Jottings on Paper

Papermaking_Vatman_Coucher_LayerAndrea/Cara here, In my current Regency-set mystery WIP (more on that in a month or two!) one of the protagonists makes her living putting words and images on paper. Which  got me to thinking about what an incredibly important basic commodity it was in the era. Communication—whether it be art, personal letters, scholarly ideas, firebrand political tracts, music, etc.—was dependent on paper, from the fine deckled edged watercolor papers to a common sheet of foolscap (though none of it, however humble, was cheap.)



EssayFig19_DryingSo let’s take a quick look at some of the historical highlights of papermaking in Great Britain during the Georgian and Regency eras. Until the late 19th century, when wood pulp became the primary source for mass market printing, paper was made of plant fiber, with linen and cotton fibers being the most common. Ragmen collected scraps of cloth, which were sold to paper mills. These were washed to rid them of dirt and foreign matter, then soaked in large vats where they were, as the old saying goes, pounded to a pulp!

Paper_making_at_HahnemühleUntil the 18th century, stampers—large metal-clad lengths of wood—were worked by hand to reduce the rags to a slurry of fibers (Imagine the muscles of a paper stamper!) The hollander (named as such because it was invented in Holland) took tech to a new level. It was a drum with a wooden roller in its center that was bristling with knifelike blades. The hollander was rotated in a vat of soaking rags, and reduced them to pulp much faster than the old method. (Steam power further improved productivity.) But as is usual with progress, not everything was for the better. Hollanders cut the rag fibers to very short length, while stamping produced long fibers, which made for a stronger paper.

Watercolor paperFrom there, the pulp was then put in a paper mold—wooden frames with a screen set inside it. The pulp embedded in the screen and the water drained away (Leveling the pulp quickly and efficiently was an art!) After a first stage of drying, the sheet was placed on a felt pad—the papermaker would interleaf maybe two dozen sheets of paper and felt together before placed the stack in a press to squeeze out the remaining water.

BoningtonThe earliest type of screen was a grid fine horizontal wires held together by regularly spaced vertical wires or threads of horsehair, which produced “laid” paper. The surface tended to be a little irregular and was hard to print on. In 1757, James Whatman the Elder invented a screen that looks very much like our modern window screens. It produced a finer texture paper, which was called “wove” paper. (Today, Whatman paper is still one of the top brands of high quality paper, and is a favorite of watercolor artists.)

Austen msAs a final step, the sheets were hung to dry completely before being packaged for sale. As mentioned, paper was not inexpensive—while we routinely buy reams of paper for our printers, Jane Austen and her contemporaries would more often buy far less. The most common package was a quire, which consisted of 24 sheets.

Old_book_bindingsOne of the interesting things I discovered was that in 1800, the papermaking industry was using nearly 24 million pounds of rags annually to produce 10,000 tons of paper in England and Wales, and imported cloth scraps were needed to keep up with demand. The shortage of rags prompted experiments with other materials, such as sawdust, rye straw and cabbage stumps, but it wasn’t until the middle of the 19th century that wood pulp became a viable alternative to rag paper.

KelmscottI love the feel of fine rag paper and have a number of older books printed on thick, deckled-edge sheet. Inexpensive paper for mass market books—pulp novels!—and newsprint may be practical but is aesthetically disappointing for its feel and rapid deterioration. I also love fancy wrapping papers, good stationery, handmade craft sheets, and thick watercolor paper (I keep telling myself that at some point I will have time to get back into painting . . . Ha!)

What about you? Does paper appeal to you as an art in itself? Do you do a favorite art or craft that uses paper? And lastly, if you write in a journal, do you choose one with special paper?

100 thoughts on “Jottings on Paper”

  1. I save every sheet of clean-on-one side printer paper for reuse. I depend on paper for note taking and for fiddling with with colors. I notice the finer grade paper that appears in some of my puzzle books, as opposed to the near newsprint paper in some of the others. But I can’t say that I have ever delved into paper-making as such.
    Your post, however, brings to mind that in Science-Fiction stranded colony stories, the re-invention of paper is always high on the list of items which must be restored. Just after food and shelter.

    Reply
  2. I save every sheet of clean-on-one side printer paper for reuse. I depend on paper for note taking and for fiddling with with colors. I notice the finer grade paper that appears in some of my puzzle books, as opposed to the near newsprint paper in some of the others. But I can’t say that I have ever delved into paper-making as such.
    Your post, however, brings to mind that in Science-Fiction stranded colony stories, the re-invention of paper is always high on the list of items which must be restored. Just after food and shelter.

    Reply
  3. I save every sheet of clean-on-one side printer paper for reuse. I depend on paper for note taking and for fiddling with with colors. I notice the finer grade paper that appears in some of my puzzle books, as opposed to the near newsprint paper in some of the others. But I can’t say that I have ever delved into paper-making as such.
    Your post, however, brings to mind that in Science-Fiction stranded colony stories, the re-invention of paper is always high on the list of items which must be restored. Just after food and shelter.

