Juliet Marillier

Anne here introducing our latest guest, Juliet Marillier, whose name might be familiar to you, either from your own reading or because I've recommended her novels in a number of posts. I'm a huge fan, and I'm not alone: here's her goodreads page. JM-with-Harry_sq

Juliet writes historical fantasy— her stories weave folklore/fairy tales into history in, for example, places like ancient Ireland at the time just before Christianity makes its first appearance. She's an internationally bestselling, award-winning author. She's won the American Library Association’s Alex Award, the Aurealis Award (numerous times), the Sir Julius Vogel Award and the Prix Imaginales, among other awards. She's also a passionate dog-lover with a small tribe of rescue dogs. This is Juliet with one of her dogs, Harry.

TOT US final correctedToday I'm interviewing her about her latest book, the second in the Blackthorn and Grim series. I haven't yet read it (it's still in transit), but I opened Dreamers Pool (the first book) the other day — meaning only to glance through it and refresh my memory. Instead I found myself rereading it from cover to cover again, and being transported, moved, and entranced just as much the second time around.

Anne:  Welcome to the Word Wenches, Juliet. Most of your books involve the re-imagining or re-exploring of fairy tales, woven into an ancient Celtic background, with an added touch of magic. Why do fairy tales appeal so strongly?

Juliet: I’ve loved fairy tales and folklore since I was very small, so it was pretty much inevitable that they’d influence my own writing. Sometimes I will base a novel on a particular fairy tale (eg Heart’s Blood, which is a Beauty and the Beast story, or my first novel Daughter of the Forest, which places the Six Swans fairy tale in early medieval Ireland.) 220px-Daughter-of-the-forest

More commonly there’s a subtle touch of a fairy tale in my stories, or fairy tale themes and tropes. Fairy tales have deep-down wisdom for us. Back when they were told around the fire after dark, they provided coded ways for dealing with real life problems – a young man of the tribe might easily identify with that youngest son setting off to seek his fortune, and being rewarded for kindness; a young woman might wish to be like Vasilissa, who finds the courage to front up to the witch Baba Yaga and learns a lesson in wisdom.

Those stories contain values that are still important to living well and wisely: courage, friendship, loyalty, faith, family, endurance and so on. And those values resonate with today’s reader, who also recognises the old tropes – the thorn hedge, the magic ring, the three wishes.

Anne: The Blurb for Dreamers Pool , the first of the Blackthorn & Grim series begins: What if you were locked up awaiting execution and a stranger offered you a bargain that would set you free? What if accepting bound you to certain rules of behavior for seven years, rules you knew you were likely to break within days? And what if the penalty for breaking them was to find yourself back where you started, eaten up with bitterness and waiting to die?
And thus commences an adventure as both Blackthorn and Grim battle to survive and to overcome and live with the damage that has been done to them. Blackthorn is a wonderful character. Tell us a little about her.

17305016Juliet: With both Blackthorn and Grim I set out to create characters who were older and more damaged than my earlier protagonists. Blackthorn is a healer, a wise woman, who is deeply disillusioned and embittered after several traumatic events. At the beginning of the series she is eaten up by anger and only one thing matters to her – bringing her old enemy to justice.

As the series continues the reader gets to know Blackthorn better – she is one of three narrators in Dreamer’s Pool and Tower of Thorns. Blackthorn is good at her work and has a lot to offer, but cannot believe in her own worth. And she finds it difficult to be around other people. When she is overwhelmed, usually with anger at herself, she lashes out. Grim, who becomes her companion, suffers a bit from her sharp tongue.

The relationship between these two is complex and develops slowly through the whole series. In addition, each book has its own stand-alone story, always a mystery for Blackthorn and Grim to solve, with an uncanny element.

Anne: I'm always interested in the spark that happens in a writer's brain when out of the myriad story ideas and possibilities swimming around in there, one story in particular springs to life and demands to be told. What was the spark for the Blackthorn and Grim series?

Juliet: The main spark for the series was wanting to write about characters with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) – to see them work through the challenges and find ways of surviving. Both Blackthorn and Grim suffer from this disorder. I had been reading a lot about military personnel returning from deployment and the impact of their service on their mental and physical health, in particular the memoir Exit Wounds by John Cantwell and a devastating book called The Good Soldiers by David Finkel. PTSD is an extremely challenging condition not only for the person concerned but also for their family.

While I was reading those books and others, the characters of Blackthorn and Grim came to me. There’s also a fairy tale in Dreamer’s Pool, but I won’t say which. I’d like readers to work that out for themselves. Tower of Thorns has a tower surrounded by a hedge of thorns. But it’s not based on any existing fairy tale. If it were, it would be a very dark one. I explore a lot of moral ambiguities in this series.

Anne: When I heard you speak at a conference a few years ago, you talked a little about your research. How does one research such a long forgotten time? Sevenwaters-iv-us

Juliet: I’ve looked for broad historical background – the political setup, the leaders, the power structures. There are some excellent guides to the Irish law of the period, which I made good use of in Dreamer’s Pool. And I have to read up on geography, flora and fauna etc. With the folklore, I have a pretty sound basis already because B&G is set in roughly the same time and place as my Sevenwaters series, and I have read vast numbers of fairy tales and folk tales. I do sometimes tweak the geography to suit the story and the historical detail is pretty light on. An expert in the period and culture would find masses of flaws, I’m sure. My choices about voice and dialogue would fill up a whole blog post of their own.

Anne: Would you give us a brief taste of Blackthorn & Grim—either book— please?

Juliet: Here is the opening of Tower of Thorns:

Rain had swollen the river to a churning mass of grey. The tower wore a soft shroud of mist; though it was past dawn, no cries broke the silence. Perhaps he slept, curled tight on himself, dreaming of a time when he was whole and hale and handsome. Perhaps he knew even in his sleep that she still kept watch, her shawl clutched around her against the cold, her gaze fixed on his shuttered window.

But he might have forgotten who she was, who he was, what had befallen them. It had been a long time ago. So long that she had no more tears to shed. So long that one summer blurred into another as the years passed in an endless wait for the next chance, and the next, to put it right. She did not know if he could see her. There were the trees, and the water, and on mornings like this, the mist lying thick between them. Only the top of the tower was visible, with its shuttered window.

Beautiful. Here you will find links to a longer excerpt and some of Juliet's other books. (Below is a pic of my own bookshelf)

MarillierBooksAnne: What's next for Juliet Marillier?

