Jo Beverley: Too Dangerous for a Lady!

Cat 243 DoverBy Mary Jo

I  shamelessly begged for an advance reading copy of Jo Beverley's new book, Too Dangerous for a Lady.  It's a great read, with romance, suspense, and even medical matters of the time.  Not only is the story a Romantic Times Top Pick (along with new books from Wenches Patricia Rice and Cara Elliott), but it received a wonderful review in Publisher's Weekly:  "Beverley's brilliantly drawn protagonists shine in a  story that puts equal emphasis on intrigue and love."

Too Dangerous is set in Jo's long-running Regency Rogues World.  There's more about the Rogues here.

MJP: Jo, is it true that the Rogues are the longest-running series of Regency heroes? Tdyalmod

JB: As best I can tell. The first book came out in 1991, which means 24 years. The characters have covered three years in fifteen books.

 MJP: How do Mark and Hermione fit into the Rogues World?

JB: I completed the stories of the 10 surviving members of the Company of Rogues in To Rescue a Rogue, but I've written spin-off characters along the way. Two years ago I was considering a few characters who are waiting in the wings, but then some of my readers asked  about the families of the two dead Rogues. When I wrote the first book, set in 1814, it seemed unlikely that out of twelve young men none had died in the ongoing war, so  I killed off two. We authors are so carelessly cruel.

Cue Lady Hermione Merryhew, sister of Lord Roger Merryhew. Roger joined the army and was killed in Spain. His older brother has since died so the family title,  Marquess of Carsheld, has gone to a distant relative.

 

Despite the grand title there's never been much money so when there's a chance of a fortune from a long-lost relative, Hermione pursues it. She's on her way to a death bed, in the company of her sister and Polly's family, when a scruffy rascal seeks refuge in her inn bedroom. That leads to the danger,  the romance, and eventually to an encounter with the Company of Rogues.

What amused me was that when Nicholas Delaney, the leader of the Rogues, turns up to Trarwwmjhelp Hermione, she's never heard of him. Previously in the Rogues books friends and family have heard about the Rogues, sometimes to the point of exasperation, but Roger pretty well ignored his kid sisters. Hermione is Not Amused to have a stranger turn up to take charge. Here's a bit of the scene.

Hermione is in London by this point, seeking a cure for her elderly relative, who is suffering from a tropical disease. She's heard of a lecture given to a group called the Curious Creatures and has tried to make contact. A gentleman arrives.

    “Mr. Delaney, thank you for coming. Won’t you be seated?” She took her chair near the fire and he sat in the one opposite.
    “I could hardly resist,” he said with a smile. “Being a curious creature.”
    His manner unsettled her. It seemed overly familiar. She wasn’t accustomed to being nervous in men’s company, but she was glad her maid was present as chaperone. “You’re a member, sir?” she asked.
    “Founding member. I happened to be in Town, so Tenby of the Green Man sent to me to deal with what he saw as a troubling enquiry.”
    “Troubling?”
    “We do have women in the Curious Creatures, but not many, so he thinks of it as a gentlemen’s club. An enquiry from a lady—in both meanings of the word—alarmed him. No matter. How may I help you?”
    He seemed to have settled to a more normal manner, so she relaxed.
(She explains the situation.)
    Delaney lit with sparkling curiosity. “Intriguing. Perhaps you’d allow me to make enquiries for you—being a Curious Creature of some expertise.”
    His light manner made her uncertain again, but she needed help, especially from one who knew London. “Thank you, sir. That’s very generous.”
    “On the contrary, it’s obligatory. You don’t recognize my name, do you?”
    Clearly she should. Hampshire? Yorkshire? “My apologies, sir . . .”
    “I was at school with your brother Roger.”
    “Oh. That was some time ago, and Roger is dead.”
    “Yes, I know. I wrote to your parents, though it was delayed, as I was abroad in 1810.”
    He remembered the date. “You were good friends? I was five years younger than he, so I don’t know much about his school days.”
    “We were good friends,” he agreed. “We were part of a group who called themselves the Company of Rogues.”

Willy-nilly Hermione is swept into the Rogues and soon finds herself installed in a duke's house and preparing to attend a grand entertainment, but her preoccupations are her great-uncle's health and the safety of the scruffy invader she's come to love.

MJP: The  story is set in 1817, which is a troubled time.  Could you describe some of the social problems of that period?  

JB: The end of war is often a difficult time, even for the victorious. War is expensive 1819terrorand the debts need to be paid. After Waterloo there were additional problems. The unnatural stimulus to industry stopped at the same time that cheap imports became available.  This all led to unemployment, low wages, and unrest, as it does in all times and places, including today.

Desperate people gathered to make their voices heard. Reformers made stirring speeches. Men set off to march to London, not with any violent intent, but to try to make clear how bad their situation was. However, there were some orators who would harangue a mob to break open gunsmiths to steal weapons, and handbills urging the slaughter of the government and the royal family.

