Jennifer Kloester’s Biography of Georgette Heyer


JenKloester
Anne here, delighted to be hosting another visit from Honorary Word Wench, Dr. Jennifer Kloester, pictured here in her study, surrounded by Heyer novels and a few of her many files of research. If you'
d like to read my first interview with Jennifer, it's here.

Jennifer's eagerly awaited biography of Georgette Heyer will be released in London on the 6th October. That's just a few short weeks away. I'm so excited. Jen, this biography has been 10 years of research and five years of writing. Has the journey been worth it? What have been some of the highlights along the way?

HeyerBioCover Jennifer: I have had the most wonderful time writing this biography but I must confess that when I began working on Georgette Heyer’s life and writing, I never imagined where it would lead me. I actually began the research in 1999 but didn’t really get serious about it until I began my doctorate on her in February 2001. When I began I can remember thinking, ‘oh, there’s hardly any material out there about her.’ Boy, was I wrong! I have had so many incredible moments of discovery and made so many wonderful friends along the way that I do feel fortunate in having followed this path. 

One of the main highlights has been discovering the new archives of her letters and having her son, Sir Richard Rougier, give me copyright permission to acquire copies of them and to quote from them.

Another highlight has been the discovery of nine of Georgette’s short stories, seven of which will be completely unknown to the modern reader. I spent days at the British Library trawling thousands of magazines from the 1920s and 30s and I can’t tell you how exciting it was to turn the page and find Georgette Heyer’s name at the top of the page!

Anne: I can imagine. And I hope those stories get published some day. There have been several books written about Georgette Heyer, but I gather you've had unprecedented access to Georgette Heyer's private family papers. How did that come about?

Jennifer: My access to Georgette’s private papers was entirely due to the kindness and generosity of her son. I wrote him a formal letter in 2001 and he invited me to lunch at his house in Somerset. It was a truly memorable occasion sitting with him in the arbour beneath the most magnificent scented wisteria and talking about his mother and her writing. After lunch he showed me his office where he kept her notebooks and papers and pretty much left me to it. After that, he and his wife, Lady Rougier, invited me to stay and I guess I just kept going back. 12 Georgette & Richard

(Picture on right is Georgette with her son Richard, aged 8.)

On each of my research trips to England they had me to stay and each time Sir Richard would show me something new. On one trip he brought out the family photo albums, on another, Georgette’s baby book and, of course, we wrote to each other. I would send half a dozen questions in a letter and he would write back with the answers. That proved to be a particularly good way of doing it because he was a wonderful writer himself and the act of putting pen to paper often jogged his memory and as a result I got some wonderful new anecdotes about his mother and her family. (Pic below, Georgette, her husband, Ronald and her son, Richard.)

22 Ronald, Georgette & Richard Anne: Even though there have been other books written about Georgette Heyer, I believe there are some new and exciting revelations. Can you share one or two with us?

Jennifer: The new biography is full of new information about Georgette Heyer and that’s the thing that’s probably given me the most satisfaction. For those who have read the first biography, you’ll know that Georgette is in her early forties by the end of the second chapter, whereas in the new biography the first two thirds of the book are about those years.

DSCN3683 I have been hugely fortunate in having access to a wealth of new material and that has meant that, among other things, I can tell you a lot more about her childhood and adolescence than we have known before. There’s a fascinating story about when These Old Shades was written and Georgette’s vision for the book and lots and lots of pithy quotes direct from her pen about her novels. There’s also the complete story of her 1942 novel Penhallow and the crucial role it had in her writing life.

Anne:  These Old Shades was my first Heyer, so I'm dying to read that. What surprised you most in your discoveries?

Jennifer: What surprised me most about Georgette was the extent to which she wrote her emotions into her novels. She once said ‘I am to be found in my work’ and when you read her letters and understand more about her life and writing you can see what she means. I recently re-read Bath Tangle and I was struck by how much Lady Serena’s response to her father’s sudden death echoed Georgette’s own experience. These days I often see these sorts of parallels in the novels. (Pic below, Georgette aged 21 by E. O. Hoppe 1923)16 Georgette aged 21 by E. O. Hoppe 1923

The plagiarism chapter in the biography is short but fascinating, especially as I have let Georgette tell a lot of it in her own words. I was really pleased to be able to write openly about the case, not only because people have wondered about it for years, but more importantly because it is in these letters that Georgette really rises to the defence of her writing and research and this was not something she did very often.

 Anne: Yes, I read some of the articles about it in the UK papers.(Here's a link to one such but prepare to be annoyed by the last paragraph.)

That's a beautiful photo of Georgette on the cover of the book. I don't think I've ever seen it before.  I know you have quite a few photos never before seen by the public in this book. Would you care to share a photo or two?    8 Georgette, Sylvia & baby Boris

Jennifer: I would love to share some photos with you that (on account of space restrictions) did not make it into the final book. Having said that, I am thrilled with the number of never-before-seen photos that are in the biography and I really hope readers will be as delighted as I am to see them.

(On right, Georgette, her mother and baby brother, Boris.
Below, Georgette.)

DSCN3288

Anne: You're flying to London for the launch, shortly, and I understand there's a whole Regency day planned by the Romantic Novelists Association, of which your launch is a major part. WordWenches Jo Beverley and Nicola Cornick will also be in attendance. Sounds like a marvellous day. I wish I could be there but I'll have to content myself with the Australian launch in December. What else will you be doing in the UK?

Jennifer: I leave for London in a couple of weeks and I am SO excited to be doing the Romantic Novelists Association Regency day. The programme is terrific and there will be some wonderful writers there as well as lots of enthusiastic readers. I also have a book launch at Daunts Books in Marylebone High Street on Thursday 6 October at 6.30pm and a signing at Hatchard’s, the famous eighteenth-century bookstore on Piccadilly, on Monday 10th at 3pm. Georgette used to shop there so that makes it extra exciting.  Hatchards1

I’m speaking at the Wimbledon Bookfest on the 3rd and the Guildford Literary Festival on the 17th and I am being interviewed on BBC4 Woman’s Hour on Tuesday 11 October. So all in all it should be a really exciting trip.

 Anne: It sounds wonderful. Are there any plans for a North American release?

Jennifer: I am also about to sign a contract for the biography with Sourcebooks which means there will be an American edition out in fall next year in the USA – I’m very excited about that.

Anne: Me, too, as are many of the readers here, I'm sure. What else is planned?

Jennifer: The book comes out in Australia and New Zealand on 1 December and I am having launches at Dymocks in Sydney on the 1st and in Melbourne on the 8th. Everyone is welcome. There will be launches in Brisbane, Adelaide and Hobart in the New Year and I also hope to do a tour of New Zealand in the first half of 2012.

Anne: It all sounds so exciting, Jen. I'll be joining you on at least one of those occasions — more if I can wangle it. Congratulations on all your work and research finally coming to fruition.

Jennifer: Thanks, Anne. It has been the most marvellous journey and I fervently hope that Georgette Heyer’s many admirers will enjoy the result. 

Anne: I'm sure they will. Thanks so much for joining us here on wordwenches, Jen.  Jennifer's biography of Georgette Heyer can be ordered from here. People can also check out Jen's website for more about Heyer and some of the things that didn’t make it into the book.

Jennifer is giving away one copy of Georgette Heyer's biography to some lucky person who leaves a comment. So here's the question — who is your favorite Heyer character, and why are they your favorite? And if you have any questions about Georgette Heyer, Jen will be happy to answer them.

305 thoughts on “Jennifer Kloester’s Biography of Georgette Heyer”

  1. I’m attending the Regency Day too and I’m so looking forward to it, and to reading your biography. I love The Toll Gate, and Captain Staples and Nell.
    Do you feel your biography was ‘easier’ in a sense since Georgette Heyer was dead by the time you began your researches? I know there’s always difficulties in writing a biography later, as people aren’t around so much to question, but you do also get a ‘distance’ that perhaps would be harder closer to the real events. What are your thoughts on that?

    Reply
  2. I’m attending the Regency Day too and I’m so looking forward to it, and to reading your biography. I love The Toll Gate, and Captain Staples and Nell.
    Do you feel your biography was ‘easier’ in a sense since Georgette Heyer was dead by the time you began your researches? I know there’s always difficulties in writing a biography later, as people aren’t around so much to question, but you do also get a ‘distance’ that perhaps would be harder closer to the real events. What are your thoughts on that?

    Reply
  3. I’m attending the Regency Day too and I’m so looking forward to it, and to reading your biography. I love The Toll Gate, and Captain Staples and Nell.
    Do you feel your biography was ‘easier’ in a sense since Georgette Heyer was dead by the time you began your researches? I know there’s always difficulties in writing a biography later, as people aren’t around so much to question, but you do also get a ‘distance’ that perhaps would be harder closer to the real events. What are your thoughts on that?