Juliet: I’m currently working on the third Blackthorn & Grim book, Den of Wolves (this is the very first time I have made the title public.) My deadline is quite soon, so the pressure is intense. I’ll be occupied with edits for that book until around March of 2016.

I would like to continue the Blackthorn and Grim series beyond the three books I’m contracted for, and will be doing some negotiations to that end. I’m also toying with the idea of writing some novellas, and I have two short stories to write for particular anthologies. I am quite a slow worker, doing heaps of revision as I go, so I need to be realistic about what I commit to. Time off would be nice, too!

Anne: Indeed it would. Juliet, thanks so much for visiting the Word Wenches and answering my questions, especially at such a busy time. 

To readers: if you'd like to read more of Juliet's work, try Daughter of the Forest, the first in her wonderful Sevenwaters series, which has more than 35,000 ratings on Goodreads and an average readers' score of 4.28. It's the book that first got me addicted to her writing. Or try the first in her YA series, Wildwood Dancing. But really, you can't go wrong. You can read more about Juliet in this wonderful interview with Kate Forsyth

Juliet will be giving away a book to someone who leaves a comment, and asks this question: What's your favorite fairy tale?

205 thoughts on “Juliet Marillier”

  1. Well, you have me hooked, Juliet! Your books sound absolutely wonderful(or perhaps I should say enchanting because you’ve got me under your spell!) Thanks so much for such a great interview—we’re delighted you made time to visit the Wenches.

    Reply
  2. Well, you have me hooked, Juliet! Your books sound absolutely wonderful(or perhaps I should say enchanting because you’ve got me under your spell!) Thanks so much for such a great interview—we’re delighted you made time to visit the Wenches.

    Reply
  3. Well, you have me hooked, Juliet! Your books sound absolutely wonderful(or perhaps I should say enchanting because you’ve got me under your spell!) Thanks so much for such a great interview—we’re delighted you made time to visit the Wenches.

    Reply
  4. Well, you have me hooked, Juliet! Your books sound absolutely wonderful(or perhaps I should say enchanting because you’ve got me under your spell!) Thanks so much for such a great interview—we’re delighted you made time to visit the Wenches.

    Reply
  5. Well, you have me hooked, Juliet! Your books sound absolutely wonderful(or perhaps I should say enchanting because you’ve got me under your spell!) Thanks so much for such a great interview—we’re delighted you made time to visit the Wenches.

    Reply
  6. It has to be Androcles and the Lion. As a kid going to the zoo I used to dream about helping one of the lions. Fortunately for me I never got the chance Tory but it was fun dreaming

    Reply
  7. It has to be Androcles and the Lion. As a kid going to the zoo I used to dream about helping one of the lions. Fortunately for me I never got the chance Tory but it was fun dreaming

    Reply
  8. It has to be Androcles and the Lion. As a kid going to the zoo I used to dream about helping one of the lions. Fortunately for me I never got the chance Tory but it was fun dreaming

    Reply
  9. It has to be Androcles and the Lion. As a kid going to the zoo I used to dream about helping one of the lions. Fortunately for me I never got the chance Tory but it was fun dreaming

    Reply
  10. It has to be Androcles and the Lion. As a kid going to the zoo I used to dream about helping one of the lions. Fortunately for me I never got the chance Tory but it was fun dreaming

    Reply
  11. I am reading ‘Daughter of the Forest’ right now …. the brothers have just been turned into swans by the evil sorceress! I’m very impressed by the writing …. could say that I’m hooked. Delighted to see that audio versions of this series are also available so my fantasy desires look well catered for,for a while!
    Fairy tales only really enter my mental awareness at Christmas when English pantomimes are prominent. I have always had a soft spot for Cinderella on stage … the rags to riches theme strikes a chord and I love to ‘Boo’ the ugly sisters with all the other ‘Children’. LOL

    Reply
  12. I am reading ‘Daughter of the Forest’ right now …. the brothers have just been turned into swans by the evil sorceress! I’m very impressed by the writing …. could say that I’m hooked. Delighted to see that audio versions of this series are also available so my fantasy desires look well catered for,for a while!
    Fairy tales only really enter my mental awareness at Christmas when English pantomimes are prominent. I have always had a soft spot for Cinderella on stage … the rags to riches theme strikes a chord and I love to ‘Boo’ the ugly sisters with all the other ‘Children’. LOL

    Reply
  13. I am reading ‘Daughter of the Forest’ right now …. the brothers have just been turned into swans by the evil sorceress! I’m very impressed by the writing …. could say that I’m hooked. Delighted to see that audio versions of this series are also available so my fantasy desires look well catered for,for a while!
    Fairy tales only really enter my mental awareness at Christmas when English pantomimes are prominent. I have always had a soft spot for Cinderella on stage … the rags to riches theme strikes a chord and I love to ‘Boo’ the ugly sisters with all the other ‘Children’. LOL

    Reply
  14. I am reading ‘Daughter of the Forest’ right now …. the brothers have just been turned into swans by the evil sorceress! I’m very impressed by the writing …. could say that I’m hooked. Delighted to see that audio versions of this series are also available so my fantasy desires look well catered for,for a while!
    Fairy tales only really enter my mental awareness at Christmas when English pantomimes are prominent. I have always had a soft spot for Cinderella on stage … the rags to riches theme strikes a chord and I love to ‘Boo’ the ugly sisters with all the other ‘Children’. LOL

    Reply
  15. I am reading ‘Daughter of the Forest’ right now …. the brothers have just been turned into swans by the evil sorceress! I’m very impressed by the writing …. could say that I’m hooked. Delighted to see that audio versions of this series are also available so my fantasy desires look well catered for,for a while!
    Fairy tales only really enter my mental awareness at Christmas when English pantomimes are prominent. I have always had a soft spot for Cinderella on stage … the rags to riches theme strikes a chord and I love to ‘Boo’ the ugly sisters with all the other ‘Children’. LOL

    Reply
  16. Cara, Juliet's books are addictive. You know how we were talking last week about finding a new-to -you author that you just read and then have to glom? That's exactly what happened to me with Juliet's books.

    Reply
  17. Cara, Juliet's books are addictive. You know how we were talking last week about finding a new-to -you author that you just read and then have to glom? That's exactly what happened to me with Juliet's books.

    Reply
  18. Cara, Juliet's books are addictive. You know how we were talking last week about finding a new-to -you author that you just read and then have to glom? That's exactly what happened to me with Juliet's books.

