Julia Quinn

Jq_publicityphoto_2
The Wenches are delighted to welcome bestselling author,
Julia Quinn as guest.  Welcome, Julia.

Julia’s first novel, Splendid, was published in 1995 and has
been followed by 15 novels and four novellas in twelve years. No slacker here,
especially as much of Julia’s work has hit high on the bestsellingOnerita
lists. Last
year Julia won a very overdue RITA award for best Long
Historical Romance of
2006 for On The Way To The Wedding.

Her recent novels have all been centered on the Bridgerton
family, who are particularly beloved. She also comes up with great titles. Her
How to Marry A Marquis started a trend for such titles in historical romance,
and others such as The Duke and I and The Viscount Who Loved Me are simply
delicious, and so appropriate for the delicious stories within. 

Jo: In the past twelve years, have you had a yen to write in
another period, or a different type of romance or fiction?

JQ: Not really. I have
always considered myself amazingly fortunate that what I like to write (regency
historicals) happens to be the most popular setting in historical romance. It’s a lucky writer who gets to keep the muse
and the mortgage satisfied at the same time.

Jo: Is there a danger of getting bored? I’ve flitted around a bit.

JQ: Rather than vary the setting, I’ve begun to vary the writing
process. Right now I’m just finishing up
a two book set: The Lost Duke of Wyndham
and Mr. Cavendish, I Presume.

Jo: More great titles! You have a gift for them.

JQ: Thanks. Each of
these books has its own love story, but the external plots are very closely
intertwined and there are many scenes that use main characters from different
books. I didn’t want to write one book
and then have the other be dependent upon it, so I wrote them both
simultaneously. It was quite a
challenge, but worth it for me as a writer. (And hopefully for readers, too!)

Jo: I’m sure it will be. I ended up doing something like that inadvertently a few years ago and it was a stimulating experience. Quite rewarding, too.

JQ:  The Bridgerton 2nd Epilogues have been another terrific
way for me to keep things fresh. It’s
been really fun to work in such a short format. Plus, I get to use an entirely different story arc. Boy doesn’t have to meet girl, lose girl, or
even get her back again, because I’ve already done all that!

Jo:What’s happening with those epilogues? Will they ever be available in print?

JQ: They will definitely be available in print someday. I’m hoping sooner rather than later. The e-books division of my publishing house
has been thrilled with the sales, but the numbers are still quite small
compared with my print sales, which leads me to believe that a lot of my
readers haven’t heard about them or simply don’t want to read electronic books.

Jo: Do you have a partial or complete manuscript stashed away,
waiting its time?

JQ: I did have a manuscript stashed away, but I took that out
last yearDiaries_276
and rewrote it into The Secret Diaries of Miss Miranda Cheever. It was, in its original incarnation, the
third book I’d written. It was a
fascinating process to tear it apart and put it back together again. I really didn’t think I’d do all that much
work to it, but I ended up taking a good three months to rewrite it.

(Jo: That’s a particularly strong cover, isn’t it, everyone?)

JQ: This turned out to be another example of varying the
process, too. I got to write without
having to worry so much about the plot (since that was already mostly in
place).

Nothing else tucked in my cabinets, though, except for a
young adult romance I wrote when I
was a young adult. It was a Sweet Dreams
type of romance that I wrote during the summers when I was 14 and 15. Unfortunately there is no market now for that
type of thing.

Jo: Any ideas about your future writing? Is there something
you’re longing to do someday, you young thing?

JQ: Ha! Just had a
birthday. Not feeling so young
anymore…

Jo: Can you remember when, why and how you came up with the
Bridgerton family?

JQ: Honestly, no.

Jo: The mysterious Lady Whistledown, purveyor of social tid-bits
and scandals, was inspired. How did that come about?

JQ: Now this one I do recall. I was trying to avoid what’s known as an info-dump. I needed to get a whole mess of expository
information across in The Duke and I, which was the first of the Bridgerton
series. The opening scene had the
heroine and her mother, and the last thing you ever want to do is to have two
characters talking to each other about things they already know. So instead I plunked all of the information
into a gossip column, and then showed the characters reacting to it.

Jo: You have a wonderful website , full of goodies for your
readers. One page is about music that inspires you with each book. Can you tell
us more about music and creativity for you?

JQ: I wish. I don’t
really understand it myself, but some books just seem to want some music.

Jo:

What is your opinion of the historical romance market?
Everyone has been saying for years that it’s dying, but strangely enough, it
still seems pretty lively to me.

JQ: I’m with you, Jo. I’ve never thought we were dinosaurs. But I do think that historical romance has been holding steady at a time
when other subgenres (paranormal, most notably) have been taking off. So we might look a little slow by comparison.

Jo:

Your upcoming book is The Lost Duke of Wyndham – another intriguing title. Can you tell us more about it? Click here for more.

JQ: Sure! As I mentioned
above, it’s a part of a two-book set. The heroes are Thomas Cavendish, the Duke of Wyndham, and Jack Audley,
who is recognized as his long-lost cousin. The big question is whether Jack’s birth was legitimate. If it is, then he is really the duke, not
Thomas. So there is the mystery of which
man will turn out to be the duke, but more importantly, how will each adjust to
the changes in their lives. And, of
course, they each get to fall in love.

Jo: That sounds like a great set up. Mystery plus internal and external conflicts built it.

I’m sure you’re all bursting with praise for Julia’s books, and all kinds of questions, so have at it! Julia is offering three signed copies of her novel Brighter Than The Sun,
(another great title) as prizes here. Post a comment to this blog up to
midnight pacific time tomorrow, Tuesday, and your name will be entered
into a draw.

Jo
(I apologize for any problems with this blog. My internet connection has been on the booze, I think, and I thought I’d better get it on line in a brief moment of coherence!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

160 thoughts on “Julia Quinn”

  1. Julia, I love your books. They are very entertaining and the characters and plots are usually quite out of the ordinary way.
    My question is – please can you write faster?

    Reply
  2. Julia, I love your books. They are very entertaining and the characters and plots are usually quite out of the ordinary way.
    My question is – please can you write faster?

    Reply
  3. Julia, I love your books. They are very entertaining and the characters and plots are usually quite out of the ordinary way.
    My question is – please can you write faster?

    Reply
  4. Julia, I love your books. They are very entertaining and the characters and plots are usually quite out of the ordinary way.
    My question is – please can you write faster?

    Reply
  5. Julia, I love your books. They are very entertaining and the characters and plots are usually quite out of the ordinary way.
    My question is – please can you write faster?

    Reply
  6. Julia, thanks for sharing your time with us. I love your books; To Sir Phillip with Love is my favorite.
    My questions:
    Do your title and blurb/hook come before the characters and story, or does it all evolve together?
    And how deeply do you plot or outline?

    Reply
  7. Julia, thanks for sharing your time with us. I love your books; To Sir Phillip with Love is my favorite.
    My questions:
    Do your title and blurb/hook come before the characters and story, or does it all evolve together?
    And how deeply do you plot or outline?

    Reply
  8. Julia, thanks for sharing your time with us. I love your books; To Sir Phillip with Love is my favorite.
    My questions:
    Do your title and blurb/hook come before the characters and story, or does it all evolve together?
    And how deeply do you plot or outline?

    Reply
  9. Julia, thanks for sharing your time with us. I love your books; To Sir Phillip with Love is my favorite.
    My questions:
    Do your title and blurb/hook come before the characters and story, or does it all evolve together?
    And how deeply do you plot or outline?

    Reply
  10. Julia, thanks for sharing your time with us. I love your books; To Sir Phillip with Love is my favorite.
    My questions:
    Do your title and blurb/hook come before the characters and story, or does it all evolve together?
    And how deeply do you plot or outline?

    Reply
  11. Julia, you (and Jo) were amongst the first authors I glommed when I rediscovered romance after a long hiatus.
    Do you set a goal of a particular number of books you intend to write in a year? Are you a “slow” or “fast” writer? Any more (non-Bridgerton) family sagas up your sleeve?

    Reply
  12. Julia, you (and Jo) were amongst the first authors I glommed when I rediscovered romance after a long hiatus.
    Do you set a goal of a particular number of books you intend to write in a year? Are you a “slow” or “fast” writer? Any more (non-Bridgerton) family sagas up your sleeve?

    Reply
  13. Julia, you (and Jo) were amongst the first authors I glommed when I rediscovered romance after a long hiatus.
    Do you set a goal of a particular number of books you intend to write in a year? Are you a “slow” or “fast” writer? Any more (non-Bridgerton) family sagas up your sleeve?

    Reply
  14. Julia, you (and Jo) were amongst the first authors I glommed when I rediscovered romance after a long hiatus.
    Do you set a goal of a particular number of books you intend to write in a year? Are you a “slow” or “fast” writer? Any more (non-Bridgerton) family sagas up your sleeve?

    Reply
  15. Julia, you (and Jo) were amongst the first authors I glommed when I rediscovered romance after a long hiatus.
    Do you set a goal of a particular number of books you intend to write in a year? Are you a “slow” or “fast” writer? Any more (non-Bridgerton) family sagas up your sleeve?