    Reply
  4. I’m attending the Regency Day too and I’m so looking forward to it, and to reading your biography. I love The Toll Gate, and Captain Staples and Nell.
    Do you feel your biography was ‘easier’ in a sense since Georgette Heyer was dead by the time you began your researches? I know there’s always difficulties in writing a biography later, as people aren’t around so much to question, but you do also get a ‘distance’ that perhaps would be harder closer to the real events. What are your thoughts on that?

    Reply
  5. I’m attending the Regency Day too and I’m so looking forward to it, and to reading your biography. I love The Toll Gate, and Captain Staples and Nell.
    Do you feel your biography was ‘easier’ in a sense since Georgette Heyer was dead by the time you began your researches? I know there’s always difficulties in writing a biography later, as people aren’t around so much to question, but you do also get a ‘distance’ that perhaps would be harder closer to the real events. What are your thoughts on that?

    Reply
  6. *squee* I’m so excited that it is finally here! (Well, nearly!)
    My favourite Heyer character has to be Sophy, because she is oh-so-grand, and reminds me of my managing self!

    Reply
  7. *squee* I’m so excited that it is finally here! (Well, nearly!)
    My favourite Heyer character has to be Sophy, because she is oh-so-grand, and reminds me of my managing self!

    Reply
  8. *squee* I’m so excited that it is finally here! (Well, nearly!)
    My favourite Heyer character has to be Sophy, because she is oh-so-grand, and reminds me of my managing self!

    Reply
  9. *squee* I’m so excited that it is finally here! (Well, nearly!)
    My favourite Heyer character has to be Sophy, because she is oh-so-grand, and reminds me of my managing self!

    Reply
  10. *squee* I’m so excited that it is finally here! (Well, nearly!)
    My favourite Heyer character has to be Sophy, because she is oh-so-grand, and reminds me of my managing self!

    Reply
  11. Hi Jennifer, I have your first book and am looking forward to your second. My mother introduced me to THESE OLD SHADES when I was a young teenager and I was hooked.
    Thanks for an excellent interview, Anne.

    Reply
  12. Hi Jennifer, I have your first book and am looking forward to your second. My mother introduced me to THESE OLD SHADES when I was a young teenager and I was hooked.
    Thanks for an excellent interview, Anne.

    Reply
  13. Hi Jennifer, I have your first book and am looking forward to your second. My mother introduced me to THESE OLD SHADES when I was a young teenager and I was hooked.
    Thanks for an excellent interview, Anne.

    Reply
  14. Hi Jennifer, I have your first book and am looking forward to your second. My mother introduced me to THESE OLD SHADES when I was a young teenager and I was hooked.
    Thanks for an excellent interview, Anne.

    Reply
  15. Hi Jennifer, I have your first book and am looking forward to your second. My mother introduced me to THESE OLD SHADES when I was a young teenager and I was hooked.
    Thanks for an excellent interview, Anne.

    Reply
  16. My favourite Heyer book, so far, is Devil’s Cub! I went to see Jennifer speak at Melbourne Writer’s Festival a few years ago even before I had even read any Heyer books (I just knew that I was going to eventually!) I enjoyed the talk, and I am looking forward to reading the book!

    Reply
  17. My favourite Heyer book, so far, is Devil’s Cub! I went to see Jennifer speak at Melbourne Writer’s Festival a few years ago even before I had even read any Heyer books (I just knew that I was going to eventually!) I enjoyed the talk, and I am looking forward to reading the book!

    Reply
  18. My favourite Heyer book, so far, is Devil’s Cub! I went to see Jennifer speak at Melbourne Writer’s Festival a few years ago even before I had even read any Heyer books (I just knew that I was going to eventually!) I enjoyed the talk, and I am looking forward to reading the book!

    Reply
  19. My favourite Heyer book, so far, is Devil’s Cub! I went to see Jennifer speak at Melbourne Writer’s Festival a few years ago even before I had even read any Heyer books (I just knew that I was going to eventually!) I enjoyed the talk, and I am looking forward to reading the book!

    Reply
  20. My favourite Heyer book, so far, is Devil’s Cub! I went to see Jennifer speak at Melbourne Writer’s Festival a few years ago even before I had even read any Heyer books (I just knew that I was going to eventually!) I enjoyed the talk, and I am looking forward to reading the book!

    Reply
  21. I don’t think I can name just one favourite character but I’m re-reading Cotillion at the moment and remembering how much I like Freddy Standen. He’s so not a conventional ‘romance’ hero but Heyer has us rooting for him over Jack all along. I am really looking forward to Kloester’s biography and hope that I win the giveaway!

    Reply
  22. I don’t think I can name just one favourite character but I’m re-reading Cotillion at the moment and remembering how much I like Freddy Standen. He’s so not a conventional ‘romance’ hero but Heyer has us rooting for him over Jack all along. I am really looking forward to Kloester’s biography and hope that I win the giveaway!

    Reply
  23. I don’t think I can name just one favourite character but I’m re-reading Cotillion at the moment and remembering how much I like Freddy Standen. He’s so not a conventional ‘romance’ hero but Heyer has us rooting for him over Jack all along. I am really looking forward to Kloester’s biography and hope that I win the giveaway!

    Reply
  24. I don’t think I can name just one favourite character but I’m re-reading Cotillion at the moment and remembering how much I like Freddy Standen. He’s so not a conventional ‘romance’ hero but Heyer has us rooting for him over Jack all along. I am really looking forward to Kloester’s biography and hope that I win the giveaway!

    Reply
  25. I don’t think I can name just one favourite character but I’m re-reading Cotillion at the moment and remembering how much I like Freddy Standen. He’s so not a conventional ‘romance’ hero but Heyer has us rooting for him over Jack all along. I am really looking forward to Kloester’s biography and hope that I win the giveaway!

    Reply
  26. I have so many Heyer favorites. But pushed to pick just one, I’d have to say Mary Challoner. I love the way she deals with Vidal – threatening to take away his clothes so he can’t travel too soon after she shoots him; well, and shooting him in the first place. She’s clever, resourceful and has tons of integrity.
    I read Jane Aiken Hodge’s biography a few years ago, but I am so looking forward to reading this one and excited about the new information. But sounds like I’ll have to wait a whole year for the North American release. Wish I could be in London for the Regency Celebration / book launch!

    Reply
  27. I have so many Heyer favorites. But pushed to pick just one, I’d have to say Mary Challoner. I love the way she deals with Vidal – threatening to take away his clothes so he can’t travel too soon after she shoots him; well, and shooting him in the first place. She’s clever, resourceful and has tons of integrity.
    I read Jane Aiken Hodge’s biography a few years ago, but I am so looking forward to reading this one and excited about the new information. But sounds like I’ll have to wait a whole year for the North American release. Wish I could be in London for the Regency Celebration / book launch!

    Reply
  28. I have so many Heyer favorites. But pushed to pick just one, I’d have to say Mary Challoner. I love the way she deals with Vidal – threatening to take away his clothes so he can’t travel too soon after she shoots him; well, and shooting him in the first place. She’s clever, resourceful and has tons of integrity.
    I read Jane Aiken Hodge’s biography a few years ago, but I am so looking forward to reading this one and excited about the new information. But sounds like I’ll have to wait a whole year for the North American release. Wish I could be in London for the Regency Celebration / book launch!

    Reply
  29. I have so many Heyer favorites. But pushed to pick just one, I’d have to say Mary Challoner. I love the way she deals with Vidal – threatening to take away his clothes so he can’t travel too soon after she shoots him; well, and shooting him in the first place. She’s clever, resourceful and has tons of integrity.
    I read Jane Aiken Hodge’s biography a few years ago, but I am so looking forward to reading this one and excited about the new information. But sounds like I’ll have to wait a whole year for the North American release. Wish I could be in London for the Regency Celebration / book launch!

    Reply
  30. I have so many Heyer favorites. But pushed to pick just one, I’d have to say Mary Challoner. I love the way she deals with Vidal – threatening to take away his clothes so he can’t travel too soon after she shoots him; well, and shooting him in the first place. She’s clever, resourceful and has tons of integrity.
    I read Jane Aiken Hodge’s biography a few years ago, but I am so looking forward to reading this one and excited about the new information. But sounds like I’ll have to wait a whole year for the North American release. Wish I could be in London for the Regency Celebration / book launch!

    Reply
  31. After reading this interview, I’m more eager than ever to read the bigraphy.
    Choosing one character from among many beloved ones is a difficult task. I adore Frederica and Sophy, but if forced to choose a single character, I’ll go with The Unknown Ajax, Major Hugo Darracott, because he is indeed as “strong, as valiant, as wise,. . . noble . . . gentle” as Anthea describes him plus he proves a true hero in a crisis and has a killer sense of humor.

    Reply
  32. After reading this interview, I’m more eager than ever to read the bigraphy.
    Choosing one character from among many beloved ones is a difficult task. I adore Frederica and Sophy, but if forced to choose a single character, I’ll go with The Unknown Ajax, Major Hugo Darracott, because he is indeed as “strong, as valiant, as wise,. . . noble . . . gentle” as Anthea describes him plus he proves a true hero in a crisis and has a killer sense of humor.