1817 is only a generation away from the French Revolution (Jane Austen had a relative whose husband had died on the guillotine) so many were terrified by all this and the government brought in new laws and imposed severe penalties, but that often made matters worse.

Many people were torn as to which side to support. They wanted help for the distressed poor, but wanted law and order as well.

Too Dangerous for a Lady isn't about the social turmoil, but the hero's French mother was traumatized by the
Revolution and he's determined never to let anything like that happen in England.

TdflsbMJP: Ah, yes. That's how Mark and Hermione meet at the beginning of the book.

JB: Or meet again. Mark's now Lord Faringay, but when he left the army he went undercover as Ned Granger to infiltrate a particularly dangerous group. He's evading detection and death when he slips into Hermione's bedroom.

    “Am I allowed to stay?” he asked.
    “No.”
    “I won’t harm any of you.”
    “Why should I believe that?”
    “For no reason at all.”
    Even so, her instincts said he was safe, which was ridiculous, except . . . Dear Lord, could it be . . . ?
    “You could tie me up,” he said.
    She started. “What?”
    “If you tied me to that wooden chair, you’d all be safe and you could sleep.”
    Still distracted, Hermione could hardly make sense of his words. “You imagine I travel with rope in my valise?”
    “Stockings would do.”
    “You’re deranged.”
    “Not at all. Think about it.”
    But instead she was thinking that he just might be, could possibly be, the dashing dance partner, the man who’d almost given her her first kiss, the soldier she’d never been able to forget. Thayne. Lieutenant Thayne. She’d never known his first name. How had he sunk to such a state?
    One thing was clear. If there was any chance of that, she couldn’t eject him to possible death.

That's her big mistake. Except, of course, that it sets her on the path to true love and a happy ending. As the step-back says, "Nothing's too dangerous for a woman in love."

Here's one more taste. He's invaded her room again, but this time in her great-uncle's house, where they've truly explored their feeling and shared truths.

    A log collapsed in the grate, bringing them back to reality.
    The fire would soon be out. How long had they been here, illicitly alone and intimate, lost in passion, longing, and whimsy?
    He stood, straightening his clothing, but then he looked at her. “My Hermione, relaxed in the glow of firelight, disordered and dangerous to all my righteous intentions.”
    She should have straightened, stood up, and perhaps even protested, but she could only smile back at him, so handsome and strong in the dying light, despite his scruffy trimmings.
    He knelt by the sofa to kiss her. “I want to stay here with you more than I’ve wanted anything in my life.”
    So tempting to grasp him and hold him. Instead she smiled. “One day you will.”
    One day, if it was within her power, a fireside conversation and kisses sweet and spicy would lead in due course to a lawful bed and thence to heaven.
    “You truly must go to London?” she asked.
    “Yes.”
    “Into danger?”
    “Perhaps.”
    "I wish I could give you a talisman.”
    “You already did.” He rose and took a bit of dirty white out of his pocket. She recognized the silk rose.
    “You kept it,” she said, and tears threatened.
    “Treasured it. It’s sadly battered and grimy, but it’s kept me safe.”
    “Then don’t lose it.” She reached into a pocket and took out a brass button. “I still have this.”
    “Polished, even.”
    “Of course.”
    “I’d kiss you again if I dared."

MJP: You  gave Mark an intriguing friend with great hero potential! Will we be seeing more  of Beau Braydon?   

JB: Definitely! I didn't bring him in to be a hero — I simply needed some help for Mark at that point — but he was instantly a distinctive character. He, too, was in the army, but he's been an elegant dresser since his schooldays, hence "Beau." Despite that, he proved useful to Mark in all kinds of ways, including tracking down villains and disposing of dead bodies.

TdyalmodHe's a town man, son of a government official, born and raised in London. Now, thanks to a rich uncle and Mark's introduction to anti-terrorism work, he pretty well has the life he wants — until he inherits a title. What? Live in the country? Manage property? Deal with interfering neighbors and rural politics? There's only one thing for it. The Viscount Need a Wife. I'm writing that book now, and it will be out next April.

A  copy of Too Dangerous for a Lady will  be given to one commenter between now and Tuesday midnight, so comment away!

MJP: Thanks so much for telling us about the book, Jo.  Now I'm waiting for Beau Braydon! 

275 thoughts on “Jo Beverley: Too Dangerous for a Lady!”

  1. One of the few series of a group of people that never disappoints. Hermione sounds delightful. The button and the rose as sentimental keepsakes are touching and very realistic.

    Reply
  2. One of the few series of a group of people that never disappoints. Hermione sounds delightful. The button and the rose as sentimental keepsakes are touching and very realistic.

    Reply
  3. One of the few series of a group of people that never disappoints. Hermione sounds delightful. The button and the rose as sentimental keepsakes are touching and very realistic.

    Reply
  4. One of the few series of a group of people that never disappoints. Hermione sounds delightful. The button and the rose as sentimental keepsakes are touching and very realistic.

    Reply
  5. One of the few series of a group of people that never disappoints. Hermione sounds delightful. The button and the rose as sentimental keepsakes are touching and very realistic.

