms were being divided and conquered, new names were coming to power, borders were shifting. I love Scottish medieval novels very much, probably because of my Scots heritage, but possibly also because there is something in them, when well-written, that stirs my blood — something a bit barbaric and raw and basic. Yep, I DO enjoy a good Scottish medieval historical novel!

    Reply
  26. I haven’t read them because I always thought the language would slow me down so much in reading and I’d have a hard time understanding what was meant.

    Reply
  27. I haven’t read them because I always thought the language would slow me down so much in reading and I’d have a hard time understanding what was meant.

    Reply
  28. I haven’t read them because I always thought the language would slow me down so much in reading and I’d have a hard time understanding what was meant.

    Reply
  29. I haven’t read them because I always thought the language would slow me down so much in reading and I’d have a hard time understanding what was meant.

    Reply
  30. I haven’t read them because I always thought the language would slow me down so much in reading and I’d have a hard time understanding what was meant.

    Reply
  31. I like medievals beacuse of the foreign element. Even though they are set in Scotland or England (which is my own heritage), they are a completely different culture than our own. I admire any author who can immerse herself in such a rich and exciting time period.

    Reply
  32. I like medievals beacuse of the foreign element. Even though they are set in Scotland or England (which is my own heritage), they are a completely different culture than our own. I admire any author who can immerse herself in such a rich and exciting time period.

    Reply
  33. I like medievals beacuse of the foreign element. Even though they are set in Scotland or England (which is my own heritage), they are a completely different culture than our own. I admire any author who can immerse herself in such a rich and exciting time period.

    Reply
  34. I like medievals beacuse of the foreign element. Even though they are set in Scotland or England (which is my own heritage), they are a completely different culture than our own. I admire any author who can immerse herself in such a rich and exciting time period.

    Reply
  35. I like medievals beacuse of the foreign element. Even though they are set in Scotland or England (which is my own heritage), they are a completely different culture than our own. I admire any author who can immerse herself in such a rich and exciting time period.

    Reply
  36. I like medievals because it brings to life details that are often neglected or told in such a way it seems dry and sometimes boring. A good story told is the best way to learn about different time periods and different cultures.

    Reply
  37. I like medievals because it brings to life details that are often neglected or told in such a way it seems dry and sometimes boring. A good story told is the best way to learn about different time periods and different cultures.

    Reply
  38. I like medievals because it brings to life details that are often neglected or told in such a way it seems dry and sometimes boring. A good story told is the best way to learn about different time periods and different cultures.

    Reply
  39. I like medievals because it brings to life details that are often neglected or told in such a way it seems dry and sometimes boring. A good story told is the best way to learn about different time periods and different cultures.

    Reply
  40. I like medievals because it brings to life details that are often neglected or told in such a way it seems dry and sometimes boring. A good story told is the best way to learn about different time periods and different cultures.

    Reply
  41. Oooo…I love medivals! There is something about the fierce and proud men, loyal to their clans (Scottish). The wild and beautiful terrain, the chivalry of the time (knights)…it is ripe for romance. Sigh…

    Reply
  42. Oooo…I love medivals! There is something about the fierce and proud men, loyal to their clans (Scottish). The wild and beautiful terrain, the chivalry of the time (knights)…it is ripe for romance. Sigh…

    Reply
  43. Oooo…I love medivals! There is something about the fierce and proud men, loyal to their clans (Scottish). The wild and beautiful terrain, the chivalry of the time (knights)…it is ripe for romance. Sigh…

    Reply
  44. Oooo…I love medivals! There is something about the fierce and proud men, loyal to their clans (Scottish). The wild and beautiful terrain, the chivalry of the time (knights)…it is ripe for romance. Sigh…

    Reply
  45. Oooo…I love medivals! There is something about the fierce and proud men, loyal to their clans (Scottish). The wild and beautiful terrain, the chivalry of the time (knights)…it is ripe for romance. Sigh…

    Reply
  46. I have read medieval-set historicals and Scottish-set medievals, but not recently. What I like best about them is the hero of the book is usally such a hunk, and when I read it’s like I can just hear their accent. Have to love the accent. Please enter me. Thanks!

    Reply
  47. I have read medieval-set historicals and Scottish-set medievals, but not recently. What I like best about them is the hero of the book is usally such a hunk, and when I read it’s like I can just hear their accent. Have to love the accent. Please enter me. Thanks!

    Reply
  48. I have read medieval-set historicals and Scottish-set medievals, but not recently. What I like best about them is the hero of the book is usally such a hunk, and when I read it’s like I can just hear their accent. Have to love the accent. Please enter me. Thanks!

    Reply
  49. I have read medieval-set historicals and Scottish-set medievals, but not recently. What I like best about them is the hero of the book is usally such a hunk, and when I read it’s like I can just hear their accent. Have to love the accent. Please enter me. Thanks!

    Reply
  50. I have read medieval-set historicals and Scottish-set medievals, but not recently. What I like best about them is the hero of the book is usally such a hunk, and when I read it’s like I can just hear their accent. Have to love the accent. Please enter me. Thanks!

    Reply
  51. It’s too late for the drawing, I know, but I had to chime in here and say how much I love medieval-set novels, and any novel set in Scotland. 🙂 Keep ’em coming!

    Reply
  52. It’s too late for the drawing, I know, but I had to chime in here and say how much I love medieval-set novels, and any novel set in Scotland. 🙂 Keep ’em coming!

    Reply
  53. It’s too late for the drawing, I know, but I had to chime in here and say how much I love medieval-set novels, and any novel set in Scotland. 🙂 Keep ’em coming!

    Reply
  54. It’s too late for the drawing, I know, but I had to chime in here and say how much I love medieval-set novels, and any novel set in Scotland. 🙂 Keep ’em coming!

    Reply
  55. It’s too late for the drawing, I know, but I had to chime in here and say how much I love medieval-set novels, and any novel set in Scotland. 🙂 Keep ’em coming!

    Reply

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