    Reply
  4. I save every sheet of clean-on-one side printer paper for reuse. I depend on paper for note taking and for fiddling with with colors. I notice the finer grade paper that appears in some of my puzzle books, as opposed to the near newsprint paper in some of the others. But I can’t say that I have ever delved into paper-making as such.
    Your post, however, brings to mind that in Science-Fiction stranded colony stories, the re-invention of paper is always high on the list of items which must be restored. Just after food and shelter.

    Reply
  5. I save every sheet of clean-on-one side printer paper for reuse. I depend on paper for note taking and for fiddling with with colors. I notice the finer grade paper that appears in some of my puzzle books, as opposed to the near newsprint paper in some of the others. But I can’t say that I have ever delved into paper-making as such.
    Your post, however, brings to mind that in Science-Fiction stranded colony stories, the re-invention of paper is always high on the list of items which must be restored. Just after food and shelter.

    Reply
  6. Paper s another victim of the electronic age, I fear. It’s difficult to find good writing paper for letters because no one writes them any more. I have to find it on the internet, since “stationery” stores only carry cards (and even those are being edged out by e-cards). Beautiful editions of classic books are no longer being produced. Things like cookbooks, which one might expect to be actually used, are produced with perfect (i.e. glued) bindings instead of sewn, and I have some only a few years old that are printed on such cheap newsprint that the pages are already turning yellow and crumbling.
    I’m starting to sound like a cranky old lady, but I do miss lovely paper.

    Reply
  7. Paper s another victim of the electronic age, I fear. It’s difficult to find good writing paper for letters because no one writes them any more. I have to find it on the internet, since “stationery” stores only carry cards (and even those are being edged out by e-cards). Beautiful editions of classic books are no longer being produced. Things like cookbooks, which one might expect to be actually used, are produced with perfect (i.e. glued) bindings instead of sewn, and I have some only a few years old that are printed on such cheap newsprint that the pages are already turning yellow and crumbling.
    I’m starting to sound like a cranky old lady, but I do miss lovely paper.

    Reply
  8. Paper s another victim of the electronic age, I fear. It’s difficult to find good writing paper for letters because no one writes them any more. I have to find it on the internet, since “stationery” stores only carry cards (and even those are being edged out by e-cards). Beautiful editions of classic books are no longer being produced. Things like cookbooks, which one might expect to be actually used, are produced with perfect (i.e. glued) bindings instead of sewn, and I have some only a few years old that are printed on such cheap newsprint that the pages are already turning yellow and crumbling.
    I’m starting to sound like a cranky old lady, but I do miss lovely paper.

    Reply
  9. Paper s another victim of the electronic age, I fear. It’s difficult to find good writing paper for letters because no one writes them any more. I have to find it on the internet, since “stationery” stores only carry cards (and even those are being edged out by e-cards). Beautiful editions of classic books are no longer being produced. Things like cookbooks, which one might expect to be actually used, are produced with perfect (i.e. glued) bindings instead of sewn, and I have some only a few years old that are printed on such cheap newsprint that the pages are already turning yellow and crumbling.
    I’m starting to sound like a cranky old lady, but I do miss lovely paper.

    Reply
  10. Paper s another victim of the electronic age, I fear. It’s difficult to find good writing paper for letters because no one writes them any more. I have to find it on the internet, since “stationery” stores only carry cards (and even those are being edged out by e-cards). Beautiful editions of classic books are no longer being produced. Things like cookbooks, which one might expect to be actually used, are produced with perfect (i.e. glued) bindings instead of sewn, and I have some only a few years old that are printed on such cheap newsprint that the pages are already turning yellow and crumbling.
    I’m starting to sound like a cranky old lady, but I do miss lovely paper.

    Reply
  11. During Ceausescu’s regime, we had books and notebooks made of recycled paper. Yellowish, with wood fiber showing, but cheap, affordable. Nowadays my students would not even touch such paper. They expect high quality paper, even though they know recycling is vital if they want to protect the environment.
    Your post reminded me of a documentary series about the history of paper. It was a co-production, narrated in Korean, and it was amazing, but I can’t find it online.
    As I was looking for it, I found these (enjoy! 🙂 ):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4D9efQ0L1OA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIm7rDi3A3g
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oG2mx5VAc1w
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYnK1urhVhw

    Reply
  12. During Ceausescu’s regime, we had books and notebooks made of recycled paper. Yellowish, with wood fiber showing, but cheap, affordable. Nowadays my students would not even touch such paper. They expect high quality paper, even though they know recycling is vital if they want to protect the environment.
    Your post reminded me of a documentary series about the history of paper. It was a co-production, narrated in Korean, and it was amazing, but I can’t find it online.
    As I was looking for it, I found these (enjoy! 🙂 ):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4D9efQ0L1OA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIm7rDi3A3g
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oG2mx5VAc1w
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYnK1urhVhw