    Reply
  6. This is a book I have been waiting for. I didn’t read the teasers in this interview because I will wait until I can buy my copy of the book! It is at the very top of my shopping list.
    A new Jo Beverley is always a treat. I like to return to visit with the rogues also.

    Reply
  7. This is a book I have been waiting for. I didn’t read the teasers in this interview because I will wait until I can buy my copy of the book! It is at the very top of my shopping list.
    A new Jo Beverley is always a treat. I like to return to visit with the rogues also.

    Reply
  8. This is a book I have been waiting for. I didn’t read the teasers in this interview because I will wait until I can buy my copy of the book! It is at the very top of my shopping list.
    A new Jo Beverley is always a treat. I like to return to visit with the rogues also.

    Reply
  9. This is a book I have been waiting for. I didn’t read the teasers in this interview because I will wait until I can buy my copy of the book! It is at the very top of my shopping list.
    A new Jo Beverley is always a treat. I like to return to visit with the rogues also.

    Reply
  10. This is a book I have been waiting for. I didn’t read the teasers in this interview because I will wait until I can buy my copy of the book! It is at the very top of my shopping list.
    A new Jo Beverley is always a treat. I like to return to visit with the rogues also.

    Reply
  11. Just read my ARC copy and so enjoyed it. Love the era, the intrigue and the romance. My first Rogues read and will have to start reading them all. The the way Jo writes, combines all so smoothly. Will pass to my sisters who will also enjoy “Too Dangerous for a Lady”. Diane Eberly

    Reply
  12. Just read my ARC copy and so enjoyed it. Love the era, the intrigue and the romance. My first Rogues read and will have to start reading them all. The the way Jo writes, combines all so smoothly. Will pass to my sisters who will also enjoy “Too Dangerous for a Lady”. Diane Eberly

    Reply
  13. Just read my ARC copy and so enjoyed it. Love the era, the intrigue and the romance. My first Rogues read and will have to start reading them all. The the way Jo writes, combines all so smoothly. Will pass to my sisters who will also enjoy “Too Dangerous for a Lady”. Diane Eberly

    Reply
  14. Just read my ARC copy and so enjoyed it. Love the era, the intrigue and the romance. My first Rogues read and will have to start reading them all. The the way Jo writes, combines all so smoothly. Will pass to my sisters who will also enjoy “Too Dangerous for a Lady”. Diane Eberly

    Reply
  15. Just read my ARC copy and so enjoyed it. Love the era, the intrigue and the romance. My first Rogues read and will have to start reading them all. The the way Jo writes, combines all so smoothly. Will pass to my sisters who will also enjoy “Too Dangerous for a Lady”. Diane Eberly

    Reply
  16. I’ve read each of the other fifteen Company of Rogues books within a few days of its release–the exact date depending on how long it took me to find the book. One reason that I love my ereader is that I no longer have to make a trek to a nearby city hoping they have the books I want. I preordered Too Dangerous for a Lady, and it will be on my Kindle so that I can begin reading early tomorrow. That thought puts a smile on my face.
    I was also delighted to add Forbidden to my ecollection last week. The early books in the series are so tattered from rereads that it is a treat to read new copies on Kindle and not worry about loose pages.

    Reply
  17. I’ve read each of the other fifteen Company of Rogues books within a few days of its release–the exact date depending on how long it took me to find the book. One reason that I love my ereader is that I no longer have to make a trek to a nearby city hoping they have the books I want. I preordered Too Dangerous for a Lady, and it will be on my Kindle so that I can begin reading early tomorrow. That thought puts a smile on my face.
    I was also delighted to add Forbidden to my ecollection last week. The early books in the series are so tattered from rereads that it is a treat to read new copies on Kindle and not worry about loose pages.

    Reply
  18. I’ve read each of the other fifteen Company of Rogues books within a few days of its release–the exact date depending on how long it took me to find the book. One reason that I love my ereader is that I no longer have to make a trek to a nearby city hoping they have the books I want. I preordered Too Dangerous for a Lady, and it will be on my Kindle so that I can begin reading early tomorrow. That thought puts a smile on my face.
    I was also delighted to add Forbidden to my ecollection last week. The early books in the series are so tattered from rereads that it is a treat to read new copies on Kindle and not worry about loose pages.

    Reply
  19. I’ve read each of the other fifteen Company of Rogues books within a few days of its release–the exact date depending on how long it took me to find the book. One reason that I love my ereader is that I no longer have to make a trek to a nearby city hoping they have the books I want. I preordered Too Dangerous for a Lady, and it will be on my Kindle so that I can begin reading early tomorrow. That thought puts a smile on my face.
    I was also delighted to add Forbidden to my ecollection last week. The early books in the series are so tattered from rereads that it is a treat to read new copies on Kindle and not worry about loose pages.

