Joanna here,
talking about friendship and also about how sometimes one thought leads to another.

Army and the navy unknown publisher 1890  NAM

An idealized painting of the meeting

The other day I was thinking how Nelson and Wellington once met in person. I read about this a while back and it always struck me as cool.

Wellington and Nelson wouldn’t normally have come face to face. Nelson was engaged on the high seas. Wellington, on land. They were both only intermittently in England.

 

Wench wellington c1818 by george Daawe nam

Wellington

 

 

 

But one day in 1805 both men happened to be in the waiting room of the Colonial Office in Whitehall. Wellington (well . . . he was still Wellesley but let’s keep it simple,) had just returned from India and was reporting to Lord Castlereagh, Secretary of State for War. Admiral Nelson was waiting in the same room for his own appointment with Castlereagh.

Wellesley recognized Nelson immediately. There were not, after all, so very many one-armed admirals in the Royal Navy. Nelson, at 42, was the acclaimed victor of the Battle of Copenhagen and the Battle of the Nile. A famous man at the height of his career.
He was also seven weeks from his death in the Battle of Trafalgar.

Wench nelson 2

Nelson

Wellesley was ten years younger. He’d served with distinction in India, but the most impressive part of his military career was still ahead of him. It would be another eight years before he took command of the Peninsular Campaign and began the string of victories that would culminate at Waterloo.

I delight to imagine them seated there, (that’s a quote from Yeats, btw,) the sailor and the soldier, the older and the younger, two military geniuses at ease, chatting about the political situation in Europe.
I wonder if they would have become friends if they’d had the chance to get to know each other.

I had a writing friend staying with me over the weekend so it was natural for me to go from these two military men talking shop to idea of writerly friendship.

Wench byron 2

Byron, sitting about in his banyan, being cool

Oh my, but there were lots of writer friends in the era — Coleridge and Wordsworth, Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, Boswell and Johnson, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Thoreau, Paul Verlaine and Arthur Rimbaud, Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift. Maybe the friendships didn’t last a lifetime; maybe the discussions could get a bit fraught; but there’s no question the relationships influenced the work and life of these folks.

Sometimes the writer friends were women.

 

 

 

Lord Byron, Shelley, and Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin (Mary Shelley)

Wench percy shelley

Here we got Shelley, also being cool.

The relationship between Byron, Shelley, and Mary Goodwin was kinda interesting. The way it went down: they met cute.  Mary’s stepsister, Claire Clairmont, had been Byron’s mistress and she was pregnant with his child. But the affair was over and Byron left England before his daughter was born.

In the spirit of — what? — fair play? Mischief? Neatness? Claire arranged for Mary and Percy Shelley, (who was Mary’s lover,) to meet Byron in Switzerland. This is like the original Soap Opera.

The three instantly hit it off. They rented a pair of houses near the shore of Lake Geneva and boated, hiked, went sightseeing in the Alps, and spent long evenings talking by the fire, finding common creative ground underfoot all over the place.

Shelley wrote that a boating tour with Byron was his inspiration for the Hymn to Intellectual Beauty. (In an example of “The more things change the more they remain the same,” Shelley sent the finished copy of HtIB to his friend Leigh Hunt. Who immediately lost it. Shelley had to write out another draft and resend.)

Wench mary shelley

Mary Shelley. She wrote Frankenstein when she was 19

Shelley, in his turn, encouraged Byron to begin an epic poem on a contemporary subject. That was the seed of Byron’s Don Juan.

The stay in Switzerland, famously, led Mary to write Frankenstein. The story goes that on a rainy night the three friends were sitting at the fire reading German ghost stories aloud. Byron challenged everyone to write a ghost story and Mary dreamed up Frankenstein. It’s said her own story frightened her into nightmares.

But then, what are writerly friends for?

 

George Eliot and Harriet Beecher Stowe

Can writers be friends by letter?