    Reply
  13. During Ceausescu’s regime, we had books and notebooks made of recycled paper. Yellowish, with wood fiber showing, but cheap, affordable. Nowadays my students would not even touch such paper. They expect high quality paper, even though they know recycling is vital if they want to protect the environment.
    Your post reminded me of a documentary series about the history of paper. It was a co-production, narrated in Korean, and it was amazing, but I can’t find it online.
    As I was looking for it, I found these (enjoy! 🙂 ):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4D9efQ0L1OA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIm7rDi3A3g
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oG2mx5VAc1w
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYnK1urhVhw

    Reply
  14. During Ceausescu’s regime, we had books and notebooks made of recycled paper. Yellowish, with wood fiber showing, but cheap, affordable. Nowadays my students would not even touch such paper. They expect high quality paper, even though they know recycling is vital if they want to protect the environment.
    Your post reminded me of a documentary series about the history of paper. It was a co-production, narrated in Korean, and it was amazing, but I can’t find it online.
    As I was looking for it, I found these (enjoy! 🙂 ):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4D9efQ0L1OA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIm7rDi3A3g
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oG2mx5VAc1w
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYnK1urhVhw

    Reply
  15. During Ceausescu’s regime, we had books and notebooks made of recycled paper. Yellowish, with wood fiber showing, but cheap, affordable. Nowadays my students would not even touch such paper. They expect high quality paper, even though they know recycling is vital if they want to protect the environment.
    Your post reminded me of a documentary series about the history of paper. It was a co-production, narrated in Korean, and it was amazing, but I can’t find it online.
    As I was looking for it, I found these (enjoy! 🙂 ):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4D9efQ0L1OA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIm7rDi3A3g
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oG2mx5VAc1w
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYnK1urhVhw

    Reply
  16. Sue, I’m like you—I hate to waste paper. I think some innate sense tells me it’s precious! Which it is to me. As child, I loved having paper to draw on, and my mother was very encouraging.
    All societies seem to have found a way of making paper—the Eygptians with papyrus, the Polynesians with coconut fibers . . .the babylonians with clay! Writing, or some sort of storytelling, does seem to be part of the human DNA.

    Reply
  17. Sue, I’m like you—I hate to waste paper. I think some innate sense tells me it’s precious! Which it is to me. As child, I loved having paper to draw on, and my mother was very encouraging.
    All societies seem to have found a way of making paper—the Eygptians with papyrus, the Polynesians with coconut fibers . . .the babylonians with clay! Writing, or some sort of storytelling, does seem to be part of the human DNA.

    Reply
  18. Sue, I’m like you—I hate to waste paper. I think some innate sense tells me it’s precious! Which it is to me. As child, I loved having paper to draw on, and my mother was very encouraging.
    All societies seem to have found a way of making paper—the Eygptians with papyrus, the Polynesians with coconut fibers . . .the babylonians with clay! Writing, or some sort of storytelling, does seem to be part of the human DNA.

    Reply
  19. Sue, I’m like you—I hate to waste paper. I think some innate sense tells me it’s precious! Which it is to me. As child, I loved having paper to draw on, and my mother was very encouraging.
    All societies seem to have found a way of making paper—the Eygptians with papyrus, the Polynesians with coconut fibers . . .the babylonians with clay! Writing, or some sort of storytelling, does seem to be part of the human DNA.

    Reply
  20. Sue, I’m like you—I hate to waste paper. I think some innate sense tells me it’s precious! Which it is to me. As child, I loved having paper to draw on, and my mother was very encouraging.
    All societies seem to have found a way of making paper—the Eygptians with papyrus, the Polynesians with coconut fibers . . .the babylonians with clay! Writing, or some sort of storytelling, does seem to be part of the human DNA.

    Reply
  21. Lillian, I too, hate to see good quality paper disappearing from common places. But one can get good stuff—it just takes some looking. Papyrus, a chain that seems to be in a lot of cities, offers some nice writing papers. And traditional stationery makers like Crance’s still offer lovely rag papers.
    Fine editions of classics still are being made, but alas they are expensive. I see a small trend back to appreciating well-made books. But you have to have a fat wallet.
    I so agree about the cookbooks. If you really use them in a kitchen, which I do, they don’t last very well. And as for opening a recent book and seeing the paper is already turning brown with acid . . . Sigh.