    Reply
  20. I’ve read each of the other fifteen Company of Rogues books within a few days of its release–the exact date depending on how long it took me to find the book. One reason that I love my ereader is that I no longer have to make a trek to a nearby city hoping they have the books I want. I preordered Too Dangerous for a Lady, and it will be on my Kindle so that I can begin reading early tomorrow. That thought puts a smile on my face.
    I was also delighted to add Forbidden to my ecollection last week. The early books in the series are so tattered from rereads that it is a treat to read new copies on Kindle and not worry about loose pages.

    Reply
  21. I appreciate the fact you have included the fact that even in victory the cost can be very high. From these excerpts, I like Hermione. She seems to have a great deal of family business on a very bright and capable mind.

    Reply
  22. I appreciate the fact you have included the fact that even in victory the cost can be very high. From these excerpts, I like Hermione. She seems to have a great deal of family business on a very bright and capable mind.

    Reply
  23. I appreciate the fact you have included the fact that even in victory the cost can be very high. From these excerpts, I like Hermione. She seems to have a great deal of family business on a very bright and capable mind.

    Reply
  24. I appreciate the fact you have included the fact that even in victory the cost can be very high. From these excerpts, I like Hermione. She seems to have a great deal of family business on a very bright and capable mind.

    Reply
  25. I appreciate the fact you have included the fact that even in victory the cost can be very high. From these excerpts, I like Hermione. She seems to have a great deal of family business on a very bright and capable mind.

    Reply
  26. Jo’s Rogues series is one of my top 3 or 4 favorites. (I’ll admit, some days my favorites change, but the Rogues and Lindsey’s Mallorys always stay in the top 4, lol) I eagerly await each new installment, and am counting the days til I get my greedy little hands on this one! lol

    Reply
  27. Jo’s Rogues series is one of my top 3 or 4 favorites. (I’ll admit, some days my favorites change, but the Rogues and Lindsey’s Mallorys always stay in the top 4, lol) I eagerly await each new installment, and am counting the days til I get my greedy little hands on this one! lol

    Reply
  28. Jo’s Rogues series is one of my top 3 or 4 favorites. (I’ll admit, some days my favorites change, but the Rogues and Lindsey’s Mallorys always stay in the top 4, lol) I eagerly await each new installment, and am counting the days til I get my greedy little hands on this one! lol

    Reply
  29. Jo’s Rogues series is one of my top 3 or 4 favorites. (I’ll admit, some days my favorites change, but the Rogues and Lindsey’s Mallorys always stay in the top 4, lol) I eagerly await each new installment, and am counting the days til I get my greedy little hands on this one! lol

    Reply
  30. Jo’s Rogues series is one of my top 3 or 4 favorites. (I’ll admit, some days my favorites change, but the Rogues and Lindsey’s Mallorys always stay in the top 4, lol) I eagerly await each new installment, and am counting the days til I get my greedy little hands on this one! lol

    Reply
  31. I’ve loved the Company of Rogues since I discovered them — not quite as early as they were written but not too long after. I’m especially fond of “An Unwilling Bride”. It so beautifully captures two people from rather different worlds forced into a situation not of their own making but who manage to overcome their initial antagonism to find that they are not so different after all. I also appreciate the solution to the duke’s dilemma about wanting an heir of his blood.
    I also like that the ancillary books are equally good. For example, Lady Anne might be rejected by two Rogues, but she does find happiness in a lovely book of her own.
    Looking forward to release day for this latest addition to the Company.

    Reply
  32. I’ve loved the Company of Rogues since I discovered them — not quite as early as they were written but not too long after. I’m especially fond of “An Unwilling Bride”. It so beautifully captures two people from rather different worlds forced into a situation not of their own making but who manage to overcome their initial antagonism to find that they are not so different after all. I also appreciate the solution to the duke’s dilemma about wanting an heir of his blood.
    I also like that the ancillary books are equally good. For example, Lady Anne might be rejected by two Rogues, but she does find happiness in a lovely book of her own.
    Looking forward to release day for this latest addition to the Company.

    Reply
  33. I’ve loved the Company of Rogues since I discovered them — not quite as early as they were written but not too long after. I’m especially fond of “An Unwilling Bride”. It so beautifully captures two people from rather different worlds forced into a situation not of their own making but who manage to overcome their initial antagonism to find that they are not so different after all. I also appreciate the solution to the duke’s dilemma about wanting an heir of his blood.
    I also like that the ancillary books are equally good. For example, Lady Anne might be rejected by two Rogues, but she does find happiness in a lovely book of her own.
    Looking forward to release day for this latest addition to the Company.

    Reply
  34. I’ve loved the Company of Rogues since I discovered them — not quite as early as they were written but not too long after. I’m especially fond of “An Unwilling Bride”. It so beautifully captures two people from rather different worlds forced into a situation not of their own making but who manage to overcome their initial antagonism to find that they are not so different after all. I also appreciate the solution to the duke’s dilemma about wanting an heir of his blood.
    I also like that the ancillary books are equally good. For example, Lady Anne might be rejected by two Rogues, but she does find happiness in a lovely book of her own.
    Looking forward to release day for this latest addition to the Company.