George Eliot and Harriet Beecher Stowe lived on opposite sides of the Atlantic. They never met, but they shared a genuinely close friendship by letter. Maybe it was easier for Stowe to befriend Eliot at a distance, where Eliot’s scandalous lifestyle placed no strains on the relationship.

 

From their first letters, Stowe “offered both praise and criticism of Eliot’s writing style. Stowe applauded the morality of Eliot’s writing while suggesting that her novels had not, as of yet, lived up to the best aspects of her shorter stories.”

Eliot was equally candid. “She alluded to her own frequent bouts of depression and — surprisingly for a modern audience aware of her legacy — to her lapses in confidence about her literary abilities. Stowe’s words, she said, had assured her that her own work had been “worth doing”.

… Eliot’s final novel, Daniel Deronda, with its Jewish protagonist, was one of the literary topics they discussed. Stowe provided “an ongoing and sometimes astonishingly frank critique of the works [Daniel Deronda and Middlemarch] as they unfolded.”

                                        Nava Atlas

 

Wench harriet beecher stowe

Harriet Beecher Stowe
Eliot

George Eliot

I guess I compare this epistolary friendship to what today’s authors may find emailing one another or chatting on Facebook and Twitter. I think there can be help and advice, long-distance literary influence, shared stories of uncertainty and triumph. An exchange of warmth, understanding, and encouragement even between folks who never meet.
Bring it on, says I.

I find I have no words left to talk of Charlotte Brontë and Elizabeth Gaskell or Ralph Waldo Emerson and Louisa May Alcott or the Brownings. I can’t begin to touch on the many modern writer friendships.

 

But let me ask — Do you make friends through your art or avocation, your hobby or profession? Long distance, or face to face over the table at the local café? Is a professional friendship based on shared work special?

 

115 thoughts on “”

  1. Friendships among colleagues are one of life’s blessings, and who understands writers better than other writers??? Look at the Word Wenches! And we all have many other writer friends. I’ve met most of my writer friends at conferences, but once the connection is made, there are many ways to communicate, of which my favorite is email.
    The same connection is common in just about every work group I know: teachers know teachers, doctors know doctors, engineers know engineers, quilters know quilters–and so ad infinitum.

    Reply
  2. Friendships among colleagues are one of life’s blessings, and who understands writers better than other writers??? Look at the Word Wenches! And we all have many other writer friends. I’ve met most of my writer friends at conferences, but once the connection is made, there are many ways to communicate, of which my favorite is email.
    The same connection is common in just about every work group I know: teachers know teachers, doctors know doctors, engineers know engineers, quilters know quilters–and so ad infinitum.

    Reply
  3. Friendships among colleagues are one of life’s blessings, and who understands writers better than other writers??? Look at the Word Wenches! And we all have many other writer friends. I’ve met most of my writer friends at conferences, but once the connection is made, there are many ways to communicate, of which my favorite is email.
    The same connection is common in just about every work group I know: teachers know teachers, doctors know doctors, engineers know engineers, quilters know quilters–and so ad infinitum.

    Reply
  4. Friendships among colleagues are one of life’s blessings, and who understands writers better than other writers??? Look at the Word Wenches! And we all have many other writer friends. I’ve met most of my writer friends at conferences, but once the connection is made, there are many ways to communicate, of which my favorite is email.
    The same connection is common in just about every work group I know: teachers know teachers, doctors know doctors, engineers know engineers, quilters know quilters–and so ad infinitum.

    Reply
  5. Friendships among colleagues are one of life’s blessings, and who understands writers better than other writers??? Look at the Word Wenches! And we all have many other writer friends. I’ve met most of my writer friends at conferences, but once the connection is made, there are many ways to communicate, of which my favorite is email.
    The same connection is common in just about every work group I know: teachers know teachers, doctors know doctors, engineers know engineers, quilters know quilters–and so ad infinitum.

