July What We’re Reading

Christina here with a round-up of what the Wenches have been reading this month. This is a truly varied selection and I hope there will be something for everyone and that you find something that appeals to you. I’ve already clicked on a few things myself …

My own favourite reads this month were the two new Wench books – The Crystal Key by Patricia Rice and The Rake’s Daughter by Anne Gracie.

Crystal KeyThe Crystal Key is the third book in the Psychic Solutions Mystery series, and these stories just keep getting better and better. I thoroughly enjoyed this one, which broadened the cast and built on the previous books in a most satisfying way. Ghostbuster Evie Malcolm Carstairs has finally got together with gorgeous lawyer Jax Ives and they are raising their ward, Loretta, together while trying to make ends meet – her by speaking to ghosts and him by setting up a new law practice in the tiny town where they live. When Evie and her hacker team at the Sensible Solutions Agency take on a new case that involves a dead former FBI agent – an old lady who had been poking around in things she shouldn’t have – and a potential murder, things start to heat up. Jax tries to keep Evie out of trouble, but she has her own way of dealing with things and doesn’t think she needs his help. He wants to do things the proper way while Evie and the others don’t always take the legal approach. Add to that the fact that his reclusive sister Ariel starts to help his best friend to uncover a major scamming network run by some seriously unscrupulous people – while slightly coming out of her shell – and he has his work cut out for him making sure everyone is safe and the bad guys get their come-uppance. With a huge cast of crazy but wonderful characters, this is a fabulous story that kept me turning the pages. I can’t wait for the next book in the series to see what will happen next!


Rakes DaughterThe Rake’s Daughter by Anne Gracie is the second title in the Brides of Bellaire Gardens series. I had been eagerly awaiting this one and it definitely didn’t disappoint! I love the setting – large houses backing onto a huge and gorgeous garden where the residents can enjoy a quiet oasis away from the hustle and bustle of London. In this story, Leo, the Earl of Salcott has just returned from a lengthy sojourn abroad to find that he is the guardian of Clarissa, a wealthy young heiress. She arrives in town with an illegitimate half-sister in tow, Izzy, and to his dismay the girls refuse to be parted. They believe they can make their entry into the ton together, and nothing he says can dissuade them. He is powerfully attracted to the half-sister, but tries to resist as she is not suitable wife material and he doesn’t believe she’ll ever be accepted by the ton. He has no idea what to do with her and she thwarts him at every turn while sparks fly between them. How is he supposed to find a suitable husband for Clarissa with Izzy around? He deposits them with his eccentric old aunt, thinking that will help matters, but instead it makes things worse. I thoroughly enjoyed the battle of wits that ensued between Leo and Izzy, and the old lady was a hoot! This is the perfect Regency romance with everything a reader could wish for – highly recommended!

Menuhin 1Patricia recommends Murder at Melrose Court and The Black Cat Murders by Karen Baugh Menuhin.

These are the first two books of the Heathcliff Lennox series. They’re called historical mysteries, although I quit caring whodunnit, and simply sank into the illusion the author creates of an aristocratic Cotswold world after the first war. Our hero is a pilot who has returned to his stately, rundown home, to hunt pigeons with his untrustworthy dog, aided by his even less trustworthy butler. In the first book, he’s invited to the home of a relative from whom he might expect an inheritance, only to be accused of murder, as these things happen. So, of course, he sets out to defy his hated lawyer of a kinsman and the annoying policeman who wants to hang him. The tone is just on the edge of Wodehouse with a hint of Agatha Christie.

Menuhin 2Out of curiosity, to see how the author carries on, I quickly read the next book, and it’s even better than the first. This time, our curmudgeonly loner of a bachelor hero is roped into attending the wedding of a childhood friend. He’s been reading Sherlock Holmes and learning this detecting business, and the detective who almost had him hanged now asks for his aid, said detective being a Socialist unaccustomed to aristocratic homes and manners. Opera singers, art forgers, men in drag, and a wedding party from Texas are all thrown into one wildly fascinating if improbable set of murders. It’s not the mystery so much as the lovely hints of description, the moldering wallpaper in the unused rooms, the can-can with men in slipping wigs, the dust on the back of the stolen Gainsborough … small touches that make the world come alive.

I’d been warned of copy edit errors before I started, but to me, the oddly wrong word used by an author much too clever to make such a mistake, seem like Easter eggs planted to joyfully wait for the nitpickers to uncover. But then, I was enjoying myself, so who cares?

Summer at the Highland Coral BeachNicola – Summer at the Highland Coral Beach by Kiley Dunbar. It was the beautiful cover of this book that first grabbed me followed by the description of summer in a quaint seaside village in the Scottish Highlands and the mention of a gorgeous if grumpy hero! I started reading it at bedtime and it was one of those books that I carried on with far into the night because it was so charming and I just wanted to read one more page.

Beatrice Halliday is in dire need of a break after some painful personal experiences and on a whim she books herself onto what she thinks is a Gaelic language course in a remote Scottish seaside hotel. However when she arrives she discovers that she is all set for a personal course in willow weaving at Port Willow Bay, she has a Princess and the Pea themed room in the dilapidated hotel, and inevitably she is drawn into the eccentric lives of the owner and the other guests and villagers. On one level it’s a gentle, romantic and amusing read but it’s underpinned with real emotional poignancy as Beatrice deals with grief and loss, and I found it very moving. The grumpy hero, Atholl, is an absolute gem, a rugged and loyal guy who cares deeply for his home and community. This is a small town romance where the cast of characters are funny and very likeable and the Scottish setting is richly described. The book has a Local Hero vibe about it and I was rooting for Beatrice to let the magic of Port Willow and its inhabitants help heal her heart. 

Lizzie&DanteAnne here, and I'm recommending three books — two fiction and one non-fiction. First up is Lizzie and Dante by Mary Bly (aka Eloisa James). Not a romance but a wonderful love story with a bittersweet, but perfect ending. Facing a devastating diagnosis, Shakespearean scholar Lizzie travels to Elba, the beautiful island off the Italian coast (where Napoleon was once exiled — not that it's an important part of the story) with her oldest friend and his lover, a well known actor. There she meets Dante, a gorgeous local chef, and slowly she becomes involved with him, his dog and his young teenage daughter. But the more she is drawn to them, the more she asks herself, is it fair to let herself become part of their lives, when she knows it cannot last long? Sophie Kinsella called it 'A feast of a novel: for the senses, the mind and the emotions' and I couldn't agree more. Highly recommended.

WildGardenRobinsonThe Wild Garden by William Robinson with photos by Rick Darke. Non-fiction. I came across this book while watching a program that referred to the garden at Gravetye in the UK, and its 19th century designer, William Robinson. The Wild Garden was first published in 1870, and it challenged the Victorian-era fashion of strictly controlled garden design, and advocated a return to a more natural, wild landscape. With the current growth in the popularity of "wild gardening", this book is as relevant as ever, so I bought it, and have been browsing through it. Along with the photos it's gorgeous and inspiring. 

RememberLoveLastly I read Mary Balogh's latest, Remember Love, the first in a new series. To be honest, I found the first few chapters very slow and descriptive but then wow! — the story really took off with Mary Balogh's trademark emotional intensity, and never slowed after that. It's a story that explores the question, is it better to expose an uncomfortable truth or to remain discreet and pretend not to notice? Heartbreaking in places but ultimately heartwarming. An engaging and thought provoking story, with a wonderful romance at the heart of it. Highly recommended.

Mary Jo here. I second Pat's recommendation of the Heathcliff Lennox mysteries. Set in Britain shortly after WWI and featuring a handsome former flying officer who loves dogs, cats, and eating, and drives his car as if he's still in an airplane, what's not to like?  <G>  I've read the first seven books of the series, and I see that there's now an eighth.

Lost and Found in ParisMoving along here, I've enjoyed all of Lian Dolan's women's fiction novels because they’re warm, witty, and romantic. Her newest book, Lost and Found in Paris, is another fine read, not to mention a great travelogue of Paris. The narrator, Joan Blakely, is the daughter of a world-famous space and light artist and an equally famous supermodel and photographer. In her youth she'd traveled widely and met lots of famous people. But her life shatters when her father is killed in one of the planes crashing into the Twin Towers, and she and her mother are both paralyzed with grief and become frozen in their lives.

Joan works as a curator at a topnotch private art museum in Southern California.  She's the keeper of her father's legacy and is the one who gives all the interviews as her mother withdraws from life completely. Ten years after her father's death, Joan's life shatters again when her husband blows up their marriage in a spectacularly messy way. Joan has been numb but she's no doormat. She divorces her husband and jumps at the chance to act as a courier delivering a set of sketches to Paris, a city she knows and loves. But the sketches are stolen from her hotel room before she can deliver them, and she starts receiving clues from the thief that lead her around Paris to places that featured in her father's work, many of them associated with Joan of Arc, for whom Joan was named. With a tech genius sidekick named Nate, she rediscovers herself as well as parts of her family's past that she'd never known.

There is romance, but the book is not primarily a romance because in women's fiction, the heart of the story is always a woman's journey as she overcomes her past and moves into a better future.  This is exactly what Joan does – and so does her mother. <G> I thoroughly enjoyed Lost and Found in Paris.

The Diamond EyeAndrea – I’m a big fan of Kate Quinn’s WWII books, which all feature strong and complex woman heroines. I just finished her latest one, The Diamond Eye, and found it just as compelling as her earlier stories. This one features Mila, a studious, bookish young woman, who is raising her young son in a loveless marriage while working on her dissertation. Her dream is to become a history professor – but then the Nazis invade Russia and her passions turn to defending her homeland. (She is actually Ukrainian, and much of the emotional passion she and her Russian comrades express against the invaders has a very poignant ring, though the book was written before Russia invaded Ukraine.) It turns out Mila has a gift for marksmanship and she becomes the most celebrated sniper in the Russian army, a lethal shadow known to the enemy as Lady Death. The descriptions of warfare – the camaraderie, along with the emotional stresses and wrenching personal losses in battle – make for an absolutely riveting read.

Then, after Mila is wounded, the Russian government decides to send her to the U.S. as part of a student delegation to an international conference organized by Eleanor Roosevelt. Russia is desperate to have the Allies open a European front to help them fight the Nazis. And suddenly the shy, introverted Mila finds herself expected to do a publicity tour through America to win public support for the “Commies.” But little does she know that an old enemy of hers and forces opposed to President Roosevelt are planning to test her mettle … Quinn unearthed the real-life diary of a woman sniper and the books is based on a true story. I had never heard of Eleanor Roosevelt’s unlikely friendship with a Russian sniper, so learning some history also added to the pleasure of the book. I highly recommend it!

What about you – what wonderful stories have you discovered this month? We'd love to hear all about them!