    Reply
  35. I’ve loved the Company of Rogues since I discovered them — not quite as early as they were written but not too long after. I’m especially fond of “An Unwilling Bride”. It so beautifully captures two people from rather different worlds forced into a situation not of their own making but who manage to overcome their initial antagonism to find that they are not so different after all. I also appreciate the solution to the duke’s dilemma about wanting an heir of his blood.
    I also like that the ancillary books are equally good. For example, Lady Anne might be rejected by two Rogues, but she does find happiness in a lovely book of her own.
    Looking forward to release day for this latest addition to the Company.

    Reply
  36. I’ve been reading the Rogues since the very first book and have quite a collection of them now! (Is it really 24 years?!) I’m looking forward to this one.
    BTW, I have also enjoyed Jo’s medieval books and wish there were more of them.

    Reply
  37. I’ve been reading the Rogues since the very first book and have quite a collection of them now! (Is it really 24 years?!) I’m looking forward to this one.
    BTW, I have also enjoyed Jo’s medieval books and wish there were more of them.

    Reply
  38. I’ve been reading the Rogues since the very first book and have quite a collection of them now! (Is it really 24 years?!) I’m looking forward to this one.
    BTW, I have also enjoyed Jo’s medieval books and wish there were more of them.

    Reply
  39. I’ve been reading the Rogues since the very first book and have quite a collection of them now! (Is it really 24 years?!) I’m looking forward to this one.
    BTW, I have also enjoyed Jo’s medieval books and wish there were more of them.

    Reply
  40. I’ve been reading the Rogues since the very first book and have quite a collection of them now! (Is it really 24 years?!) I’m looking forward to this one.
    BTW, I have also enjoyed Jo’s medieval books and wish there were more of them.

    Reply
  41. Not at all, Linda! All the books are still available, I think, and while it’s fun to read them in order, it’s not necessary because the romances are largely freestanding. In fact, Too Dangerous for a Lady might be a good place to start since much of it takes place away from the Rogues.

    Reply
  42. Not at all, Linda! All the books are still available, I think, and while it’s fun to read them in order, it’s not necessary because the romances are largely freestanding. In fact, Too Dangerous for a Lady might be a good place to start since much of it takes place away from the Rogues.

    Reply
  43. Not at all, Linda! All the books are still available, I think, and while it’s fun to read them in order, it’s not necessary because the romances are largely freestanding. In fact, Too Dangerous for a Lady might be a good place to start since much of it takes place away from the Rogues.

    Reply
  44. Not at all, Linda! All the books are still available, I think, and while it’s fun to read them in order, it’s not necessary because the romances are largely freestanding. In fact, Too Dangerous for a Lady might be a good place to start since much of it takes place away from the Rogues.

    Reply
  45. Not at all, Linda! All the books are still available, I think, and while it’s fun to read them in order, it’s not necessary because the romances are largely freestanding. In fact, Too Dangerous for a Lady might be a good place to start since much of it takes place away from the Rogues.

    Reply
  46. This whole series seems delightful, and it would be such fun to read them! Thank you for the chance to win one!

    Reply
  47. This whole series seems delightful, and it would be such fun to read them! Thank you for the chance to win one!

    Reply
  48. This whole series seems delightful, and it would be such fun to read them! Thank you for the chance to win one!

    Reply
  49. This whole series seems delightful, and it would be such fun to read them! Thank you for the chance to win one!

    Reply
  50. This whole series seems delightful, and it would be such fun to read them! Thank you for the chance to win one!

    Reply
  51. I love Jo Bev’s books – have a complete library. Even begged one of the local authors I know to get me an autographed copy at RWA one year :).
    I can’t wait to read the newest book in this world.

    Reply
  52. I love Jo Bev’s books – have a complete library. Even begged one of the local authors I know to get me an autographed copy at RWA one year :).
    I can’t wait to read the newest book in this world.

    Reply
  53. I love Jo Bev’s books – have a complete library. Even begged one of the local authors I know to get me an autographed copy at RWA one year :).
    I can’t wait to read the newest book in this world.

    Reply
  54. I love Jo Bev’s books – have a complete library. Even begged one of the local authors I know to get me an autographed copy at RWA one year :).
    I can’t wait to read the newest book in this world.

    Reply
  55. I love Jo Bev’s books – have a complete library. Even begged one of the local authors I know to get me an autographed copy at RWA one year :).
    I can’t wait to read the newest book in this world.

    Reply
  56. Dear me….I guess I need to add more to my TBR pile which is already enormous. I went downstairs and found I have 3 Jo Beverly’s in my TBR pile and to see that both of them are parts of big series. Oh dear.
    Even if I read 1 book a day I’ll never catch up…. What to do, what to do. Read 2 books a day? Grin.
    This series does sound fun.

    Reply
  57. Dear me….I guess I need to add more to my TBR pile which is already enormous. I went downstairs and found I have 3 Jo Beverly’s in my TBR pile and to see that both of them are parts of big series. Oh dear.
    Even if I read 1 book a day I’ll never catch up…. What to do, what to do. Read 2 books a day? Grin.
    This series does sound fun.