    Reply
  6. I love theatre. Performing; front or backstage. My very favorite part is the close friendships you make as a result of working intensely with each other over the course of a show. This past week I found an old high school year book and took pictures of the photos of a show we did then and shared them on Facebook. I can’t tell you how many of these people I am still friends with because the list is too long! The show was in 1980.
    Shared interests and working with wonderful people is a Godsend that can bless your whole life.
    Also in junior high school I had penpal who I have eventually lost track of but would dearly love to meet in reality.

    Reply
  7. I love theatre. Performing; front or backstage. My very favorite part is the close friendships you make as a result of working intensely with each other over the course of a show. This past week I found an old high school year book and took pictures of the photos of a show we did then and shared them on Facebook. I can’t tell you how many of these people I am still friends with because the list is too long! The show was in 1980.
    Shared interests and working with wonderful people is a Godsend that can bless your whole life.
    Also in junior high school I had penpal who I have eventually lost track of but would dearly love to meet in reality.

    Reply
  8. I love theatre. Performing; front or backstage. My very favorite part is the close friendships you make as a result of working intensely with each other over the course of a show. This past week I found an old high school year book and took pictures of the photos of a show we did then and shared them on Facebook. I can’t tell you how many of these people I am still friends with because the list is too long! The show was in 1980.
    Shared interests and working with wonderful people is a Godsend that can bless your whole life.
    Also in junior high school I had penpal who I have eventually lost track of but would dearly love to meet in reality.

    Reply
  9. I love theatre. Performing; front or backstage. My very favorite part is the close friendships you make as a result of working intensely with each other over the course of a show. This past week I found an old high school year book and took pictures of the photos of a show we did then and shared them on Facebook. I can’t tell you how many of these people I am still friends with because the list is too long! The show was in 1980.
    Shared interests and working with wonderful people is a Godsend that can bless your whole life.
    Also in junior high school I had penpal who I have eventually lost track of but would dearly love to meet in reality.

    Reply
  10. I love theatre. Performing; front or backstage. My very favorite part is the close friendships you make as a result of working intensely with each other over the course of a show. This past week I found an old high school year book and took pictures of the photos of a show we did then and shared them on Facebook. I can’t tell you how many of these people I am still friends with because the list is too long! The show was in 1980.
    Shared interests and working with wonderful people is a Godsend that can bless your whole life.
    Also in junior high school I had penpal who I have eventually lost track of but would dearly love to meet in reality.

    Reply
  11. I have many “virtual” friends that I met via blogs, mostly related to politics. Nowadays most of them have migrated to Facebook and Twitter. I have had a chance to met some of them in person occasionally too, which is great fun, after you’ve been chatting online for so many years.

    Reply
  12. I have many “virtual” friends that I met via blogs, mostly related to politics. Nowadays most of them have migrated to Facebook and Twitter. I have had a chance to met some of them in person occasionally too, which is great fun, after you’ve been chatting online for so many years.

    Reply
  13. I have many “virtual” friends that I met via blogs, mostly related to politics. Nowadays most of them have migrated to Facebook and Twitter. I have had a chance to met some of them in person occasionally too, which is great fun, after you’ve been chatting online for so many years.

    Reply
  14. I have many “virtual” friends that I met via blogs, mostly related to politics. Nowadays most of them have migrated to Facebook and Twitter. I have had a chance to met some of them in person occasionally too, which is great fun, after you’ve been chatting online for so many years.

    Reply
  15. I have many “virtual” friends that I met via blogs, mostly related to politics. Nowadays most of them have migrated to Facebook and Twitter. I have had a chance to met some of them in person occasionally too, which is great fun, after you’ve been chatting online for so many years.

    Reply
  16. In my research about Wellington’s intelligence networks, I came across Wellington’s recollection of the encounter. If I find it again, I’ll post it.

    Reply
  17. In my research about Wellington’s intelligence networks, I came across Wellington’s recollection of the encounter. If I find it again, I’ll post it.

    Reply
  18. In my research about Wellington’s intelligence networks, I came across Wellington’s recollection of the encounter. If I find it again, I’ll post it.

    Reply
  19. In my research about Wellington’s intelligence networks, I came across Wellington’s recollection of the encounter. If I find it again, I’ll post it.