210 thoughts on “July What We’re Reading”

  1. What a tempting collection of books you’ve all read lately; I’ve read one and think I could well enjoy the remainder!
    **
    Since last time, week by week ~
    — Qualify (The Atlantis Grail Book 1) by Vera Nazarian. Note: this is FREE for US Kindle readers. It seems to be categorized as young adult, but be aware that it has quite some deaths. It has some similarities to the Hunger Games series. I enjoyed it and might read on as I’m curious where the story will go.
    — I’m participating in the adult summer reading program that my library is hosting. One of the challenges is to read a book from 2011. I happily reread Stray (Touchstone Book 1) by Andrea K. Höst which is FREE for Kindle readers. This science fiction story features a young woman who on her last day of high school, finishes her exams and then walks into a different world.
    — continued my reread of the Touchstone series with Lab Rat One, Caszandra, Gratuitous Epilogue, In Arcadia, and Snow Day all by Andrea K Höst which I enjoyed once more.
    — For my distant book group, The Necessary Beggar by Susan Palwick. This book is categorized as science fiction; however, I’d be more inclined to consider it as fantasy or magical realism. In a very different world, a young man is banished for having murdered a mendicant (a beggar). His family elects to stay with him, and they walk through a portal into … Nevada (specifically a refugee camp). The book was published in 2005 but is set in the future. Funnily enough, a good part of the book takes place in 2022. The story was intriguing, and I look forward to the discussion.
    — very much enjoyed Season’s Change (Trade Season Book 1) by Cait Nary, a contemporary romance featuring two hockey players. The story showed the leads moving from strangers to friends before the relationship moved to a romance.
    — reread Any Given Lifetime by Leta Blake. This is an unusual romance set in the near future that begins with a young man mourning the tragic death of his partner. Meanwhile a baby (a furious baby!) is born with all the memories of the dead man. The story covers a time span of some twenty years before the leads meet and then some time thereafter.
    — stayed up late to finish Nettle & Bone by T. Kingfisher. This is classified as horror, so I was leery of reading it as I have an aversion to being scared. I’m happy to say that while there were a few icky (note highbrow vocabulary) things, I found the book very enjoyable.

    Reply
  2. What a tempting collection of books you’ve all read lately; I’ve read one and think I could well enjoy the remainder!
    **
    Since last time, week by week ~
    — Qualify (The Atlantis Grail Book 1) by Vera Nazarian. Note: this is FREE for US Kindle readers. It seems to be categorized as young adult, but be aware that it has quite some deaths. It has some similarities to the Hunger Games series. I enjoyed it and might read on as I’m curious where the story will go.
    — I’m participating in the adult summer reading program that my library is hosting. One of the challenges is to read a book from 2011. I happily reread Stray (Touchstone Book 1) by Andrea K. Höst which is FREE for Kindle readers. This science fiction story features a young woman who on her last day of high school, finishes her exams and then walks into a different world.
    — continued my reread of the Touchstone series with Lab Rat One, Caszandra, Gratuitous Epilogue, In Arcadia, and Snow Day all by Andrea K Höst which I enjoyed once more.
    — For my distant book group, The Necessary Beggar by Susan Palwick. This book is categorized as science fiction; however, I’d be more inclined to consider it as fantasy or magical realism. In a very different world, a young man is banished for having murdered a mendicant (a beggar). His family elects to stay with him, and they walk through a portal into … Nevada (specifically a refugee camp). The book was published in 2005 but is set in the future. Funnily enough, a good part of the book takes place in 2022. The story was intriguing, and I look forward to the discussion.
    — very much enjoyed Season’s Change (Trade Season Book 1) by Cait Nary, a contemporary romance featuring two hockey players. The story showed the leads moving from strangers to friends before the relationship moved to a romance.
    — reread Any Given Lifetime by Leta Blake. This is an unusual romance set in the near future that begins with a young man mourning the tragic death of his partner. Meanwhile a baby (a furious baby!) is born with all the memories of the dead man. The story covers a time span of some twenty years before the leads meet and then some time thereafter.
    — stayed up late to finish Nettle & Bone by T. Kingfisher. This is classified as horror, so I was leery of reading it as I have an aversion to being scared. I’m happy to say that while there were a few icky (note highbrow vocabulary) things, I found the book very enjoyable.

    Reply
  3. What a tempting collection of books you’ve all read lately; I’ve read one and think I could well enjoy the remainder!
    **
    Since last time, week by week ~
    — Qualify (The Atlantis Grail Book 1) by Vera Nazarian. Note: this is FREE for US Kindle readers. It seems to be categorized as young adult, but be aware that it has quite some deaths. It has some similarities to the Hunger Games series. I enjoyed it and might read on as I’m curious where the story will go.
    — I’m participating in the adult summer reading program that my library is hosting. One of the challenges is to read a book from 2011. I happily reread Stray (Touchstone Book 1) by Andrea K. Höst which is FREE for Kindle readers. This science fiction story features a young woman who on her last day of high school, finishes her exams and then walks into a different world.
    — continued my reread of the Touchstone series with Lab Rat One, Caszandra, Gratuitous Epilogue, In Arcadia, and Snow Day all by Andrea K Höst which I enjoyed once more.
    — For my distant book group, The Necessary Beggar by Susan Palwick. This book is categorized as science fiction; however, I’d be more inclined to consider it as fantasy or magical realism. In a very different world, a young man is banished for having murdered a mendicant (a beggar). His family elects to stay with him, and they walk through a portal into … Nevada (specifically a refugee camp). The book was published in 2005 but is set in the future. Funnily enough, a good part of the book takes place in 2022. The story was intriguing, and I look forward to the discussion.
    — very much enjoyed Season’s Change (Trade Season Book 1) by Cait Nary, a contemporary romance featuring two hockey players. The story showed the leads moving from strangers to friends before the relationship moved to a romance.
    — reread Any Given Lifetime by Leta Blake. This is an unusual romance set in the near future that begins with a young man mourning the tragic death of his partner. Meanwhile a baby (a furious baby!) is born with all the memories of the dead man. The story covers a time span of some twenty years before the leads meet and then some time thereafter.
    — stayed up late to finish Nettle & Bone by T. Kingfisher. This is classified as horror, so I was leery of reading it as I have an aversion to being scared. I’m happy to say that while there were a few icky (note highbrow vocabulary) things, I found the book very enjoyable.

    Reply
  4. What a tempting collection of books you’ve all read lately; I’ve read one and think I could well enjoy the remainder!
    **
    Since last time, week by week ~
    — Qualify (The Atlantis Grail Book 1) by Vera Nazarian. Note: this is FREE for US Kindle readers. It seems to be categorized as young adult, but be aware that it has quite some deaths. It has some similarities to the Hunger Games series. I enjoyed it and might read on as I’m curious where the story will go.
    — I’m participating in the adult summer reading program that my library is hosting. One of the challenges is to read a book from 2011. I happily reread Stray (Touchstone Book 1) by Andrea K. Höst which is FREE for Kindle readers. This science fiction story features a young woman who on her last day of high school, finishes her exams and then walks into a different world.
    — continued my reread of the Touchstone series with Lab Rat One, Caszandra, Gratuitous Epilogue, In Arcadia, and Snow Day all by Andrea K Höst which I enjoyed once more.
    — For my distant book group, The Necessary Beggar by Susan Palwick. This book is categorized as science fiction; however, I’d be more inclined to consider it as fantasy or magical realism. In a very different world, a young man is banished for having murdered a mendicant (a beggar). His family elects to stay with him, and they walk through a portal into … Nevada (specifically a refugee camp). The book was published in 2005 but is set in the future. Funnily enough, a good part of the book takes place in 2022. The story was intriguing, and I look forward to the discussion.
    — very much enjoyed Season’s Change (Trade Season Book 1) by Cait Nary, a contemporary romance featuring two hockey players. The story showed the leads moving from strangers to friends before the relationship moved to a romance.
    — reread Any Given Lifetime by Leta Blake. This is an unusual romance set in the near future that begins with a young man mourning the tragic death of his partner. Meanwhile a baby (a furious baby!) is born with all the memories of the dead man. The story covers a time span of some twenty years before the leads meet and then some time thereafter.
    — stayed up late to finish Nettle & Bone by T. Kingfisher. This is classified as horror, so I was leery of reading it as I have an aversion to being scared. I’m happy to say that while there were a few icky (note highbrow vocabulary) things, I found the book very enjoyable.

    Reply
  5. What a tempting collection of books you’ve all read lately; I’ve read one and think I could well enjoy the remainder!
    **
    Since last time, week by week ~
    — Qualify (The Atlantis Grail Book 1) by Vera Nazarian. Note: this is FREE for US Kindle readers. It seems to be categorized as young adult, but be aware that it has quite some deaths. It has some similarities to the Hunger Games series. I enjoyed it and might read on as I’m curious where the story will go.
    — I’m participating in the adult summer reading program that my library is hosting. One of the challenges is to read a book from 2011. I happily reread Stray (Touchstone Book 1) by Andrea K. Höst which is FREE for Kindle readers. This science fiction story features a young woman who on her last day of high school, finishes her exams and then walks into a different world.
    — continued my reread of the Touchstone series with Lab Rat One, Caszandra, Gratuitous Epilogue, In Arcadia, and Snow Day all by Andrea K Höst which I enjoyed once more.
    — For my distant book group, The Necessary Beggar by Susan Palwick. This book is categorized as science fiction; however, I’d be more inclined to consider it as fantasy or magical realism. In a very different world, a young man is banished for having murdered a mendicant (a beggar). His family elects to stay with him, and they walk through a portal into … Nevada (specifically a refugee camp). The book was published in 2005 but is set in the future. Funnily enough, a good part of the book takes place in 2022. The story was intriguing, and I look forward to the discussion.
    — very much enjoyed Season’s Change (Trade Season Book 1) by Cait Nary, a contemporary romance featuring two hockey players. The story showed the leads moving from strangers to friends before the relationship moved to a romance.
    — reread Any Given Lifetime by Leta Blake. This is an unusual romance set in the near future that begins with a young man mourning the tragic death of his partner. Meanwhile a baby (a furious baby!) is born with all the memories of the dead man. The story covers a time span of some twenty years before the leads meet and then some time thereafter.
    — stayed up late to finish Nettle & Bone by T. Kingfisher. This is classified as horror, so I was leery of reading it as I have an aversion to being scared. I’m happy to say that while there were a few icky (note highbrow vocabulary) things, I found the book very enjoyable.

    Reply
  6. This was a long month, so here is the rest ~
    — For ten days, I read thirty-five or so pages of The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World by Andrea Wulf for my local book group. This was an incredibly detailed book about a man of whom I’d known nothing, and (after a bit of a slow start) I quite enjoyed it.
    — enjoyed The Suite Spot by Trish Doller which features the sister of the heroine of the author’s Float Plan but which can stand alone. I think it’s described as women’s fiction, but it seemed like a romance to me.
    — reread Murmuration by TJ Klune which I enjoyed once more. If you know the author from his recent popular The House in the Cerulean Sea be aware that this book has a different vibe that is, at times, reminiscent of the Twilight Zone.
    — read Mary Balogh’s newest historical romance ~ Remember Love (A Ravenswood Novel Book 1). I enjoyed it, but the premise seemed a little farfetched.
    — One of my summer reading challenges is to read a book in the Dewey decimal 700s, so I decided to read Mahjong: A Chinese Game and the Making of Modern American Culture by Annelise Heinz. I read the first fifty pages and then skimmed the rest; this is a dense, very well researched academic study…but not quite what I’d hoped for!
    — A more successful outcome for my summer reading challenges of reading a book in the Dewey decimal 700s was to reread A Beginner’s Guide to American Mah Jongg: How to Play the Game & Win by Elaine Sandberg which I read a few years ago when I was a novice. This time I was able to nod with familiarity at most things though I did still learn a thing or two.
    — reread The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold which I enjoyed once more. This really is an excellent fantasy.