    Reply
  16. Julia, Love your books, looking forward to your next release. And Jo, I love the cover of your book that is about to be released.
    Julia looking forward to your epilogues being released in paper form. I’m one of “those” readers who don’t do e-books. It’s not that I am computer illiterate, because I’m not, in fact I love computers, however, I also love books. Books, books and more books, don’t let me loose in a used book store. I love the smell of books and the feel of paper. I love to relax in my tub with a good book. I have boxes full of books I no longer have room for on my books shelves. Maybe some of it is all day I’m sitting at a computer, and when I want to relax I usually snuggle up with a book, somehow snuggling up to some hand held device loses something in the translation.

    Reply
  17. Julia, Love your books, looking forward to your next release. And Jo, I love the cover of your book that is about to be released.
    Julia looking forward to your epilogues being released in paper form. I’m one of “those” readers who don’t do e-books. It’s not that I am computer illiterate, because I’m not, in fact I love computers, however, I also love books. Books, books and more books, don’t let me loose in a used book store. I love the smell of books and the feel of paper. I love to relax in my tub with a good book. I have boxes full of books I no longer have room for on my books shelves. Maybe some of it is all day I’m sitting at a computer, and when I want to relax I usually snuggle up with a book, somehow snuggling up to some hand held device loses something in the translation.

    Reply
  18. Julia, Love your books, looking forward to your next release. And Jo, I love the cover of your book that is about to be released.
    Julia looking forward to your epilogues being released in paper form. I’m one of “those” readers who don’t do e-books. It’s not that I am computer illiterate, because I’m not, in fact I love computers, however, I also love books. Books, books and more books, don’t let me loose in a used book store. I love the smell of books and the feel of paper. I love to relax in my tub with a good book. I have boxes full of books I no longer have room for on my books shelves. Maybe some of it is all day I’m sitting at a computer, and when I want to relax I usually snuggle up with a book, somehow snuggling up to some hand held device loses something in the translation.

    Reply
  19. Julia, Love your books, looking forward to your next release. And Jo, I love the cover of your book that is about to be released.
    Julia looking forward to your epilogues being released in paper form. I’m one of “those” readers who don’t do e-books. It’s not that I am computer illiterate, because I’m not, in fact I love computers, however, I also love books. Books, books and more books, don’t let me loose in a used book store. I love the smell of books and the feel of paper. I love to relax in my tub with a good book. I have boxes full of books I no longer have room for on my books shelves. Maybe some of it is all day I’m sitting at a computer, and when I want to relax I usually snuggle up with a book, somehow snuggling up to some hand held device loses something in the translation.

    Reply
  20. Julia, Love your books, looking forward to your next release. And Jo, I love the cover of your book that is about to be released.
    Julia looking forward to your epilogues being released in paper form. I’m one of “those” readers who don’t do e-books. It’s not that I am computer illiterate, because I’m not, in fact I love computers, however, I also love books. Books, books and more books, don’t let me loose in a used book store. I love the smell of books and the feel of paper. I love to relax in my tub with a good book. I have boxes full of books I no longer have room for on my books shelves. Maybe some of it is all day I’m sitting at a computer, and when I want to relax I usually snuggle up with a book, somehow snuggling up to some hand held device loses something in the translation.

    Reply
  21. Julia, your two new books sound fabulous — and what a great hook. I will be looking for them. Also, thank you for mentioning the ebooks because I have not heard about them and will be checking them out.

    Reply
  22. Julia, your two new books sound fabulous — and what a great hook. I will be looking for them. Also, thank you for mentioning the ebooks because I have not heard about them and will be checking them out.

    Reply
  23. Julia, your two new books sound fabulous — and what a great hook. I will be looking for them. Also, thank you for mentioning the ebooks because I have not heard about them and will be checking them out.

    Reply
  24. Julia, your two new books sound fabulous — and what a great hook. I will be looking for them. Also, thank you for mentioning the ebooks because I have not heard about them and will be checking them out.

    Reply
  25. Julia, your two new books sound fabulous — and what a great hook. I will be looking for them. Also, thank you for mentioning the ebooks because I have not heard about them and will be checking them out.

    Reply
  26. Julia,
    I’m a faithful reader who didn’t even realize you HAD e-books (of course, I’m just now finding my writers’ websites!) I’ve never read an e-book. Wouldn’t know how to get an e-book. Now I have go learn something else at my age so that I can catch up with my Bridgertons. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  27. Julia,
    I’m a faithful reader who didn’t even realize you HAD e-books (of course, I’m just now finding my writers’ websites!) I’ve never read an e-book. Wouldn’t know how to get an e-book. Now I have go learn something else at my age so that I can catch up with my Bridgertons. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  28. Julia,
    I’m a faithful reader who didn’t even realize you HAD e-books (of course, I’m just now finding my writers’ websites!) I’ve never read an e-book. Wouldn’t know how to get an e-book. Now I have go learn something else at my age so that I can catch up with my Bridgertons. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  29. Julia,
    I’m a faithful reader who didn’t even realize you HAD e-books (of course, I’m just now finding my writers’ websites!) I’ve never read an e-book. Wouldn’t know how to get an e-book. Now I have go learn something else at my age so that I can catch up with my Bridgertons. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  30. Julia,
    I’m a faithful reader who didn’t even realize you HAD e-books (of course, I’m just now finding my writers’ websites!) I’ve never read an e-book. Wouldn’t know how to get an e-book. Now I have go learn something else at my age so that I can catch up with my Bridgertons. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  31. Hi Julia,
    I enjoy your books very much and I’m looking forward to reading more of them! I love the cover on The Secret Diaries of Miss Miranda Cheever! Do you have any say on the covers of your books?

    Reply
  32. Hi Julia,
    I enjoy your books very much and I’m looking forward to reading more of them! I love the cover on The Secret Diaries of Miss Miranda Cheever! Do you have any say on the covers of your books?

    Reply
  33. Hi Julia,
    I enjoy your books very much and I’m looking forward to reading more of them! I love the cover on The Secret Diaries of Miss Miranda Cheever! Do you have any say on the covers of your books?

    Reply
  34. Hi Julia,
    I enjoy your books very much and I’m looking forward to reading more of them! I love the cover on The Secret Diaries of Miss Miranda Cheever! Do you have any say on the covers of your books?

    Reply
  35. Hi Julia,
    I enjoy your books very much and I’m looking forward to reading more of them! I love the cover on The Secret Diaries of Miss Miranda Cheever! Do you have any say on the covers of your books?

    Reply
  36. my first quinn book was also ‘to sir phillip’, and being so well and memorably written it was such a happy literary ‘find’ (despite the sometimes non-happy content) that i have eagerly anticipated new quinn titles ever since.
    i confess that i haven’t yet jumped on the e-book wagon despite all the goodies to be found there, precisely because of how much time i already spend in front of an electonic screen. by the time i get to the pleasure-readiing part of the day my eyes need a break.

    Reply
  37. my first quinn book was also ‘to sir phillip’, and being so well and memorably written it was such a happy literary ‘find’ (despite the sometimes non-happy content) that i have eagerly anticipated new quinn titles ever since.
    i confess that i haven’t yet jumped on the e-book wagon despite all the goodies to be found there, precisely because of how much time i already spend in front of an electonic screen. by the time i get to the pleasure-readiing part of the day my eyes need a break.

    Reply
  38. my first quinn book was also ‘to sir phillip’, and being so well and memorably written it was such a happy literary ‘find’ (despite the sometimes non-happy content) that i have eagerly anticipated new quinn titles ever since.
    i confess that i haven’t yet jumped on the e-book wagon despite all the goodies to be found there, precisely because of how much time i already spend in front of an electonic screen. by the time i get to the pleasure-readiing part of the day my eyes need a break.

    Reply
  39. my first quinn book was also ‘to sir phillip’, and being so well and memorably written it was such a happy literary ‘find’ (despite the sometimes non-happy content) that i have eagerly anticipated new quinn titles ever since.
    i confess that i haven’t yet jumped on the e-book wagon despite all the goodies to be found there, precisely because of how much time i already spend in front of an electonic screen. by the time i get to the pleasure-readiing part of the day my eyes need a break.

    Reply
  40. my first quinn book was also ‘to sir phillip’, and being so well and memorably written it was such a happy literary ‘find’ (despite the sometimes non-happy content) that i have eagerly anticipated new quinn titles ever since.
    i confess that i haven’t yet jumped on the e-book wagon despite all the goodies to be found there, precisely because of how much time i already spend in front of an electonic screen. by the time i get to the pleasure-readiing part of the day my eyes need a break.

    Reply
  41. Hi Julia!
    I do enjoy your books and am excited that a new one will be out in a few months. I love the humor you put in your books. I call it witty. What would you call your sense of humor in your books?

    Reply
  42. Hi Julia!
    I do enjoy your books and am excited that a new one will be out in a few months. I love the humor you put in your books. I call it witty. What would you call your sense of humor in your books?

    Reply
  43. Hi Julia!
    I do enjoy your books and am excited that a new one will be out in a few months. I love the humor you put in your books. I call it witty. What would you call your sense of humor in your books?