    Reply
  19. Cara, Juliet's books are addictive. You know how we were talking last week about finding a new-to -you author that you just read and then have to glom? That's exactly what happened to me with Juliet's books.

    Reply
  20. Cara, Juliet's books are addictive. You know how we were talking last week about finding a new-to -you author that you just read and then have to glom? That's exactly what happened to me with Juliet's books.

    Reply
  21. Quantum, my Juliet Marillier adventure started with Daughter of the Forest, too, and I'm so pleased you're enjoying it. And I did the same — read all the rest. Wonderful writing, superb storytelling and I love that there's a love story at the core of all her books, and a hopeful message. Yes bad things happen to some characters, but they always leave me feeling good at the end. I've just put a photo of my bookshelf with a section of my Marillier books up in the blog — can't think why I forgot it last night.

    Reply
  22. Quantum, my Juliet Marillier adventure started with Daughter of the Forest, too, and I'm so pleased you're enjoying it. And I did the same — read all the rest. Wonderful writing, superb storytelling and I love that there's a love story at the core of all her books, and a hopeful message. Yes bad things happen to some characters, but they always leave me feeling good at the end. I've just put a photo of my bookshelf with a section of my Marillier books up in the blog — can't think why I forgot it last night.

    Reply
  23. Quantum, my Juliet Marillier adventure started with Daughter of the Forest, too, and I'm so pleased you're enjoying it. And I did the same — read all the rest. Wonderful writing, superb storytelling and I love that there's a love story at the core of all her books, and a hopeful message. Yes bad things happen to some characters, but they always leave me feeling good at the end. I've just put a photo of my bookshelf with a section of my Marillier books up in the blog — can't think why I forgot it last night.

    Reply
  24. Quantum, my Juliet Marillier adventure started with Daughter of the Forest, too, and I'm so pleased you're enjoying it. And I did the same — read all the rest. Wonderful writing, superb storytelling and I love that there's a love story at the core of all her books, and a hopeful message. Yes bad things happen to some characters, but they always leave me feeling good at the end. I've just put a photo of my bookshelf with a section of my Marillier books up in the blog — can't think why I forgot it last night.

    Reply
  25. Quantum, my Juliet Marillier adventure started with Daughter of the Forest, too, and I'm so pleased you're enjoying it. And I did the same — read all the rest. Wonderful writing, superb storytelling and I love that there's a love story at the core of all her books, and a hopeful message. Yes bad things happen to some characters, but they always leave me feeling good at the end. I've just put a photo of my bookshelf with a section of my Marillier books up in the blog — can't think why I forgot it last night.

    Reply
  26. What a great interview. I have to confess I have never read Juliet Marillier before, only because that is not my usual genre I read, but that is about to change. I love fairytales so much and I think The Princess and the Pea is one of my faves cx

    Reply
  27. What a great interview. I have to confess I have never read Juliet Marillier before, only because that is not my usual genre I read, but that is about to change. I love fairytales so much and I think The Princess and the Pea is one of my faves cx

    Reply
  28. What a great interview. I have to confess I have never read Juliet Marillier before, only because that is not my usual genre I read, but that is about to change. I love fairytales so much and I think The Princess and the Pea is one of my faves cx

    Reply
  29. What a great interview. I have to confess I have never read Juliet Marillier before, only because that is not my usual genre I read, but that is about to change. I love fairytales so much and I think The Princess and the Pea is one of my faves cx

    Reply
  30. What a great interview. I have to confess I have never read Juliet Marillier before, only because that is not my usual genre I read, but that is about to change. I love fairytales so much and I think The Princess and the Pea is one of my faves cx

    Reply
  31. Thanks, Carol — the princess and the pea is a fun one, isn't it.
    I think you'd love Juliet's books — they range from dark and gritty to warm and intense — and there is always a lovestory and a message of hope at the end.

    Reply
  32. Thanks, Carol — the princess and the pea is a fun one, isn't it.
    I think you'd love Juliet's books — they range from dark and gritty to warm and intense — and there is always a lovestory and a message of hope at the end.

    Reply
  33. Thanks, Carol — the princess and the pea is a fun one, isn't it.
    I think you'd love Juliet's books — they range from dark and gritty to warm and intense — and there is always a lovestory and a message of hope at the end.

    Reply
  34. Thanks, Carol — the princess and the pea is a fun one, isn't it.
    I think you'd love Juliet's books — they range from dark and gritty to warm and intense — and there is always a lovestory and a message of hope at the end.

    Reply
  35. Thanks, Carol — the princess and the pea is a fun one, isn't it.
    I think you'd love Juliet's books — they range from dark and gritty to warm and intense — and there is always a lovestory and a message of hope at the end.

    Reply
  36. Great interview – thank you both. Juliet is such a wonderful author – love her books! I’ve just ordered Dreamer’s Pool which will be my first holiday read. I love the premise in the blurb and now can’t wait to read it! Juliet has such beautiful writing and such clever twists on the different fairy tales. She totally deserves her huge following. Congratulations on the new book. Looking forward to a lovely new series.

    Reply
  37. Great interview – thank you both. Juliet is such a wonderful author – love her books! I’ve just ordered Dreamer’s Pool which will be my first holiday read. I love the premise in the blurb and now can’t wait to read it! Juliet has such beautiful writing and such clever twists on the different fairy tales. She totally deserves her huge following. Congratulations on the new book. Looking forward to a lovely new series.

    Reply
  38. Great interview – thank you both. Juliet is such a wonderful author – love her books! I’ve just ordered Dreamer’s Pool which will be my first holiday read. I love the premise in the blurb and now can’t wait to read it! Juliet has such beautiful writing and such clever twists on the different fairy tales. She totally deserves her huge following. Congratulations on the new book. Looking forward to a lovely new series.

    Reply
  39. Great interview – thank you both. Juliet is such a wonderful author – love her books! I’ve just ordered Dreamer’s Pool which will be my first holiday read. I love the premise in the blurb and now can’t wait to read it! Juliet has such beautiful writing and such clever twists on the different fairy tales. She totally deserves her huge following. Congratulations on the new book. Looking forward to a lovely new series.

    Reply
  40. Great interview – thank you both. Juliet is such a wonderful author – love her books! I’ve just ordered Dreamer’s Pool which will be my first holiday read. I love the premise in the blurb and now can’t wait to read it! Juliet has such beautiful writing and such clever twists on the different fairy tales. She totally deserves her huge following. Congratulations on the new book. Looking forward to a lovely new series.