    Reply
  22. Lillian, I too, hate to see good quality paper disappearing from common places. But one can get good stuff—it just takes some looking. Papyrus, a chain that seems to be in a lot of cities, offers some nice writing papers. And traditional stationery makers like Crance’s still offer lovely rag papers.
    Fine editions of classics still are being made, but alas they are expensive. I see a small trend back to appreciating well-made books. But you have to have a fat wallet.
    I so agree about the cookbooks. If you really use them in a kitchen, which I do, they don’t last very well. And as for opening a recent book and seeing the paper is already turning brown with acid . . . Sigh.

    Reply
  23. Lillian, I too, hate to see good quality paper disappearing from common places. But one can get good stuff—it just takes some looking. Papyrus, a chain that seems to be in a lot of cities, offers some nice writing papers. And traditional stationery makers like Crance’s still offer lovely rag papers.
    Fine editions of classics still are being made, but alas they are expensive. I see a small trend back to appreciating well-made books. But you have to have a fat wallet.
    I so agree about the cookbooks. If you really use them in a kitchen, which I do, they don’t last very well. And as for opening a recent book and seeing the paper is already turning brown with acid . . . Sigh.

    Reply
  24. Lillian, I too, hate to see good quality paper disappearing from common places. But one can get good stuff—it just takes some looking. Papyrus, a chain that seems to be in a lot of cities, offers some nice writing papers. And traditional stationery makers like Crance’s still offer lovely rag papers.
    Fine editions of classics still are being made, but alas they are expensive. I see a small trend back to appreciating well-made books. But you have to have a fat wallet.
    I so agree about the cookbooks. If you really use them in a kitchen, which I do, they don’t last very well. And as for opening a recent book and seeing the paper is already turning brown with acid . . . Sigh.

    Reply
  25. Lillian, I too, hate to see good quality paper disappearing from common places. But one can get good stuff—it just takes some looking. Papyrus, a chain that seems to be in a lot of cities, offers some nice writing papers. And traditional stationery makers like Crance’s still offer lovely rag papers.
    Fine editions of classics still are being made, but alas they are expensive. I see a small trend back to appreciating well-made books. But you have to have a fat wallet.
    I so agree about the cookbooks. If you really use them in a kitchen, which I do, they don’t last very well. And as for opening a recent book and seeing the paper is already turning brown with acid . . . Sigh.

    Reply
  26. Thanks for sharing, Oana-Marie! Recycling is very important, but I’ve actually seen some lovely recycled papers, that have very nice feel, texture and color. I’m sure they don’t last as long as rag paper, but they are a big improvement on what you describe.

    Reply
  27. Thanks for sharing, Oana-Marie! Recycling is very important, but I’ve actually seen some lovely recycled papers, that have very nice feel, texture and color. I’m sure they don’t last as long as rag paper, but they are a big improvement on what you describe.

    Reply
  28. Thanks for sharing, Oana-Marie! Recycling is very important, but I’ve actually seen some lovely recycled papers, that have very nice feel, texture and color. I’m sure they don’t last as long as rag paper, but they are a big improvement on what you describe.

    Reply
  29. Thanks for sharing, Oana-Marie! Recycling is very important, but I’ve actually seen some lovely recycled papers, that have very nice feel, texture and color. I’m sure they don’t last as long as rag paper, but they are a big improvement on what you describe.

    Reply
  30. Thanks for sharing, Oana-Marie! Recycling is very important, but I’ve actually seen some lovely recycled papers, that have very nice feel, texture and color. I’m sure they don’t last as long as rag paper, but they are a big improvement on what you describe.

    Reply
  31. At one time I was a stationery hoarder. That was at a time when people wrote letters. I loved to find lovely stationery – some were onion skin light – some were thick and luxurious. I still write to people. I send cards with notes enclosed – and no – the notes are not written on beautiful stationery. But, I am a person who admires beautiful paper.

    Reply
  32. At one time I was a stationery hoarder. That was at a time when people wrote letters. I loved to find lovely stationery – some were onion skin light – some were thick and luxurious. I still write to people. I send cards with notes enclosed – and no – the notes are not written on beautiful stationery. But, I am a person who admires beautiful paper.

    Reply
  33. At one time I was a stationery hoarder. That was at a time when people wrote letters. I loved to find lovely stationery – some were onion skin light – some were thick and luxurious. I still write to people. I send cards with notes enclosed – and no – the notes are not written on beautiful stationery. But, I am a person who admires beautiful paper.

    Reply
  34. At one time I was a stationery hoarder. That was at a time when people wrote letters. I loved to find lovely stationery – some were onion skin light – some were thick and luxurious. I still write to people. I send cards with notes enclosed – and no – the notes are not written on beautiful stationery. But, I am a person who admires beautiful paper.

    Reply
  35. At one time I was a stationery hoarder. That was at a time when people wrote letters. I loved to find lovely stationery – some were onion skin light – some were thick and luxurious. I still write to people. I send cards with notes enclosed – and no – the notes are not written on beautiful stationery. But, I am a person who admires beautiful paper.