    Reply
  44. Hi Julia!
    I do enjoy your books and am excited that a new one will be out in a few months. I love the humor you put in your books. I call it witty. What would you call your sense of humor in your books?

    Reply
  45. Hi Julia!
    I do enjoy your books and am excited that a new one will be out in a few months. I love the humor you put in your books. I call it witty. What would you call your sense of humor in your books?

    Reply
  46. Hi, JQ!
    Do you know when the next 2nd epilogue will be available? I love the first four, especially the one for When He Was Wicked. As I have said before, it was an absolutely perfect read for me.
    I love the idea of the 2nd epilogue. There is just something comforting in being reassured that the happiness IS indeed “ever after.” I can think of lots of favorites I’d love to read a 2nd epilogue for. (I remember we discussed this once when EJ interviewed you on Squawk.) I was thrilled when I read that Deborah Smith is doing a variation of this concept for her characters Claire and Roan in A Place to Call Home. Do you think other writers will adapt/adopt the 2nd epilogue idea??

    Reply
  47. Hi, JQ!
    Do you know when the next 2nd epilogue will be available? I love the first four, especially the one for When He Was Wicked. As I have said before, it was an absolutely perfect read for me.
    I love the idea of the 2nd epilogue. There is just something comforting in being reassured that the happiness IS indeed “ever after.” I can think of lots of favorites I’d love to read a 2nd epilogue for. (I remember we discussed this once when EJ interviewed you on Squawk.) I was thrilled when I read that Deborah Smith is doing a variation of this concept for her characters Claire and Roan in A Place to Call Home. Do you think other writers will adapt/adopt the 2nd epilogue idea??

    Reply
  48. Hi, JQ!
    Do you know when the next 2nd epilogue will be available? I love the first four, especially the one for When He Was Wicked. As I have said before, it was an absolutely perfect read for me.
    I love the idea of the 2nd epilogue. There is just something comforting in being reassured that the happiness IS indeed “ever after.” I can think of lots of favorites I’d love to read a 2nd epilogue for. (I remember we discussed this once when EJ interviewed you on Squawk.) I was thrilled when I read that Deborah Smith is doing a variation of this concept for her characters Claire and Roan in A Place to Call Home. Do you think other writers will adapt/adopt the 2nd epilogue idea??

    Reply
  49. Hi, JQ!
    Do you know when the next 2nd epilogue will be available? I love the first four, especially the one for When He Was Wicked. As I have said before, it was an absolutely perfect read for me.
    I love the idea of the 2nd epilogue. There is just something comforting in being reassured that the happiness IS indeed “ever after.” I can think of lots of favorites I’d love to read a 2nd epilogue for. (I remember we discussed this once when EJ interviewed you on Squawk.) I was thrilled when I read that Deborah Smith is doing a variation of this concept for her characters Claire and Roan in A Place to Call Home. Do you think other writers will adapt/adopt the 2nd epilogue idea??

    Reply
  50. Hi, JQ!
    Do you know when the next 2nd epilogue will be available? I love the first four, especially the one for When He Was Wicked. As I have said before, it was an absolutely perfect read for me.
    I love the idea of the 2nd epilogue. There is just something comforting in being reassured that the happiness IS indeed “ever after.” I can think of lots of favorites I’d love to read a 2nd epilogue for. (I remember we discussed this once when EJ interviewed you on Squawk.) I was thrilled when I read that Deborah Smith is doing a variation of this concept for her characters Claire and Roan in A Place to Call Home. Do you think other writers will adapt/adopt the 2nd epilogue idea??

    Reply
  51. Hi everybody! I have to dash on an errand, so whichever questions I don’t get to now, I’ll answer in a couple hours.
    Francois–
    I WISH I could write faster! I probably could if I could learn a little discipline. Alas, I think that might be a lost cause. But I do have two books out this year, which is something I haven’t done since 2000!
    Gillian–
    Each book is different. With the Bridgerton series, the characters ended up coming first, mostly because so many of the characters were fairly well established. With How to Marry a Marquis, the title came first. With To Catch an Heiress, it all started out of the first line, which was: Caroline Trent hadn’t meant to shoot Percival Prewitt, but she had, and now he was dead.
    After whatever the initial impetus is, though, it all seems to evolve together.
    Maggie–
    Pretty slow writer, I’m afraid. Or I should say–I’m an average-speed writer, but I’m a slow conceiver.
    Don’t know about any more family sagas. I’m not really certain what I’m going to do next.
    Kay–
    I’m with you about curling up with a book. But I have found that ebooks are kind of nice for travel.
    Okay, gotta run! I’ll be back to answer the rest (and any more you guys think of!)
    JQ

    Reply
  52. Hi everybody! I have to dash on an errand, so whichever questions I don’t get to now, I’ll answer in a couple hours.
    Francois–
    I WISH I could write faster! I probably could if I could learn a little discipline. Alas, I think that might be a lost cause. But I do have two books out this year, which is something I haven’t done since 2000!
    Gillian–
    Each book is different. With the Bridgerton series, the characters ended up coming first, mostly because so many of the characters were fairly well established. With How to Marry a Marquis, the title came first. With To Catch an Heiress, it all started out of the first line, which was: Caroline Trent hadn’t meant to shoot Percival Prewitt, but she had, and now he was dead.
    After whatever the initial impetus is, though, it all seems to evolve together.
    Maggie–
    Pretty slow writer, I’m afraid. Or I should say–I’m an average-speed writer, but I’m a slow conceiver.
    Don’t know about any more family sagas. I’m not really certain what I’m going to do next.
    Kay–
    I’m with you about curling up with a book. But I have found that ebooks are kind of nice for travel.
    Okay, gotta run! I’ll be back to answer the rest (and any more you guys think of!)
    JQ

    Reply
  53. Hi everybody! I have to dash on an errand, so whichever questions I don’t get to now, I’ll answer in a couple hours.
    Francois–
    I WISH I could write faster! I probably could if I could learn a little discipline. Alas, I think that might be a lost cause. But I do have two books out this year, which is something I haven’t done since 2000!
    Gillian–
    Each book is different. With the Bridgerton series, the characters ended up coming first, mostly because so many of the characters were fairly well established. With How to Marry a Marquis, the title came first. With To Catch an Heiress, it all started out of the first line, which was: Caroline Trent hadn’t meant to shoot Percival Prewitt, but she had, and now he was dead.
    After whatever the initial impetus is, though, it all seems to evolve together.
    Maggie–
    Pretty slow writer, I’m afraid. Or I should say–I’m an average-speed writer, but I’m a slow conceiver.
    Don’t know about any more family sagas. I’m not really certain what I’m going to do next.
    Kay–
    I’m with you about curling up with a book. But I have found that ebooks are kind of nice for travel.
    Okay, gotta run! I’ll be back to answer the rest (and any more you guys think of!)
    JQ

    Reply
  54. Hi everybody! I have to dash on an errand, so whichever questions I don’t get to now, I’ll answer in a couple hours.
    Francois–
    I WISH I could write faster! I probably could if I could learn a little discipline. Alas, I think that might be a lost cause. But I do have two books out this year, which is something I haven’t done since 2000!
    Gillian–
    Each book is different. With the Bridgerton series, the characters ended up coming first, mostly because so many of the characters were fairly well established. With How to Marry a Marquis, the title came first. With To Catch an Heiress, it all started out of the first line, which was: Caroline Trent hadn’t meant to shoot Percival Prewitt, but she had, and now he was dead.
    After whatever the initial impetus is, though, it all seems to evolve together.
    Maggie–
    Pretty slow writer, I’m afraid. Or I should say–I’m an average-speed writer, but I’m a slow conceiver.
    Don’t know about any more family sagas. I’m not really certain what I’m going to do next.
    Kay–
    I’m with you about curling up with a book. But I have found that ebooks are kind of nice for travel.
    Okay, gotta run! I’ll be back to answer the rest (and any more you guys think of!)
    JQ

    Reply
  55. Hi everybody! I have to dash on an errand, so whichever questions I don’t get to now, I’ll answer in a couple hours.
    Francois–
    I WISH I could write faster! I probably could if I could learn a little discipline. Alas, I think that might be a lost cause. But I do have two books out this year, which is something I haven’t done since 2000!
    Gillian–
    Each book is different. With the Bridgerton series, the characters ended up coming first, mostly because so many of the characters were fairly well established. With How to Marry a Marquis, the title came first. With To Catch an Heiress, it all started out of the first line, which was: Caroline Trent hadn’t meant to shoot Percival Prewitt, but she had, and now he was dead.
    After whatever the initial impetus is, though, it all seems to evolve together.
    Maggie–
    Pretty slow writer, I’m afraid. Or I should say–I’m an average-speed writer, but I’m a slow conceiver.
    Don’t know about any more family sagas. I’m not really certain what I’m going to do next.
    Kay–
    I’m with you about curling up with a book. But I have found that ebooks are kind of nice for travel.
    Okay, gotta run! I’ll be back to answer the rest (and any more you guys think of!)
    JQ

    Reply
  56. Hi, Julia. I have read many of your books and have ALL the Bridgerton series, as well as Lady Whistleton’s. What I love most is your humor, which to me is vital to a book’s enjoyment. I think we all need a good laugh.
    My very favorite books are “To Catch an Heiress” and “How To Marry A Millionaire”. Have read both of those several times, and can do so since I have them. All the others I read through the library, but it’s time to re-read them. I’ve done something similar with Jo’s books.
    I agree with her and enjoy your website. Like Kay, I have many books on hand; probably over 300. Like Kay, I’m also running out of space. Most of them have been re-read more than once or twice. But I’ll often go to the library the same day I buy books, so I’m doing what my parent always accused me of – spending time with my nose in a book!
    The Regency love stories are my favorite, although a year ago I started reading modern stories, especially westerns. I’ve always loved a good western(US)either modern or Old West.
    You may “feel” old, but I’m with Jo. I hope you write for a lot of years yet.