    Reply
  7. This was a long month, so here is the rest ~
    — For ten days, I read thirty-five or so pages of The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World by Andrea Wulf for my local book group. This was an incredibly detailed book about a man of whom I’d known nothing, and (after a bit of a slow start) I quite enjoyed it.
    — enjoyed The Suite Spot by Trish Doller which features the sister of the heroine of the author’s Float Plan but which can stand alone. I think it’s described as women’s fiction, but it seemed like a romance to me.
    — reread Murmuration by TJ Klune which I enjoyed once more. If you know the author from his recent popular The House in the Cerulean Sea be aware that this book has a different vibe that is, at times, reminiscent of the Twilight Zone.
    — read Mary Balogh’s newest historical romance ~ Remember Love (A Ravenswood Novel Book 1). I enjoyed it, but the premise seemed a little farfetched.
    — One of my summer reading challenges is to read a book in the Dewey decimal 700s, so I decided to read Mahjong: A Chinese Game and the Making of Modern American Culture by Annelise Heinz. I read the first fifty pages and then skimmed the rest; this is a dense, very well researched academic study…but not quite what I’d hoped for!
    — A more successful outcome for my summer reading challenges of reading a book in the Dewey decimal 700s was to reread A Beginner’s Guide to American Mah Jongg: How to Play the Game & Win by Elaine Sandberg which I read a few years ago when I was a novice. This time I was able to nod with familiarity at most things though I did still learn a thing or two.
    — reread The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold which I enjoyed once more. This really is an excellent fantasy.

    Reply
  8. This was a long month, so here is the rest ~
    — For ten days, I read thirty-five or so pages of The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World by Andrea Wulf for my local book group. This was an incredibly detailed book about a man of whom I’d known nothing, and (after a bit of a slow start) I quite enjoyed it.
    — enjoyed The Suite Spot by Trish Doller which features the sister of the heroine of the author’s Float Plan but which can stand alone. I think it’s described as women’s fiction, but it seemed like a romance to me.
    — reread Murmuration by TJ Klune which I enjoyed once more. If you know the author from his recent popular The House in the Cerulean Sea be aware that this book has a different vibe that is, at times, reminiscent of the Twilight Zone.
    — read Mary Balogh’s newest historical romance ~ Remember Love (A Ravenswood Novel Book 1). I enjoyed it, but the premise seemed a little farfetched.
    — One of my summer reading challenges is to read a book in the Dewey decimal 700s, so I decided to read Mahjong: A Chinese Game and the Making of Modern American Culture by Annelise Heinz. I read the first fifty pages and then skimmed the rest; this is a dense, very well researched academic study…but not quite what I’d hoped for!
    — A more successful outcome for my summer reading challenges of reading a book in the Dewey decimal 700s was to reread A Beginner’s Guide to American Mah Jongg: How to Play the Game & Win by Elaine Sandberg which I read a few years ago when I was a novice. This time I was able to nod with familiarity at most things though I did still learn a thing or two.
    — reread The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold which I enjoyed once more. This really is an excellent fantasy.

    Reply
  9. This was a long month, so here is the rest ~
    — For ten days, I read thirty-five or so pages of The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World by Andrea Wulf for my local book group. This was an incredibly detailed book about a man of whom I’d known nothing, and (after a bit of a slow start) I quite enjoyed it.
    — enjoyed The Suite Spot by Trish Doller which features the sister of the heroine of the author’s Float Plan but which can stand alone. I think it’s described as women’s fiction, but it seemed like a romance to me.
    — reread Murmuration by TJ Klune which I enjoyed once more. If you know the author from his recent popular The House in the Cerulean Sea be aware that this book has a different vibe that is, at times, reminiscent of the Twilight Zone.
    — read Mary Balogh’s newest historical romance ~ Remember Love (A Ravenswood Novel Book 1). I enjoyed it, but the premise seemed a little farfetched.
    — One of my summer reading challenges is to read a book in the Dewey decimal 700s, so I decided to read Mahjong: A Chinese Game and the Making of Modern American Culture by Annelise Heinz. I read the first fifty pages and then skimmed the rest; this is a dense, very well researched academic study…but not quite what I’d hoped for!
    — A more successful outcome for my summer reading challenges of reading a book in the Dewey decimal 700s was to reread A Beginner’s Guide to American Mah Jongg: How to Play the Game & Win by Elaine Sandberg which I read a few years ago when I was a novice. This time I was able to nod with familiarity at most things though I did still learn a thing or two.
    — reread The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold which I enjoyed once more. This really is an excellent fantasy.

    Reply
  10. This was a long month, so here is the rest ~
    — For ten days, I read thirty-five or so pages of The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World by Andrea Wulf for my local book group. This was an incredibly detailed book about a man of whom I’d known nothing, and (after a bit of a slow start) I quite enjoyed it.
    — enjoyed The Suite Spot by Trish Doller which features the sister of the heroine of the author’s Float Plan but which can stand alone. I think it’s described as women’s fiction, but it seemed like a romance to me.
    — reread Murmuration by TJ Klune which I enjoyed once more. If you know the author from his recent popular The House in the Cerulean Sea be aware that this book has a different vibe that is, at times, reminiscent of the Twilight Zone.
    — read Mary Balogh’s newest historical romance ~ Remember Love (A Ravenswood Novel Book 1). I enjoyed it, but the premise seemed a little farfetched.
    — One of my summer reading challenges is to read a book in the Dewey decimal 700s, so I decided to read Mahjong: A Chinese Game and the Making of Modern American Culture by Annelise Heinz. I read the first fifty pages and then skimmed the rest; this is a dense, very well researched academic study…but not quite what I’d hoped for!
    — A more successful outcome for my summer reading challenges of reading a book in the Dewey decimal 700s was to reread A Beginner’s Guide to American Mah Jongg: How to Play the Game & Win by Elaine Sandberg which I read a few years ago when I was a novice. This time I was able to nod with familiarity at most things though I did still learn a thing or two.
    — reread The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold which I enjoyed once more. This really is an excellent fantasy.

    Reply
  11. So much to read! Many of these books sound tempting.
    I got Gill Hornby’s “Godmersham Park” as a birthday present and so far have only read the first chapter.
    The style is quite different from Stephanie Barron’s “Jane and the Year Without A Summer” which I read recently. Much lighter and less laboriously Regency. I think it’s got lots of comic touches. I do admire people who can construct a good mystery story. There is so much skill and cunning involved!

    Reply
  12. So much to read! Many of these books sound tempting.
    I got Gill Hornby’s “Godmersham Park” as a birthday present and so far have only read the first chapter.
    The style is quite different from Stephanie Barron’s “Jane and the Year Without A Summer” which I read recently. Much lighter and less laboriously Regency. I think it’s got lots of comic touches. I do admire people who can construct a good mystery story. There is so much skill and cunning involved!

    Reply
  13. So much to read! Many of these books sound tempting.
    I got Gill Hornby’s “Godmersham Park” as a birthday present and so far have only read the first chapter.
    The style is quite different from Stephanie Barron’s “Jane and the Year Without A Summer” which I read recently. Much lighter and less laboriously Regency. I think it’s got lots of comic touches. I do admire people who can construct a good mystery story. There is so much skill and cunning involved!

    Reply
  14. So much to read! Many of these books sound tempting.
    I got Gill Hornby’s “Godmersham Park” as a birthday present and so far have only read the first chapter.
    The style is quite different from Stephanie Barron’s “Jane and the Year Without A Summer” which I read recently. Much lighter and less laboriously Regency. I think it’s got lots of comic touches. I do admire people who can construct a good mystery story. There is so much skill and cunning involved!

    Reply
  15. So much to read! Many of these books sound tempting.
    I got Gill Hornby’s “Godmersham Park” as a birthday present and so far have only read the first chapter.
    The style is quite different from Stephanie Barron’s “Jane and the Year Without A Summer” which I read recently. Much lighter and less laboriously Regency. I think it’s got lots of comic touches. I do admire people who can construct a good mystery story. There is so much skill and cunning involved!

    Reply
  16. Wow Kareni, lots of great recommendations there, thank you! And I agree with you – I’m not keen on being scared so am reluctant to read horror.

    Reply
  17. Wow Kareni, lots of great recommendations there, thank you! And I agree with you – I’m not keen on being scared so am reluctant to read horror.

    Reply
  18. Wow Kareni, lots of great recommendations there, thank you! And I agree with you – I’m not keen on being scared so am reluctant to read horror.

    Reply
  19. Wow Kareni, lots of great recommendations there, thank you! And I agree with you – I’m not keen on being scared so am reluctant to read horror.

    Reply
  20. Wow Kareni, lots of great recommendations there, thank you! And I agree with you – I’m not keen on being scared so am reluctant to read horror.

    Reply
  21. Many thanks again, Kareni, lots to choose from there! I remember trying to learn how to play mah jongg when I was younger but have forgotten now.

    Reply
  22. Many thanks again, Kareni, lots to choose from there! I remember trying to learn how to play mah jongg when I was younger but have forgotten now.

    Reply
  23. Many thanks again, Kareni, lots to choose from there! I remember trying to learn how to play mah jongg when I was younger but have forgotten now.

    Reply
  24. Many thanks again, Kareni, lots to choose from there! I remember trying to learn how to play mah jongg when I was younger but have forgotten now.

    Reply
  25. Many thanks again, Kareni, lots to choose from there! I remember trying to learn how to play mah jongg when I was younger but have forgotten now.

    Reply
  26. I’ve read T Kingfisher’s books, including Nettle and Bone, and Karina’s description is spot on — a few icky bits, but nothing terribly scary. I won’t usually touch horror, but T Kingfisher is wonderful.

    Reply
  27. I’ve read T Kingfisher’s books, including Nettle and Bone, and Karina’s description is spot on — a few icky bits, but nothing terribly scary. I won’t usually touch horror, but T Kingfisher is wonderful.

    Reply
  28. I’ve read T Kingfisher’s books, including Nettle and Bone, and Karina’s description is spot on — a few icky bits, but nothing terribly scary. I won’t usually touch horror, but T Kingfisher is wonderful.

    Reply
  29. I’ve read T Kingfisher’s books, including Nettle and Bone, and Karina’s description is spot on — a few icky bits, but nothing terribly scary. I won’t usually touch horror, but T Kingfisher is wonderful.

    Reply
  30. I’ve read T Kingfisher’s books, including Nettle and Bone, and Karina’s description is spot on — a few icky bits, but nothing terribly scary. I won’t usually touch horror, but T Kingfisher is wonderful.

    Reply
  31. LOL we always think that about our own books! And you’re very welcome – loved it! Someone I know is a complete hermit like Ariel, although not quite that bad, so her parts of the story really resonated with me.

    Reply
  32. LOL we always think that about our own books! And you’re very welcome – loved it! Someone I know is a complete hermit like Ariel, although not quite that bad, so her parts of the story really resonated with me.