    Reply
  33. After reading this interview, I’m more eager than ever to read the bigraphy.
    Choosing one character from among many beloved ones is a difficult task. I adore Frederica and Sophy, but if forced to choose a single character, I’ll go with The Unknown Ajax, Major Hugo Darracott, because he is indeed as “strong, as valiant, as wise,. . . noble . . . gentle” as Anthea describes him plus he proves a true hero in a crisis and has a killer sense of humor.

    Reply
  34. After reading this interview, I’m more eager than ever to read the bigraphy.
    Choosing one character from among many beloved ones is a difficult task. I adore Frederica and Sophy, but if forced to choose a single character, I’ll go with The Unknown Ajax, Major Hugo Darracott, because he is indeed as “strong, as valiant, as wise,. . . noble . . . gentle” as Anthea describes him plus he proves a true hero in a crisis and has a killer sense of humor.

    Reply
  35. After reading this interview, I’m more eager than ever to read the bigraphy.
    Choosing one character from among many beloved ones is a difficult task. I adore Frederica and Sophy, but if forced to choose a single character, I’ll go with The Unknown Ajax, Major Hugo Darracott, because he is indeed as “strong, as valiant, as wise,. . . noble . . . gentle” as Anthea describes him plus he proves a true hero in a crisis and has a killer sense of humor.

    Reply
  36. I would probably say Dameral was my favorite character, if I had to choose. But then I also like John Staples in Tollbooth, Venetia, Sophy, Oliver, everyone in the Talisman Ring, Drucilla , the Quiet Gentleman, …… the list grows too long.
    The biography sounds intriquing.

    Reply
  37. I would probably say Dameral was my favorite character, if I had to choose. But then I also like John Staples in Tollbooth, Venetia, Sophy, Oliver, everyone in the Talisman Ring, Drucilla , the Quiet Gentleman, …… the list grows too long.
    The biography sounds intriquing.

    Reply
  38. I would probably say Dameral was my favorite character, if I had to choose. But then I also like John Staples in Tollbooth, Venetia, Sophy, Oliver, everyone in the Talisman Ring, Drucilla , the Quiet Gentleman, …… the list grows too long.
    The biography sounds intriquing.

    Reply
  39. I would probably say Dameral was my favorite character, if I had to choose. But then I also like John Staples in Tollbooth, Venetia, Sophy, Oliver, everyone in the Talisman Ring, Drucilla , the Quiet Gentleman, …… the list grows too long.
    The biography sounds intriquing.

    Reply
  40. I would probably say Dameral was my favorite character, if I had to choose. But then I also like John Staples in Tollbooth, Venetia, Sophy, Oliver, everyone in the Talisman Ring, Drucilla , the Quiet Gentleman, …… the list grows too long.
    The biography sounds intriquing.

    Reply
  41. I am looking forward to this new biography. Heyer introduced me to the Regency period. My favorite character is the Baluchistan dog from Frederica…human-wise, it has to be Dameral.

    Reply
  42. I am looking forward to this new biography. Heyer introduced me to the Regency period. My favorite character is the Baluchistan dog from Frederica…human-wise, it has to be Dameral.

    Reply
  43. I am looking forward to this new biography. Heyer introduced me to the Regency period. My favorite character is the Baluchistan dog from Frederica…human-wise, it has to be Dameral.

    Reply
  44. I am looking forward to this new biography. Heyer introduced me to the Regency period. My favorite character is the Baluchistan dog from Frederica…human-wise, it has to be Dameral.

    Reply
  45. I am looking forward to this new biography. Heyer introduced me to the Regency period. My favorite character is the Baluchistan dog from Frederica…human-wise, it has to be Dameral.

    Reply
  46. I love and adore all Georgette’s characters.
    When I was fourteen, my mother bought me Sylvester or The Wicked Uncle. This hero was so very different from every other hero I had ever read, so if I have to narrow it down to one, I choose Sylvester, since he was my first. I developed an insatiable appetite for Heyer’s books. I particularly enjoy her histories as well as her Regencies.
    Virginia Henley

    Reply
  47. I love and adore all Georgette’s characters.
    When I was fourteen, my mother bought me Sylvester or The Wicked Uncle. This hero was so very different from every other hero I had ever read, so if I have to narrow it down to one, I choose Sylvester, since he was my first. I developed an insatiable appetite for Heyer’s books. I particularly enjoy her histories as well as her Regencies.
    Virginia Henley

    Reply
  48. I love and adore all Georgette’s characters.
    When I was fourteen, my mother bought me Sylvester or The Wicked Uncle. This hero was so very different from every other hero I had ever read, so if I have to narrow it down to one, I choose Sylvester, since he was my first. I developed an insatiable appetite for Heyer’s books. I particularly enjoy her histories as well as her Regencies.
    Virginia Henley

    Reply
  49. I love and adore all Georgette’s characters.
    When I was fourteen, my mother bought me Sylvester or The Wicked Uncle. This hero was so very different from every other hero I had ever read, so if I have to narrow it down to one, I choose Sylvester, since he was my first. I developed an insatiable appetite for Heyer’s books. I particularly enjoy her histories as well as her Regencies.
    Virginia Henley

    Reply
  50. I love and adore all Georgette’s characters.
    When I was fourteen, my mother bought me Sylvester or The Wicked Uncle. This hero was so very different from every other hero I had ever read, so if I have to narrow it down to one, I choose Sylvester, since he was my first. I developed an insatiable appetite for Heyer’s books. I particularly enjoy her histories as well as her Regencies.
    Virginia Henley

    Reply
  51. Pageturner asked whether it was easier to write the biography after Georgette’s death. It’s a great question and one I’ve thought about whenever I’ve found myself delving into her life. I’ve often wondered what she would think of me doing all the research and whether she would approve. I’m not sure of the answer so perhaps it’s better that she isn’t here to tell me frankly! When her son Richard died I found it very hard to go on because he had been such a good friend and so generous in allowing me total access to Georgette’s papers and library and things. To be honest he wasn’t always sure himself about whether there should be a biography but as the years went by and I kept on going with the research and he read the early drafts he was happy to give the project his blessing. So to answer your question I think perhaps there wouldn’t be a biography if Georgette were still alive and I have been very fortunate in having access to many of the people of the people she knew and to the many many letters she wrote. I really hope the biography does her justice!

    Reply
  52. Pageturner asked whether it was easier to write the biography after Georgette’s death. It’s a great question and one I’ve thought about whenever I’ve found myself delving into her life. I’ve often wondered what she would think of me doing all the research and whether she would approve. I’m not sure of the answer so perhaps it’s better that she isn’t here to tell me frankly! When her son Richard died I found it very hard to go on because he had been such a good friend and so generous in allowing me total access to Georgette’s papers and library and things. To be honest he wasn’t always sure himself about whether there should be a biography but as the years went by and I kept on going with the research and he read the early drafts he was happy to give the project his blessing. So to answer your question I think perhaps there wouldn’t be a biography if Georgette were still alive and I have been very fortunate in having access to many of the people of the people she knew and to the many many letters she wrote. I really hope the biography does her justice!

    Reply
  53. Pageturner asked whether it was easier to write the biography after Georgette’s death. It’s a great question and one I’ve thought about whenever I’ve found myself delving into her life. I’ve often wondered what she would think of me doing all the research and whether she would approve. I’m not sure of the answer so perhaps it’s better that she isn’t here to tell me frankly! When her son Richard died I found it very hard to go on because he had been such a good friend and so generous in allowing me total access to Georgette’s papers and library and things. To be honest he wasn’t always sure himself about whether there should be a biography but as the years went by and I kept on going with the research and he read the early drafts he was happy to give the project his blessing. So to answer your question I think perhaps there wouldn’t be a biography if Georgette were still alive and I have been very fortunate in having access to many of the people of the people she knew and to the many many letters she wrote. I really hope the biography does her justice!

    Reply
  54. Pageturner asked whether it was easier to write the biography after Georgette’s death. It’s a great question and one I’ve thought about whenever I’ve found myself delving into her life. I’ve often wondered what she would think of me doing all the research and whether she would approve. I’m not sure of the answer so perhaps it’s better that she isn’t here to tell me frankly! When her son Richard died I found it very hard to go on because he had been such a good friend and so generous in allowing me total access to Georgette’s papers and library and things. To be honest he wasn’t always sure himself about whether there should be a biography but as the years went by and I kept on going with the research and he read the early drafts he was happy to give the project his blessing. So to answer your question I think perhaps there wouldn’t be a biography if Georgette were still alive and I have been very fortunate in having access to many of the people of the people she knew and to the many many letters she wrote. I really hope the biography does her justice!