    Reply
  57. Hi, Julia. I have read many of your books and have ALL the Bridgerton series, as well as Lady Whistleton’s. What I love most is your humor, which to me is vital to a book’s enjoyment. I think we all need a good laugh.
    My very favorite books are “To Catch an Heiress” and “How To Marry A Millionaire”. Have read both of those several times, and can do so since I have them. All the others I read through the library, but it’s time to re-read them. I’ve done something similar with Jo’s books.
    I agree with her and enjoy your website. Like Kay, I have many books on hand; probably over 300. Like Kay, I’m also running out of space. Most of them have been re-read more than once or twice. But I’ll often go to the library the same day I buy books, so I’m doing what my parent always accused me of – spending time with my nose in a book!
    The Regency love stories are my favorite, although a year ago I started reading modern stories, especially westerns. I’ve always loved a good western(US)either modern or Old West.
    You may “feel” old, but I’m with Jo. I hope you write for a lot of years yet.

    Reply
  58. Hi, Julia. I have read many of your books and have ALL the Bridgerton series, as well as Lady Whistleton’s. What I love most is your humor, which to me is vital to a book’s enjoyment. I think we all need a good laugh.
    My very favorite books are “To Catch an Heiress” and “How To Marry A Millionaire”. Have read both of those several times, and can do so since I have them. All the others I read through the library, but it’s time to re-read them. I’ve done something similar with Jo’s books.
    I agree with her and enjoy your website. Like Kay, I have many books on hand; probably over 300. Like Kay, I’m also running out of space. Most of them have been re-read more than once or twice. But I’ll often go to the library the same day I buy books, so I’m doing what my parent always accused me of – spending time with my nose in a book!
    The Regency love stories are my favorite, although a year ago I started reading modern stories, especially westerns. I’ve always loved a good western(US)either modern or Old West.
    You may “feel” old, but I’m with Jo. I hope you write for a lot of years yet.

    Reply
  59. Hi, Julia. I have read many of your books and have ALL the Bridgerton series, as well as Lady Whistleton’s. What I love most is your humor, which to me is vital to a book’s enjoyment. I think we all need a good laugh.
    My very favorite books are “To Catch an Heiress” and “How To Marry A Millionaire”. Have read both of those several times, and can do so since I have them. All the others I read through the library, but it’s time to re-read them. I’ve done something similar with Jo’s books.
    I agree with her and enjoy your website. Like Kay, I have many books on hand; probably over 300. Like Kay, I’m also running out of space. Most of them have been re-read more than once or twice. But I’ll often go to the library the same day I buy books, so I’m doing what my parent always accused me of – spending time with my nose in a book!
    The Regency love stories are my favorite, although a year ago I started reading modern stories, especially westerns. I’ve always loved a good western(US)either modern or Old West.
    You may “feel” old, but I’m with Jo. I hope you write for a lot of years yet.

    Reply
  60. Hi, Julia. I have read many of your books and have ALL the Bridgerton series, as well as Lady Whistleton’s. What I love most is your humor, which to me is vital to a book’s enjoyment. I think we all need a good laugh.
    My very favorite books are “To Catch an Heiress” and “How To Marry A Millionaire”. Have read both of those several times, and can do so since I have them. All the others I read through the library, but it’s time to re-read them. I’ve done something similar with Jo’s books.
    I agree with her and enjoy your website. Like Kay, I have many books on hand; probably over 300. Like Kay, I’m also running out of space. Most of them have been re-read more than once or twice. But I’ll often go to the library the same day I buy books, so I’m doing what my parent always accused me of – spending time with my nose in a book!
    The Regency love stories are my favorite, although a year ago I started reading modern stories, especially westerns. I’ve always loved a good western(US)either modern or Old West.
    You may “feel” old, but I’m with Jo. I hope you write for a lot of years yet.

    Reply
  61. Hi Julia,
    “How to Marry a Marquis” is one of my all time favorites. If you do decide to write about the Bridgerton siblings’ children, would it be in far future?

    Reply
  62. Hi Julia,
    “How to Marry a Marquis” is one of my all time favorites. If you do decide to write about the Bridgerton siblings’ children, would it be in far future?

    Reply
  63. Hi Julia,
    “How to Marry a Marquis” is one of my all time favorites. If you do decide to write about the Bridgerton siblings’ children, would it be in far future?

    Reply
  64. Hi Julia,
    “How to Marry a Marquis” is one of my all time favorites. If you do decide to write about the Bridgerton siblings’ children, would it be in far future?

    Reply
  65. Hi Julia,
    “How to Marry a Marquis” is one of my all time favorites. If you do decide to write about the Bridgerton siblings’ children, would it be in far future?

    Reply
  66. I have no question, only praise!
    Unlike some of the other posters, I actually discovered your books when my library bought up your backlist for their new eBook site.
    Most of my romance reading up to that point was contemporary or sci-fi/paranormal. But I so enjoyed your “Brighter Than the Sun” that I had to read up everything else of yours I could find!

    Reply
  67. I have no question, only praise!
    Unlike some of the other posters, I actually discovered your books when my library bought up your backlist for their new eBook site.
    Most of my romance reading up to that point was contemporary or sci-fi/paranormal. But I so enjoyed your “Brighter Than the Sun” that I had to read up everything else of yours I could find!

    Reply
  68. I have no question, only praise!
    Unlike some of the other posters, I actually discovered your books when my library bought up your backlist for their new eBook site.
    Most of my romance reading up to that point was contemporary or sci-fi/paranormal. But I so enjoyed your “Brighter Than the Sun” that I had to read up everything else of yours I could find!

    Reply
  69. I have no question, only praise!
    Unlike some of the other posters, I actually discovered your books when my library bought up your backlist for their new eBook site.
    Most of my romance reading up to that point was contemporary or sci-fi/paranormal. But I so enjoyed your “Brighter Than the Sun” that I had to read up everything else of yours I could find!

    Reply
  70. I have no question, only praise!
    Unlike some of the other posters, I actually discovered your books when my library bought up your backlist for their new eBook site.
    Most of my romance reading up to that point was contemporary or sci-fi/paranormal. But I so enjoyed your “Brighter Than the Sun” that I had to read up everything else of yours I could find!

    Reply
  71. Hi, JQ. Some other thoughts since I wrote.
    I just requested the early books through the library. The first five books, as well as “Scottish Brides” – those are the ones I don’t own. I’ll be going to the library this week, so hopefully some of them will be in by then.
    Did Dunford in “Minx” appear in another of your books? The name sounds familiar.
    Your website had a great page that talked about some of the inter-relation of the various characters. It was helpful to tie the books together. But I can’t find it. I assume your webpage has undergone changes on occasion?

    Reply
  72. Hi, JQ. Some other thoughts since I wrote.
    I just requested the early books through the library. The first five books, as well as “Scottish Brides” – those are the ones I don’t own. I’ll be going to the library this week, so hopefully some of them will be in by then.
    Did Dunford in “Minx” appear in another of your books? The name sounds familiar.
    Your website had a great page that talked about some of the inter-relation of the various characters. It was helpful to tie the books together. But I can’t find it. I assume your webpage has undergone changes on occasion?

    Reply
  73. Hi, JQ. Some other thoughts since I wrote.
    I just requested the early books through the library. The first five books, as well as “Scottish Brides” – those are the ones I don’t own. I’ll be going to the library this week, so hopefully some of them will be in by then.
    Did Dunford in “Minx” appear in another of your books? The name sounds familiar.
    Your website had a great page that talked about some of the inter-relation of the various characters. It was helpful to tie the books together. But I can’t find it. I assume your webpage has undergone changes on occasion?

    Reply
  74. Hi, JQ. Some other thoughts since I wrote.
    I just requested the early books through the library. The first five books, as well as “Scottish Brides” – those are the ones I don’t own. I’ll be going to the library this week, so hopefully some of them will be in by then.
    Did Dunford in “Minx” appear in another of your books? The name sounds familiar.
    Your website had a great page that talked about some of the inter-relation of the various characters. It was helpful to tie the books together. But I can’t find it. I assume your webpage has undergone changes on occasion?