    Reply
  58. Dear me….I guess I need to add more to my TBR pile which is already enormous. I went downstairs and found I have 3 Jo Beverly’s in my TBR pile and to see that both of them are parts of big series. Oh dear.
    Even if I read 1 book a day I’ll never catch up…. What to do, what to do. Read 2 books a day? Grin.
    This series does sound fun.

    Reply
  59. Dear me….I guess I need to add more to my TBR pile which is already enormous. I went downstairs and found I have 3 Jo Beverly’s in my TBR pile and to see that both of them are parts of big series. Oh dear.
    Even if I read 1 book a day I’ll never catch up…. What to do, what to do. Read 2 books a day? Grin.
    This series does sound fun.

    Reply
  60. Dear me….I guess I need to add more to my TBR pile which is already enormous. I went downstairs and found I have 3 Jo Beverly’s in my TBR pile and to see that both of them are parts of big series. Oh dear.
    Even if I read 1 book a day I’ll never catch up…. What to do, what to do. Read 2 books a day? Grin.
    This series does sound fun.

    Reply
  61. I’ve read several of the Rogue books and loved each one! I do have some catching up on my plate – but at least catching up is something to look forward to. 🙂 I’m curious Jo, do you have plans for many more Rogue books?

    Reply
  62. I’ve read several of the Rogue books and loved each one! I do have some catching up on my plate – but at least catching up is something to look forward to. 🙂 I’m curious Jo, do you have plans for many more Rogue books?

    Reply
  63. I’ve read several of the Rogue books and loved each one! I do have some catching up on my plate – but at least catching up is something to look forward to. 🙂 I’m curious Jo, do you have plans for many more Rogue books?

    Reply
  64. I’ve read several of the Rogue books and loved each one! I do have some catching up on my plate – but at least catching up is something to look forward to. 🙂 I’m curious Jo, do you have plans for many more Rogue books?

    Reply
  65. I’ve read several of the Rogue books and loved each one! I do have some catching up on my plate – but at least catching up is something to look forward to. 🙂 I’m curious Jo, do you have plans for many more Rogue books?

    Reply
  66. I’ve long appreciated Jo’s attention to historical detail – I often end up googling some things she mentions in her books. It’s a lot of fun to follow a group thru a long series and then to meet new characters. I have to go back and re-read some of the earlier books to refresh my memory – it did start a long time ago!

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  67. I’ve long appreciated Jo’s attention to historical detail – I often end up googling some things she mentions in her books. It’s a lot of fun to follow a group thru a long series and then to meet new characters. I have to go back and re-read some of the earlier books to refresh my memory – it did start a long time ago!

    Reply
  68. I’ve long appreciated Jo’s attention to historical detail – I often end up googling some things she mentions in her books. It’s a lot of fun to follow a group thru a long series and then to meet new characters. I have to go back and re-read some of the earlier books to refresh my memory – it did start a long time ago!

    Reply
  69. I’ve long appreciated Jo’s attention to historical detail – I often end up googling some things she mentions in her books. It’s a lot of fun to follow a group thru a long series and then to meet new characters. I have to go back and re-read some of the earlier books to refresh my memory – it did start a long time ago!

    Reply
  70. I’ve long appreciated Jo’s attention to historical detail – I often end up googling some things she mentions in her books. It’s a lot of fun to follow a group thru a long series and then to meet new characters. I have to go back and re-read some of the earlier books to refresh my memory – it did start a long time ago!

    Reply
  71. Thank you, Diane. I’m very pleased you enjoyed it, and that you’ll read more Rogues. I’d recommend starting at the beginning with An Arranged Marriage. There is a narrative flow.

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  72. Thank you, Diane. I’m very pleased you enjoyed it, and that you’ll read more Rogues. I’d recommend starting at the beginning with An Arranged Marriage. There is a narrative flow.

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  73. Thank you, Diane. I’m very pleased you enjoyed it, and that you’ll read more Rogues. I’d recommend starting at the beginning with An Arranged Marriage. There is a narrative flow.

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  74. Thank you, Diane. I’m very pleased you enjoyed it, and that you’ll read more Rogues. I’d recommend starting at the beginning with An Arranged Marriage. There is a narrative flow.

    Reply
  75. Thank you, Diane. I’m very pleased you enjoyed it, and that you’ll read more Rogues. I’d recommend starting at the beginning with An Arranged Marriage. There is a narrative flow.

    Reply
  76. Linda, I agree with Mary Jo. Too Dangerous for a Lady isn’t a bad place to start, because they’re both new characters to the series. I hope you enjoy it and the Rogues.

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  77. Linda, I agree with Mary Jo. Too Dangerous for a Lady isn’t a bad place to start, because they’re both new characters to the series. I hope you enjoy it and the Rogues.

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  78. Linda, I agree with Mary Jo. Too Dangerous for a Lady isn’t a bad place to start, because they’re both new characters to the series. I hope you enjoy it and the Rogues.