    Reply
  20. In my research about Wellington’s intelligence networks, I came across Wellington’s recollection of the encounter. If I find it again, I’ll post it.

    Reply
  21. I have real-life friends I keep up with on Facebook (One has just come home from the hospital). I have virtual friends I met on blogs (like this one) and on Facebook. The Best of the Facebook friends are those I meet other places, such as the dedicated Facebook Groups. My friendships overlap. I also keep up with the family on Facebook.
    And, again they overlap.

    Reply
  22. I have real-life friends I keep up with on Facebook (One has just come home from the hospital). I have virtual friends I met on blogs (like this one) and on Facebook. The Best of the Facebook friends are those I meet other places, such as the dedicated Facebook Groups. My friendships overlap. I also keep up with the family on Facebook.
    And, again they overlap.

    Reply
  23. I have real-life friends I keep up with on Facebook (One has just come home from the hospital). I have virtual friends I met on blogs (like this one) and on Facebook. The Best of the Facebook friends are those I meet other places, such as the dedicated Facebook Groups. My friendships overlap. I also keep up with the family on Facebook.
    And, again they overlap.

    Reply
  24. I have real-life friends I keep up with on Facebook (One has just come home from the hospital). I have virtual friends I met on blogs (like this one) and on Facebook. The Best of the Facebook friends are those I meet other places, such as the dedicated Facebook Groups. My friendships overlap. I also keep up with the family on Facebook.
    And, again they overlap.

    Reply
  25. I have real-life friends I keep up with on Facebook (One has just come home from the hospital). I have virtual friends I met on blogs (like this one) and on Facebook. The Best of the Facebook friends are those I meet other places, such as the dedicated Facebook Groups. My friendships overlap. I also keep up with the family on Facebook.
    And, again they overlap.

    Reply
  26. I thought of the many fan groups of authors which have developed via the web. Many of them sponsor yearly get togethers, sometimes inviting the author to join them for a time. I am part of such a group and have been since 1998. We still contact each other and visit in person when possible. As we like to say….it’s all because of a book.

    Reply
  27. I thought of the many fan groups of authors which have developed via the web. Many of them sponsor yearly get togethers, sometimes inviting the author to join them for a time. I am part of such a group and have been since 1998. We still contact each other and visit in person when possible. As we like to say….it’s all because of a book.

    Reply
  28. I thought of the many fan groups of authors which have developed via the web. Many of them sponsor yearly get togethers, sometimes inviting the author to join them for a time. I am part of such a group and have been since 1998. We still contact each other and visit in person when possible. As we like to say….it’s all because of a book.

    Reply
  29. I thought of the many fan groups of authors which have developed via the web. Many of them sponsor yearly get togethers, sometimes inviting the author to join them for a time. I am part of such a group and have been since 1998. We still contact each other and visit in person when possible. As we like to say….it’s all because of a book.

    Reply
  30. I thought of the many fan groups of authors which have developed via the web. Many of them sponsor yearly get togethers, sometimes inviting the author to join them for a time. I am part of such a group and have been since 1998. We still contact each other and visit in person when possible. As we like to say….it’s all because of a book.

    Reply
  31. I suppose this reply isn’t about friendships, but your posting of Wellington’s portrait made me look him up, and I’m fascinated by all the changes he saw in his lifetime.
    He began in an age of portrait painting, horse-transportation, and a postal system that went strictly by wagon or foot. He died in an age of railroads and telegraphs, and we know what he really did look like as an old man, because his daguerreotype portrait appears in his Wikipedia entry. He forms, if you will, the connecting link between the 18th century and the world we call modern.
    Somehow, looking at that daguerreotype makes reading about Waterloo and the Regency years stunningly vivid. So even if it wasn’t the point of this blog post, thank you for including him in it.