    Reply
  41. Although not always considered a classic fairy tale, I love legends/tales revolving around the story of Robin Hood. There’s a great YA book – The Forest Wife by Theresa Tomlinson and Dumas’ vesion, Robin Hood, Prince of Theives (I believe is the title). The Forest Wife has a great, strong female lead!

    Reply
  42. Although not always considered a classic fairy tale, I love legends/tales revolving around the story of Robin Hood. There’s a great YA book – The Forest Wife by Theresa Tomlinson and Dumas’ vesion, Robin Hood, Prince of Theives (I believe is the title). The Forest Wife has a great, strong female lead!

    Reply
  43. Although not always considered a classic fairy tale, I love legends/tales revolving around the story of Robin Hood. There’s a great YA book – The Forest Wife by Theresa Tomlinson and Dumas’ vesion, Robin Hood, Prince of Theives (I believe is the title). The Forest Wife has a great, strong female lead!

    Reply
  44. Although not always considered a classic fairy tale, I love legends/tales revolving around the story of Robin Hood. There’s a great YA book – The Forest Wife by Theresa Tomlinson and Dumas’ vesion, Robin Hood, Prince of Theives (I believe is the title). The Forest Wife has a great, strong female lead!

    Reply
  45. Although not always considered a classic fairy tale, I love legends/tales revolving around the story of Robin Hood. There’s a great YA book – The Forest Wife by Theresa Tomlinson and Dumas’ vesion, Robin Hood, Prince of Theives (I believe is the title). The Forest Wife has a great, strong female lead!

    Reply
  46. I’m in the middle of an online folk-tale course from scholars from the Hans Christian Andersen centre (University of Southern Denmark, Odense) and its conjured so many of my favourite fairy/folk tales. But the standout(s) for me are what I know as ‘The Little Match Girl’ and the ‘Tin Soldier’ — both utterly heartbreaking but both so incredibly visual and rich. I only have two books from my childhood — one is a Nordic book of Gnomes and the other is an old edition of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tales in which both my favourites appear — probably why they’re my favs.
    (BTW, Juliette, I loved ‘Dreamers Pool’ and read it in one sitting on a long, sleepless international flight. Looking forward to continuing Grim and Blackthorn’s adventures…)

    Reply
  47. I’m in the middle of an online folk-tale course from scholars from the Hans Christian Andersen centre (University of Southern Denmark, Odense) and its conjured so many of my favourite fairy/folk tales. But the standout(s) for me are what I know as ‘The Little Match Girl’ and the ‘Tin Soldier’ — both utterly heartbreaking but both so incredibly visual and rich. I only have two books from my childhood — one is a Nordic book of Gnomes and the other is an old edition of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tales in which both my favourites appear — probably why they’re my favs.
    (BTW, Juliette, I loved ‘Dreamers Pool’ and read it in one sitting on a long, sleepless international flight. Looking forward to continuing Grim and Blackthorn’s adventures…)

    Reply
  48. I’m in the middle of an online folk-tale course from scholars from the Hans Christian Andersen centre (University of Southern Denmark, Odense) and its conjured so many of my favourite fairy/folk tales. But the standout(s) for me are what I know as ‘The Little Match Girl’ and the ‘Tin Soldier’ — both utterly heartbreaking but both so incredibly visual and rich. I only have two books from my childhood — one is a Nordic book of Gnomes and the other is an old edition of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tales in which both my favourites appear — probably why they’re my favs.
    (BTW, Juliette, I loved ‘Dreamers Pool’ and read it in one sitting on a long, sleepless international flight. Looking forward to continuing Grim and Blackthorn’s adventures…)

    Reply
  49. I’m in the middle of an online folk-tale course from scholars from the Hans Christian Andersen centre (University of Southern Denmark, Odense) and its conjured so many of my favourite fairy/folk tales. But the standout(s) for me are what I know as ‘The Little Match Girl’ and the ‘Tin Soldier’ — both utterly heartbreaking but both so incredibly visual and rich. I only have two books from my childhood — one is a Nordic book of Gnomes and the other is an old edition of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tales in which both my favourites appear — probably why they’re my favs.
    (BTW, Juliette, I loved ‘Dreamers Pool’ and read it in one sitting on a long, sleepless international flight. Looking forward to continuing Grim and Blackthorn’s adventures…)

    Reply
  50. I’m in the middle of an online folk-tale course from scholars from the Hans Christian Andersen centre (University of Southern Denmark, Odense) and its conjured so many of my favourite fairy/folk tales. But the standout(s) for me are what I know as ‘The Little Match Girl’ and the ‘Tin Soldier’ — both utterly heartbreaking but both so incredibly visual and rich. I only have two books from my childhood — one is a Nordic book of Gnomes and the other is an old edition of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tales in which both my favourites appear — probably why they’re my favs.
    (BTW, Juliette, I loved ‘Dreamers Pool’ and read it in one sitting on a long, sleepless international flight. Looking forward to continuing Grim and Blackthorn’s adventures…)

    Reply
  51. Thanks Lou — I also love the Robin Hood legend and riffs off it. Thanks so much for those recommendations. I love a strong female lead, too. It's one of the things I loved about Dreamer's Pool — she was so damaged, but so strong.

    Reply
  52. Thanks Lou — I also love the Robin Hood legend and riffs off it. Thanks so much for those recommendations. I love a strong female lead, too. It's one of the things I loved about Dreamer's Pool — she was so damaged, but so strong.

    Reply
  53. Thanks Lou — I also love the Robin Hood legend and riffs off it. Thanks so much for those recommendations. I love a strong female lead, too. It's one of the things I loved about Dreamer's Pool — she was so damaged, but so strong.

    Reply
  54. Thanks Lou — I also love the Robin Hood legend and riffs off it. Thanks so much for those recommendations. I love a strong female lead, too. It's one of the things I loved about Dreamer's Pool — she was so damaged, but so strong.

    Reply
  55. Thanks Lou — I also love the Robin Hood legend and riffs off it. Thanks so much for those recommendations. I love a strong female lead, too. It's one of the things I loved about Dreamer's Pool — she was so damaged, but so strong.