    Reply
  36. I have always been a writer. Not as in books, but as in letters and cards. I used to buy beautiful stationary on heavy, ornate paper but as time has gone on, I’ve stopped trying to find in and instead I buy beautiful cards that are blank inside and send those. I will occasionally come across cards that are made with beautiful paper instead of just printed cardstock, but it’s so very rare. It’s amazing how much technology, though helpful, has made way for us to forget the beauty that can be found in common things.

    Reply
  37. I have always been a writer. Not as in books, but as in letters and cards. I used to buy beautiful stationary on heavy, ornate paper but as time has gone on, I’ve stopped trying to find in and instead I buy beautiful cards that are blank inside and send those. I will occasionally come across cards that are made with beautiful paper instead of just printed cardstock, but it’s so very rare. It’s amazing how much technology, though helpful, has made way for us to forget the beauty that can be found in common things.

    Reply
  38. I have always been a writer. Not as in books, but as in letters and cards. I used to buy beautiful stationary on heavy, ornate paper but as time has gone on, I’ve stopped trying to find in and instead I buy beautiful cards that are blank inside and send those. I will occasionally come across cards that are made with beautiful paper instead of just printed cardstock, but it’s so very rare. It’s amazing how much technology, though helpful, has made way for us to forget the beauty that can be found in common things.

    Reply
  39. I have always been a writer. Not as in books, but as in letters and cards. I used to buy beautiful stationary on heavy, ornate paper but as time has gone on, I’ve stopped trying to find in and instead I buy beautiful cards that are blank inside and send those. I will occasionally come across cards that are made with beautiful paper instead of just printed cardstock, but it’s so very rare. It’s amazing how much technology, though helpful, has made way for us to forget the beauty that can be found in common things.

    Reply
  40. I have always been a writer. Not as in books, but as in letters and cards. I used to buy beautiful stationary on heavy, ornate paper but as time has gone on, I’ve stopped trying to find in and instead I buy beautiful cards that are blank inside and send those. I will occasionally come across cards that are made with beautiful paper instead of just printed cardstock, but it’s so very rare. It’s amazing how much technology, though helpful, has made way for us to forget the beauty that can be found in common things.

    Reply
  41. I can’t say that I ever thought about the quality of the paper, but I do miss the written word – you know, cards, letters, etc. I do remember shopping for and owning several boxes of special stationary for letters. I always favored floral designs. Some were even scented.
    There is no email or e-card and certainly no text that can compare to a letter or card with a written message from someone you love – even if you can print it out from your computer.

    Reply
  42. I can’t say that I ever thought about the quality of the paper, but I do miss the written word – you know, cards, letters, etc. I do remember shopping for and owning several boxes of special stationary for letters. I always favored floral designs. Some were even scented.
    There is no email or e-card and certainly no text that can compare to a letter or card with a written message from someone you love – even if you can print it out from your computer.

    Reply
  43. I can’t say that I ever thought about the quality of the paper, but I do miss the written word – you know, cards, letters, etc. I do remember shopping for and owning several boxes of special stationary for letters. I always favored floral designs. Some were even scented.
    There is no email or e-card and certainly no text that can compare to a letter or card with a written message from someone you love – even if you can print it out from your computer.

    Reply
  44. I can’t say that I ever thought about the quality of the paper, but I do miss the written word – you know, cards, letters, etc. I do remember shopping for and owning several boxes of special stationary for letters. I always favored floral designs. Some were even scented.
    There is no email or e-card and certainly no text that can compare to a letter or card with a written message from someone you love – even if you can print it out from your computer.

    Reply
  45. I can’t say that I ever thought about the quality of the paper, but I do miss the written word – you know, cards, letters, etc. I do remember shopping for and owning several boxes of special stationary for letters. I always favored floral designs. Some were even scented.
    There is no email or e-card and certainly no text that can compare to a letter or card with a written message from someone you love – even if you can print it out from your computer.

    Reply
  46. Oh, I have several drawers full of lovely paper. I don’t write as many letters as I’d like, But I do enjoy taking the time to do it. (And love getting a handwritten letter too.) I even have a brass seal and sealing wax for the envelope! Yes, I am a Luddite at heart.

    Reply
  47. Oh, I have several drawers full of lovely paper. I don’t write as many letters as I’d like, But I do enjoy taking the time to do it. (And love getting a handwritten letter too.) I even have a brass seal and sealing wax for the envelope! Yes, I am a Luddite at heart.

    Reply
  48. Oh, I have several drawers full of lovely paper. I don’t write as many letters as I’d like, But I do enjoy taking the time to do it. (And love getting a handwritten letter too.) I even have a brass seal and sealing wax for the envelope! Yes, I am a Luddite at heart.