    Reply
  32. I suppose this reply isn’t about friendships, but your posting of Wellington’s portrait made me look him up, and I’m fascinated by all the changes he saw in his lifetime.
    He began in an age of portrait painting, horse-transportation, and a postal system that went strictly by wagon or foot. He died in an age of railroads and telegraphs, and we know what he really did look like as an old man, because his daguerreotype portrait appears in his Wikipedia entry. He forms, if you will, the connecting link between the 18th century and the world we call modern.
    Somehow, looking at that daguerreotype makes reading about Waterloo and the Regency years stunningly vivid. So even if it wasn’t the point of this blog post, thank you for including him in it.

    Reply
  33. I suppose this reply isn’t about friendships, but your posting of Wellington’s portrait made me look him up, and I’m fascinated by all the changes he saw in his lifetime.
    He began in an age of portrait painting, horse-transportation, and a postal system that went strictly by wagon or foot. He died in an age of railroads and telegraphs, and we know what he really did look like as an old man, because his daguerreotype portrait appears in his Wikipedia entry. He forms, if you will, the connecting link between the 18th century and the world we call modern.
    Somehow, looking at that daguerreotype makes reading about Waterloo and the Regency years stunningly vivid. So even if it wasn’t the point of this blog post, thank you for including him in it.

    Reply
  34. I suppose this reply isn’t about friendships, but your posting of Wellington’s portrait made me look him up, and I’m fascinated by all the changes he saw in his lifetime.
    He began in an age of portrait painting, horse-transportation, and a postal system that went strictly by wagon or foot. He died in an age of railroads and telegraphs, and we know what he really did look like as an old man, because his daguerreotype portrait appears in his Wikipedia entry. He forms, if you will, the connecting link between the 18th century and the world we call modern.
    Somehow, looking at that daguerreotype makes reading about Waterloo and the Regency years stunningly vivid. So even if it wasn’t the point of this blog post, thank you for including him in it.

    Reply
  35. I suppose this reply isn’t about friendships, but your posting of Wellington’s portrait made me look him up, and I’m fascinated by all the changes he saw in his lifetime.
    He began in an age of portrait painting, horse-transportation, and a postal system that went strictly by wagon or foot. He died in an age of railroads and telegraphs, and we know what he really did look like as an old man, because his daguerreotype portrait appears in his Wikipedia entry. He forms, if you will, the connecting link between the 18th century and the world we call modern.
    Somehow, looking at that daguerreotype makes reading about Waterloo and the Regency years stunningly vivid. So even if it wasn’t the point of this blog post, thank you for including him in it.

    Reply
  36. Theatre folks work together so intensely. They’re in the business of creating emotion. It’s not surprising folks form strong bonds.
    I wonder if the plays being produced have an effect on this.

    Reply
  37. Theatre folks work together so intensely. They’re in the business of creating emotion. It’s not surprising folks form strong bonds.
    I wonder if the plays being produced have an effect on this.

    Reply
  38. Theatre folks work together so intensely. They’re in the business of creating emotion. It’s not surprising folks form strong bonds.
    I wonder if the plays being produced have an effect on this.

    Reply
  39. Theatre folks work together so intensely. They’re in the business of creating emotion. It’s not surprising folks form strong bonds.
    I wonder if the plays being produced have an effect on this.

    Reply
  40. Theatre folks work together so intensely. They’re in the business of creating emotion. It’s not surprising folks form strong bonds.
    I wonder if the plays being produced have an effect on this.

    Reply
  41. Working together for politics is a wonderful way to make friends. I live in a relatively small town and it’s got so I can’t buy a loaf of whole-wheat bread without running into somebody I was manning a phone bank with.

    Reply
  42. Working together for politics is a wonderful way to make friends. I live in a relatively small town and it’s got so I can’t buy a loaf of whole-wheat bread without running into somebody I was manning a phone bank with.

    Reply
  43. Working together for politics is a wonderful way to make friends. I live in a relatively small town and it’s got so I can’t buy a loaf of whole-wheat bread without running into somebody I was manning a phone bank with.