    Reply
  75. Hi, JQ. Some other thoughts since I wrote.
    I just requested the early books through the library. The first five books, as well as “Scottish Brides” – those are the ones I don’t own. I’ll be going to the library this week, so hopefully some of them will be in by then.
    Did Dunford in “Minx” appear in another of your books? The name sounds familiar.
    Your website had a great page that talked about some of the inter-relation of the various characters. It was helpful to tie the books together. But I can’t find it. I assume your webpage has undergone changes on occasion?

    Reply
  76. Hi JQ!! I’m SO thrilled that you’ll have two books out this year.
    One of my favorite things about the Bridgerton’s is that sense of family. Is that something we can expect in your upcoming books?

    Reply
  77. Hi JQ!! I’m SO thrilled that you’ll have two books out this year.
    One of my favorite things about the Bridgerton’s is that sense of family. Is that something we can expect in your upcoming books?

    Reply
  78. Hi JQ!! I’m SO thrilled that you’ll have two books out this year.
    One of my favorite things about the Bridgerton’s is that sense of family. Is that something we can expect in your upcoming books?

    Reply
  79. Hi JQ!! I’m SO thrilled that you’ll have two books out this year.
    One of my favorite things about the Bridgerton’s is that sense of family. Is that something we can expect in your upcoming books?

    Reply
  80. Hi JQ!! I’m SO thrilled that you’ll have two books out this year.
    One of my favorite things about the Bridgerton’s is that sense of family. Is that something we can expect in your upcoming books?

    Reply
  81. Julia, welcome to the Wenchdom! I got a kick out of hearing how Lady Whistledown was conceived as a way to avoid infodump. Amazing how pragmatic solution can take on a life of their own. 🙂
    And I’ll echo Jo–you really have a gift for titles!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  82. Julia, welcome to the Wenchdom! I got a kick out of hearing how Lady Whistledown was conceived as a way to avoid infodump. Amazing how pragmatic solution can take on a life of their own. 🙂
    And I’ll echo Jo–you really have a gift for titles!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  83. Julia, welcome to the Wenchdom! I got a kick out of hearing how Lady Whistledown was conceived as a way to avoid infodump. Amazing how pragmatic solution can take on a life of their own. 🙂
    And I’ll echo Jo–you really have a gift for titles!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  84. Julia, welcome to the Wenchdom! I got a kick out of hearing how Lady Whistledown was conceived as a way to avoid infodump. Amazing how pragmatic solution can take on a life of their own. 🙂
    And I’ll echo Jo–you really have a gift for titles!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  85. Julia, welcome to the Wenchdom! I got a kick out of hearing how Lady Whistledown was conceived as a way to avoid infodump. Amazing how pragmatic solution can take on a life of their own. 🙂
    And I’ll echo Jo–you really have a gift for titles!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  86. I’m back! But not for long—I’m treating myself to my birthday present I didn’t manage to do last weekend—a spa mani-pedi at Nordstrom. It’s just divine—you’re in your own private room, in a reclining chair, massage, paraffin dip–the works!
    Carol–
    I do have some say in my covers, but most authors do not. We kind of think we do, because the publisher does ask for input, but they really only use the input insofar as it jibes with their ideas for sales and marketing.
    OTOH, when you get far enough up the food chain, you do get some say. The original cover for To Sir Phillip, With Love, for example, was the same design except it was pale yellow with red writing. The red on yellow was spectacular, but because of the design, the yellow made it look like a western. I was able to get it changed (not that this was a costly thing to do at this point in the process). But earlier in my career I would not have been able to get this done.
    Maureen–
    I’m not exactly sure what I’d call my sense of humor. I like witty, though!
    Janga–
    In theory the next to epilogues will be out this spring. We try to bring them out to pretty much coincide with my book releases. But I might hold them until the second book this year. It really just depends on how fast I get my writing done.
    I don’t know if more authors are going to do this. I think that in order to make it work, you have to have characters or a set of characters that readers are really emotionally invested in. I think that there are many books that are quite beloved but the characters don’t call out for 2nd epis so much—for me, the concept worked because readers have seen these characters across eight books. It really adds to the emotional attachment.
    Jane–
    I’m sure I’ll revisit the Bridgertons someday (how could I resist???) but I’m not sure when.
    Judy–
    Dunford was a pretty active secondary character in my first two books—Splendid and Dancing at Midnight. Additionally, he had a very short appearance in How to Marry a Marquis–it ended up confusing people a little, though, because he was not married in it. But HTMAM takes place before Minx, even though it was published later.
    My website does change and evolve. I can’t recall a page that describes the relationships between characters, but each book page has a section called “Inside the Story” and I usually include that sort of information there.
    Mary Jo–
    Isn’t it funny about Whistledown? What started out as a semi-desperate measure basically made my career!
    And thanks for the kudos on titles. Most (not all) I came up with myself. Special props to Candice Hern, though—she had wanted to name a book How to Marry a Duke, but her editor nixed it. I was horrified and immediately asked, “Can I have it?” then changed it to marquis for the alliteration.
    Cheers!
    JQ

    Reply
  87. I’m back! But not for long—I’m treating myself to my birthday present I didn’t manage to do last weekend—a spa mani-pedi at Nordstrom. It’s just divine—you’re in your own private room, in a reclining chair, massage, paraffin dip–the works!
    Carol–
    I do have some say in my covers, but most authors do not. We kind of think we do, because the publisher does ask for input, but they really only use the input insofar as it jibes with their ideas for sales and marketing.
    OTOH, when you get far enough up the food chain, you do get some say. The original cover for To Sir Phillip, With Love, for example, was the same design except it was pale yellow with red writing. The red on yellow was spectacular, but because of the design, the yellow made it look like a western. I was able to get it changed (not that this was a costly thing to do at this point in the process). But earlier in my career I would not have been able to get this done.
    Maureen–
    I’m not exactly sure what I’d call my sense of humor. I like witty, though!
    Janga–
    In theory the next to epilogues will be out this spring. We try to bring them out to pretty much coincide with my book releases. But I might hold them until the second book this year. It really just depends on how fast I get my writing done.
    I don’t know if more authors are going to do this. I think that in order to make it work, you have to have characters or a set of characters that readers are really emotionally invested in. I think that there are many books that are quite beloved but the characters don’t call out for 2nd epis so much—for me, the concept worked because readers have seen these characters across eight books. It really adds to the emotional attachment.
    Jane–
    I’m sure I’ll revisit the Bridgertons someday (how could I resist???) but I’m not sure when.
    Judy–
    Dunford was a pretty active secondary character in my first two books—Splendid and Dancing at Midnight. Additionally, he had a very short appearance in How to Marry a Marquis–it ended up confusing people a little, though, because he was not married in it. But HTMAM takes place before Minx, even though it was published later.
    My website does change and evolve. I can’t recall a page that describes the relationships between characters, but each book page has a section called “Inside the Story” and I usually include that sort of information there.
    Mary Jo–
    Isn’t it funny about Whistledown? What started out as a semi-desperate measure basically made my career!
    And thanks for the kudos on titles. Most (not all) I came up with myself. Special props to Candice Hern, though—she had wanted to name a book How to Marry a Duke, but her editor nixed it. I was horrified and immediately asked, “Can I have it?” then changed it to marquis for the alliteration.
    Cheers!
    JQ

    Reply
  88. I’m back! But not for long—I’m treating myself to my birthday present I didn’t manage to do last weekend—a spa mani-pedi at Nordstrom. It’s just divine—you’re in your own private room, in a reclining chair, massage, paraffin dip–the works!
    Carol–
    I do have some say in my covers, but most authors do not. We kind of think we do, because the publisher does ask for input, but they really only use the input insofar as it jibes with their ideas for sales and marketing.
    OTOH, when you get far enough up the food chain, you do get some say. The original cover for To Sir Phillip, With Love, for example, was the same design except it was pale yellow with red writing. The red on yellow was spectacular, but because of the design, the yellow made it look like a western. I was able to get it changed (not that this was a costly thing to do at this point in the process). But earlier in my career I would not have been able to get this done.
    Maureen–
    I’m not exactly sure what I’d call my sense of humor. I like witty, though!
    Janga–
    In theory the next to epilogues will be out this spring. We try to bring them out to pretty much coincide with my book releases. But I might hold them until the second book this year. It really just depends on how fast I get my writing done.
    I don’t know if more authors are going to do this. I think that in order to make it work, you have to have characters or a set of characters that readers are really emotionally invested in. I think that there are many books that are quite beloved but the characters don’t call out for 2nd epis so much—for me, the concept worked because readers have seen these characters across eight books. It really adds to the emotional attachment.
    Jane–
    I’m sure I’ll revisit the Bridgertons someday (how could I resist???) but I’m not sure when.
    Judy–
    Dunford was a pretty active secondary character in my first two books—Splendid and Dancing at Midnight. Additionally, he had a very short appearance in How to Marry a Marquis–it ended up confusing people a little, though, because he was not married in it. But HTMAM takes place before Minx, even though it was published later.
    My website does change and evolve. I can’t recall a page that describes the relationships between characters, but each book page has a section called “Inside the Story” and I usually include that sort of information there.
    Mary Jo–
    Isn’t it funny about Whistledown? What started out as a semi-desperate measure basically made my career!
    And thanks for the kudos on titles. Most (not all) I came up with myself. Special props to Candice Hern, though—she had wanted to name a book How to Marry a Duke, but her editor nixed it. I was horrified and immediately asked, “Can I have it?” then changed it to marquis for the alliteration.
    Cheers!
    JQ