    Reply
  33. LOL we always think that about our own books! And you’re very welcome – loved it! Someone I know is a complete hermit like Ariel, although not quite that bad, so her parts of the story really resonated with me.

    Reply
  34. LOL we always think that about our own books! And you’re very welcome – loved it! Someone I know is a complete hermit like Ariel, although not quite that bad, so her parts of the story really resonated with me.

    Reply
  35. LOL we always think that about our own books! And you’re very welcome – loved it! Someone I know is a complete hermit like Ariel, although not quite that bad, so her parts of the story really resonated with me.

    Reply
  36. I am so glad that others have found Heathcliff Lennox. I absolutely love the entire series. The Birdcage Murders is the most recent. The best other book I’ve read this month – The Beekeeper At Elderflower Grove by Jamie Admans.
    Thanks for everyone who has provided me with other titles to read.
    For some reason this has been a rather less than stellar month….and only these 2 books which provided me with joy. The others were sort of blah…so shall remain nameless.
    Y’all always give me such good leads to books. Hope everyone is staying cool.

    Reply
  37. I am so glad that others have found Heathcliff Lennox. I absolutely love the entire series. The Birdcage Murders is the most recent. The best other book I’ve read this month – The Beekeeper At Elderflower Grove by Jamie Admans.
    Thanks for everyone who has provided me with other titles to read.
    For some reason this has been a rather less than stellar month….and only these 2 books which provided me with joy. The others were sort of blah…so shall remain nameless.
    Y’all always give me such good leads to books. Hope everyone is staying cool.

    Reply
  38. I am so glad that others have found Heathcliff Lennox. I absolutely love the entire series. The Birdcage Murders is the most recent. The best other book I’ve read this month – The Beekeeper At Elderflower Grove by Jamie Admans.
    Thanks for everyone who has provided me with other titles to read.
    For some reason this has been a rather less than stellar month….and only these 2 books which provided me with joy. The others were sort of blah…so shall remain nameless.
    Y’all always give me such good leads to books. Hope everyone is staying cool.

    Reply
  39. I am so glad that others have found Heathcliff Lennox. I absolutely love the entire series. The Birdcage Murders is the most recent. The best other book I’ve read this month – The Beekeeper At Elderflower Grove by Jamie Admans.
    Thanks for everyone who has provided me with other titles to read.
    For some reason this has been a rather less than stellar month….and only these 2 books which provided me with joy. The others were sort of blah…so shall remain nameless.
    Y’all always give me such good leads to books. Hope everyone is staying cool.

    Reply
  40. I am so glad that others have found Heathcliff Lennox. I absolutely love the entire series. The Birdcage Murders is the most recent. The best other book I’ve read this month – The Beekeeper At Elderflower Grove by Jamie Admans.
    Thanks for everyone who has provided me with other titles to read.
    For some reason this has been a rather less than stellar month….and only these 2 books which provided me with joy. The others were sort of blah…so shall remain nameless.
    Y’all always give me such good leads to books. Hope everyone is staying cool.

    Reply
  41. My end-of-month read was Anne’s The Rake’s Daughter, and I agree with every comment made about it! And thanks again to Mary Jo for interviewing Anne here in the blog.
    Before that, I read Remember Love by Mary Balogh, and also agree with the comments on that: slow to start, with a somewhat unbelievable premise, but a very satisfying read overall. While I quite enjoyed her previous Westcott series, I’m hoping this new one might have fewer family members to keep straight! 😉
    Most of the month, I’ve been reading cooking memoirs, or should they be called cookbooks with stories? I was looking for a particular recipe in Ruth Reichl’s My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life, and found myself re-reading this wonderful diary of her life the first 12 months after Gourmet magazine was shut down. That led me to MFK Fisher, who writes so beautifully, and I re-read How to Cook a Wolf, Long Ago in France, and Provence. I regret to say, I haven’t actually done that much cooking from any of them, but the reading has been wonderful!

    Reply
  42. My end-of-month read was Anne’s The Rake’s Daughter, and I agree with every comment made about it! And thanks again to Mary Jo for interviewing Anne here in the blog.
    Before that, I read Remember Love by Mary Balogh, and also agree with the comments on that: slow to start, with a somewhat unbelievable premise, but a very satisfying read overall. While I quite enjoyed her previous Westcott series, I’m hoping this new one might have fewer family members to keep straight! 😉
    Most of the month, I’ve been reading cooking memoirs, or should they be called cookbooks with stories? I was looking for a particular recipe in Ruth Reichl’s My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life, and found myself re-reading this wonderful diary of her life the first 12 months after Gourmet magazine was shut down. That led me to MFK Fisher, who writes so beautifully, and I re-read How to Cook a Wolf, Long Ago in France, and Provence. I regret to say, I haven’t actually done that much cooking from any of them, but the reading has been wonderful!

    Reply
  43. My end-of-month read was Anne’s The Rake’s Daughter, and I agree with every comment made about it! And thanks again to Mary Jo for interviewing Anne here in the blog.
    Before that, I read Remember Love by Mary Balogh, and also agree with the comments on that: slow to start, with a somewhat unbelievable premise, but a very satisfying read overall. While I quite enjoyed her previous Westcott series, I’m hoping this new one might have fewer family members to keep straight! 😉
    Most of the month, I’ve been reading cooking memoirs, or should they be called cookbooks with stories? I was looking for a particular recipe in Ruth Reichl’s My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life, and found myself re-reading this wonderful diary of her life the first 12 months after Gourmet magazine was shut down. That led me to MFK Fisher, who writes so beautifully, and I re-read How to Cook a Wolf, Long Ago in France, and Provence. I regret to say, I haven’t actually done that much cooking from any of them, but the reading has been wonderful!

    Reply
  44. My end-of-month read was Anne’s The Rake’s Daughter, and I agree with every comment made about it! And thanks again to Mary Jo for interviewing Anne here in the blog.
    Before that, I read Remember Love by Mary Balogh, and also agree with the comments on that: slow to start, with a somewhat unbelievable premise, but a very satisfying read overall. While I quite enjoyed her previous Westcott series, I’m hoping this new one might have fewer family members to keep straight! 😉
    Most of the month, I’ve been reading cooking memoirs, or should they be called cookbooks with stories? I was looking for a particular recipe in Ruth Reichl’s My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life, and found myself re-reading this wonderful diary of her life the first 12 months after Gourmet magazine was shut down. That led me to MFK Fisher, who writes so beautifully, and I re-read How to Cook a Wolf, Long Ago in France, and Provence. I regret to say, I haven’t actually done that much cooking from any of them, but the reading has been wonderful!

    Reply
  45. My end-of-month read was Anne’s The Rake’s Daughter, and I agree with every comment made about it! And thanks again to Mary Jo for interviewing Anne here in the blog.
    Before that, I read Remember Love by Mary Balogh, and also agree with the comments on that: slow to start, with a somewhat unbelievable premise, but a very satisfying read overall. While I quite enjoyed her previous Westcott series, I’m hoping this new one might have fewer family members to keep straight! 😉
    Most of the month, I’ve been reading cooking memoirs, or should they be called cookbooks with stories? I was looking for a particular recipe in Ruth Reichl’s My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life, and found myself re-reading this wonderful diary of her life the first 12 months after Gourmet magazine was shut down. That led me to MFK Fisher, who writes so beautifully, and I re-read How to Cook a Wolf, Long Ago in France, and Provence. I regret to say, I haven’t actually done that much cooking from any of them, but the reading has been wonderful!

    Reply
  46. Thank you Constance, so pleased you agree with me about The Rake’s Daughter, it’s fabulous isn’t it! And now you’ve got me wanting to look at cook books/memoirs – they sound great!

    Reply
  47. Thank you Constance, so pleased you agree with me about The Rake’s Daughter, it’s fabulous isn’t it! And now you’ve got me wanting to look at cook books/memoirs – they sound great!

    Reply
  48. Thank you Constance, so pleased you agree with me about The Rake’s Daughter, it’s fabulous isn’t it! And now you’ve got me wanting to look at cook books/memoirs – they sound great!

    Reply
  49. Thank you Constance, so pleased you agree with me about The Rake’s Daughter, it’s fabulous isn’t it! And now you’ve got me wanting to look at cook books/memoirs – they sound great!

    Reply
  50. Thank you Constance, so pleased you agree with me about The Rake’s Daughter, it’s fabulous isn’t it! And now you’ve got me wanting to look at cook books/memoirs – they sound great!

    Reply
  51. I am finally starting to come out of my reading slump. For so long I was doing mostly only re-reads.
    I too just finished REMEMBER LOVE by Mary Balogh and just started books 3 and 4 (THE FORGOTTEN DAUGHTER and THE UPRIGHT SON) by Caroline Warfield. Next in the cue after that is Anne Gracie’s THE RAKE’S DAUGHTER.
    I agree with Constance above about there being too many characters in Ms. Balogh’s last series. Maybe my brain is turning to mush, but I had to keep referring to the Family Tree to keep them all straight. But I love Mary Balogh so much I made the effort (smile). I prefer series be between 4 to 8 books. That is just a personal preference.

    Reply
  52. I am finally starting to come out of my reading slump. For so long I was doing mostly only re-reads.
    I too just finished REMEMBER LOVE by Mary Balogh and just started books 3 and 4 (THE FORGOTTEN DAUGHTER and THE UPRIGHT SON) by Caroline Warfield. Next in the cue after that is Anne Gracie’s THE RAKE’S DAUGHTER.
    I agree with Constance above about there being too many characters in Ms. Balogh’s last series. Maybe my brain is turning to mush, but I had to keep referring to the Family Tree to keep them all straight. But I love Mary Balogh so much I made the effort (smile). I prefer series be between 4 to 8 books. That is just a personal preference.

    Reply
  53. I am finally starting to come out of my reading slump. For so long I was doing mostly only re-reads.
    I too just finished REMEMBER LOVE by Mary Balogh and just started books 3 and 4 (THE FORGOTTEN DAUGHTER and THE UPRIGHT SON) by Caroline Warfield. Next in the cue after that is Anne Gracie’s THE RAKE’S DAUGHTER.
    I agree with Constance above about there being too many characters in Ms. Balogh’s last series. Maybe my brain is turning to mush, but I had to keep referring to the Family Tree to keep them all straight. But I love Mary Balogh so much I made the effort (smile). I prefer series be between 4 to 8 books. That is just a personal preference.

    Reply
  54. I am finally starting to come out of my reading slump. For so long I was doing mostly only re-reads.
    I too just finished REMEMBER LOVE by Mary Balogh and just started books 3 and 4 (THE FORGOTTEN DAUGHTER and THE UPRIGHT SON) by Caroline Warfield. Next in the cue after that is Anne Gracie’s THE RAKE’S DAUGHTER.
    I agree with Constance above about there being too many characters in Ms. Balogh’s last series. Maybe my brain is turning to mush, but I had to keep referring to the Family Tree to keep them all straight. But I love Mary Balogh so much I made the effort (smile). I prefer series be between 4 to 8 books. That is just a personal preference.