    Reply
  44. Working together for politics is a wonderful way to make friends. I live in a relatively small town and it’s got so I can’t buy a loaf of whole-wheat bread without running into somebody I was manning a phone bank with.

    Reply
  45. Working together for politics is a wonderful way to make friends. I live in a relatively small town and it’s got so I can’t buy a loaf of whole-wheat bread without running into somebody I was manning a phone bank with.

    Reply
  46. Not to say I don’t have friends who think I’m a bit odd, but yes … one of the best foundation for long-term friendship, it seems to me, has always been being crazy in similar ways.

    Reply
  47. Not to say I don’t have friends who think I’m a bit odd, but yes … one of the best foundation for long-term friendship, it seems to me, has always been being crazy in similar ways.

    Reply
  48. Not to say I don’t have friends who think I’m a bit odd, but yes … one of the best foundation for long-term friendship, it seems to me, has always been being crazy in similar ways.

    Reply
  49. Not to say I don’t have friends who think I’m a bit odd, but yes … one of the best foundation for long-term friendship, it seems to me, has always been being crazy in similar ways.

    Reply
  50. Not to say I don’t have friends who think I’m a bit odd, but yes … one of the best foundation for long-term friendship, it seems to me, has always been being crazy in similar ways.

    Reply
  51. I guess FaceBook is a bit like the extensive correspondences folks used to keep up in C18 and C19.
    We’d be a lot poorer if it weren’t for those literary letters authors kept writing back and forth.
    I wonder if future historian folks will someday mine Facebook for their Master’s thesis

    Reply
  52. I guess FaceBook is a bit like the extensive correspondences folks used to keep up in C18 and C19.
    We’d be a lot poorer if it weren’t for those literary letters authors kept writing back and forth.
    I wonder if future historian folks will someday mine Facebook for their Master’s thesis

    Reply
  53. I guess FaceBook is a bit like the extensive correspondences folks used to keep up in C18 and C19.
    We’d be a lot poorer if it weren’t for those literary letters authors kept writing back and forth.
    I wonder if future historian folks will someday mine Facebook for their Master’s thesis

    Reply
  54. I guess FaceBook is a bit like the extensive correspondences folks used to keep up in C18 and C19.
    We’d be a lot poorer if it weren’t for those literary letters authors kept writing back and forth.
    I wonder if future historian folks will someday mine Facebook for their Master’s thesis

    Reply
  55. I guess FaceBook is a bit like the extensive correspondences folks used to keep up in C18 and C19.
    We’d be a lot poorer if it weren’t for those literary letters authors kept writing back and forth.
    I wonder if future historian folks will someday mine Facebook for their Master’s thesis

    Reply
  56. Wellington lived long enough to have two careers — general and statesman. Not so many folks get to do this. Eisenhower comes to mind as another.
    We’re closer to history than we think. My father remembered the first car that drove into his small town in Mississippi.

    Reply
  57. Wellington lived long enough to have two careers — general and statesman. Not so many folks get to do this. Eisenhower comes to mind as another.
    We’re closer to history than we think. My father remembered the first car that drove into his small town in Mississippi.

    Reply
  58. Wellington lived long enough to have two careers — general and statesman. Not so many folks get to do this. Eisenhower comes to mind as another.
    We’re closer to history than we think. My father remembered the first car that drove into his small town in Mississippi.

    Reply
  59. Wellington lived long enough to have two careers — general and statesman. Not so many folks get to do this. Eisenhower comes to mind as another.
    We’re closer to history than we think. My father remembered the first car that drove into his small town in Mississippi.

    Reply
  60. Wellington lived long enough to have two careers — general and statesman. Not so many folks get to do this. Eisenhower comes to mind as another.
    We’re closer to history than we think. My father remembered the first car that drove into his small town in Mississippi.

    Reply
  61. My husband is the youngest of a large family. His father was in the Austro-Hungarian army on the Italian Front during WWI!

    Reply
  62. My husband is the youngest of a large family. His father was in the Austro-Hungarian army on the Italian Front during WWI!