    Reply
  55. Pageturner asked whether it was easier to write the biography after Georgette’s death. It’s a great question and one I’ve thought about whenever I’ve found myself delving into her life. I’ve often wondered what she would think of me doing all the research and whether she would approve. I’m not sure of the answer so perhaps it’s better that she isn’t here to tell me frankly! When her son Richard died I found it very hard to go on because he had been such a good friend and so generous in allowing me total access to Georgette’s papers and library and things. To be honest he wasn’t always sure himself about whether there should be a biography but as the years went by and I kept on going with the research and he read the early drafts he was happy to give the project his blessing. So to answer your question I think perhaps there wouldn’t be a biography if Georgette were still alive and I have been very fortunate in having access to many of the people of the people she knew and to the many many letters she wrote. I really hope the biography does her justice!

    Reply
  56. I love everyone’s choice of favourite Heyer character and if I’m allowed to mention mine I thnk it might be Hester Theale from Sprig Muslin. I always loved her ‘myopic gaze’ and her way of shutting out her dreadful family. She has great strength of character and a wonderful sense of humour. Of course I also love Sir Tristram and Sarah Thane from Talisman Ring and Freddy from Cotillion, oh, and Miles Calverleigh from Black Sheep and …

    Reply
  57. I love everyone’s choice of favourite Heyer character and if I’m allowed to mention mine I thnk it might be Hester Theale from Sprig Muslin. I always loved her ‘myopic gaze’ and her way of shutting out her dreadful family. She has great strength of character and a wonderful sense of humour. Of course I also love Sir Tristram and Sarah Thane from Talisman Ring and Freddy from Cotillion, oh, and Miles Calverleigh from Black Sheep and …

    Reply
  58. I love everyone’s choice of favourite Heyer character and if I’m allowed to mention mine I thnk it might be Hester Theale from Sprig Muslin. I always loved her ‘myopic gaze’ and her way of shutting out her dreadful family. She has great strength of character and a wonderful sense of humour. Of course I also love Sir Tristram and Sarah Thane from Talisman Ring and Freddy from Cotillion, oh, and Miles Calverleigh from Black Sheep and …

    Reply
  59. I love everyone’s choice of favourite Heyer character and if I’m allowed to mention mine I thnk it might be Hester Theale from Sprig Muslin. I always loved her ‘myopic gaze’ and her way of shutting out her dreadful family. She has great strength of character and a wonderful sense of humour. Of course I also love Sir Tristram and Sarah Thane from Talisman Ring and Freddy from Cotillion, oh, and Miles Calverleigh from Black Sheep and …

    Reply
  60. I love everyone’s choice of favourite Heyer character and if I’m allowed to mention mine I thnk it might be Hester Theale from Sprig Muslin. I always loved her ‘myopic gaze’ and her way of shutting out her dreadful family. She has great strength of character and a wonderful sense of humour. Of course I also love Sir Tristram and Sarah Thane from Talisman Ring and Freddy from Cotillion, oh, and Miles Calverleigh from Black Sheep and …

    Reply
  61. My favourite is the Grand Sophy. I love her spirit and her humour and the way she machmakes so superbly – even for herself.
    I can’t wait to read the book and to meet Jennifer at the Regency Day

    Reply
  62. My favourite is the Grand Sophy. I love her spirit and her humour and the way she machmakes so superbly – even for herself.
    I can’t wait to read the book and to meet Jennifer at the Regency Day

    Reply
  63. My favourite is the Grand Sophy. I love her spirit and her humour and the way she machmakes so superbly – even for herself.
    I can’t wait to read the book and to meet Jennifer at the Regency Day

    Reply
  64. My favourite is the Grand Sophy. I love her spirit and her humour and the way she machmakes so superbly – even for herself.
    I can’t wait to read the book and to meet Jennifer at the Regency Day

    Reply
  65. My favourite is the Grand Sophy. I love her spirit and her humour and the way she machmakes so superbly – even for herself.
    I can’t wait to read the book and to meet Jennifer at the Regency Day

    Reply
  66. Thanks so much for this fascinating interview. All was interesting but I especially loved the photos. Like most authors of a Regency, I was inspired by her work and tried to follow her high standards of research and humor.
    – Phoebe Matthews

    Reply
  67. Thanks so much for this fascinating interview. All was interesting but I especially loved the photos. Like most authors of a Regency, I was inspired by her work and tried to follow her high standards of research and humor.
    – Phoebe Matthews

    Reply
  68. Thanks so much for this fascinating interview. All was interesting but I especially loved the photos. Like most authors of a Regency, I was inspired by her work and tried to follow her high standards of research and humor.
    – Phoebe Matthews

    Reply
  69. Thanks so much for this fascinating interview. All was interesting but I especially loved the photos. Like most authors of a Regency, I was inspired by her work and tried to follow her high standards of research and humor.
    – Phoebe Matthews

    Reply
  70. Thanks so much for this fascinating interview. All was interesting but I especially loved the photos. Like most authors of a Regency, I was inspired by her work and tried to follow her high standards of research and humor.
    – Phoebe Matthews

    Reply
  71. Thanks for replying, Jennifer, to my question. I think the same as you – I suspect she would have been baffled at the thought anyone would want to write her biography, but it will be a fascinating read for Heyer’s fans. I collect Jeffrey Farnol, Orczy, Sabatini as well and I can see that she’s part of that tradition too. I enjoyed the article in JPRS http://jprstudies.org/ about teaching “Sylvester” as part of a literature course and could see why she was tsught in with Scott.
    pageturner345@gmail.com

    Reply
  72. Thanks for replying, Jennifer, to my question. I think the same as you – I suspect she would have been baffled at the thought anyone would want to write her biography, but it will be a fascinating read for Heyer’s fans. I collect Jeffrey Farnol, Orczy, Sabatini as well and I can see that she’s part of that tradition too. I enjoyed the article in JPRS http://jprstudies.org/ about teaching “Sylvester” as part of a literature course and could see why she was tsught in with Scott.
    pageturner345@gmail.com

    Reply
  73. Thanks for replying, Jennifer, to my question. I think the same as you – I suspect she would have been baffled at the thought anyone would want to write her biography, but it will be a fascinating read for Heyer’s fans. I collect Jeffrey Farnol, Orczy, Sabatini as well and I can see that she’s part of that tradition too. I enjoyed the article in JPRS http://jprstudies.org/ about teaching “Sylvester” as part of a literature course and could see why she was tsught in with Scott.
    pageturner345@gmail.com

    Reply
  74. Thanks for replying, Jennifer, to my question. I think the same as you – I suspect she would have been baffled at the thought anyone would want to write her biography, but it will be a fascinating read for Heyer’s fans. I collect Jeffrey Farnol, Orczy, Sabatini as well and I can see that she’s part of that tradition too. I enjoyed the article in JPRS http://jprstudies.org/ about teaching “Sylvester” as part of a literature course and could see why she was tsught in with Scott.
    pageturner345@gmail.com

    Reply
  75. Thanks for replying, Jennifer, to my question. I think the same as you – I suspect she would have been baffled at the thought anyone would want to write her biography, but it will be a fascinating read for Heyer’s fans. I collect Jeffrey Farnol, Orczy, Sabatini as well and I can see that she’s part of that tradition too. I enjoyed the article in JPRS http://jprstudies.org/ about teaching “Sylvester” as part of a literature course and could see why she was tsught in with Scott.
    pageturner345@gmail.com

    Reply
  76. I have to go with Jenny from Civil Contract as my favorite. She saw herself as just a regular person, and I think she “settled” for a lot in life because that is what she saw as her lot in life.
    But all good things came to her in the end.

    Reply
  77. I have to go with Jenny from Civil Contract as my favorite. She saw herself as just a regular person, and I think she “settled” for a lot in life because that is what she saw as her lot in life.
    But all good things came to her in the end.

    Reply
  78. I have to go with Jenny from Civil Contract as my favorite. She saw herself as just a regular person, and I think she “settled” for a lot in life because that is what she saw as her lot in life.
    But all good things came to her in the end.

    Reply
  79. I have to go with Jenny from Civil Contract as my favorite. She saw herself as just a regular person, and I think she “settled” for a lot in life because that is what she saw as her lot in life.
    But all good things came to her in the end.

    Reply
  80. I have to go with Jenny from Civil Contract as my favorite. She saw herself as just a regular person, and I think she “settled” for a lot in life because that is what she saw as her lot in life.
    But all good things came to her in the end.

    Reply
  81. I love Heyer. To pick my favorite character is really hard, her interplay and banter among her characters is done so well; I think today (as I reread it changes) I will go with Dameral.
    Recently a blog had a live chat about Heyer and her novels. There was some concern that while reading her books people found Heyer anti Semitic and therefore unable to enjoy her stories. I am not personally offended by her writing and maybe I am putting on rose-colored glasses like to think that her view was just being historically accurate. While doing her biography did you tackle this issue?

    Reply
  82. I love Heyer. To pick my favorite character is really hard, her interplay and banter among her characters is done so well; I think today (as I reread it changes) I will go with Dameral.
    Recently a blog had a live chat about Heyer and her novels. There was some concern that while reading her books people found Heyer anti Semitic and therefore unable to enjoy her stories. I am not personally offended by her writing and maybe I am putting on rose-colored glasses like to think that her view was just being historically accurate. While doing her biography did you tackle this issue?