    Reply
  49. Oh, I have several drawers full of lovely paper. I don’t write as many letters as I’d like, But I do enjoy taking the time to do it. (And love getting a handwritten letter too.) I even have a brass seal and sealing wax for the envelope! Yes, I am a Luddite at heart.

    Reply
  50. Oh, I have several drawers full of lovely paper. I don’t write as many letters as I’d like, But I do enjoy taking the time to do it. (And love getting a handwritten letter too.) I even have a brass seal and sealing wax for the envelope! Yes, I am a Luddite at heart.

    Reply
  51. SO true about the beauty in everyday things, Stephanie. That’s one of the reasons I love the V&A Museum in London, which celebrates everyday items.
    However I do see a renewed interest in quality things. I live near New York City, and go in often. I’m pleased to say there are more and more shops featuring good cards and paper, and other items made of quality material and craftsmanship. It makes me smile!

    Reply
  52. SO true about the beauty in everyday things, Stephanie. That’s one of the reasons I love the V&A Museum in London, which celebrates everyday items.
    However I do see a renewed interest in quality things. I live near New York City, and go in often. I’m pleased to say there are more and more shops featuring good cards and paper, and other items made of quality material and craftsmanship. It makes me smile!

    Reply
  53. SO true about the beauty in everyday things, Stephanie. That’s one of the reasons I love the V&A Museum in London, which celebrates everyday items.
    However I do see a renewed interest in quality things. I live near New York City, and go in often. I’m pleased to say there are more and more shops featuring good cards and paper, and other items made of quality material and craftsmanship. It makes me smile!

    Reply
  54. SO true about the beauty in everyday things, Stephanie. That’s one of the reasons I love the V&A Museum in London, which celebrates everyday items.
    However I do see a renewed interest in quality things. I live near New York City, and go in often. I’m pleased to say there are more and more shops featuring good cards and paper, and other items made of quality material and craftsmanship. It makes me smile!

    Reply
  55. SO true about the beauty in everyday things, Stephanie. That’s one of the reasons I love the V&A Museum in London, which celebrates everyday items.
    However I do see a renewed interest in quality things. I live near New York City, and go in often. I’m pleased to say there are more and more shops featuring good cards and paper, and other items made of quality material and craftsmanship. It makes me smile!

    Reply
  56. The post and discussion brought to mind several memories related to paper. Coloring books when I was a child were on paper that already had a tinge of yellow. Paper for practicing penmanship both in the country school I attended and my first classes as a teacher were of such poor quality that chunks of wood still floated on top and were large enough to give you a sliver – I’m only slightly exaggerating. Reminds me of a comedian’s piece about “chunks of wood in the paper and pencils the size of logs” for beginning writers never mind that they had been using “real” pencils for years before starting school. I’ll have to see if I can find whose genius idea those large pencils were. While engaged, my then fiance had a type set made for me of the question mark symbol used on the Tom Quest books. He then had a box of stationary printed for me with that symbol in an upper corner. I still have some of that stationary from more than fifty years ago. Thanks for the memory! Another lovely use of paper I recently saw on Read a Romance Month FB page is from an Oklahoma artist who recycles pages from old dictionaries as the paper for her art. The page she uses gives the definition of the subject of her art. “Book”, “Violin”, and “Tea” were favorites. Web site: https://www.etsy.com/listing/158746785/print-book-mixed-media-drawing-on

    Reply
  57. The post and discussion brought to mind several memories related to paper. Coloring books when I was a child were on paper that already had a tinge of yellow. Paper for practicing penmanship both in the country school I attended and my first classes as a teacher were of such poor quality that chunks of wood still floated on top and were large enough to give you a sliver – I’m only slightly exaggerating. Reminds me of a comedian’s piece about “chunks of wood in the paper and pencils the size of logs” for beginning writers never mind that they had been using “real” pencils for years before starting school. I’ll have to see if I can find whose genius idea those large pencils were. While engaged, my then fiance had a type set made for me of the question mark symbol used on the Tom Quest books. He then had a box of stationary printed for me with that symbol in an upper corner. I still have some of that stationary from more than fifty years ago. Thanks for the memory! Another lovely use of paper I recently saw on Read a Romance Month FB page is from an Oklahoma artist who recycles pages from old dictionaries as the paper for her art. The page she uses gives the definition of the subject of her art. “Book”, “Violin”, and “Tea” were favorites. Web site: https://www.etsy.com/listing/158746785/print-book-mixed-media-drawing-on