    Reply
  89. I’m back! But not for long—I’m treating myself to my birthday present I didn’t manage to do last weekend—a spa mani-pedi at Nordstrom. It’s just divine—you’re in your own private room, in a reclining chair, massage, paraffin dip–the works!
    Carol–
    I do have some say in my covers, but most authors do not. We kind of think we do, because the publisher does ask for input, but they really only use the input insofar as it jibes with their ideas for sales and marketing.
    OTOH, when you get far enough up the food chain, you do get some say. The original cover for To Sir Phillip, With Love, for example, was the same design except it was pale yellow with red writing. The red on yellow was spectacular, but because of the design, the yellow made it look like a western. I was able to get it changed (not that this was a costly thing to do at this point in the process). But earlier in my career I would not have been able to get this done.
    Maureen–
    I’m not exactly sure what I’d call my sense of humor. I like witty, though!
    Janga–
    In theory the next to epilogues will be out this spring. We try to bring them out to pretty much coincide with my book releases. But I might hold them until the second book this year. It really just depends on how fast I get my writing done.
    I don’t know if more authors are going to do this. I think that in order to make it work, you have to have characters or a set of characters that readers are really emotionally invested in. I think that there are many books that are quite beloved but the characters don’t call out for 2nd epis so much—for me, the concept worked because readers have seen these characters across eight books. It really adds to the emotional attachment.
    Jane–
    I’m sure I’ll revisit the Bridgertons someday (how could I resist???) but I’m not sure when.
    Judy–
    Dunford was a pretty active secondary character in my first two books—Splendid and Dancing at Midnight. Additionally, he had a very short appearance in How to Marry a Marquis–it ended up confusing people a little, though, because he was not married in it. But HTMAM takes place before Minx, even though it was published later.
    My website does change and evolve. I can’t recall a page that describes the relationships between characters, but each book page has a section called “Inside the Story” and I usually include that sort of information there.
    Mary Jo–
    Isn’t it funny about Whistledown? What started out as a semi-desperate measure basically made my career!
    And thanks for the kudos on titles. Most (not all) I came up with myself. Special props to Candice Hern, though—she had wanted to name a book How to Marry a Duke, but her editor nixed it. I was horrified and immediately asked, “Can I have it?” then changed it to marquis for the alliteration.
    Cheers!
    JQ

    Reply
  90. I’m back! But not for long—I’m treating myself to my birthday present I didn’t manage to do last weekend—a spa mani-pedi at Nordstrom. It’s just divine—you’re in your own private room, in a reclining chair, massage, paraffin dip–the works!
    Carol–
    I do have some say in my covers, but most authors do not. We kind of think we do, because the publisher does ask for input, but they really only use the input insofar as it jibes with their ideas for sales and marketing.
    OTOH, when you get far enough up the food chain, you do get some say. The original cover for To Sir Phillip, With Love, for example, was the same design except it was pale yellow with red writing. The red on yellow was spectacular, but because of the design, the yellow made it look like a western. I was able to get it changed (not that this was a costly thing to do at this point in the process). But earlier in my career I would not have been able to get this done.
    Maureen–
    I’m not exactly sure what I’d call my sense of humor. I like witty, though!
    Janga–
    In theory the next to epilogues will be out this spring. We try to bring them out to pretty much coincide with my book releases. But I might hold them until the second book this year. It really just depends on how fast I get my writing done.
    I don’t know if more authors are going to do this. I think that in order to make it work, you have to have characters or a set of characters that readers are really emotionally invested in. I think that there are many books that are quite beloved but the characters don’t call out for 2nd epis so much—for me, the concept worked because readers have seen these characters across eight books. It really adds to the emotional attachment.
    Jane–
    I’m sure I’ll revisit the Bridgertons someday (how could I resist???) but I’m not sure when.
    Judy–
    Dunford was a pretty active secondary character in my first two books—Splendid and Dancing at Midnight. Additionally, he had a very short appearance in How to Marry a Marquis–it ended up confusing people a little, though, because he was not married in it. But HTMAM takes place before Minx, even though it was published later.
    My website does change and evolve. I can’t recall a page that describes the relationships between characters, but each book page has a section called “Inside the Story” and I usually include that sort of information there.
    Mary Jo–
    Isn’t it funny about Whistledown? What started out as a semi-desperate measure basically made my career!
    And thanks for the kudos on titles. Most (not all) I came up with myself. Special props to Candice Hern, though—she had wanted to name a book How to Marry a Duke, but her editor nixed it. I was horrified and immediately asked, “Can I have it?” then changed it to marquis for the alliteration.
    Cheers!
    JQ

    Reply
  91. Hi Julia,
    A friend recommended your books to me a few months ago, and I’ve been tearing through them ever since. I just finished the Bridgerton series and have been trying to download the epilogues. I say “trying” because I haven’t been terribly successful. I’m not sure if it’s because my Mac is ornery or if it’s somehow connected to my pitiful showing in college Calculus, but I am grasping desperately at this opportunity to encourage your publisher to get those suckers in book format as soon as possible. So I can read them.
    (I feel I need to go redeem my self-esteem by, I don’t know, wrestling a tiger to the floor and then teaching it Chinese calligraphy.)
    I love your books, and thanks for the lovely afternoons of reading!

    Reply
  92. Hi Julia,
    A friend recommended your books to me a few months ago, and I’ve been tearing through them ever since. I just finished the Bridgerton series and have been trying to download the epilogues. I say “trying” because I haven’t been terribly successful. I’m not sure if it’s because my Mac is ornery or if it’s somehow connected to my pitiful showing in college Calculus, but I am grasping desperately at this opportunity to encourage your publisher to get those suckers in book format as soon as possible. So I can read them.
    (I feel I need to go redeem my self-esteem by, I don’t know, wrestling a tiger to the floor and then teaching it Chinese calligraphy.)
    I love your books, and thanks for the lovely afternoons of reading!

    Reply
  93. Hi Julia,
    A friend recommended your books to me a few months ago, and I’ve been tearing through them ever since. I just finished the Bridgerton series and have been trying to download the epilogues. I say “trying” because I haven’t been terribly successful. I’m not sure if it’s because my Mac is ornery or if it’s somehow connected to my pitiful showing in college Calculus, but I am grasping desperately at this opportunity to encourage your publisher to get those suckers in book format as soon as possible. So I can read them.
    (I feel I need to go redeem my self-esteem by, I don’t know, wrestling a tiger to the floor and then teaching it Chinese calligraphy.)
    I love your books, and thanks for the lovely afternoons of reading!

    Reply
  94. Hi Julia,
    A friend recommended your books to me a few months ago, and I’ve been tearing through them ever since. I just finished the Bridgerton series and have been trying to download the epilogues. I say “trying” because I haven’t been terribly successful. I’m not sure if it’s because my Mac is ornery or if it’s somehow connected to my pitiful showing in college Calculus, but I am grasping desperately at this opportunity to encourage your publisher to get those suckers in book format as soon as possible. So I can read them.
    (I feel I need to go redeem my self-esteem by, I don’t know, wrestling a tiger to the floor and then teaching it Chinese calligraphy.)
    I love your books, and thanks for the lovely afternoons of reading!

    Reply
  95. Hi Julia,
    A friend recommended your books to me a few months ago, and I’ve been tearing through them ever since. I just finished the Bridgerton series and have been trying to download the epilogues. I say “trying” because I haven’t been terribly successful. I’m not sure if it’s because my Mac is ornery or if it’s somehow connected to my pitiful showing in college Calculus, but I am grasping desperately at this opportunity to encourage your publisher to get those suckers in book format as soon as possible. So I can read them.
    (I feel I need to go redeem my self-esteem by, I don’t know, wrestling a tiger to the floor and then teaching it Chinese calligraphy.)
    I love your books, and thanks for the lovely afternoons of reading!

    Reply
  96. I’ve been a Julia convert for a long time, now. What’s not to love about someone who can weave a darned good yarn that keeps you up way past your bedtime?!!
    Welcome to the Word Wenches, Julia. It’s so fun and exciting to have you all to ourselves for a couple days!

    Reply
  97. I’ve been a Julia convert for a long time, now. What’s not to love about someone who can weave a darned good yarn that keeps you up way past your bedtime?!!
    Welcome to the Word Wenches, Julia. It’s so fun and exciting to have you all to ourselves for a couple days!

    Reply
  98. I’ve been a Julia convert for a long time, now. What’s not to love about someone who can weave a darned good yarn that keeps you up way past your bedtime?!!
    Welcome to the Word Wenches, Julia. It’s so fun and exciting to have you all to ourselves for a couple days!