    Reply
  83. I love Heyer. To pick my favorite character is really hard, her interplay and banter among her characters is done so well; I think today (as I reread it changes) I will go with Dameral.
    Recently a blog had a live chat about Heyer and her novels. There was some concern that while reading her books people found Heyer anti Semitic and therefore unable to enjoy her stories. I am not personally offended by her writing and maybe I am putting on rose-colored glasses like to think that her view was just being historically accurate. While doing her biography did you tackle this issue?

    Reply
  84. I love Heyer. To pick my favorite character is really hard, her interplay and banter among her characters is done so well; I think today (as I reread it changes) I will go with Dameral.
    Recently a blog had a live chat about Heyer and her novels. There was some concern that while reading her books people found Heyer anti Semitic and therefore unable to enjoy her stories. I am not personally offended by her writing and maybe I am putting on rose-colored glasses like to think that her view was just being historically accurate. While doing her biography did you tackle this issue?

    Reply
  85. I love Heyer. To pick my favorite character is really hard, her interplay and banter among her characters is done so well; I think today (as I reread it changes) I will go with Dameral.
    Recently a blog had a live chat about Heyer and her novels. There was some concern that while reading her books people found Heyer anti Semitic and therefore unable to enjoy her stories. I am not personally offended by her writing and maybe I am putting on rose-colored glasses like to think that her view was just being historically accurate. While doing her biography did you tackle this issue?

    Reply
  86. I think if I had to pick just one favorite Heyer character, it would be Hugo Darracott in The Unknown Ajax because he is so much fun!
    Your mentions of Heyer’s letters make me think of the fine time I’ve had reading the published letters of some of my favorite authors, and wonder whether there might ever be a volume of Heyer’s published letters. In the meantime I’m looking forward to the bio!

    Reply
  87. I think if I had to pick just one favorite Heyer character, it would be Hugo Darracott in The Unknown Ajax because he is so much fun!
    Your mentions of Heyer’s letters make me think of the fine time I’ve had reading the published letters of some of my favorite authors, and wonder whether there might ever be a volume of Heyer’s published letters. In the meantime I’m looking forward to the bio!

    Reply
  88. I think if I had to pick just one favorite Heyer character, it would be Hugo Darracott in The Unknown Ajax because he is so much fun!
    Your mentions of Heyer’s letters make me think of the fine time I’ve had reading the published letters of some of my favorite authors, and wonder whether there might ever be a volume of Heyer’s published letters. In the meantime I’m looking forward to the bio!

    Reply
  89. I think if I had to pick just one favorite Heyer character, it would be Hugo Darracott in The Unknown Ajax because he is so much fun!
    Your mentions of Heyer’s letters make me think of the fine time I’ve had reading the published letters of some of my favorite authors, and wonder whether there might ever be a volume of Heyer’s published letters. In the meantime I’m looking forward to the bio!

    Reply
  90. I think if I had to pick just one favorite Heyer character, it would be Hugo Darracott in The Unknown Ajax because he is so much fun!
    Your mentions of Heyer’s letters make me think of the fine time I’ve had reading the published letters of some of my favorite authors, and wonder whether there might ever be a volume of Heyer’s published letters. In the meantime I’m looking forward to the bio!

    Reply
  91. I’m another fan of Hugo Darracott. Give me a sweet Beta hero any day! And I love a hero who’s underestimated, but proves himself masterful in the end. The book is one of my favorites, with that hilarious scene “diddling the dupes.”
    Freddy Standen and Gervaise Frant also are at the top of my list.
    I’m looking forward to reading the biography! Thanks for bringing more attention to Georgette.

    Reply
  92. I’m another fan of Hugo Darracott. Give me a sweet Beta hero any day! And I love a hero who’s underestimated, but proves himself masterful in the end. The book is one of my favorites, with that hilarious scene “diddling the dupes.”
    Freddy Standen and Gervaise Frant also are at the top of my list.
    I’m looking forward to reading the biography! Thanks for bringing more attention to Georgette.

    Reply
  93. I’m another fan of Hugo Darracott. Give me a sweet Beta hero any day! And I love a hero who’s underestimated, but proves himself masterful in the end. The book is one of my favorites, with that hilarious scene “diddling the dupes.”
    Freddy Standen and Gervaise Frant also are at the top of my list.
    I’m looking forward to reading the biography! Thanks for bringing more attention to Georgette.

    Reply
  94. I’m another fan of Hugo Darracott. Give me a sweet Beta hero any day! And I love a hero who’s underestimated, but proves himself masterful in the end. The book is one of my favorites, with that hilarious scene “diddling the dupes.”
    Freddy Standen and Gervaise Frant also are at the top of my list.
    I’m looking forward to reading the biography! Thanks for bringing more attention to Georgette.

    Reply
  95. I’m another fan of Hugo Darracott. Give me a sweet Beta hero any day! And I love a hero who’s underestimated, but proves himself masterful in the end. The book is one of my favorites, with that hilarious scene “diddling the dupes.”
    Freddy Standen and Gervaise Frant also are at the top of my list.
    I’m looking forward to reading the biography! Thanks for bringing more attention to Georgette.

    Reply
  96. I loved THE QUIET GENTLEMAN. I loved Gervase, because he’s quiet, unassuming, looks like a pushover, but is anything but. He has a secret identity without the mask, and I love it. Especially since this book also has a mystery in it, and I love romances that have something in addition to the romance. And I like Drusilla–a hard-headed, intelligent woman. Nobody puts anything over on her.
    My third favorite is young Tom, the heroine Phoebe’s childhood friend in SYLVESTER. Tom calls a spade a spade, and isn’t afraid to confront high-and-mighty duke Sylvester when he’s wrong about Phoebe. And Sylvester is wrong all the time. I couldn’t stand both obnoxious Sylvester and doormat Phoebe, but I loved Tom.

    Reply
  97. I loved THE QUIET GENTLEMAN. I loved Gervase, because he’s quiet, unassuming, looks like a pushover, but is anything but. He has a secret identity without the mask, and I love it. Especially since this book also has a mystery in it, and I love romances that have something in addition to the romance. And I like Drusilla–a hard-headed, intelligent woman. Nobody puts anything over on her.
    My third favorite is young Tom, the heroine Phoebe’s childhood friend in SYLVESTER. Tom calls a spade a spade, and isn’t afraid to confront high-and-mighty duke Sylvester when he’s wrong about Phoebe. And Sylvester is wrong all the time. I couldn’t stand both obnoxious Sylvester and doormat Phoebe, but I loved Tom.

    Reply
  98. I loved THE QUIET GENTLEMAN. I loved Gervase, because he’s quiet, unassuming, looks like a pushover, but is anything but. He has a secret identity without the mask, and I love it. Especially since this book also has a mystery in it, and I love romances that have something in addition to the romance. And I like Drusilla–a hard-headed, intelligent woman. Nobody puts anything over on her.
    My third favorite is young Tom, the heroine Phoebe’s childhood friend in SYLVESTER. Tom calls a spade a spade, and isn’t afraid to confront high-and-mighty duke Sylvester when he’s wrong about Phoebe. And Sylvester is wrong all the time. I couldn’t stand both obnoxious Sylvester and doormat Phoebe, but I loved Tom.

    Reply
  99. I loved THE QUIET GENTLEMAN. I loved Gervase, because he’s quiet, unassuming, looks like a pushover, but is anything but. He has a secret identity without the mask, and I love it. Especially since this book also has a mystery in it, and I love romances that have something in addition to the romance. And I like Drusilla–a hard-headed, intelligent woman. Nobody puts anything over on her.
    My third favorite is young Tom, the heroine Phoebe’s childhood friend in SYLVESTER. Tom calls a spade a spade, and isn’t afraid to confront high-and-mighty duke Sylvester when he’s wrong about Phoebe. And Sylvester is wrong all the time. I couldn’t stand both obnoxious Sylvester and doormat Phoebe, but I loved Tom.

    Reply
  100. I loved THE QUIET GENTLEMAN. I loved Gervase, because he’s quiet, unassuming, looks like a pushover, but is anything but. He has a secret identity without the mask, and I love it. Especially since this book also has a mystery in it, and I love romances that have something in addition to the romance. And I like Drusilla–a hard-headed, intelligent woman. Nobody puts anything over on her.
    My third favorite is young Tom, the heroine Phoebe’s childhood friend in SYLVESTER. Tom calls a spade a spade, and isn’t afraid to confront high-and-mighty duke Sylvester when he’s wrong about Phoebe. And Sylvester is wrong all the time. I couldn’t stand both obnoxious Sylvester and doormat Phoebe, but I loved Tom.

    Reply
  101. What a wonderful book! I’ve loved Heyer since I was 10 so I can’t wait to read this. My favourite character – so hard to choose but either Phoebe from Sylvester because it’s fantastic to have a shy heroine who I can relate to so well; or, maybe just ahead by a whisker, Dominic in Devil’s Cub. His relationship with Léonie & Rupert is hysterical and the pairing of him and Mary is perfect in every way.