    Reply
  58. The post and discussion brought to mind several memories related to paper. Coloring books when I was a child were on paper that already had a tinge of yellow. Paper for practicing penmanship both in the country school I attended and my first classes as a teacher were of such poor quality that chunks of wood still floated on top and were large enough to give you a sliver – I’m only slightly exaggerating. Reminds me of a comedian’s piece about “chunks of wood in the paper and pencils the size of logs” for beginning writers never mind that they had been using “real” pencils for years before starting school. I’ll have to see if I can find whose genius idea those large pencils were. While engaged, my then fiance had a type set made for me of the question mark symbol used on the Tom Quest books. He then had a box of stationary printed for me with that symbol in an upper corner. I still have some of that stationary from more than fifty years ago. Thanks for the memory! Another lovely use of paper I recently saw on Read a Romance Month FB page is from an Oklahoma artist who recycles pages from old dictionaries as the paper for her art. The page she uses gives the definition of the subject of her art. “Book”, “Violin”, and “Tea” were favorites. Web site: https://www.etsy.com/listing/158746785/print-book-mixed-media-drawing-on

    Reply
  59. The post and discussion brought to mind several memories related to paper. Coloring books when I was a child were on paper that already had a tinge of yellow. Paper for practicing penmanship both in the country school I attended and my first classes as a teacher were of such poor quality that chunks of wood still floated on top and were large enough to give you a sliver – I’m only slightly exaggerating. Reminds me of a comedian’s piece about “chunks of wood in the paper and pencils the size of logs” for beginning writers never mind that they had been using “real” pencils for years before starting school. I’ll have to see if I can find whose genius idea those large pencils were. While engaged, my then fiance had a type set made for me of the question mark symbol used on the Tom Quest books. He then had a box of stationary printed for me with that symbol in an upper corner. I still have some of that stationary from more than fifty years ago. Thanks for the memory! Another lovely use of paper I recently saw on Read a Romance Month FB page is from an Oklahoma artist who recycles pages from old dictionaries as the paper for her art. The page she uses gives the definition of the subject of her art. “Book”, “Violin”, and “Tea” were favorites. Web site: https://www.etsy.com/listing/158746785/print-book-mixed-media-drawing-on

    Reply
  60. The post and discussion brought to mind several memories related to paper. Coloring books when I was a child were on paper that already had a tinge of yellow. Paper for practicing penmanship both in the country school I attended and my first classes as a teacher were of such poor quality that chunks of wood still floated on top and were large enough to give you a sliver – I’m only slightly exaggerating. Reminds me of a comedian’s piece about “chunks of wood in the paper and pencils the size of logs” for beginning writers never mind that they had been using “real” pencils for years before starting school. I’ll have to see if I can find whose genius idea those large pencils were. While engaged, my then fiance had a type set made for me of the question mark symbol used on the Tom Quest books. He then had a box of stationary printed for me with that symbol in an upper corner. I still have some of that stationary from more than fifty years ago. Thanks for the memory! Another lovely use of paper I recently saw on Read a Romance Month FB page is from an Oklahoma artist who recycles pages from old dictionaries as the paper for her art. The page she uses gives the definition of the subject of her art. “Book”, “Violin”, and “Tea” were favorites. Web site: https://www.etsy.com/listing/158746785/print-book-mixed-media-drawing-on

    Reply
  61. Many years ago, I remember doing a paper making workshop. In 1980, due to my interest, we visited Wookey Hole in the UK, where they were making paper by hand.
    An apprenticeship took 7 years to complete. My workshop lasted a weekend. However, the couple who taught us used to try very old methods. I remember when they tried the Egyptian way and it took them a month to make one sheet of paper, by the time they hammered out the fibres.
    That couple had a write up in one of the Australian magazines. I’ve kept it and if it ever comes to hand then I’ll let Anne Gracie know!

    Reply
  62. Many years ago, I remember doing a paper making workshop. In 1980, due to my interest, we visited Wookey Hole in the UK, where they were making paper by hand.
    An apprenticeship took 7 years to complete. My workshop lasted a weekend. However, the couple who taught us used to try very old methods. I remember when they tried the Egyptian way and it took them a month to make one sheet of paper, by the time they hammered out the fibres.
    That couple had a write up in one of the Australian magazines. I’ve kept it and if it ever comes to hand then I’ll let Anne Gracie know!

    Reply
  63. Many years ago, I remember doing a paper making workshop. In 1980, due to my interest, we visited Wookey Hole in the UK, where they were making paper by hand.
    An apprenticeship took 7 years to complete. My workshop lasted a weekend. However, the couple who taught us used to try very old methods. I remember when they tried the Egyptian way and it took them a month to make one sheet of paper, by the time they hammered out the fibres.
    That couple had a write up in one of the Australian magazines. I’ve kept it and if it ever comes to hand then I’ll let Anne Gracie know!

    Reply
  64. Many years ago, I remember doing a paper making workshop. In 1980, due to my interest, we visited Wookey Hole in the UK, where they were making paper by hand.
    An apprenticeship took 7 years to complete. My workshop lasted a weekend. However, the couple who taught us used to try very old methods. I remember when they tried the Egyptian way and it took them a month to make one sheet of paper, by the time they hammered out the fibres.
    That couple had a write up in one of the Australian magazines. I’ve kept it and if it ever comes to hand then I’ll let Anne Gracie know!