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  79. Linda, I agree with Mary Jo. Too Dangerous for a Lady isn’t a bad place to start, because they’re both new characters to the series. I hope you enjoy it and the Rogues.

    Reply
  80. Linda, I agree with Mary Jo. Too Dangerous for a Lady isn’t a bad place to start, because they’re both new characters to the series. I hope you enjoy it and the Rogues.

    Reply
  81. Thanks, Janga. One of the delights of e-publishing is that all the books in a series are available. It used to be so frustrating, for me and for readers.

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  82. Thanks, Janga. One of the delights of e-publishing is that all the books in a series are available. It used to be so frustrating, for me and for readers.

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  83. Thanks, Janga. One of the delights of e-publishing is that all the books in a series are available. It used to be so frustrating, for me and for readers.

    Reply
  84. Thanks, Janga. One of the delights of e-publishing is that all the books in a series are available. It used to be so frustrating, for me and for readers.

    Reply
  85. Thanks, Janga. One of the delights of e-publishing is that all the books in a series are available. It used to be so frustrating, for me and for readers.

    Reply
  86. Thanks, Annette. Yes, war has its costs, even for the victors. I like Hermione a lot. She’s sensible. Most of the time. 🙂
    I suppose another line could be “No woman in love can be sensible all the time.”

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  87. Thanks, Annette. Yes, war has its costs, even for the victors. I like Hermione a lot. She’s sensible. Most of the time. 🙂
    I suppose another line could be “No woman in love can be sensible all the time.”

    Reply
  88. Thanks, Annette. Yes, war has its costs, even for the victors. I like Hermione a lot. She’s sensible. Most of the time. 🙂
    I suppose another line could be “No woman in love can be sensible all the time.”

    Reply
  89. Thanks, Annette. Yes, war has its costs, even for the victors. I like Hermione a lot. She’s sensible. Most of the time. 🙂
    I suppose another line could be “No woman in love can be sensible all the time.”

    Reply
  90. Thanks, Annette. Yes, war has its costs, even for the victors. I like Hermione a lot. She’s sensible. Most of the time. 🙂
    I suppose another line could be “No woman in love can be sensible all the time.”

    Reply
  91. Thanks, Susan. One of the fun things about writing the Rogues series is that the original Rogues were all different. Nicholas chose them in part for that. So they give different stories, which avoids my becoming bored.

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  92. Thanks, Susan. One of the fun things about writing the Rogues series is that the original Rogues were all different. Nicholas chose them in part for that. So they give different stories, which avoids my becoming bored.

    Reply
  93. Thanks, Susan. One of the fun things about writing the Rogues series is that the original Rogues were all different. Nicholas chose them in part for that. So they give different stories, which avoids my becoming bored.

    Reply
  94. Thanks, Susan. One of the fun things about writing the Rogues series is that the original Rogues were all different. Nicholas chose them in part for that. So they give different stories, which avoids my becoming bored.

    Reply
  95. Thanks, Susan. One of the fun things about writing the Rogues series is that the original Rogues were all different. Nicholas chose them in part for that. So they give different stories, which avoids my becoming bored.

    Reply
  96. Thanks, Elaine.
    I really enjoyed writing the medievals and I wish I could have continued them, but the sales were so low compared to the Regencies and Georgians. And now, I just don’t seem to have the time.
    I play a little in novellas, as in The Raven and the Rose and The Dragon and the Princess. (Fantasy, but still medievalish.)

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  97. Thanks, Elaine.
    I really enjoyed writing the medievals and I wish I could have continued them, but the sales were so low compared to the Regencies and Georgians. And now, I just don’t seem to have the time.
    I play a little in novellas, as in The Raven and the Rose and The Dragon and the Princess. (Fantasy, but still medievalish.)

    Reply
  98. Thanks, Elaine.
    I really enjoyed writing the medievals and I wish I could have continued them, but the sales were so low compared to the Regencies and Georgians. And now, I just don’t seem to have the time.
    I play a little in novellas, as in The Raven and the Rose and The Dragon and the Princess. (Fantasy, but still medievalish.)

    Reply
  99. Thanks, Elaine.
    I really enjoyed writing the medievals and I wish I could have continued them, but the sales were so low compared to the Regencies and Georgians. And now, I just don’t seem to have the time.
    I play a little in novellas, as in The Raven and the Rose and The Dragon and the Princess. (Fantasy, but still medievalish.)

    Reply
  100. Thanks, Elaine.
    I really enjoyed writing the medievals and I wish I could have continued them, but the sales were so low compared to the Regencies and Georgians. And now, I just don’t seem to have the time.
    I play a little in novellas, as in The Raven and the Rose and The Dragon and the Princess. (Fantasy, but still medievalish.)

    Reply
  101. Glenda, I suspect the Rogues World will continue as long as I do. I’m writing a spin off now, and there are some characters from past books that people want more of.
    There’s also the other dead Rogue’s family — the Ingrams. I haven’t found out much about them as yet.