    Reply
  55. I am finally starting to come out of my reading slump. For so long I was doing mostly only re-reads.
    I too just finished REMEMBER LOVE by Mary Balogh and just started books 3 and 4 (THE FORGOTTEN DAUGHTER and THE UPRIGHT SON) by Caroline Warfield. Next in the cue after that is Anne Gracie’s THE RAKE’S DAUGHTER.
    I agree with Constance above about there being too many characters in Ms. Balogh’s last series. Maybe my brain is turning to mush, but I had to keep referring to the Family Tree to keep them all straight. But I love Mary Balogh so much I made the effort (smile). I prefer series be between 4 to 8 books. That is just a personal preference.

    Reply
  56. If you enjoy memoirs intermixed with lots of talking about food, and some recipes, you would probably like Laurie Colwin’ books, “Home Cooking” and “More Home Cooking”. Her advice is very practical and even the chapter titles are delightful: “The Family Dinner in Real Life”, “Desserts That Quiver”, “How To Cook Like an American”, and “How To Face the Holidays”.

    Reply
  57. If you enjoy memoirs intermixed with lots of talking about food, and some recipes, you would probably like Laurie Colwin’ books, “Home Cooking” and “More Home Cooking”. Her advice is very practical and even the chapter titles are delightful: “The Family Dinner in Real Life”, “Desserts That Quiver”, “How To Cook Like an American”, and “How To Face the Holidays”.

    Reply
  58. If you enjoy memoirs intermixed with lots of talking about food, and some recipes, you would probably like Laurie Colwin’ books, “Home Cooking” and “More Home Cooking”. Her advice is very practical and even the chapter titles are delightful: “The Family Dinner in Real Life”, “Desserts That Quiver”, “How To Cook Like an American”, and “How To Face the Holidays”.

    Reply
  59. If you enjoy memoirs intermixed with lots of talking about food, and some recipes, you would probably like Laurie Colwin’ books, “Home Cooking” and “More Home Cooking”. Her advice is very practical and even the chapter titles are delightful: “The Family Dinner in Real Life”, “Desserts That Quiver”, “How To Cook Like an American”, and “How To Face the Holidays”.

    Reply
  60. If you enjoy memoirs intermixed with lots of talking about food, and some recipes, you would probably like Laurie Colwin’ books, “Home Cooking” and “More Home Cooking”. Her advice is very practical and even the chapter titles are delightful: “The Family Dinner in Real Life”, “Desserts That Quiver”, “How To Cook Like an American”, and “How To Face the Holidays”.

    Reply
  61. Thank you for the recommendations, Mary, and great that you’re out of the reading slump! Interesting about the series – when I write one I don’t always know how many books it will be. Sometimes characters just demand their own story 🙂

    Reply
  62. Thank you for the recommendations, Mary, and great that you’re out of the reading slump! Interesting about the series – when I write one I don’t always know how many books it will be. Sometimes characters just demand their own story 🙂

    Reply
  63. Thank you for the recommendations, Mary, and great that you’re out of the reading slump! Interesting about the series – when I write one I don’t always know how many books it will be. Sometimes characters just demand their own story 🙂

    Reply
  64. Thank you for the recommendations, Mary, and great that you’re out of the reading slump! Interesting about the series – when I write one I don’t always know how many books it will be. Sometimes characters just demand their own story 🙂

    Reply
  65. Thank you for the recommendations, Mary, and great that you’re out of the reading slump! Interesting about the series – when I write one I don’t always know how many books it will be. Sometimes characters just demand their own story 🙂

    Reply
  66. I finished the 3rd Harriet Gordon mystery, Evil in Emerald, and it was the best yet. There were quite a few dark moments for the 2 main characters, but I can’t wait to see where Alison Stuart goes next with the series.
    I also read a delightful Patricia Wentworth mystery from the 1950’s, Out of the Past. It was one of those stories where the murder victim is much disliked and at least half a dozen people have good reason to want to be rid of him, so there is a surfeit of suspects.
    It seems like everyone here is reading Remember Love, and I am no exception! I am midway, but like the rest of you, I had to get through the first few chapters of mainly exposition. One interesting thing I did note was, just like the Westcott series, although the specifics are different, what kicks off the plot is a betrayal by the patriarch of the family. I wondered if that was coincidental, or a convenient plot device, or a recurring theme that Mary Balogh feels compelled to keep exploring. I’d love to hear everyone’s thoughts.
    Lastly, I am reading a contemporary novella by Ali Hazelwood called “Below Zero”. She specialized in heroines and heroes who are geniuses in scientific fields, but not great with social interactions. I loved “The Love Hypothesis”, and this novella starts off with the heroine getting stranded while on an expedition in a remote region of Norway.

    Reply
  67. I finished the 3rd Harriet Gordon mystery, Evil in Emerald, and it was the best yet. There were quite a few dark moments for the 2 main characters, but I can’t wait to see where Alison Stuart goes next with the series.
    I also read a delightful Patricia Wentworth mystery from the 1950’s, Out of the Past. It was one of those stories where the murder victim is much disliked and at least half a dozen people have good reason to want to be rid of him, so there is a surfeit of suspects.
    It seems like everyone here is reading Remember Love, and I am no exception! I am midway, but like the rest of you, I had to get through the first few chapters of mainly exposition. One interesting thing I did note was, just like the Westcott series, although the specifics are different, what kicks off the plot is a betrayal by the patriarch of the family. I wondered if that was coincidental, or a convenient plot device, or a recurring theme that Mary Balogh feels compelled to keep exploring. I’d love to hear everyone’s thoughts.
    Lastly, I am reading a contemporary novella by Ali Hazelwood called “Below Zero”. She specialized in heroines and heroes who are geniuses in scientific fields, but not great with social interactions. I loved “The Love Hypothesis”, and this novella starts off with the heroine getting stranded while on an expedition in a remote region of Norway.

    Reply
  68. I finished the 3rd Harriet Gordon mystery, Evil in Emerald, and it was the best yet. There were quite a few dark moments for the 2 main characters, but I can’t wait to see where Alison Stuart goes next with the series.
    I also read a delightful Patricia Wentworth mystery from the 1950’s, Out of the Past. It was one of those stories where the murder victim is much disliked and at least half a dozen people have good reason to want to be rid of him, so there is a surfeit of suspects.
    It seems like everyone here is reading Remember Love, and I am no exception! I am midway, but like the rest of you, I had to get through the first few chapters of mainly exposition. One interesting thing I did note was, just like the Westcott series, although the specifics are different, what kicks off the plot is a betrayal by the patriarch of the family. I wondered if that was coincidental, or a convenient plot device, or a recurring theme that Mary Balogh feels compelled to keep exploring. I’d love to hear everyone’s thoughts.
    Lastly, I am reading a contemporary novella by Ali Hazelwood called “Below Zero”. She specialized in heroines and heroes who are geniuses in scientific fields, but not great with social interactions. I loved “The Love Hypothesis”, and this novella starts off with the heroine getting stranded while on an expedition in a remote region of Norway.

    Reply
  69. I finished the 3rd Harriet Gordon mystery, Evil in Emerald, and it was the best yet. There were quite a few dark moments for the 2 main characters, but I can’t wait to see where Alison Stuart goes next with the series.
    I also read a delightful Patricia Wentworth mystery from the 1950’s, Out of the Past. It was one of those stories where the murder victim is much disliked and at least half a dozen people have good reason to want to be rid of him, so there is a surfeit of suspects.
    It seems like everyone here is reading Remember Love, and I am no exception! I am midway, but like the rest of you, I had to get through the first few chapters of mainly exposition. One interesting thing I did note was, just like the Westcott series, although the specifics are different, what kicks off the plot is a betrayal by the patriarch of the family. I wondered if that was coincidental, or a convenient plot device, or a recurring theme that Mary Balogh feels compelled to keep exploring. I’d love to hear everyone’s thoughts.
    Lastly, I am reading a contemporary novella by Ali Hazelwood called “Below Zero”. She specialized in heroines and heroes who are geniuses in scientific fields, but not great with social interactions. I loved “The Love Hypothesis”, and this novella starts off with the heroine getting stranded while on an expedition in a remote region of Norway.

    Reply
  70. I finished the 3rd Harriet Gordon mystery, Evil in Emerald, and it was the best yet. There were quite a few dark moments for the 2 main characters, but I can’t wait to see where Alison Stuart goes next with the series.
    I also read a delightful Patricia Wentworth mystery from the 1950’s, Out of the Past. It was one of those stories where the murder victim is much disliked and at least half a dozen people have good reason to want to be rid of him, so there is a surfeit of suspects.
    It seems like everyone here is reading Remember Love, and I am no exception! I am midway, but like the rest of you, I had to get through the first few chapters of mainly exposition. One interesting thing I did note was, just like the Westcott series, although the specifics are different, what kicks off the plot is a betrayal by the patriarch of the family. I wondered if that was coincidental, or a convenient plot device, or a recurring theme that Mary Balogh feels compelled to keep exploring. I’d love to hear everyone’s thoughts.
    Lastly, I am reading a contemporary novella by Ali Hazelwood called “Below Zero”. She specialized in heroines and heroes who are geniuses in scientific fields, but not great with social interactions. I loved “The Love Hypothesis”, and this novella starts off with the heroine getting stranded while on an expedition in a remote region of Norway.

    Reply
  71. Karin, re: Mary Balogh. I remember something similar in her Huxtable Series. One of the heroes father had two families. Great series BTW. I read a LOT of romance, so I see many plot devices used many time by many authors.

    Reply
  72. Karin, re: Mary Balogh. I remember something similar in her Huxtable Series. One of the heroes father had two families. Great series BTW. I read a LOT of romance, so I see many plot devices used many time by many authors.

    Reply
  73. Karin, re: Mary Balogh. I remember something similar in her Huxtable Series. One of the heroes father had two families. Great series BTW. I read a LOT of romance, so I see many plot devices used many time by many authors.

    Reply
  74. Karin, re: Mary Balogh. I remember something similar in her Huxtable Series. One of the heroes father had two families. Great series BTW. I read a LOT of romance, so I see many plot devices used many time by many authors.

    Reply
  75. Karin, re: Mary Balogh. I remember something similar in her Huxtable Series. One of the heroes father had two families. Great series BTW. I read a LOT of romance, so I see many plot devices used many time by many authors.

    Reply
  76. Karin — Laurie Colwin’s recipes were some of the first cooking I ever did, and her gingerbread recipe is my comfort dessert go to! My mother had all of her books – her cookbooks and the novels that she wrote. All of them came to me when my mother died, and they have their own shelf (an honor only shared in my house by Jane Austen). So glad you like her work, too!

    Reply
  77. Karin — Laurie Colwin’s recipes were some of the first cooking I ever did, and her gingerbread recipe is my comfort dessert go to! My mother had all of her books – her cookbooks and the novels that she wrote. All of them came to me when my mother died, and they have their own shelf (an honor only shared in my house by Jane Austen). So glad you like her work, too!

    Reply
  78. Karin — Laurie Colwin’s recipes were some of the first cooking I ever did, and her gingerbread recipe is my comfort dessert go to! My mother had all of her books – her cookbooks and the novels that she wrote. All of them came to me when my mother died, and they have their own shelf (an honor only shared in my house by Jane Austen). So glad you like her work, too!