    Reply
  65. Many years ago, I remember doing a paper making workshop. In 1980, due to my interest, we visited Wookey Hole in the UK, where they were making paper by hand.
    An apprenticeship took 7 years to complete. My workshop lasted a weekend. However, the couple who taught us used to try very old methods. I remember when they tried the Egyptian way and it took them a month to make one sheet of paper, by the time they hammered out the fibres.
    That couple had a write up in one of the Australian magazines. I’ve kept it and if it ever comes to hand then I’ll let Anne Gracie know!

    Reply
  66. Great post Cara/Andrea. I’m doing an on-line course at the moment about Wordsworth’s poetry. It’s mentioned many times in it that paper was very expensive and I was wondering why. Now I have my answer. Isn’t coincidence a wonderful thing!!!

    Reply
  67. Great post Cara/Andrea. I’m doing an on-line course at the moment about Wordsworth’s poetry. It’s mentioned many times in it that paper was very expensive and I was wondering why. Now I have my answer. Isn’t coincidence a wonderful thing!!!

    Reply
  68. Great post Cara/Andrea. I’m doing an on-line course at the moment about Wordsworth’s poetry. It’s mentioned many times in it that paper was very expensive and I was wondering why. Now I have my answer. Isn’t coincidence a wonderful thing!!!

    Reply
  69. Great post Cara/Andrea. I’m doing an on-line course at the moment about Wordsworth’s poetry. It’s mentioned many times in it that paper was very expensive and I was wondering why. Now I have my answer. Isn’t coincidence a wonderful thing!!!

    Reply
  70. Great post Cara/Andrea. I’m doing an on-line course at the moment about Wordsworth’s poetry. It’s mentioned many times in it that paper was very expensive and I was wondering why. Now I have my answer. Isn’t coincidence a wonderful thing!!!

    Reply
  71. I’ve always wanted to try making my own homemade paper-one of our local museums has workshops. I do have some lovely handmade notepaper from either Tibet or Nepal, which I got via UNICEF.
    Paper quality wise, the worst books I’ve seen are the ones printed during WWII, like the Pocket Books, made on the cheap to conserve for the war effort.

    Reply
  72. I’ve always wanted to try making my own homemade paper-one of our local museums has workshops. I do have some lovely handmade notepaper from either Tibet or Nepal, which I got via UNICEF.
    Paper quality wise, the worst books I’ve seen are the ones printed during WWII, like the Pocket Books, made on the cheap to conserve for the war effort.

    Reply
  73. I’ve always wanted to try making my own homemade paper-one of our local museums has workshops. I do have some lovely handmade notepaper from either Tibet or Nepal, which I got via UNICEF.
    Paper quality wise, the worst books I’ve seen are the ones printed during WWII, like the Pocket Books, made on the cheap to conserve for the war effort.

    Reply
  74. I’ve always wanted to try making my own homemade paper-one of our local museums has workshops. I do have some lovely handmade notepaper from either Tibet or Nepal, which I got via UNICEF.
    Paper quality wise, the worst books I’ve seen are the ones printed during WWII, like the Pocket Books, made on the cheap to conserve for the war effort.

    Reply
  75. I’ve always wanted to try making my own homemade paper-one of our local museums has workshops. I do have some lovely handmade notepaper from either Tibet or Nepal, which I got via UNICEF.
    Paper quality wise, the worst books I’ve seen are the ones printed during WWII, like the Pocket Books, made on the cheap to conserve for the war effort.

    Reply
  76. Hi Andrea, I am popping in on this discussion late, but I couldn’t resist. Thank you for a very interesting article. I think (almost) all readers and writers have a love affair with paper and it shows in our obsession with not only books but stationery.

    Reply
  77. Hi Andrea, I am popping in on this discussion late, but I couldn’t resist. Thank you for a very interesting article. I think (almost) all readers and writers have a love affair with paper and it shows in our obsession with not only books but stationery.

    Reply
  78. Hi Andrea, I am popping in on this discussion late, but I couldn’t resist. Thank you for a very interesting article. I think (almost) all readers and writers have a love affair with paper and it shows in our obsession with not only books but stationery.

    Reply
  79. Hi Andrea, I am popping in on this discussion late, but I couldn’t resist. Thank you for a very interesting article. I think (almost) all readers and writers have a love affair with paper and it shows in our obsession with not only books but stationery.

    Reply
  80. Hi Andrea, I am popping in on this discussion late, but I couldn’t resist. Thank you for a very interesting article. I think (almost) all readers and writers have a love affair with paper and it shows in our obsession with not only books but stationery.

    Reply

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