    Reply
  63. My husband is the youngest of a large family. His father was in the Austro-Hungarian army on the Italian Front during WWI!

    Reply
  64. My husband is the youngest of a large family. His father was in the Austro-Hungarian army on the Italian Front during WWI!

    Reply
  65. My husband is the youngest of a large family. His father was in the Austro-Hungarian army on the Italian Front during WWI!

    Reply
  66. As to closer to history: My grandmother lived in the 19th and 20th centuries (as did her son, my father). I have lived in the 20th and 21st centuries, So the family has lived through parts of 3 centuries in the course of 3 generations. And my children knew many of those 19th century ancestors. So they also have that 3 century connection.

    Reply
  67. As to closer to history: My grandmother lived in the 19th and 20th centuries (as did her son, my father). I have lived in the 20th and 21st centuries, So the family has lived through parts of 3 centuries in the course of 3 generations. And my children knew many of those 19th century ancestors. So they also have that 3 century connection.

    Reply
  68. As to closer to history: My grandmother lived in the 19th and 20th centuries (as did her son, my father). I have lived in the 20th and 21st centuries, So the family has lived through parts of 3 centuries in the course of 3 generations. And my children knew many of those 19th century ancestors. So they also have that 3 century connection.

    Reply
  69. As to closer to history: My grandmother lived in the 19th and 20th centuries (as did her son, my father). I have lived in the 20th and 21st centuries, So the family has lived through parts of 3 centuries in the course of 3 generations. And my children knew many of those 19th century ancestors. So they also have that 3 century connection.

    Reply
  70. As to closer to history: My grandmother lived in the 19th and 20th centuries (as did her son, my father). I have lived in the 20th and 21st centuries, So the family has lived through parts of 3 centuries in the course of 3 generations. And my children knew many of those 19th century ancestors. So they also have that 3 century connection.

    Reply
  71. My uncles fought in WWI and my mother remembered them ringing all the church bells when it ended.
    And now they’ve decided the 1950s can be Historical Romance.
    I don’t object, really, but I’m a little taken aback.
    History just comes racing past us, doesn’t it?

    Reply
  72. My uncles fought in WWI and my mother remembered them ringing all the church bells when it ended.
    And now they’ve decided the 1950s can be Historical Romance.
    I don’t object, really, but I’m a little taken aback.
    History just comes racing past us, doesn’t it?

    Reply
  73. My uncles fought in WWI and my mother remembered them ringing all the church bells when it ended.
    And now they’ve decided the 1950s can be Historical Romance.
    I don’t object, really, but I’m a little taken aback.
    History just comes racing past us, doesn’t it?

    Reply
  74. My uncles fought in WWI and my mother remembered them ringing all the church bells when it ended.
    And now they’ve decided the 1950s can be Historical Romance.
    I don’t object, really, but I’m a little taken aback.
    History just comes racing past us, doesn’t it?

    Reply
  75. My uncles fought in WWI and my mother remembered them ringing all the church bells when it ended.
    And now they’ve decided the 1950s can be Historical Romance.
    I don’t object, really, but I’m a little taken aback.
    History just comes racing past us, doesn’t it?

    Reply
  76. Wait … the ’50s? HIstorical? Ooooh. Who decided that?
    Still trying to process the “Mid-Century Modern” meme, and now you tell me my salad days are HISTORICAL!
    Hahaha, How about that—I’ve lived long enough to be history. Wonder if Wellington felt that, too.

    Reply
  77. Wait … the ’50s? HIstorical? Ooooh. Who decided that?
    Still trying to process the “Mid-Century Modern” meme, and now you tell me my salad days are HISTORICAL!
    Hahaha, How about that—I’ve lived long enough to be history. Wonder if Wellington felt that, too.

    Reply
  78. Wait … the ’50s? HIstorical? Ooooh. Who decided that?
    Still trying to process the “Mid-Century Modern” meme, and now you tell me my salad days are HISTORICAL!
    Hahaha, How about that—I’ve lived long enough to be history. Wonder if Wellington felt that, too.