    Reply
  79. Karin — Laurie Colwin’s recipes were some of the first cooking I ever did, and her gingerbread recipe is my comfort dessert go to! My mother had all of her books – her cookbooks and the novels that she wrote. All of them came to me when my mother died, and they have their own shelf (an honor only shared in my house by Jane Austen). So glad you like her work, too!

    Reply
  80. Karin — Laurie Colwin’s recipes were some of the first cooking I ever did, and her gingerbread recipe is my comfort dessert go to! My mother had all of her books – her cookbooks and the novels that she wrote. All of them came to me when my mother died, and they have their own shelf (an honor only shared in my house by Jane Austen). So glad you like her work, too!

    Reply
  81. Still thinking about Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus that I read last month – always the sign of a good one! Have been reading steadily since – just started a sci fi by Nathan Lowell called Double Share. It’s the fourth in a series but the only one my library system had so I’m going with it. Enjoying it so far. Have been reading Jenny Colgan, Jennifer Ashley (both historical romance and historical mystery), Julie Anne Long, with some fantasy and YA mixed in. My TBA pile includes Charles Finch (love Charles Lenox!) and a magic realism book by Susan Bishop Crispell(love a bit of magic!). Thanks for all your great suggestions – so sad my library does not have some of them.

    Reply
  82. Still thinking about Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus that I read last month – always the sign of a good one! Have been reading steadily since – just started a sci fi by Nathan Lowell called Double Share. It’s the fourth in a series but the only one my library system had so I’m going with it. Enjoying it so far. Have been reading Jenny Colgan, Jennifer Ashley (both historical romance and historical mystery), Julie Anne Long, with some fantasy and YA mixed in. My TBA pile includes Charles Finch (love Charles Lenox!) and a magic realism book by Susan Bishop Crispell(love a bit of magic!). Thanks for all your great suggestions – so sad my library does not have some of them.

    Reply
  83. Still thinking about Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus that I read last month – always the sign of a good one! Have been reading steadily since – just started a sci fi by Nathan Lowell called Double Share. It’s the fourth in a series but the only one my library system had so I’m going with it. Enjoying it so far. Have been reading Jenny Colgan, Jennifer Ashley (both historical romance and historical mystery), Julie Anne Long, with some fantasy and YA mixed in. My TBA pile includes Charles Finch (love Charles Lenox!) and a magic realism book by Susan Bishop Crispell(love a bit of magic!). Thanks for all your great suggestions – so sad my library does not have some of them.

    Reply
  84. Still thinking about Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus that I read last month – always the sign of a good one! Have been reading steadily since – just started a sci fi by Nathan Lowell called Double Share. It’s the fourth in a series but the only one my library system had so I’m going with it. Enjoying it so far. Have been reading Jenny Colgan, Jennifer Ashley (both historical romance and historical mystery), Julie Anne Long, with some fantasy and YA mixed in. My TBA pile includes Charles Finch (love Charles Lenox!) and a magic realism book by Susan Bishop Crispell(love a bit of magic!). Thanks for all your great suggestions – so sad my library does not have some of them.

    Reply
  85. Still thinking about Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus that I read last month – always the sign of a good one! Have been reading steadily since – just started a sci fi by Nathan Lowell called Double Share. It’s the fourth in a series but the only one my library system had so I’m going with it. Enjoying it so far. Have been reading Jenny Colgan, Jennifer Ashley (both historical romance and historical mystery), Julie Anne Long, with some fantasy and YA mixed in. My TBA pile includes Charles Finch (love Charles Lenox!) and a magic realism book by Susan Bishop Crispell(love a bit of magic!). Thanks for all your great suggestions – so sad my library does not have some of them.

    Reply
  86. Thanks so much for your very kind words about my Rake’s Daughter, Constance. Much appreciated.
    And thank you also to Christina for her recommendation. I’m embarrassed to say, I thought I’d seen all the wench recommendations and went straight to the comments before.
    A cookbook — or rather several cookbooks I often end up reading, though I do occasionally use the recipes, are the books by English writer Elizabeth David. Such wonderfully evocative descriptions and small stories about how she discovered this dish or that. I might follow up some of your recommendations.

    Reply
  87. Thanks so much for your very kind words about my Rake’s Daughter, Constance. Much appreciated.
    And thank you also to Christina for her recommendation. I’m embarrassed to say, I thought I’d seen all the wench recommendations and went straight to the comments before.
    A cookbook — or rather several cookbooks I often end up reading, though I do occasionally use the recipes, are the books by English writer Elizabeth David. Such wonderfully evocative descriptions and small stories about how she discovered this dish or that. I might follow up some of your recommendations.

    Reply
  88. Thanks so much for your very kind words about my Rake’s Daughter, Constance. Much appreciated.
    And thank you also to Christina for her recommendation. I’m embarrassed to say, I thought I’d seen all the wench recommendations and went straight to the comments before.
    A cookbook — or rather several cookbooks I often end up reading, though I do occasionally use the recipes, are the books by English writer Elizabeth David. Such wonderfully evocative descriptions and small stories about how she discovered this dish or that. I might follow up some of your recommendations.

    Reply
  89. Thanks so much for your very kind words about my Rake’s Daughter, Constance. Much appreciated.
    And thank you also to Christina for her recommendation. I’m embarrassed to say, I thought I’d seen all the wench recommendations and went straight to the comments before.
    A cookbook — or rather several cookbooks I often end up reading, though I do occasionally use the recipes, are the books by English writer Elizabeth David. Such wonderfully evocative descriptions and small stories about how she discovered this dish or that. I might follow up some of your recommendations.

    Reply
  90. Thanks so much for your very kind words about my Rake’s Daughter, Constance. Much appreciated.
    And thank you also to Christina for her recommendation. I’m embarrassed to say, I thought I’d seen all the wench recommendations and went straight to the comments before.
    A cookbook — or rather several cookbooks I often end up reading, though I do occasionally use the recipes, are the books by English writer Elizabeth David. Such wonderfully evocative descriptions and small stories about how she discovered this dish or that. I might follow up some of your recommendations.

    Reply
  91. Many thanks, Karin, lots of great recommendations there and I look forward to hearing other readers’ thoughts on Ms Balogh’s story. I too read and loved the Ali Hazelwood novellas – forgot to mention that!

    Reply
  92. Many thanks, Karin, lots of great recommendations there and I look forward to hearing other readers’ thoughts on Ms Balogh’s story. I too read and loved the Ali Hazelwood novellas – forgot to mention that!

    Reply
  93. Many thanks, Karin, lots of great recommendations there and I look forward to hearing other readers’ thoughts on Ms Balogh’s story. I too read and loved the Ali Hazelwood novellas – forgot to mention that!

    Reply
  94. Many thanks, Karin, lots of great recommendations there and I look forward to hearing other readers’ thoughts on Ms Balogh’s story. I too read and loved the Ali Hazelwood novellas – forgot to mention that!

    Reply
  95. Many thanks, Karin, lots of great recommendations there and I look forward to hearing other readers’ thoughts on Ms Balogh’s story. I too read and loved the Ali Hazelwood novellas – forgot to mention that!

    Reply
  96. I totally endorse the Heathcliff Lennox series (I’m just finishing the latest). Love it. However I do prefer the audio to the print. The narrator really brings the books to life!

    Reply
  97. I totally endorse the Heathcliff Lennox series (I’m just finishing the latest). Love it. However I do prefer the audio to the print. The narrator really brings the books to life!

    Reply
  98. I totally endorse the Heathcliff Lennox series (I’m just finishing the latest). Love it. However I do prefer the audio to the print. The narrator really brings the books to life!

    Reply
  99. I totally endorse the Heathcliff Lennox series (I’m just finishing the latest). Love it. However I do prefer the audio to the print. The narrator really brings the books to life!

    Reply
  100. I totally endorse the Heathcliff Lennox series (I’m just finishing the latest). Love it. However I do prefer the audio to the print. The narrator really brings the books to life!

    Reply
  101. I’m a Catherine Anderson fan and listened to the audio of her latest addition to the Mystic Creek series ‘Maple Leaf Harvest’. This is a romantic suspense novel where identical twins, unaware of each other’s existence due to separation for adoption at an early age, are psychically connected. One of the twins gets into deep trouble with drug peddlers and this affects the other twin. Their romantic interests are also connected which eventually leads to a rescue. I thoroughly enjoyed the suspense but thought the ending leading to HEA was a little drawn out. As I had started Anne’s latest in parallel and this was grabbing most of my attention, my perception of the ending may have been a little distorted! It was definitely worth a credit.

    Reply
  102. I’m a Catherine Anderson fan and listened to the audio of her latest addition to the Mystic Creek series ‘Maple Leaf Harvest’. This is a romantic suspense novel where identical twins, unaware of each other’s existence due to separation for adoption at an early age, are psychically connected. One of the twins gets into deep trouble with drug peddlers and this affects the other twin. Their romantic interests are also connected which eventually leads to a rescue. I thoroughly enjoyed the suspense but thought the ending leading to HEA was a little drawn out. As I had started Anne’s latest in parallel and this was grabbing most of my attention, my perception of the ending may have been a little distorted! It was definitely worth a credit.

    Reply
  103. I’m a Catherine Anderson fan and listened to the audio of her latest addition to the Mystic Creek series ‘Maple Leaf Harvest’. This is a romantic suspense novel where identical twins, unaware of each other’s existence due to separation for adoption at an early age, are psychically connected. One of the twins gets into deep trouble with drug peddlers and this affects the other twin. Their romantic interests are also connected which eventually leads to a rescue. I thoroughly enjoyed the suspense but thought the ending leading to HEA was a little drawn out. As I had started Anne’s latest in parallel and this was grabbing most of my attention, my perception of the ending may have been a little distorted! It was definitely worth a credit.

    Reply
  104. I’m a Catherine Anderson fan and listened to the audio of her latest addition to the Mystic Creek series ‘Maple Leaf Harvest’. This is a romantic suspense novel where identical twins, unaware of each other’s existence due to separation for adoption at an early age, are psychically connected. One of the twins gets into deep trouble with drug peddlers and this affects the other twin. Their romantic interests are also connected which eventually leads to a rescue. I thoroughly enjoyed the suspense but thought the ending leading to HEA was a little drawn out. As I had started Anne’s latest in parallel and this was grabbing most of my attention, my perception of the ending may have been a little distorted! It was definitely worth a credit.

    Reply
  105. I’m a Catherine Anderson fan and listened to the audio of her latest addition to the Mystic Creek series ‘Maple Leaf Harvest’. This is a romantic suspense novel where identical twins, unaware of each other’s existence due to separation for adoption at an early age, are psychically connected. One of the twins gets into deep trouble with drug peddlers and this affects the other twin. Their romantic interests are also connected which eventually leads to a rescue. I thoroughly enjoyed the suspense but thought the ending leading to HEA was a little drawn out. As I had started Anne’s latest in parallel and this was grabbing most of my attention, my perception of the ending may have been a little distorted! It was definitely worth a credit.

    Reply
  106. Thank you Quantum, that sounds really intriguing! I love romantic suspense but don’t think I’ve come across one with a psychic connection. Many thanks for the recommendation!