    Reply
  56. Nikki, I remember weeping bitterly when I was a little girl and first read the Little Match Girl — and I still worry about her and wish somebody would save her! I still want good people to be saved. I also read Dreamer's Pool in one sitting — not on an international flight

    Reply
  57. Nikki, I remember weeping bitterly when I was a little girl and first read the Little Match Girl — and I still worry about her and wish somebody would save her! I still want good people to be saved. I also read Dreamer's Pool in one sitting — not on an international flight

    Reply
  58. Nikki, I remember weeping bitterly when I was a little girl and first read the Little Match Girl — and I still worry about her and wish somebody would save her! I still want good people to be saved. I also read Dreamer's Pool in one sitting — not on an international flight

    Reply
  59. Nikki, I remember weeping bitterly when I was a little girl and first read the Little Match Girl — and I still worry about her and wish somebody would save her! I still want good people to be saved. I also read Dreamer's Pool in one sitting — not on an international flight

    Reply
  60. Nikki, I remember weeping bitterly when I was a little girl and first read the Little Match Girl — and I still worry about her and wish somebody would save her! I still want good people to be saved. I also read Dreamer's Pool in one sitting — not on an international flight

    Reply
  61. I will be looking into Juliette’s books; they sound so interesting!
    I can never pick one favorite in any genre but two of my favorites that have not been mentioned yet are “Drakestail” and “Puss in Boots.”
    I frequently quote Drakestail’s “Quack, quack, quack. When will I get my money back!”

    Reply
  62. I will be looking into Juliette’s books; they sound so interesting!
    I can never pick one favorite in any genre but two of my favorites that have not been mentioned yet are “Drakestail” and “Puss in Boots.”
    I frequently quote Drakestail’s “Quack, quack, quack. When will I get my money back!”

    Reply
  63. I will be looking into Juliette’s books; they sound so interesting!
    I can never pick one favorite in any genre but two of my favorites that have not been mentioned yet are “Drakestail” and “Puss in Boots.”
    I frequently quote Drakestail’s “Quack, quack, quack. When will I get my money back!”

    Reply
  64. I will be looking into Juliette’s books; they sound so interesting!
    I can never pick one favorite in any genre but two of my favorites that have not been mentioned yet are “Drakestail” and “Puss in Boots.”
    I frequently quote Drakestail’s “Quack, quack, quack. When will I get my money back!”

    Reply
  65. I will be looking into Juliette’s books; they sound so interesting!
    I can never pick one favorite in any genre but two of my favorites that have not been mentioned yet are “Drakestail” and “Puss in Boots.”
    I frequently quote Drakestail’s “Quack, quack, quack. When will I get my money back!”

    Reply
  66. One of my favourite fairy tales is Jack and the Bean Stalk. I think I like it because it has a cheeky, innovative, and under-rated hero and a happy ending. I am fascinated that you are exploring the effects of PTSD on ordinary people, that is to say, those who are not soldiers. I grew up in South Africa and the combination of civil war and civil crime meant – and means – that so many individuals suffer from PTSD, often undiagnosed and untreated under the ‘if you weren’t killed you got lucky and shouldn’t complain’ banner. It makes life a wild ride!

    Reply
  67. One of my favourite fairy tales is Jack and the Bean Stalk. I think I like it because it has a cheeky, innovative, and under-rated hero and a happy ending. I am fascinated that you are exploring the effects of PTSD on ordinary people, that is to say, those who are not soldiers. I grew up in South Africa and the combination of civil war and civil crime meant – and means – that so many individuals suffer from PTSD, often undiagnosed and untreated under the ‘if you weren’t killed you got lucky and shouldn’t complain’ banner. It makes life a wild ride!

    Reply
  68. One of my favourite fairy tales is Jack and the Bean Stalk. I think I like it because it has a cheeky, innovative, and under-rated hero and a happy ending. I am fascinated that you are exploring the effects of PTSD on ordinary people, that is to say, those who are not soldiers. I grew up in South Africa and the combination of civil war and civil crime meant – and means – that so many individuals suffer from PTSD, often undiagnosed and untreated under the ‘if you weren’t killed you got lucky and shouldn’t complain’ banner. It makes life a wild ride!

    Reply
  69. One of my favourite fairy tales is Jack and the Bean Stalk. I think I like it because it has a cheeky, innovative, and under-rated hero and a happy ending. I am fascinated that you are exploring the effects of PTSD on ordinary people, that is to say, those who are not soldiers. I grew up in South Africa and the combination of civil war and civil crime meant – and means – that so many individuals suffer from PTSD, often undiagnosed and untreated under the ‘if you weren’t killed you got lucky and shouldn’t complain’ banner. It makes life a wild ride!

    Reply
  70. One of my favourite fairy tales is Jack and the Bean Stalk. I think I like it because it has a cheeky, innovative, and under-rated hero and a happy ending. I am fascinated that you are exploring the effects of PTSD on ordinary people, that is to say, those who are not soldiers. I grew up in South Africa and the combination of civil war and civil crime meant – and means – that so many individuals suffer from PTSD, often undiagnosed and untreated under the ‘if you weren’t killed you got lucky and shouldn’t complain’ banner. It makes life a wild ride!

    Reply
  71. It sounds as if Dreamer’s Pool takes precedence over tomorrow’s boring to-do list. It’ll be takeaway for dinner tomorrow, then 🙂 How lovely to have such a recommendation – thank you Anne.
    My favourite fairytale has to be Jack and the Beanstalk. I’ve been planting seeds for years, always hoping. I guess Jack didn’t have to contend with snails.
    Marion

    Reply
  72. It sounds as if Dreamer’s Pool takes precedence over tomorrow’s boring to-do list. It’ll be takeaway for dinner tomorrow, then 🙂 How lovely to have such a recommendation – thank you Anne.
    My favourite fairytale has to be Jack and the Beanstalk. I’ve been planting seeds for years, always hoping. I guess Jack didn’t have to contend with snails.
    Marion

    Reply
  73. It sounds as if Dreamer’s Pool takes precedence over tomorrow’s boring to-do list. It’ll be takeaway for dinner tomorrow, then 🙂 How lovely to have such a recommendation – thank you Anne.
    My favourite fairytale has to be Jack and the Beanstalk. I’ve been planting seeds for years, always hoping. I guess Jack didn’t have to contend with snails.
    Marion

    Reply
  74. It sounds as if Dreamer’s Pool takes precedence over tomorrow’s boring to-do list. It’ll be takeaway for dinner tomorrow, then 🙂 How lovely to have such a recommendation – thank you Anne.
    My favourite fairytale has to be Jack and the Beanstalk. I’ve been planting seeds for years, always hoping. I guess Jack didn’t have to contend with snails.
    Marion

    Reply
  75. It sounds as if Dreamer’s Pool takes precedence over tomorrow’s boring to-do list. It’ll be takeaway for dinner tomorrow, then 🙂 How lovely to have such a recommendation – thank you Anne.
    My favourite fairytale has to be Jack and the Beanstalk. I’ve been planting seeds for years, always hoping. I guess Jack didn’t have to contend with snails.
    Marion

    Reply
  76. Wonderful post, Anne. You’re making me stray from my to-do list. These stories sound marvelous. And I’m tempted to get copies for a young woman of my acquaintance who could use some sitting around the campfire time reflection on how to cope with things life sends your way. Thanks! Ps: Jack and the beanstalk for me too!