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  102. Glenda, I suspect the Rogues World will continue as long as I do. I’m writing a spin off now, and there are some characters from past books that people want more of.
    There’s also the other dead Rogue’s family — the Ingrams. I haven’t found out much about them as yet.

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  103. Glenda, I suspect the Rogues World will continue as long as I do. I’m writing a spin off now, and there are some characters from past books that people want more of.
    There’s also the other dead Rogue’s family — the Ingrams. I haven’t found out much about them as yet.

    Reply
  104. Glenda, I suspect the Rogues World will continue as long as I do. I’m writing a spin off now, and there are some characters from past books that people want more of.
    There’s also the other dead Rogue’s family — the Ingrams. I haven’t found out much about them as yet.

    Reply
  105. Glenda, I suspect the Rogues World will continue as long as I do. I’m writing a spin off now, and there are some characters from past books that people want more of.
    There’s also the other dead Rogue’s family — the Ingrams. I haven’t found out much about them as yet.

    Reply
  106. Thanks, Diane. I try not to weigh down the books with too much history, but they are all set in a precise time because of the narrative flow, and I have to find out about that time. Then it seems reasonable to include some of it.
    After all, people do live in their time, and even if they’re not involved in politics and live quietly, they’ll be aware of some events and gossip about the latest hot news or alarm.

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  107. Thanks, Diane. I try not to weigh down the books with too much history, but they are all set in a precise time because of the narrative flow, and I have to find out about that time. Then it seems reasonable to include some of it.
    After all, people do live in their time, and even if they’re not involved in politics and live quietly, they’ll be aware of some events and gossip about the latest hot news or alarm.

    Reply
  108. Thanks, Diane. I try not to weigh down the books with too much history, but they are all set in a precise time because of the narrative flow, and I have to find out about that time. Then it seems reasonable to include some of it.
    After all, people do live in their time, and even if they’re not involved in politics and live quietly, they’ll be aware of some events and gossip about the latest hot news or alarm.

    Reply
  109. Thanks, Diane. I try not to weigh down the books with too much history, but they are all set in a precise time because of the narrative flow, and I have to find out about that time. Then it seems reasonable to include some of it.
    After all, people do live in their time, and even if they’re not involved in politics and live quietly, they’ll be aware of some events and gossip about the latest hot news or alarm.

    Reply
  110. Thanks, Diane. I try not to weigh down the books with too much history, but they are all set in a precise time because of the narrative flow, and I have to find out about that time. Then it seems reasonable to include some of it.
    After all, people do live in their time, and even if they’re not involved in politics and live quietly, they’ll be aware of some events and gossip about the latest hot news or alarm.

    Reply
  111. Just a few Rogues here, Karin. I only bring in the ones with a role to play. And who are around. Not all of them would be in London in autumn. I hope there are enough for you.

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  112. Just a few Rogues here, Karin. I only bring in the ones with a role to play. And who are around. Not all of them would be in London in autumn. I hope there are enough for you.

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  113. Just a few Rogues here, Karin. I only bring in the ones with a role to play. And who are around. Not all of them would be in London in autumn. I hope there are enough for you.

    Reply
  114. Just a few Rogues here, Karin. I only bring in the ones with a role to play. And who are around. Not all of them would be in London in autumn. I hope there are enough for you.

    Reply
  115. Just a few Rogues here, Karin. I only bring in the ones with a role to play. And who are around. Not all of them would be in London in autumn. I hope there are enough for you.

    Reply
  116. Just my opinion, but I enjoyed the series at least twice as much because I went back and read in order. (Had read one or two, then realized it was a series & went back.)

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  117. Just my opinion, but I enjoyed the series at least twice as much because I went back and read in order. (Had read one or two, then realized it was a series & went back.)

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  118. Just my opinion, but I enjoyed the series at least twice as much because I went back and read in order. (Had read one or two, then realized it was a series & went back.)

    Reply
  119. Just my opinion, but I enjoyed the series at least twice as much because I went back and read in order. (Had read one or two, then realized it was a series & went back.)

    Reply
  120. Just my opinion, but I enjoyed the series at least twice as much because I went back and read in order. (Had read one or two, then realized it was a series & went back.)

    Reply
  121. I am waiting for your new book to arrive in the mail Jo. Then I will have to re-read all the others. By the way, love your new web banner. Makes me want to visit that room.

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  122. I am waiting for your new book to arrive in the mail Jo. Then I will have to re-read all the others. By the way, love your new web banner. Makes me want to visit that room.

    Reply
  123. I am waiting for your new book to arrive in the mail Jo. Then I will have to re-read all the others. By the way, love your new web banner. Makes me want to visit that room.

    Reply
  124. I am waiting for your new book to arrive in the mail Jo. Then I will have to re-read all the others. By the way, love your new web banner. Makes me want to visit that room.

    Reply
  125. I am waiting for your new book to arrive in the mail Jo. Then I will have to re-read all the others. By the way, love your new web banner. Makes me want to visit that room.

    Reply

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