    Reply
  107. Thank you Quantum, that sounds really intriguing! I love romantic suspense but don’t think I’ve come across one with a psychic connection. Many thanks for the recommendation!

    Reply
  108. Thank you Quantum, that sounds really intriguing! I love romantic suspense but don’t think I’ve come across one with a psychic connection. Many thanks for the recommendation!

    Reply
  109. Thank you Quantum, that sounds really intriguing! I love romantic suspense but don’t think I’ve come across one with a psychic connection. Many thanks for the recommendation!

    Reply
  110. Thank you Quantum, that sounds really intriguing! I love romantic suspense but don’t think I’ve come across one with a psychic connection. Many thanks for the recommendation!

    Reply
  111. I like the sound of the Heathcliff Lennox stories. I might give them a go. I haven’t been able to concentrate for a few weeks following a bout of covid so I’ve mostly been rereading favourite childhood books. Some great recommendations here.

    Reply
  112. I like the sound of the Heathcliff Lennox stories. I might give them a go. I haven’t been able to concentrate for a few weeks following a bout of covid so I’ve mostly been rereading favourite childhood books. Some great recommendations here.

    Reply
  113. I like the sound of the Heathcliff Lennox stories. I might give them a go. I haven’t been able to concentrate for a few weeks following a bout of covid so I’ve mostly been rereading favourite childhood books. Some great recommendations here.

    Reply
  114. I like the sound of the Heathcliff Lennox stories. I might give them a go. I haven’t been able to concentrate for a few weeks following a bout of covid so I’ve mostly been rereading favourite childhood books. Some great recommendations here.

    Reply
  115. I like the sound of the Heathcliff Lennox stories. I might give them a go. I haven’t been able to concentrate for a few weeks following a bout of covid so I’ve mostly been rereading favourite childhood books. Some great recommendations here.

    Reply
  116. Thanks,Quantum — I’m a fan of Catherine Anderson as well. Am heading off to buy her latest. The psychic connection reminds me of Mary Stewart’s The Ivy Tree…

    Reply
  117. Thanks,Quantum — I’m a fan of Catherine Anderson as well. Am heading off to buy her latest. The psychic connection reminds me of Mary Stewart’s The Ivy Tree…

    Reply
  118. Thanks,Quantum — I’m a fan of Catherine Anderson as well. Am heading off to buy her latest. The psychic connection reminds me of Mary Stewart’s The Ivy Tree…

    Reply
  119. Thanks,Quantum — I’m a fan of Catherine Anderson as well. Am heading off to buy her latest. The psychic connection reminds me of Mary Stewart’s The Ivy Tree…

    Reply
  120. Thanks,Quantum — I’m a fan of Catherine Anderson as well. Am heading off to buy her latest. The psychic connection reminds me of Mary Stewart’s The Ivy Tree…

    Reply
  121. I too read REMEMBER LOVE and found it slow going. Balogh includes a developing family tree in her series as they go along, and for once I wished she’d put the whole thing in the first book because these vague people are a lot to keep straight, and I feel that I’m supposed to. I am a sucker for a good Consequences story, and when this one got into that, I found it quite absorbing — but my preference continues to be her early works such as SECRETS OF THE HEART, THE SECRET PEARL, DARK ANGEL and a bunch of others which I reread constantly — and in which every villainous action doesn’t turn out to be just an unfortunate misunderstanding.
    Other than that, I’ve been catching up on the last series line left – Harlequin regencies. I do miss the days when I could wander into Waldenbooks and find a dozen or so new series regencies every week – Harlequins, Signets, Fawcetts, Avons, Zebras, Warners — and there they’d all be, out on shelves where I didn’t have to hunt and research and scrounge to find them, showing their pretty new covers — all I had to do was scoop them up, pay up and leave. I understand that ebooks are making reading more accessible and available to many who never learned to read for fun, and that’s good — but it is so difficult sometimes to identify the good new authors, and the ones who write at adult rather than YA level, because I like some good prose. So this month I’ve read some Elizabeth Rolls, Catherine Tinley and Amanda McCabe.
    I am currently reading CODE GIRLS by Liza Mundy, a comprehensive history and biography of some of the many women who worked as codebreakers for the Army and Navy, and who were just brilliant at it. They came from all over the country from all kinds of backgrounds, some drawn by having work that suited their talents, others because government work paid women better than civilian work did. The coding explanations are a bit above my pay grade, but the personal stories are fascinating. I admire the author’s skill at making very complicated stuff readable and engaging.

    Reply
  122. I too read REMEMBER LOVE and found it slow going. Balogh includes a developing family tree in her series as they go along, and for once I wished she’d put the whole thing in the first book because these vague people are a lot to keep straight, and I feel that I’m supposed to. I am a sucker for a good Consequences story, and when this one got into that, I found it quite absorbing — but my preference continues to be her early works such as SECRETS OF THE HEART, THE SECRET PEARL, DARK ANGEL and a bunch of others which I reread constantly — and in which every villainous action doesn’t turn out to be just an unfortunate misunderstanding.
    Other than that, I’ve been catching up on the last series line left – Harlequin regencies. I do miss the days when I could wander into Waldenbooks and find a dozen or so new series regencies every week – Harlequins, Signets, Fawcetts, Avons, Zebras, Warners — and there they’d all be, out on shelves where I didn’t have to hunt and research and scrounge to find them, showing their pretty new covers — all I had to do was scoop them up, pay up and leave. I understand that ebooks are making reading more accessible and available to many who never learned to read for fun, and that’s good — but it is so difficult sometimes to identify the good new authors, and the ones who write at adult rather than YA level, because I like some good prose. So this month I’ve read some Elizabeth Rolls, Catherine Tinley and Amanda McCabe.
    I am currently reading CODE GIRLS by Liza Mundy, a comprehensive history and biography of some of the many women who worked as codebreakers for the Army and Navy, and who were just brilliant at it. They came from all over the country from all kinds of backgrounds, some drawn by having work that suited their talents, others because government work paid women better than civilian work did. The coding explanations are a bit above my pay grade, but the personal stories are fascinating. I admire the author’s skill at making very complicated stuff readable and engaging.

    Reply
  123. I too read REMEMBER LOVE and found it slow going. Balogh includes a developing family tree in her series as they go along, and for once I wished she’d put the whole thing in the first book because these vague people are a lot to keep straight, and I feel that I’m supposed to. I am a sucker for a good Consequences story, and when this one got into that, I found it quite absorbing — but my preference continues to be her early works such as SECRETS OF THE HEART, THE SECRET PEARL, DARK ANGEL and a bunch of others which I reread constantly — and in which every villainous action doesn’t turn out to be just an unfortunate misunderstanding.
    Other than that, I’ve been catching up on the last series line left – Harlequin regencies. I do miss the days when I could wander into Waldenbooks and find a dozen or so new series regencies every week – Harlequins, Signets, Fawcetts, Avons, Zebras, Warners — and there they’d all be, out on shelves where I didn’t have to hunt and research and scrounge to find them, showing their pretty new covers — all I had to do was scoop them up, pay up and leave. I understand that ebooks are making reading more accessible and available to many who never learned to read for fun, and that’s good — but it is so difficult sometimes to identify the good new authors, and the ones who write at adult rather than YA level, because I like some good prose. So this month I’ve read some Elizabeth Rolls, Catherine Tinley and Amanda McCabe.
    I am currently reading CODE GIRLS by Liza Mundy, a comprehensive history and biography of some of the many women who worked as codebreakers for the Army and Navy, and who were just brilliant at it. They came from all over the country from all kinds of backgrounds, some drawn by having work that suited their talents, others because government work paid women better than civilian work did. The coding explanations are a bit above my pay grade, but the personal stories are fascinating. I admire the author’s skill at making very complicated stuff readable and engaging.

    Reply
  124. I too read REMEMBER LOVE and found it slow going. Balogh includes a developing family tree in her series as they go along, and for once I wished she’d put the whole thing in the first book because these vague people are a lot to keep straight, and I feel that I’m supposed to. I am a sucker for a good Consequences story, and when this one got into that, I found it quite absorbing — but my preference continues to be her early works such as SECRETS OF THE HEART, THE SECRET PEARL, DARK ANGEL and a bunch of others which I reread constantly — and in which every villainous action doesn’t turn out to be just an unfortunate misunderstanding.
    Other than that, I’ve been catching up on the last series line left – Harlequin regencies. I do miss the days when I could wander into Waldenbooks and find a dozen or so new series regencies every week – Harlequins, Signets, Fawcetts, Avons, Zebras, Warners — and there they’d all be, out on shelves where I didn’t have to hunt and research and scrounge to find them, showing their pretty new covers — all I had to do was scoop them up, pay up and leave. I understand that ebooks are making reading more accessible and available to many who never learned to read for fun, and that’s good — but it is so difficult sometimes to identify the good new authors, and the ones who write at adult rather than YA level, because I like some good prose. So this month I’ve read some Elizabeth Rolls, Catherine Tinley and Amanda McCabe.
    I am currently reading CODE GIRLS by Liza Mundy, a comprehensive history and biography of some of the many women who worked as codebreakers for the Army and Navy, and who were just brilliant at it. They came from all over the country from all kinds of backgrounds, some drawn by having work that suited their talents, others because government work paid women better than civilian work did. The coding explanations are a bit above my pay grade, but the personal stories are fascinating. I admire the author’s skill at making very complicated stuff readable and engaging.

    Reply
  125. I too read REMEMBER LOVE and found it slow going. Balogh includes a developing family tree in her series as they go along, and for once I wished she’d put the whole thing in the first book because these vague people are a lot to keep straight, and I feel that I’m supposed to. I am a sucker for a good Consequences story, and when this one got into that, I found it quite absorbing — but my preference continues to be her early works such as SECRETS OF THE HEART, THE SECRET PEARL, DARK ANGEL and a bunch of others which I reread constantly — and in which every villainous action doesn’t turn out to be just an unfortunate misunderstanding.
    Other than that, I’ve been catching up on the last series line left – Harlequin regencies. I do miss the days when I could wander into Waldenbooks and find a dozen or so new series regencies every week – Harlequins, Signets, Fawcetts, Avons, Zebras, Warners — and there they’d all be, out on shelves where I didn’t have to hunt and research and scrounge to find them, showing their pretty new covers — all I had to do was scoop them up, pay up and leave. I understand that ebooks are making reading more accessible and available to many who never learned to read for fun, and that’s good — but it is so difficult sometimes to identify the good new authors, and the ones who write at adult rather than YA level, because I like some good prose. So this month I’ve read some Elizabeth Rolls, Catherine Tinley and Amanda McCabe.
    I am currently reading CODE GIRLS by Liza Mundy, a comprehensive history and biography of some of the many women who worked as codebreakers for the Army and Navy, and who were just brilliant at it. They came from all over the country from all kinds of backgrounds, some drawn by having work that suited their talents, others because government work paid women better than civilian work did. The coding explanations are a bit above my pay grade, but the personal stories are fascinating. I admire the author’s skill at making very complicated stuff readable and engaging.

    Reply
  126. Thank you for the recommendations, Janice, I love a good Regency too and thoroughly enjoyed Anne’s latest. It does seem a shame that all those imprints have disappeared! I know what you mean about the difficulty of finding the right stories. And there’s nothing like browsing an actual shelf, always exciting!