    Reply
  77. Wonderful post, Anne. You’re making me stray from my to-do list. These stories sound marvelous. And I’m tempted to get copies for a young woman of my acquaintance who could use some sitting around the campfire time reflection on how to cope with things life sends your way. Thanks! Ps: Jack and the beanstalk for me too!

    Reply
  78. Wonderful post, Anne. You’re making me stray from my to-do list. These stories sound marvelous. And I’m tempted to get copies for a young woman of my acquaintance who could use some sitting around the campfire time reflection on how to cope with things life sends your way. Thanks! Ps: Jack and the beanstalk for me too!

    Reply
  79. Wonderful post, Anne. You’re making me stray from my to-do list. These stories sound marvelous. And I’m tempted to get copies for a young woman of my acquaintance who could use some sitting around the campfire time reflection on how to cope with things life sends your way. Thanks! Ps: Jack and the beanstalk for me too!

    Reply
  80. Wonderful post, Anne. You’re making me stray from my to-do list. These stories sound marvelous. And I’m tempted to get copies for a young woman of my acquaintance who could use some sitting around the campfire time reflection on how to cope with things life sends your way. Thanks! Ps: Jack and the beanstalk for me too!

    Reply
  81. Squeeze- so excited to hear about the upcoming Den of Wolves!
    My fav fairytale is Beauty and the Beast. I’ve read so many retellings, and it can be told so many different ways.

    Reply
  82. Squeeze- so excited to hear about the upcoming Den of Wolves!
    My fav fairytale is Beauty and the Beast. I’ve read so many retellings, and it can be told so many different ways.

    Reply
  83. Squeeze- so excited to hear about the upcoming Den of Wolves!
    My fav fairytale is Beauty and the Beast. I’ve read so many retellings, and it can be told so many different ways.

    Reply
  84. Squeeze- so excited to hear about the upcoming Den of Wolves!
    My fav fairytale is Beauty and the Beast. I’ve read so many retellings, and it can be told so many different ways.

    Reply
  85. Squeeze- so excited to hear about the upcoming Den of Wolves!
    My fav fairytale is Beauty and the Beast. I’ve read so many retellings, and it can be told so many different ways.

    Reply
  86. I loved reading Juliet Marillier’s “Heart’s Blood.”
    My favorite fairy tale growing up was “Rapunzel,” because I had hair down my spine and thought of how convenient it was that Rapunzel’s hair rescued her as well as the prince’s intervention.
    I started dancing at the age of six and loved “The Red Shoes,” even though the protagonist dances herself to death having been unable to remove her shoes.

    Reply
  87. I loved reading Juliet Marillier’s “Heart’s Blood.”
    My favorite fairy tale growing up was “Rapunzel,” because I had hair down my spine and thought of how convenient it was that Rapunzel’s hair rescued her as well as the prince’s intervention.
    I started dancing at the age of six and loved “The Red Shoes,” even though the protagonist dances herself to death having been unable to remove her shoes.

    Reply
  88. I loved reading Juliet Marillier’s “Heart’s Blood.”
    My favorite fairy tale growing up was “Rapunzel,” because I had hair down my spine and thought of how convenient it was that Rapunzel’s hair rescued her as well as the prince’s intervention.
    I started dancing at the age of six and loved “The Red Shoes,” even though the protagonist dances herself to death having been unable to remove her shoes.

    Reply
  89. I loved reading Juliet Marillier’s “Heart’s Blood.”
    My favorite fairy tale growing up was “Rapunzel,” because I had hair down my spine and thought of how convenient it was that Rapunzel’s hair rescued her as well as the prince’s intervention.
    I started dancing at the age of six and loved “The Red Shoes,” even though the protagonist dances herself to death having been unable to remove her shoes.

    Reply
  90. I loved reading Juliet Marillier’s “Heart’s Blood.”
    My favorite fairy tale growing up was “Rapunzel,” because I had hair down my spine and thought of how convenient it was that Rapunzel’s hair rescued her as well as the prince’s intervention.
    I started dancing at the age of six and loved “The Red Shoes,” even though the protagonist dances herself to death having been unable to remove her shoes.

    Reply
  91. Thanks, Sue — I don't know Drakestail, though your quote from it rings a faint bell with me. Am off to look it up.
    And Puss In Boots, of course, is a favorite. Made even more so in recent years by the gorgeous Antonio Banderas. 🙂

    Reply
  92. Thanks, Sue — I don't know Drakestail, though your quote from it rings a faint bell with me. Am off to look it up.
    And Puss In Boots, of course, is a favorite. Made even more so in recent years by the gorgeous Antonio Banderas. 🙂

    Reply
  93. Thanks, Sue — I don't know Drakestail, though your quote from it rings a faint bell with me. Am off to look it up.
    And Puss In Boots, of course, is a favorite. Made even more so in recent years by the gorgeous Antonio Banderas. 🙂

    Reply
  94. Thanks, Sue — I don't know Drakestail, though your quote from it rings a faint bell with me. Am off to look it up.
    And Puss In Boots, of course, is a favorite. Made even more so in recent years by the gorgeous Antonio Banderas. 🙂

    Reply
  95. Thanks, Sue — I don't know Drakestail, though your quote from it rings a faint bell with me. Am off to look it up.
    And Puss In Boots, of course, is a favorite. Made even more so in recent years by the gorgeous Antonio Banderas. 🙂