    Reply
  99. I’ve been a Julia convert for a long time, now. What’s not to love about someone who can weave a darned good yarn that keeps you up way past your bedtime?!!
    Welcome to the Word Wenches, Julia. It’s so fun and exciting to have you all to ourselves for a couple days!

    Reply
  100. I’ve been a Julia convert for a long time, now. What’s not to love about someone who can weave a darned good yarn that keeps you up way past your bedtime?!!
    Welcome to the Word Wenches, Julia. It’s so fun and exciting to have you all to ourselves for a couple days!

    Reply
  101. Julia, I love your books. I started re-reading them over the holidays to get reaquainted with the characters. Ever better the second time around.

    Reply
  102. Julia, I love your books. I started re-reading them over the holidays to get reaquainted with the characters. Ever better the second time around.

    Reply
  103. Julia, I love your books. I started re-reading them over the holidays to get reaquainted with the characters. Ever better the second time around.

    Reply
  104. Julia, I love your books. I started re-reading them over the holidays to get reaquainted with the characters. Ever better the second time around.

    Reply
  105. Julia, I love your books. I started re-reading them over the holidays to get reaquainted with the characters. Ever better the second time around.

    Reply
  106. Hi Julia! Two of my favorite authors right here!
    I, for one, can’t wait to meet the latest Dukes from your Regency England! I’ve been re-reading your earlier books and glad for the re-acquaintance!

    Reply
  107. Hi Julia! Two of my favorite authors right here!
    I, for one, can’t wait to meet the latest Dukes from your Regency England! I’ve been re-reading your earlier books and glad for the re-acquaintance!

    Reply
  108. Hi Julia! Two of my favorite authors right here!
    I, for one, can’t wait to meet the latest Dukes from your Regency England! I’ve been re-reading your earlier books and glad for the re-acquaintance!

    Reply
  109. Hi Julia! Two of my favorite authors right here!
    I, for one, can’t wait to meet the latest Dukes from your Regency England! I’ve been re-reading your earlier books and glad for the re-acquaintance!

    Reply
  110. Hi Julia! Two of my favorite authors right here!
    I, for one, can’t wait to meet the latest Dukes from your Regency England! I’ve been re-reading your earlier books and glad for the re-acquaintance!

    Reply
  111. Thanks for the great interview, Jo and Julia. It’s always interesting for someone like me, who is strictly a reader, to see what each writer’s writing process is like. I’ve been reading your books, Julia, since the first one came out, though I’m lagging somewhat behind, to my great misfortune.
    I hope to catch up as soon as I find your books after several moves put them out of my reach. I’ve started catching up with some of my TBR piles by lending books from our library. Slowly I’m catching up on single title books.

    Reply
  112. Thanks for the great interview, Jo and Julia. It’s always interesting for someone like me, who is strictly a reader, to see what each writer’s writing process is like. I’ve been reading your books, Julia, since the first one came out, though I’m lagging somewhat behind, to my great misfortune.
    I hope to catch up as soon as I find your books after several moves put them out of my reach. I’ve started catching up with some of my TBR piles by lending books from our library. Slowly I’m catching up on single title books.

    Reply
  113. Thanks for the great interview, Jo and Julia. It’s always interesting for someone like me, who is strictly a reader, to see what each writer’s writing process is like. I’ve been reading your books, Julia, since the first one came out, though I’m lagging somewhat behind, to my great misfortune.
    I hope to catch up as soon as I find your books after several moves put them out of my reach. I’ve started catching up with some of my TBR piles by lending books from our library. Slowly I’m catching up on single title books.

    Reply
  114. Thanks for the great interview, Jo and Julia. It’s always interesting for someone like me, who is strictly a reader, to see what each writer’s writing process is like. I’ve been reading your books, Julia, since the first one came out, though I’m lagging somewhat behind, to my great misfortune.
    I hope to catch up as soon as I find your books after several moves put them out of my reach. I’ve started catching up with some of my TBR piles by lending books from our library. Slowly I’m catching up on single title books.

    Reply
  115. Thanks for the great interview, Jo and Julia. It’s always interesting for someone like me, who is strictly a reader, to see what each writer’s writing process is like. I’ve been reading your books, Julia, since the first one came out, though I’m lagging somewhat behind, to my great misfortune.
    I hope to catch up as soon as I find your books after several moves put them out of my reach. I’ve started catching up with some of my TBR piles by lending books from our library. Slowly I’m catching up on single title books.

    Reply
  116. Another Julia Quinn fan here, and Happy Birthday, Julia!
    I love the humor and wit in your stories, but I also like the slightly darker edge you used for When He Was Wicked, one of my favorites. Hope to see you do more like that, and I can’t wait to read the Wyndhams.

    Reply
  117. Another Julia Quinn fan here, and Happy Birthday, Julia!
    I love the humor and wit in your stories, but I also like the slightly darker edge you used for When He Was Wicked, one of my favorites. Hope to see you do more like that, and I can’t wait to read the Wyndhams.

    Reply
  118. Another Julia Quinn fan here, and Happy Birthday, Julia!
    I love the humor and wit in your stories, but I also like the slightly darker edge you used for When He Was Wicked, one of my favorites. Hope to see you do more like that, and I can’t wait to read the Wyndhams.

    Reply
  119. Another Julia Quinn fan here, and Happy Birthday, Julia!
    I love the humor and wit in your stories, but I also like the slightly darker edge you used for When He Was Wicked, one of my favorites. Hope to see you do more like that, and I can’t wait to read the Wyndhams.

    Reply
  120. Another Julia Quinn fan here, and Happy Birthday, Julia!
    I love the humor and wit in your stories, but I also like the slightly darker edge you used for When He Was Wicked, one of my favorites. Hope to see you do more like that, and I can’t wait to read the Wyndhams.

    Reply
  121. (((Julia))) What fun to have a chance to chat with you on another forum.
    First the adulation: I ADORE your books, your characters, and most especially, your dialogue. You have a pitch-perfect ear for reflecting accent and shifting emotions through dialogue. And character change–Sir Phillip–wow!
    You’ve handled many difficult situations (miscarriage, shy/plain) that are just as relevant now as they were then. Where some authors have been castigated for writing about those things, you pulled them off beautifully. How do you get behind the issues, tackle them, and present them to the reader, always through the perspective of the character?
    How do you write about the physical spaces your characters have to walk through? Do you “see” the rooms, the color of the walls, paintings, etc., or do you go by descriptions of National Heritage-type houses in research books?
    Thanks for stopping by the Wenches and for another chance to chat with you.

    Reply
  122. (((Julia))) What fun to have a chance to chat with you on another forum.
    First the adulation: I ADORE your books, your characters, and most especially, your dialogue. You have a pitch-perfect ear for reflecting accent and shifting emotions through dialogue. And character change–Sir Phillip–wow!
    You’ve handled many difficult situations (miscarriage, shy/plain) that are just as relevant now as they were then. Where some authors have been castigated for writing about those things, you pulled them off beautifully. How do you get behind the issues, tackle them, and present them to the reader, always through the perspective of the character?
    How do you write about the physical spaces your characters have to walk through? Do you “see” the rooms, the color of the walls, paintings, etc., or do you go by descriptions of National Heritage-type houses in research books?
    Thanks for stopping by the Wenches and for another chance to chat with you.

    Reply
  123. (((Julia))) What fun to have a chance to chat with you on another forum.
    First the adulation: I ADORE your books, your characters, and most especially, your dialogue. You have a pitch-perfect ear for reflecting accent and shifting emotions through dialogue. And character change–Sir Phillip–wow!
    You’ve handled many difficult situations (miscarriage, shy/plain) that are just as relevant now as they were then. Where some authors have been castigated for writing about those things, you pulled them off beautifully. How do you get behind the issues, tackle them, and present them to the reader, always through the perspective of the character?
    How do you write about the physical spaces your characters have to walk through? Do you “see” the rooms, the color of the walls, paintings, etc., or do you go by descriptions of National Heritage-type houses in research books?
    Thanks for stopping by the Wenches and for another chance to chat with you.

    Reply
  124. (((Julia))) What fun to have a chance to chat with you on another forum.
    First the adulation: I ADORE your books, your characters, and most especially, your dialogue. You have a pitch-perfect ear for reflecting accent and shifting emotions through dialogue. And character change–Sir Phillip–wow!
    You’ve handled many difficult situations (miscarriage, shy/plain) that are just as relevant now as they were then. Where some authors have been castigated for writing about those things, you pulled them off beautifully. How do you get behind the issues, tackle them, and present them to the reader, always through the perspective of the character?
    How do you write about the physical spaces your characters have to walk through? Do you “see” the rooms, the color of the walls, paintings, etc., or do you go by descriptions of National Heritage-type houses in research books?
    Thanks for stopping by the Wenches and for another chance to chat with you.