    Reply
  127. Thank you for the recommendations, Janice, I love a good Regency too and thoroughly enjoyed Anne’s latest. It does seem a shame that all those imprints have disappeared! I know what you mean about the difficulty of finding the right stories. And there’s nothing like browsing an actual shelf, always exciting!

    Reply
  128. Thank you for the recommendations, Janice, I love a good Regency too and thoroughly enjoyed Anne’s latest. It does seem a shame that all those imprints have disappeared! I know what you mean about the difficulty of finding the right stories. And there’s nothing like browsing an actual shelf, always exciting!

    Reply
  129. Thank you for the recommendations, Janice, I love a good Regency too and thoroughly enjoyed Anne’s latest. It does seem a shame that all those imprints have disappeared! I know what you mean about the difficulty of finding the right stories. And there’s nothing like browsing an actual shelf, always exciting!

    Reply
  130. Thank you for the recommendations, Janice, I love a good Regency too and thoroughly enjoyed Anne’s latest. It does seem a shame that all those imprints have disappeared! I know what you mean about the difficulty of finding the right stories. And there’s nothing like browsing an actual shelf, always exciting!

    Reply
  131. I too will chime in…I got Anne’s book The Rake’s Daughter and devoured it in one sitting. I still need to go back and reread it. Excellent as always.
    Foes, Friends & Lovers by Stephanie Laurens I really enjoyed this one because there was so much about the growing relationship between Caitlin and Gregory. I also enjoyed all the explanations about the various businesses that had been set up on the estate. A mutually beneficial collective.
    Read a few new to me Anna Jacobs and Dick Francis books. Also reread the entire Trade Winds series by Anna Jacobs just because. There were other rereads during the month (Cocaine Blues by Kerry Greenwood to start me off on a Miss Fisher re-reading binge.)
    There were also the usual number of so so’s. Grin. Which just means I truly appreciate the good ones when I stumble into them!
    Definitely can’t wait for Evil in Emerald! All those great recommendations and my library still doesn’t have it. Ah well…patience is a virtue…except when it comes to waiting to get a book in my hand!

    Reply
  132. I too will chime in…I got Anne’s book The Rake’s Daughter and devoured it in one sitting. I still need to go back and reread it. Excellent as always.
    Foes, Friends & Lovers by Stephanie Laurens I really enjoyed this one because there was so much about the growing relationship between Caitlin and Gregory. I also enjoyed all the explanations about the various businesses that had been set up on the estate. A mutually beneficial collective.
    Read a few new to me Anna Jacobs and Dick Francis books. Also reread the entire Trade Winds series by Anna Jacobs just because. There were other rereads during the month (Cocaine Blues by Kerry Greenwood to start me off on a Miss Fisher re-reading binge.)
    There were also the usual number of so so’s. Grin. Which just means I truly appreciate the good ones when I stumble into them!
    Definitely can’t wait for Evil in Emerald! All those great recommendations and my library still doesn’t have it. Ah well…patience is a virtue…except when it comes to waiting to get a book in my hand!

    Reply
  133. I too will chime in…I got Anne’s book The Rake’s Daughter and devoured it in one sitting. I still need to go back and reread it. Excellent as always.
    Foes, Friends & Lovers by Stephanie Laurens I really enjoyed this one because there was so much about the growing relationship between Caitlin and Gregory. I also enjoyed all the explanations about the various businesses that had been set up on the estate. A mutually beneficial collective.
    Read a few new to me Anna Jacobs and Dick Francis books. Also reread the entire Trade Winds series by Anna Jacobs just because. There were other rereads during the month (Cocaine Blues by Kerry Greenwood to start me off on a Miss Fisher re-reading binge.)
    There were also the usual number of so so’s. Grin. Which just means I truly appreciate the good ones when I stumble into them!
    Definitely can’t wait for Evil in Emerald! All those great recommendations and my library still doesn’t have it. Ah well…patience is a virtue…except when it comes to waiting to get a book in my hand!

    Reply
  134. I too will chime in…I got Anne’s book The Rake’s Daughter and devoured it in one sitting. I still need to go back and reread it. Excellent as always.
    Foes, Friends & Lovers by Stephanie Laurens I really enjoyed this one because there was so much about the growing relationship between Caitlin and Gregory. I also enjoyed all the explanations about the various businesses that had been set up on the estate. A mutually beneficial collective.
    Read a few new to me Anna Jacobs and Dick Francis books. Also reread the entire Trade Winds series by Anna Jacobs just because. There were other rereads during the month (Cocaine Blues by Kerry Greenwood to start me off on a Miss Fisher re-reading binge.)
    There were also the usual number of so so’s. Grin. Which just means I truly appreciate the good ones when I stumble into them!
    Definitely can’t wait for Evil in Emerald! All those great recommendations and my library still doesn’t have it. Ah well…patience is a virtue…except when it comes to waiting to get a book in my hand!

    Reply
  135. I too will chime in…I got Anne’s book The Rake’s Daughter and devoured it in one sitting. I still need to go back and reread it. Excellent as always.
    Foes, Friends & Lovers by Stephanie Laurens I really enjoyed this one because there was so much about the growing relationship between Caitlin and Gregory. I also enjoyed all the explanations about the various businesses that had been set up on the estate. A mutually beneficial collective.
    Read a few new to me Anna Jacobs and Dick Francis books. Also reread the entire Trade Winds series by Anna Jacobs just because. There were other rereads during the month (Cocaine Blues by Kerry Greenwood to start me off on a Miss Fisher re-reading binge.)
    There were also the usual number of so so’s. Grin. Which just means I truly appreciate the good ones when I stumble into them!
    Definitely can’t wait for Evil in Emerald! All those great recommendations and my library still doesn’t have it. Ah well…patience is a virtue…except when it comes to waiting to get a book in my hand!

    Reply
  136. I loved it back in the day when the Regencies had a bookcase of their own. But even when they were mixed with other remance titles, it was easy to scan and spot them—they were the only ones that had the title in bigger letters than the author’s name on the covers. Glad Regencies have become mainstream and authors are getting their due respect now.

    Reply
  137. I loved it back in the day when the Regencies had a bookcase of their own. But even when they were mixed with other remance titles, it was easy to scan and spot them—they were the only ones that had the title in bigger letters than the author’s name on the covers. Glad Regencies have become mainstream and authors are getting their due respect now.

    Reply
  138. I loved it back in the day when the Regencies had a bookcase of their own. But even when they were mixed with other remance titles, it was easy to scan and spot them—they were the only ones that had the title in bigger letters than the author’s name on the covers. Glad Regencies have become mainstream and authors are getting their due respect now.

    Reply
  139. I loved it back in the day when the Regencies had a bookcase of their own. But even when they were mixed with other remance titles, it was easy to scan and spot them—they were the only ones that had the title in bigger letters than the author’s name on the covers. Glad Regencies have become mainstream and authors are getting their due respect now.

    Reply
  140. I loved it back in the day when the Regencies had a bookcase of their own. But even when they were mixed with other remance titles, it was easy to scan and spot them—they were the only ones that had the title in bigger letters than the author’s name on the covers. Glad Regencies have become mainstream and authors are getting their due respect now.

    Reply
  141. Thank you Vicki, sounds like you’ve had a good reading month overall! As you say, the not so great books make us appreciate the outstanding ones even more. Hope your library can order in the stories you want very soon!

    Reply
  142. Thank you Vicki, sounds like you’ve had a good reading month overall! As you say, the not so great books make us appreciate the outstanding ones even more. Hope your library can order in the stories you want very soon!

    Reply
  143. Thank you Vicki, sounds like you’ve had a good reading month overall! As you say, the not so great books make us appreciate the outstanding ones even more. Hope your library can order in the stories you want very soon!

    Reply
  144. Thank you Vicki, sounds like you’ve had a good reading month overall! As you say, the not so great books make us appreciate the outstanding ones even more. Hope your library can order in the stories you want very soon!

    Reply
  145. Thank you Vicki, sounds like you’ve had a good reading month overall! As you say, the not so great books make us appreciate the outstanding ones even more. Hope your library can order in the stories you want very soon!

    Reply
  146. That sounds wonderful, Mary! Living in the UK I was always jealous of how many romance novels US book stores sold so when I was over there I loved those shelves too. Romantic fiction is still not prominent in UK stores so thank goodness for online shopping.

    Reply
  147. That sounds wonderful, Mary! Living in the UK I was always jealous of how many romance novels US book stores sold so when I was over there I loved those shelves too. Romantic fiction is still not prominent in UK stores so thank goodness for online shopping.

    Reply
  148. That sounds wonderful, Mary! Living in the UK I was always jealous of how many romance novels US book stores sold so when I was over there I loved those shelves too. Romantic fiction is still not prominent in UK stores so thank goodness for online shopping.

    Reply
  149. That sounds wonderful, Mary! Living in the UK I was always jealous of how many romance novels US book stores sold so when I was over there I loved those shelves too. Romantic fiction is still not prominent in UK stores so thank goodness for online shopping.

    Reply
  150. That sounds wonderful, Mary! Living in the UK I was always jealous of how many romance novels US book stores sold so when I was over there I loved those shelves too. Romantic fiction is still not prominent in UK stores so thank goodness for online shopping.

    Reply
  151. The Heathcliff Lennox books sound quite intriguing. They’ll have to go on my list. I’m reading Lauren Willig, Beatriz Williams & Karen White books The Forgotten Room & The Glass Ocean. So good. They have a few others written together to go on my wish list.

    Reply
  152. The Heathcliff Lennox books sound quite intriguing. They’ll have to go on my list. I’m reading Lauren Willig, Beatriz Williams & Karen White books The Forgotten Room & The Glass Ocean. So good. They have a few others written together to go on my wish list.

    Reply
  153. The Heathcliff Lennox books sound quite intriguing. They’ll have to go on my list. I’m reading Lauren Willig, Beatriz Williams & Karen White books The Forgotten Room & The Glass Ocean. So good. They have a few others written together to go on my wish list.

    Reply
  154. The Heathcliff Lennox books sound quite intriguing. They’ll have to go on my list. I’m reading Lauren Willig, Beatriz Williams & Karen White books The Forgotten Room & The Glass Ocean. So good. They have a few others written together to go on my wish list.

    Reply
  155. The Heathcliff Lennox books sound quite intriguing. They’ll have to go on my list. I’m reading Lauren Willig, Beatriz Williams & Karen White books The Forgotten Room & The Glass Ocean. So good. They have a few others written together to go on my wish list.

    Reply
  156. Thank you for the recommendations Jeanne, and glad you found something on our lists that appeals to you. Hope you enjoy it!

    Reply
  157. Thank you for the recommendations Jeanne, and glad you found something on our lists that appeals to you. Hope you enjoy it!

    Reply
  158. Thank you for the recommendations Jeanne, and glad you found something on our lists that appeals to you. Hope you enjoy it!

    Reply
  159. Thank you for the recommendations Jeanne, and glad you found something on our lists that appeals to you. Hope you enjoy it!

    Reply
  160. Thank you for the recommendations Jeanne, and glad you found something on our lists that appeals to you. Hope you enjoy it!

    Reply

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