    Reply
  102. What a wonderful book! I’ve loved Heyer since I was 10 so I can’t wait to read this. My favourite character – so hard to choose but either Phoebe from Sylvester because it’s fantastic to have a shy heroine who I can relate to so well; or, maybe just ahead by a whisker, Dominic in Devil’s Cub. His relationship with Léonie & Rupert is hysterical and the pairing of him and Mary is perfect in every way.

    Reply
  103. What a wonderful book! I’ve loved Heyer since I was 10 so I can’t wait to read this. My favourite character – so hard to choose but either Phoebe from Sylvester because it’s fantastic to have a shy heroine who I can relate to so well; or, maybe just ahead by a whisker, Dominic in Devil’s Cub. His relationship with Léonie & Rupert is hysterical and the pairing of him and Mary is perfect in every way.

    Reply
  104. What a wonderful book! I’ve loved Heyer since I was 10 so I can’t wait to read this. My favourite character – so hard to choose but either Phoebe from Sylvester because it’s fantastic to have a shy heroine who I can relate to so well; or, maybe just ahead by a whisker, Dominic in Devil’s Cub. His relationship with Léonie & Rupert is hysterical and the pairing of him and Mary is perfect in every way.

    Reply
  105. What a wonderful book! I’ve loved Heyer since I was 10 so I can’t wait to read this. My favourite character – so hard to choose but either Phoebe from Sylvester because it’s fantastic to have a shy heroine who I can relate to so well; or, maybe just ahead by a whisker, Dominic in Devil’s Cub. His relationship with Léonie & Rupert is hysterical and the pairing of him and Mary is perfect in every way.

    Reply
  106. My favorite this week is Hugo Darracott, especially as portrayed in the audio book. He is so funny, big, smart, strong, masculine, gentle — the perfect hero and man for all ages. I also love Prudence in The Masqueraders and The Grand Sophy — two women who move with ease through some pretty tough situations.

    Reply
  107. My favorite this week is Hugo Darracott, especially as portrayed in the audio book. He is so funny, big, smart, strong, masculine, gentle — the perfect hero and man for all ages. I also love Prudence in The Masqueraders and The Grand Sophy — two women who move with ease through some pretty tough situations.

    Reply
  108. My favorite this week is Hugo Darracott, especially as portrayed in the audio book. He is so funny, big, smart, strong, masculine, gentle — the perfect hero and man for all ages. I also love Prudence in The Masqueraders and The Grand Sophy — two women who move with ease through some pretty tough situations.

    Reply
  109. My favorite this week is Hugo Darracott, especially as portrayed in the audio book. He is so funny, big, smart, strong, masculine, gentle — the perfect hero and man for all ages. I also love Prudence in The Masqueraders and The Grand Sophy — two women who move with ease through some pretty tough situations.

    Reply
  110. My favorite this week is Hugo Darracott, especially as portrayed in the audio book. He is so funny, big, smart, strong, masculine, gentle — the perfect hero and man for all ages. I also love Prudence in The Masqueraders and The Grand Sophy — two women who move with ease through some pretty tough situations.

    Reply
  111. I love all these comments and every time I read about someone’s favourite hero or heroine I think, ‘Oh, yes!’ I do think it is hard to choose. Great to have your question Kat and, yes, I do tackle the issue of Georgette’s apparent anti-Semitism in her novels in the biography. I felt it was very important to deal with the topic especially in light of the fact that Georgette always said her Russian ancestors were Jewish. I hope I have given greater insight into that aspect of her writing without excusing it.

    Reply
  112. I love all these comments and every time I read about someone’s favourite hero or heroine I think, ‘Oh, yes!’ I do think it is hard to choose. Great to have your question Kat and, yes, I do tackle the issue of Georgette’s apparent anti-Semitism in her novels in the biography. I felt it was very important to deal with the topic especially in light of the fact that Georgette always said her Russian ancestors were Jewish. I hope I have given greater insight into that aspect of her writing without excusing it.

    Reply
  113. I love all these comments and every time I read about someone’s favourite hero or heroine I think, ‘Oh, yes!’ I do think it is hard to choose. Great to have your question Kat and, yes, I do tackle the issue of Georgette’s apparent anti-Semitism in her novels in the biography. I felt it was very important to deal with the topic especially in light of the fact that Georgette always said her Russian ancestors were Jewish. I hope I have given greater insight into that aspect of her writing without excusing it.

    Reply
  114. I love all these comments and every time I read about someone’s favourite hero or heroine I think, ‘Oh, yes!’ I do think it is hard to choose. Great to have your question Kat and, yes, I do tackle the issue of Georgette’s apparent anti-Semitism in her novels in the biography. I felt it was very important to deal with the topic especially in light of the fact that Georgette always said her Russian ancestors were Jewish. I hope I have given greater insight into that aspect of her writing without excusing it.

    Reply
  115. I love all these comments and every time I read about someone’s favourite hero or heroine I think, ‘Oh, yes!’ I do think it is hard to choose. Great to have your question Kat and, yes, I do tackle the issue of Georgette’s apparent anti-Semitism in her novels in the biography. I felt it was very important to deal with the topic especially in light of the fact that Georgette always said her Russian ancestors were Jewish. I hope I have given greater insight into that aspect of her writing without excusing it.

    Reply
  116. I find myself incredibly interested in the lives of writers, and although I haven’t read all of Georgette Heyer’s books (please don’t excommunicate me for that, I’m working on it!)I adore what I’ve read. She was amazing, in her romances and her mysteries. My favourite romance still remains Bath Tangle, the very first book of hers I read. I’ll certainly keep a lookout for her biography; can’t wait to delve into it. Thanks for a fabulous post.
    Malvina

    Reply
  117. I find myself incredibly interested in the lives of writers, and although I haven’t read all of Georgette Heyer’s books (please don’t excommunicate me for that, I’m working on it!)I adore what I’ve read. She was amazing, in her romances and her mysteries. My favourite romance still remains Bath Tangle, the very first book of hers I read. I’ll certainly keep a lookout for her biography; can’t wait to delve into it. Thanks for a fabulous post.
    Malvina

    Reply
  118. I find myself incredibly interested in the lives of writers, and although I haven’t read all of Georgette Heyer’s books (please don’t excommunicate me for that, I’m working on it!)I adore what I’ve read. She was amazing, in her romances and her mysteries. My favourite romance still remains Bath Tangle, the very first book of hers I read. I’ll certainly keep a lookout for her biography; can’t wait to delve into it. Thanks for a fabulous post.
    Malvina

    Reply
  119. I find myself incredibly interested in the lives of writers, and although I haven’t read all of Georgette Heyer’s books (please don’t excommunicate me for that, I’m working on it!)I adore what I’ve read. She was amazing, in her romances and her mysteries. My favourite romance still remains Bath Tangle, the very first book of hers I read. I’ll certainly keep a lookout for her biography; can’t wait to delve into it. Thanks for a fabulous post.
    Malvina

    Reply
  120. I find myself incredibly interested in the lives of writers, and although I haven’t read all of Georgette Heyer’s books (please don’t excommunicate me for that, I’m working on it!)I adore what I’ve read. She was amazing, in her romances and her mysteries. My favourite romance still remains Bath Tangle, the very first book of hers I read. I’ll certainly keep a lookout for her biography; can’t wait to delve into it. Thanks for a fabulous post.
    Malvina

    Reply
  121. I would have to say my favorite character is actually the whole Merriot family from The Masqueraders. Prudence and Robin’s father is so over the top but wonderful. I love how strong and capable Prudence is and how her family not only accepts that she can be strong but actually expects it. Robin is a perfect brother for Prudence — again a strong character who is willing to bend and give if the circumstances warrant it.
    Love the convoluted twisting plot, the cross-dressing, the road trip, the sword fights, everything.
    And I must admit that I also really love Sir Anthony — who is smart enough and perceptive enough to accept Prudence as she is and not try to change her.
    I have a copy of the Hodge biography and can’t wait to get a copy of yours — am really looking forward to reading it.
    Lynn

    Reply
  122. I would have to say my favorite character is actually the whole Merriot family from The Masqueraders. Prudence and Robin’s father is so over the top but wonderful. I love how strong and capable Prudence is and how her family not only accepts that she can be strong but actually expects it. Robin is a perfect brother for Prudence — again a strong character who is willing to bend and give if the circumstances warrant it.
    Love the convoluted twisting plot, the cross-dressing, the road trip, the sword fights, everything.
    And I must admit that I also really love Sir Anthony — who is smart enough and perceptive enough to accept Prudence as she is and not try to change her.
    I have a copy of the Hodge biography and can’t wait to get a copy of yours — am really looking forward to reading it.
    Lynn