    Reply
  79. Wait … the ’50s? HIstorical? Ooooh. Who decided that?
    Still trying to process the “Mid-Century Modern” meme, and now you tell me my salad days are HISTORICAL!
    Hahaha, How about that—I’ve lived long enough to be history. Wonder if Wellington felt that, too.

    Reply
  80. Wait … the ’50s? HIstorical? Ooooh. Who decided that?
    Still trying to process the “Mid-Century Modern” meme, and now you tell me my salad days are HISTORICAL!
    Hahaha, How about that—I’ve lived long enough to be history. Wonder if Wellington felt that, too.

    Reply
  81. I associate calling the 50s “history” with Romancelandia, (and not even universal there.) But it’s more widespread than that:
    https://www.goodreads.com/genres/historical-fiction-1950s
    https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/historical-fiction-1950s
    If somebody pinned me down and tortured an opinion out of me, I’d say the 1950s won’t REALLY become history till they start teaching it in history classes.
    Right now, mostly, college history courses stop at the end of WWII.

    Reply
  82. I associate calling the 50s “history” with Romancelandia, (and not even universal there.) But it’s more widespread than that:
    https://www.goodreads.com/genres/historical-fiction-1950s
    https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/historical-fiction-1950s
    If somebody pinned me down and tortured an opinion out of me, I’d say the 1950s won’t REALLY become history till they start teaching it in history classes.
    Right now, mostly, college history courses stop at the end of WWII.

    Reply
  83. I associate calling the 50s “history” with Romancelandia, (and not even universal there.) But it’s more widespread than that:
    https://www.goodreads.com/genres/historical-fiction-1950s
    https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/historical-fiction-1950s
    If somebody pinned me down and tortured an opinion out of me, I’d say the 1950s won’t REALLY become history till they start teaching it in history classes.
    Right now, mostly, college history courses stop at the end of WWII.

    Reply
  84. I associate calling the 50s “history” with Romancelandia, (and not even universal there.) But it’s more widespread than that:
    https://www.goodreads.com/genres/historical-fiction-1950s
    https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/historical-fiction-1950s
    If somebody pinned me down and tortured an opinion out of me, I’d say the 1950s won’t REALLY become history till they start teaching it in history classes.
    Right now, mostly, college history courses stop at the end of WWII.

    Reply
  85. I associate calling the 50s “history” with Romancelandia, (and not even universal there.) But it’s more widespread than that:
    https://www.goodreads.com/genres/historical-fiction-1950s
    https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/historical-fiction-1950s
    If somebody pinned me down and tortured an opinion out of me, I’d say the 1950s won’t REALLY become history till they start teaching it in history classes.
    Right now, mostly, college history courses stop at the end of WWII.

    Reply
  86. Hey, my grandfather was also in the Austro-Hungarian army on the Italian front in WWI, small world! The only thing I ever remember him saying about it was that their rations were one loaf of bread per day, they used to eat grass to fill their stomachs.

    Reply
  87. Hey, my grandfather was also in the Austro-Hungarian army on the Italian front in WWI, small world! The only thing I ever remember him saying about it was that their rations were one loaf of bread per day, they used to eat grass to fill their stomachs.

    Reply
  88. Hey, my grandfather was also in the Austro-Hungarian army on the Italian front in WWI, small world! The only thing I ever remember him saying about it was that their rations were one loaf of bread per day, they used to eat grass to fill their stomachs.

    Reply
  89. Hey, my grandfather was also in the Austro-Hungarian army on the Italian front in WWI, small world! The only thing I ever remember him saying about it was that their rations were one loaf of bread per day, they used to eat grass to fill their stomachs.

    Reply
  90. Hey, my grandfather was also in the Austro-Hungarian army on the Italian front in WWI, small world! The only thing I ever remember him saying about it was that their rations were one loaf of bread per day, they used to eat grass to fill their stomachs.

    Reply

Leave a Comment