    Reply
  125. (((Julia))) What fun to have a chance to chat with you on another forum.
    First the adulation: I ADORE your books, your characters, and most especially, your dialogue. You have a pitch-perfect ear for reflecting accent and shifting emotions through dialogue. And character change–Sir Phillip–wow!
    You’ve handled many difficult situations (miscarriage, shy/plain) that are just as relevant now as they were then. Where some authors have been castigated for writing about those things, you pulled them off beautifully. How do you get behind the issues, tackle them, and present them to the reader, always through the perspective of the character?
    How do you write about the physical spaces your characters have to walk through? Do you “see” the rooms, the color of the walls, paintings, etc., or do you go by descriptions of National Heritage-type houses in research books?
    Thanks for stopping by the Wenches and for another chance to chat with you.

    Reply
  126. It’s great to see you here Julia! And talking to Jo, my other favourite author. Somethings don’t get any better than that. I was first turned onto the Bridgertons via the Lady Whistledown compilations.

    Reply
  127. It’s great to see you here Julia! And talking to Jo, my other favourite author. Somethings don’t get any better than that. I was first turned onto the Bridgertons via the Lady Whistledown compilations.

    Reply
  128. It’s great to see you here Julia! And talking to Jo, my other favourite author. Somethings don’t get any better than that. I was first turned onto the Bridgertons via the Lady Whistledown compilations.

    Reply
  129. It’s great to see you here Julia! And talking to Jo, my other favourite author. Somethings don’t get any better than that. I was first turned onto the Bridgertons via the Lady Whistledown compilations.

    Reply
  130. It’s great to see you here Julia! And talking to Jo, my other favourite author. Somethings don’t get any better than that. I was first turned onto the Bridgertons via the Lady Whistledown compilations.

    Reply
  131. Hi Julia! Just sneaking in here before going to work to say that I’m just in the process of “discovering” your work (read my first JQ just before Christmas) and having a great time of it. I’m looking forward to many hours yet of entertaining reading–and the new books sound fabulous.
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  132. Hi Julia! Just sneaking in here before going to work to say that I’m just in the process of “discovering” your work (read my first JQ just before Christmas) and having a great time of it. I’m looking forward to many hours yet of entertaining reading–and the new books sound fabulous.
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  133. Hi Julia! Just sneaking in here before going to work to say that I’m just in the process of “discovering” your work (read my first JQ just before Christmas) and having a great time of it. I’m looking forward to many hours yet of entertaining reading–and the new books sound fabulous.
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  134. Hi Julia! Just sneaking in here before going to work to say that I’m just in the process of “discovering” your work (read my first JQ just before Christmas) and having a great time of it. I’m looking forward to many hours yet of entertaining reading–and the new books sound fabulous.
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  135. Hi Julia! Just sneaking in here before going to work to say that I’m just in the process of “discovering” your work (read my first JQ just before Christmas) and having a great time of it. I’m looking forward to many hours yet of entertaining reading–and the new books sound fabulous.
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  136. Hi all! Thanks for all the lovely comments. Ego-stroking is an excellent thing first thing in the morning…
    Keira–
    I think with the character issues you brought up, I have just tried to draw on my own experiences and those of the people close to me. Although Freud, et al have changed the way human beings perceive themselves in context, I don’t think human emotion has changed all that much in the last couple hundred years.
    So the trick, I think is to explore the way people really feel and then try to apply that into a historical context. In Romancing Mr. Bridgerton, Penelope feels like she can’t reconcile who she feels to be inside with who she presents to the outside world. Well, that’s exactly how I felt in high school. (And most of my readers, too, if my email is any indication.) But since this is set in the regency period, I just set her inner conflict against a different social backdrop.
    As for your question about spaces, I’m generally pretty dreadful about that, which is why my books tend to be pretty lacking in description.
    I think I got everyone’s questions, but if not, please repost! I’ll pop back in for the next few days. Or (blatant advertising here) come on by the bulletin board I share with Eloisa James. That’s always the fastest way to get a hold of me. (As anyone who has ever emailed me can attest to!)
    JQ

    Reply
  137. Hi all! Thanks for all the lovely comments. Ego-stroking is an excellent thing first thing in the morning…
    Keira–
    I think with the character issues you brought up, I have just tried to draw on my own experiences and those of the people close to me. Although Freud, et al have changed the way human beings perceive themselves in context, I don’t think human emotion has changed all that much in the last couple hundred years.
    So the trick, I think is to explore the way people really feel and then try to apply that into a historical context. In Romancing Mr. Bridgerton, Penelope feels like she can’t reconcile who she feels to be inside with who she presents to the outside world. Well, that’s exactly how I felt in high school. (And most of my readers, too, if my email is any indication.) But since this is set in the regency period, I just set her inner conflict against a different social backdrop.
    As for your question about spaces, I’m generally pretty dreadful about that, which is why my books tend to be pretty lacking in description.
    I think I got everyone’s questions, but if not, please repost! I’ll pop back in for the next few days. Or (blatant advertising here) come on by the bulletin board I share with Eloisa James. That’s always the fastest way to get a hold of me. (As anyone who has ever emailed me can attest to!)
    JQ

    Reply
  138. Hi all! Thanks for all the lovely comments. Ego-stroking is an excellent thing first thing in the morning…
    Keira–
    I think with the character issues you brought up, I have just tried to draw on my own experiences and those of the people close to me. Although Freud, et al have changed the way human beings perceive themselves in context, I don’t think human emotion has changed all that much in the last couple hundred years.
    So the trick, I think is to explore the way people really feel and then try to apply that into a historical context. In Romancing Mr. Bridgerton, Penelope feels like she can’t reconcile who she feels to be inside with who she presents to the outside world. Well, that’s exactly how I felt in high school. (And most of my readers, too, if my email is any indication.) But since this is set in the regency period, I just set her inner conflict against a different social backdrop.
    As for your question about spaces, I’m generally pretty dreadful about that, which is why my books tend to be pretty lacking in description.
    I think I got everyone’s questions, but if not, please repost! I’ll pop back in for the next few days. Or (blatant advertising here) come on by the bulletin board I share with Eloisa James. That’s always the fastest way to get a hold of me. (As anyone who has ever emailed me can attest to!)
    JQ

    Reply
  139. Hi all! Thanks for all the lovely comments. Ego-stroking is an excellent thing first thing in the morning…
    Keira–
    I think with the character issues you brought up, I have just tried to draw on my own experiences and those of the people close to me. Although Freud, et al have changed the way human beings perceive themselves in context, I don’t think human emotion has changed all that much in the last couple hundred years.
    So the trick, I think is to explore the way people really feel and then try to apply that into a historical context. In Romancing Mr. Bridgerton, Penelope feels like she can’t reconcile who she feels to be inside with who she presents to the outside world. Well, that’s exactly how I felt in high school. (And most of my readers, too, if my email is any indication.) But since this is set in the regency period, I just set her inner conflict against a different social backdrop.
    As for your question about spaces, I’m generally pretty dreadful about that, which is why my books tend to be pretty lacking in description.
    I think I got everyone’s questions, but if not, please repost! I’ll pop back in for the next few days. Or (blatant advertising here) come on by the bulletin board I share with Eloisa James. That’s always the fastest way to get a hold of me. (As anyone who has ever emailed me can attest to!)
    JQ

    Reply
  140. Hi all! Thanks for all the lovely comments. Ego-stroking is an excellent thing first thing in the morning…
    Keira–
    I think with the character issues you brought up, I have just tried to draw on my own experiences and those of the people close to me. Although Freud, et al have changed the way human beings perceive themselves in context, I don’t think human emotion has changed all that much in the last couple hundred years.
    So the trick, I think is to explore the way people really feel and then try to apply that into a historical context. In Romancing Mr. Bridgerton, Penelope feels like she can’t reconcile who she feels to be inside with who she presents to the outside world. Well, that’s exactly how I felt in high school. (And most of my readers, too, if my email is any indication.) But since this is set in the regency period, I just set her inner conflict against a different social backdrop.
    As for your question about spaces, I’m generally pretty dreadful about that, which is why my books tend to be pretty lacking in description.
    I think I got everyone’s questions, but if not, please repost! I’ll pop back in for the next few days. Or (blatant advertising here) come on by the bulletin board I share with Eloisa James. That’s always the fastest way to get a hold of me. (As anyone who has ever emailed me can attest to!)
    JQ

    Reply
  141. hello julia;
    i enjoy your books.historical
    romance books.seem to have a
    special romance to them.
    I like to ask you why you think that is.And what you find romantic
    in that time zone.
    thank you for all the great books

    Reply
  142. hello julia;
    i enjoy your books.historical
    romance books.seem to have a
    special romance to them.
    I like to ask you why you think that is.And what you find romantic
    in that time zone.
    thank you for all the great books

    Reply
  143. hello julia;
    i enjoy your books.historical
    romance books.seem to have a
    special romance to them.
    I like to ask you why you think that is.And what you find romantic
    in that time zone.
    thank you for all the great books

    Reply
  144. hello julia;
    i enjoy your books.historical
    romance books.seem to have a
    special romance to them.
    I like to ask you why you think that is.And what you find romantic
    in that time zone.
    thank you for all the great books

    Reply
  145. hello julia;
    i enjoy your books.historical
    romance books.seem to have a
    special romance to them.
    I like to ask you why you think that is.And what you find romantic
    in that time zone.
    thank you for all the great books

    Reply

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