    Reply
  123. I would have to say my favorite character is actually the whole Merriot family from The Masqueraders. Prudence and Robin’s father is so over the top but wonderful. I love how strong and capable Prudence is and how her family not only accepts that she can be strong but actually expects it. Robin is a perfect brother for Prudence — again a strong character who is willing to bend and give if the circumstances warrant it.
    Love the convoluted twisting plot, the cross-dressing, the road trip, the sword fights, everything.
    And I must admit that I also really love Sir Anthony — who is smart enough and perceptive enough to accept Prudence as she is and not try to change her.
    I have a copy of the Hodge biography and can’t wait to get a copy of yours — am really looking forward to reading it.
    Lynn

    Reply
  124. I would have to say my favorite character is actually the whole Merriot family from The Masqueraders. Prudence and Robin’s father is so over the top but wonderful. I love how strong and capable Prudence is and how her family not only accepts that she can be strong but actually expects it. Robin is a perfect brother for Prudence — again a strong character who is willing to bend and give if the circumstances warrant it.
    Love the convoluted twisting plot, the cross-dressing, the road trip, the sword fights, everything.
    And I must admit that I also really love Sir Anthony — who is smart enough and perceptive enough to accept Prudence as she is and not try to change her.
    I have a copy of the Hodge biography and can’t wait to get a copy of yours — am really looking forward to reading it.
    Lynn

    Reply
  125. I would have to say my favorite character is actually the whole Merriot family from The Masqueraders. Prudence and Robin’s father is so over the top but wonderful. I love how strong and capable Prudence is and how her family not only accepts that she can be strong but actually expects it. Robin is a perfect brother for Prudence — again a strong character who is willing to bend and give if the circumstances warrant it.
    Love the convoluted twisting plot, the cross-dressing, the road trip, the sword fights, everything.
    And I must admit that I also really love Sir Anthony — who is smart enough and perceptive enough to accept Prudence as she is and not try to change her.
    I have a copy of the Hodge biography and can’t wait to get a copy of yours — am really looking forward to reading it.
    Lynn

    Reply
  126. Great post Lynn and I hope you enjoy the biography. I love The Masqueraders, too, especially the father who so totally believes in his own brilliance. But I really love knowing that Georgette wrote it in a grass hut in a remote part of Africa – such an extraordinary contrast to the world of the book. It says a lot about her imagination.

    Reply
  127. Great post Lynn and I hope you enjoy the biography. I love The Masqueraders, too, especially the father who so totally believes in his own brilliance. But I really love knowing that Georgette wrote it in a grass hut in a remote part of Africa – such an extraordinary contrast to the world of the book. It says a lot about her imagination.

    Reply
  128. Great post Lynn and I hope you enjoy the biography. I love The Masqueraders, too, especially the father who so totally believes in his own brilliance. But I really love knowing that Georgette wrote it in a grass hut in a remote part of Africa – such an extraordinary contrast to the world of the book. It says a lot about her imagination.

    Reply
  129. Great post Lynn and I hope you enjoy the biography. I love The Masqueraders, too, especially the father who so totally believes in his own brilliance. But I really love knowing that Georgette wrote it in a grass hut in a remote part of Africa – such an extraordinary contrast to the world of the book. It says a lot about her imagination.

    Reply
  130. Great post Lynn and I hope you enjoy the biography. I love The Masqueraders, too, especially the father who so totally believes in his own brilliance. But I really love knowing that Georgette wrote it in a grass hut in a remote part of Africa – such an extraordinary contrast to the world of the book. It says a lot about her imagination.

    Reply
  131. I think my favourite character is Deborah Grantham from Faro’s Daughter, but I can’t mention her without her hero, Max Ravenscar. They two of them together are so delicious! I also love Sophy in the Grand Sophy, and Mary Challoner, both of whom have spirit and a great appreciation of the absurd. This book sounds wonderful, and it’s great to see those pictures. Lovely interview, Anne.

    Reply
  132. I think my favourite character is Deborah Grantham from Faro’s Daughter, but I can’t mention her without her hero, Max Ravenscar. They two of them together are so delicious! I also love Sophy in the Grand Sophy, and Mary Challoner, both of whom have spirit and a great appreciation of the absurd. This book sounds wonderful, and it’s great to see those pictures. Lovely interview, Anne.

    Reply
  133. I think my favourite character is Deborah Grantham from Faro’s Daughter, but I can’t mention her without her hero, Max Ravenscar. They two of them together are so delicious! I also love Sophy in the Grand Sophy, and Mary Challoner, both of whom have spirit and a great appreciation of the absurd. This book sounds wonderful, and it’s great to see those pictures. Lovely interview, Anne.

    Reply
  134. I think my favourite character is Deborah Grantham from Faro’s Daughter, but I can’t mention her without her hero, Max Ravenscar. They two of them together are so delicious! I also love Sophy in the Grand Sophy, and Mary Challoner, both of whom have spirit and a great appreciation of the absurd. This book sounds wonderful, and it’s great to see those pictures. Lovely interview, Anne.

    Reply
  135. I think my favourite character is Deborah Grantham from Faro’s Daughter, but I can’t mention her without her hero, Max Ravenscar. They two of them together are so delicious! I also love Sophy in the Grand Sophy, and Mary Challoner, both of whom have spirit and a great appreciation of the absurd. This book sounds wonderful, and it’s great to see those pictures. Lovely interview, Anne.

    Reply
  136. Georgette Heyer books started me on my love of romance novels. Devil’s Cub was my first at age13, and remains one of my favorites/keepers. Venetia is my fave ever!

    Reply
  137. Georgette Heyer books started me on my love of romance novels. Devil’s Cub was my first at age13, and remains one of my favorites/keepers. Venetia is my fave ever!

    Reply
  138. Georgette Heyer books started me on my love of romance novels. Devil’s Cub was my first at age13, and remains one of my favorites/keepers. Venetia is my fave ever!

    Reply
  139. Georgette Heyer books started me on my love of romance novels. Devil’s Cub was my first at age13, and remains one of my favorites/keepers. Venetia is my fave ever!

    Reply
  140. Georgette Heyer books started me on my love of romance novels. Devil’s Cub was my first at age13, and remains one of my favorites/keepers. Venetia is my fave ever!

    Reply
  141. Great interview, Ladies! I can’t wait to read the biography, Jen, and will be doing my best to get to the Sydney launch.
    I’m with Sarah on this one — Deborah Grantham is my favourite character. She’s resourceful and somehow never loses her sense of humour. Loved her sense of fair play too. Hmm… have a sudden urge to reread Faro’s Daughter now! 🙂

    Reply
  142. Great interview, Ladies! I can’t wait to read the biography, Jen, and will be doing my best to get to the Sydney launch.
    I’m with Sarah on this one — Deborah Grantham is my favourite character. She’s resourceful and somehow never loses her sense of humour. Loved her sense of fair play too. Hmm… have a sudden urge to reread Faro’s Daughter now! 🙂

    Reply
  143. Great interview, Ladies! I can’t wait to read the biography, Jen, and will be doing my best to get to the Sydney launch.
    I’m with Sarah on this one — Deborah Grantham is my favourite character. She’s resourceful and somehow never loses her sense of humour. Loved her sense of fair play too. Hmm… have a sudden urge to reread Faro’s Daughter now! 🙂

    Reply
  144. Great interview, Ladies! I can’t wait to read the biography, Jen, and will be doing my best to get to the Sydney launch.
    I’m with Sarah on this one — Deborah Grantham is my favourite character. She’s resourceful and somehow never loses her sense of humour. Loved her sense of fair play too. Hmm… have a sudden urge to reread Faro’s Daughter now! 🙂

    Reply
  145. Great interview, Ladies! I can’t wait to read the biography, Jen, and will be doing my best to get to the Sydney launch.
    I’m with Sarah on this one — Deborah Grantham is my favourite character. She’s resourceful and somehow never loses her sense of humour. Loved her sense of fair play too. Hmm… have a sudden urge to reread Faro’s Daughter now! 🙂

    Reply
  146. Lovely interview. I’m glad that there will be a North American edition of the biography, but profoundly sorry it will take another year to come out. If the shipping didn’t put the price up over my budget, I’d gladly order a UK edition in order to have it earlier. I was introduced to Heyer’s work in the early 70s, and it’s led to my building a library of my own research. SO looking forward to my own copy!

    Reply
  147. Lovely interview. I’m glad that there will be a North American edition of the biography, but profoundly sorry it will take another year to come out. If the shipping didn’t put the price up over my budget, I’d gladly order a UK edition in order to have it earlier. I was introduced to Heyer’s work in the early 70s, and it’s led to my building a library of my own research. SO looking forward to my own copy!

    Reply
  148. Lovely interview. I’m glad that there will be a North American edition of the biography, but profoundly sorry it will take another year to come out. If the shipping didn’t put the price up over my budget, I’d gladly order a UK edition in order to have it earlier. I was introduced to Heyer’s work in the early 70s, and it’s led to my building a library of my own research. SO looking forward to my own copy!