    Reply
  96. Marion I have a friend who has just such a beanstalk in her small inner-urban back garden. No beans alas, and no giant (yet) but this plant is towering, twice the size of her house. I think planting seeds is always something of an adventure. If the birds don't get them, the snails will. Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  97. Marion I have a friend who has just such a beanstalk in her small inner-urban back garden. No beans alas, and no giant (yet) but this plant is towering, twice the size of her house. I think planting seeds is always something of an adventure. If the birds don't get them, the snails will. Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  98. Marion I have a friend who has just such a beanstalk in her small inner-urban back garden. No beans alas, and no giant (yet) but this plant is towering, twice the size of her house. I think planting seeds is always something of an adventure. If the birds don't get them, the snails will. Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  99. Marion I have a friend who has just such a beanstalk in her small inner-urban back garden. No beans alas, and no giant (yet) but this plant is towering, twice the size of her house. I think planting seeds is always something of an adventure. If the birds don't get them, the snails will. Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  100. Marion I have a friend who has just such a beanstalk in her small inner-urban back garden. No beans alas, and no giant (yet) but this plant is towering, twice the size of her house. I think planting seeds is always something of an adventure. If the birds don't get them, the snails will. Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  101. Laura, that's so interesting. And yes, I think it's not only soldiers who suffer from PTSD. The things suffered by Juliet's Blackthorn and Grim certainly rang a bell with me from the days when I taught refugees, and it's wonderful and heartening to watch those two characters slowly work through it — and not in a convenient or easy way. Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  102. Laura, that's so interesting. And yes, I think it's not only soldiers who suffer from PTSD. The things suffered by Juliet's Blackthorn and Grim certainly rang a bell with me from the days when I taught refugees, and it's wonderful and heartening to watch those two characters slowly work through it — and not in a convenient or easy way. Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  103. Laura, that's so interesting. And yes, I think it's not only soldiers who suffer from PTSD. The things suffered by Juliet's Blackthorn and Grim certainly rang a bell with me from the days when I taught refugees, and it's wonderful and heartening to watch those two characters slowly work through it — and not in a convenient or easy way. Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  104. Laura, that's so interesting. And yes, I think it's not only soldiers who suffer from PTSD. The things suffered by Juliet's Blackthorn and Grim certainly rang a bell with me from the days when I taught refugees, and it's wonderful and heartening to watch those two characters slowly work through it — and not in a convenient or easy way. Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  105. Laura, that's so interesting. And yes, I think it's not only soldiers who suffer from PTSD. The things suffered by Juliet's Blackthorn and Grim certainly rang a bell with me from the days when I taught refugees, and it's wonderful and heartening to watch those two characters slowly work through it — and not in a convenient or easy way. Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  106. Anne I think you'd really enjoy them, and maybe your friend would too. Juliet's female characters are so strong, and they suffer, too, but the stories are always hopeful—and not unrealistically so—which I think is a lovely change. And there is always a love story at the heart of each book.

    Reply
  107. Anne I think you'd really enjoy them, and maybe your friend would too. Juliet's female characters are so strong, and they suffer, too, but the stories are always hopeful—and not unrealistically so—which I think is a lovely change. And there is always a love story at the heart of each book.

    Reply
  108. Anne I think you'd really enjoy them, and maybe your friend would too. Juliet's female characters are so strong, and they suffer, too, but the stories are always hopeful—and not unrealistically so—which I think is a lovely change. And there is always a love story at the heart of each book.

    Reply
  109. Anne I think you'd really enjoy them, and maybe your friend would too. Juliet's female characters are so strong, and they suffer, too, but the stories are always hopeful—and not unrealistically so—which I think is a lovely change. And there is always a love story at the heart of each book.

    Reply
  110. Anne I think you'd really enjoy them, and maybe your friend would too. Juliet's female characters are so strong, and they suffer, too, but the stories are always hopeful—and not unrealistically so—which I think is a lovely change. And there is always a love story at the heart of each book.

    Reply
  111. Yes Make Kay, I've read a few wonderful variations of Beauty and the Beast, too — marvellous story. And Den of Wolves sounds just perfect. I can't wait either. Thanks for popping by.

    Reply
  112. Yes Make Kay, I've read a few wonderful variations of Beauty and the Beast, too — marvellous story. And Den of Wolves sounds just perfect. I can't wait either. Thanks for popping by.

    Reply
  113. Yes Make Kay, I've read a few wonderful variations of Beauty and the Beast, too — marvellous story. And Den of Wolves sounds just perfect. I can't wait either. Thanks for popping by.

    Reply
  114. Yes Make Kay, I've read a few wonderful variations of Beauty and the Beast, too — marvellous story. And Den of Wolves sounds just perfect. I can't wait either. Thanks for popping by.

    Reply
  115. Yes Make Kay, I've read a few wonderful variations of Beauty and the Beast, too — marvellous story. And Den of Wolves sounds just perfect. I can't wait either. Thanks for popping by.

    Reply
  116. Thanks, Patricia. I was out with a friend in a bookshop yesterday and she bought Hearts Blood, too, which will be her first Juliet Marillier, but not her last, I'm sure. I also loved Rapunzel — but I hated the Red Shoes when I was a child — all that little girl wanted was a pair of pretty red shoes and she was punished so horribly for her frivolity. I still hate it for that reason. Maybe I haven't grown up yet. 🙂

    Reply
  117. Thanks, Patricia. I was out with a friend in a bookshop yesterday and she bought Hearts Blood, too, which will be her first Juliet Marillier, but not her last, I'm sure. I also loved Rapunzel — but I hated the Red Shoes when I was a child — all that little girl wanted was a pair of pretty red shoes and she was punished so horribly for her frivolity. I still hate it for that reason. Maybe I haven't grown up yet. 🙂

    Reply
  118. Thanks, Patricia. I was out with a friend in a bookshop yesterday and she bought Hearts Blood, too, which will be her first Juliet Marillier, but not her last, I'm sure. I also loved Rapunzel — but I hated the Red Shoes when I was a child — all that little girl wanted was a pair of pretty red shoes and she was punished so horribly for her frivolity. I still hate it for that reason. Maybe I haven't grown up yet. 🙂

    Reply
  119. Thanks, Patricia. I was out with a friend in a bookshop yesterday and she bought Hearts Blood, too, which will be her first Juliet Marillier, but not her last, I'm sure. I also loved Rapunzel — but I hated the Red Shoes when I was a child — all that little girl wanted was a pair of pretty red shoes and she was punished so horribly for her frivolity. I still hate it for that reason. Maybe I haven't grown up yet. 🙂

    Reply
  120. Thanks, Patricia. I was out with a friend in a bookshop yesterday and she bought Hearts Blood, too, which will be her first Juliet Marillier, but not her last, I'm sure. I also loved Rapunzel — but I hated the Red Shoes when I was a child — all that little girl wanted was a pair of pretty red shoes and she was punished so horribly for her frivolity. I still hate it for that reason. Maybe I haven't grown up yet. 🙂

    Reply
  121. I don’t know why I haven’t read any of Juliet’s books before. They sound right up my alley! I’ll be fixing that though. Taking your recommendation, Anne, Daughter of the Forest is now winging to my e-reader.
    I remember being given a Grimm’s fairytales as a child and loving them. These weren’t the sanitised stories either. These were the classic tales with all their wonderful horror. The scenes in Cinderella when the sisters cut off bits of their feet trying to fit into the shoe? Delicious. Rumpelstiltskin also sticks in my mind from then too.
    Great interview. Thanks Anne and Juliet.

    Reply
  122. I don’t know why I haven’t read any of Juliet’s books before. They sound right up my alley! I’ll be fixing that though. Taking your recommendation, Anne, Daughter of the Forest is now winging to my e-reader.
    I remember being given a Grimm’s fairytales as a child and loving them. These weren’t the sanitised stories either. These were the classic tales with all their wonderful horror. The scenes in Cinderella when the sisters cut off bits of their feet trying to fit into the shoe? Delicious. Rumpelstiltskin also sticks in my mind from then too.
    Great interview. Thanks Anne and Juliet.

    Reply
  123. I don’t know why I haven’t read any of Juliet’s books before. They sound right up my alley! I’ll be fixing that though. Taking your recommendation, Anne, Daughter of the Forest is now winging to my e-reader.
    I remember being given a Grimm’s fairytales as a child and loving them. These weren’t the sanitised stories either. These were the classic tales with all their wonderful horror. The scenes in Cinderella when the sisters cut off bits of their feet trying to fit into the shoe? Delicious. Rumpelstiltskin also sticks in my mind from then too.
    Great interview. Thanks Anne and Juliet.

    Reply
  124. I don’t know why I haven’t read any of Juliet’s books before. They sound right up my alley! I’ll be fixing that though. Taking your recommendation, Anne, Daughter of the Forest is now winging to my e-reader.
    I remember being given a Grimm’s fairytales as a child and loving them. These weren’t the sanitised stories either. These were the classic tales with all their wonderful horror. The scenes in Cinderella when the sisters cut off bits of their feet trying to fit into the shoe? Delicious. Rumpelstiltskin also sticks in my mind from then too.
    Great interview. Thanks Anne and Juliet.

    Reply
  125. I don’t know why I haven’t read any of Juliet’s books before. They sound right up my alley! I’ll be fixing that though. Taking your recommendation, Anne, Daughter of the Forest is now winging to my e-reader.
    I remember being given a Grimm’s fairytales as a child and loving them. These weren’t the sanitised stories either. These were the classic tales with all their wonderful horror. The scenes in Cinderella when the sisters cut off bits of their feet trying to fit into the shoe? Delicious. Rumpelstiltskin also sticks in my mind from then too.
    Great interview. Thanks Anne and Juliet.

    Reply
  126. Cathryn I'm sure you'll enjoy it — it's a great book. Thanks for visiting. I find it odd when people say :Oh I don't read fantasy" — it's the same as "I don't read historicals" IMO. What's not to love about fascinating characters and a great story in a setting that comes alive?

    Reply
  127. Cathryn I'm sure you'll enjoy it — it's a great book. Thanks for visiting. I find it odd when people say :Oh I don't read fantasy" — it's the same as "I don't read historicals" IMO. What's not to love about fascinating characters and a great story in a setting that comes alive?

    Reply
  128. Cathryn I'm sure you'll enjoy it — it's a great book. Thanks for visiting. I find it odd when people say :Oh I don't read fantasy" — it's the same as "I don't read historicals" IMO. What's not to love about fascinating characters and a great story in a setting that comes alive?

    Reply
  129. Cathryn I'm sure you'll enjoy it — it's a great book. Thanks for visiting. I find it odd when people say :Oh I don't read fantasy" — it's the same as "I don't read historicals" IMO. What's not to love about fascinating characters and a great story in a setting that comes alive?

    Reply
  130. Cathryn I'm sure you'll enjoy it — it's a great book. Thanks for visiting. I find it odd when people say :Oh I don't read fantasy" — it's the same as "I don't read historicals" IMO. What's not to love about fascinating characters and a great story in a setting that comes alive?

    Reply
  131. That was a favorite fairytale of mine as well but I always loved “The White Cat” and I don’t think many know of this fairytale. I used to listen to these fairytale records as a child called “Let’s Pretend…” I wish I had kept them. “East of the sun and West of the Moon” was on one of those albums with “Rapunzel” I believe but may be wrong. If noone has ever heard of “The White Cat” its a very enchanting fairytale.

    Reply
  132. That was a favorite fairytale of mine as well but I always loved “The White Cat” and I don’t think many know of this fairytale. I used to listen to these fairytale records as a child called “Let’s Pretend…” I wish I had kept them. “East of the sun and West of the Moon” was on one of those albums with “Rapunzel” I believe but may be wrong. If noone has ever heard of “The White Cat” its a very enchanting fairytale.

    Reply
  133. That was a favorite fairytale of mine as well but I always loved “The White Cat” and I don’t think many know of this fairytale. I used to listen to these fairytale records as a child called “Let’s Pretend…” I wish I had kept them. “East of the sun and West of the Moon” was on one of those albums with “Rapunzel” I believe but may be wrong. If noone has ever heard of “The White Cat” its a very enchanting fairytale.

    Reply
  134. That was a favorite fairytale of mine as well but I always loved “The White Cat” and I don’t think many know of this fairytale. I used to listen to these fairytale records as a child called “Let’s Pretend…” I wish I had kept them. “East of the sun and West of the Moon” was on one of those albums with “Rapunzel” I believe but may be wrong. If noone has ever heard of “The White Cat” its a very enchanting fairytale.

    Reply
  135. That was a favorite fairytale of mine as well but I always loved “The White Cat” and I don’t think many know of this fairytale. I used to listen to these fairytale records as a child called “Let’s Pretend…” I wish I had kept them. “East of the sun and West of the Moon” was on one of those albums with “Rapunzel” I believe but may be wrong. If noone has ever heard of “The White Cat” its a very enchanting fairytale.

    Reply

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