    Reply
  149. Lovely interview. I’m glad that there will be a North American edition of the biography, but profoundly sorry it will take another year to come out. If the shipping didn’t put the price up over my budget, I’d gladly order a UK edition in order to have it earlier. I was introduced to Heyer’s work in the early 70s, and it’s led to my building a library of my own research. SO looking forward to my own copy!

    Reply
  150. Lovely interview. I’m glad that there will be a North American edition of the biography, but profoundly sorry it will take another year to come out. If the shipping didn’t put the price up over my budget, I’d gladly order a UK edition in order to have it earlier. I was introduced to Heyer’s work in the early 70s, and it’s led to my building a library of my own research. SO looking forward to my own copy!

    Reply
  151. I have to say Sylvester for me – Besides the fact that I love it and that Richard Armitage has made the Audio book version fab, it mentions my relation (Henry Francis Cary who translated Dante into English) in chapter two.

    Reply
  152. I have to say Sylvester for me – Besides the fact that I love it and that Richard Armitage has made the Audio book version fab, it mentions my relation (Henry Francis Cary who translated Dante into English) in chapter two.

    Reply
  153. I have to say Sylvester for me – Besides the fact that I love it and that Richard Armitage has made the Audio book version fab, it mentions my relation (Henry Francis Cary who translated Dante into English) in chapter two.

    Reply
  154. I have to say Sylvester for me – Besides the fact that I love it and that Richard Armitage has made the Audio book version fab, it mentions my relation (Henry Francis Cary who translated Dante into English) in chapter two.

    Reply
  155. I have to say Sylvester for me – Besides the fact that I love it and that Richard Armitage has made the Audio book version fab, it mentions my relation (Henry Francis Cary who translated Dante into English) in chapter two.

    Reply
  156. That’s so nice of you Marilyn and it is a nuisance that the US edition won’t be out until next year. If you’re keen to get the book though you can order it from book Depository which has free postage anywhere in the world. Your library sounds fascinating – mine is full of Heyer and Regency-related books!
    Cassie, how wonderful to be related to Cary, it must give reading Sylvester an extra frisson I think!

    Reply
  157. That’s so nice of you Marilyn and it is a nuisance that the US edition won’t be out until next year. If you’re keen to get the book though you can order it from book Depository which has free postage anywhere in the world. Your library sounds fascinating – mine is full of Heyer and Regency-related books!
    Cassie, how wonderful to be related to Cary, it must give reading Sylvester an extra frisson I think!

    Reply
  158. That’s so nice of you Marilyn and it is a nuisance that the US edition won’t be out until next year. If you’re keen to get the book though you can order it from book Depository which has free postage anywhere in the world. Your library sounds fascinating – mine is full of Heyer and Regency-related books!
    Cassie, how wonderful to be related to Cary, it must give reading Sylvester an extra frisson I think!

    Reply
  159. That’s so nice of you Marilyn and it is a nuisance that the US edition won’t be out until next year. If you’re keen to get the book though you can order it from book Depository which has free postage anywhere in the world. Your library sounds fascinating – mine is full of Heyer and Regency-related books!
    Cassie, how wonderful to be related to Cary, it must give reading Sylvester an extra frisson I think!

    Reply
  160. That’s so nice of you Marilyn and it is a nuisance that the US edition won’t be out until next year. If you’re keen to get the book though you can order it from book Depository which has free postage anywhere in the world. Your library sounds fascinating – mine is full of Heyer and Regency-related books!
    Cassie, how wonderful to be related to Cary, it must give reading Sylvester an extra frisson I think!

    Reply
  161. My last post disappeared, but for Marilyn and anyone else who’s thinking the cost of postage from the UK will be too much, the link I used for buying Jen’s book is to the Book Depository, which will post books anywhere in the world for free. The Heyer biography costs US $24.70, and postage is free. Here’s the link again.
    http://tinyurl.com/5shezxp
    cheers
    anne

    Reply
  162. My last post disappeared, but for Marilyn and anyone else who’s thinking the cost of postage from the UK will be too much, the link I used for buying Jen’s book is to the Book Depository, which will post books anywhere in the world for free. The Heyer biography costs US $24.70, and postage is free. Here’s the link again.
    http://tinyurl.com/5shezxp
    cheers
    anne

    Reply
  163. My last post disappeared, but for Marilyn and anyone else who’s thinking the cost of postage from the UK will be too much, the link I used for buying Jen’s book is to the Book Depository, which will post books anywhere in the world for free. The Heyer biography costs US $24.70, and postage is free. Here’s the link again.
    http://tinyurl.com/5shezxp
    cheers
    anne

    Reply
  164. My last post disappeared, but for Marilyn and anyone else who’s thinking the cost of postage from the UK will be too much, the link I used for buying Jen’s book is to the Book Depository, which will post books anywhere in the world for free. The Heyer biography costs US $24.70, and postage is free. Here’s the link again.
    http://tinyurl.com/5shezxp
    cheers
    anne

    Reply
  165. My last post disappeared, but for Marilyn and anyone else who’s thinking the cost of postage from the UK will be too much, the link I used for buying Jen’s book is to the Book Depository, which will post books anywhere in the world for free. The Heyer biography costs US $24.70, and postage is free. Here’s the link again.
    http://tinyurl.com/5shezxp
    cheers
    anne

    Reply
  166. Like growlycub, I think Venetia is still the best reformed rake story around. I love that Venetia and Damerel are so obviously right for each other, not because of a purple-prose physical attraction beyond anything the world has ever known, but because they make each other laugh.
    Venetia gets my character vote over Damerel however because it’s her that drives the story. We know she’s fabulously spunky – not because she does outrageous cliched fiesty heroine stuff – but because she handles everyone with aplomb – Nurse, Edward, Oswald, her Aunt & Uncle, her mother – and of course, Damerel. She sees through him, and goes all out to get her man. Go girl!

    Reply
  167. Like growlycub, I think Venetia is still the best reformed rake story around. I love that Venetia and Damerel are so obviously right for each other, not because of a purple-prose physical attraction beyond anything the world has ever known, but because they make each other laugh.
    Venetia gets my character vote over Damerel however because it’s her that drives the story. We know she’s fabulously spunky – not because she does outrageous cliched fiesty heroine stuff – but because she handles everyone with aplomb – Nurse, Edward, Oswald, her Aunt & Uncle, her mother – and of course, Damerel. She sees through him, and goes all out to get her man. Go girl!

    Reply
  168. Like growlycub, I think Venetia is still the best reformed rake story around. I love that Venetia and Damerel are so obviously right for each other, not because of a purple-prose physical attraction beyond anything the world has ever known, but because they make each other laugh.
    Venetia gets my character vote over Damerel however because it’s her that drives the story. We know she’s fabulously spunky – not because she does outrageous cliched fiesty heroine stuff – but because she handles everyone with aplomb – Nurse, Edward, Oswald, her Aunt & Uncle, her mother – and of course, Damerel. She sees through him, and goes all out to get her man. Go girl!

    Reply
  169. Like growlycub, I think Venetia is still the best reformed rake story around. I love that Venetia and Damerel are so obviously right for each other, not because of a purple-prose physical attraction beyond anything the world has ever known, but because they make each other laugh.
    Venetia gets my character vote over Damerel however because it’s her that drives the story. We know she’s fabulously spunky – not because she does outrageous cliched fiesty heroine stuff – but because she handles everyone with aplomb – Nurse, Edward, Oswald, her Aunt & Uncle, her mother – and of course, Damerel. She sees through him, and goes all out to get her man. Go girl!

    Reply
  170. Like growlycub, I think Venetia is still the best reformed rake story around. I love that Venetia and Damerel are so obviously right for each other, not because of a purple-prose physical attraction beyond anything the world has ever known, but because they make each other laugh.
    Venetia gets my character vote over Damerel however because it’s her that drives the story. We know she’s fabulously spunky – not because she does outrageous cliched fiesty heroine stuff – but because she handles everyone with aplomb – Nurse, Edward, Oswald, her Aunt & Uncle, her mother – and of course, Damerel. She sees through him, and goes all out to get her man. Go girl!

    Reply
  171. Gosh! How to pick one character from all of Georgette Heyer’s books. I love Frederica, and Freddy Standen, and Mary Challoner, but probably Adam deveril, Viscount Lynton,(although I really like Mr Chawleigh). I am looking forward to reading your new book Jennifer. Good luck with it.

    Reply
  172. Gosh! How to pick one character from all of Georgette Heyer’s books. I love Frederica, and Freddy Standen, and Mary Challoner, but probably Adam deveril, Viscount Lynton,(although I really like Mr Chawleigh). I am looking forward to reading your new book Jennifer. Good luck with it.

    Reply
  173. Gosh! How to pick one character from all of Georgette Heyer’s books. I love Frederica, and Freddy Standen, and Mary Challoner, but probably Adam deveril, Viscount Lynton,(although I really like Mr Chawleigh). I am looking forward to reading your new book Jennifer. Good luck with it.

    Reply
  174. Gosh! How to pick one character from all of Georgette Heyer’s books. I love Frederica, and Freddy Standen, and Mary Challoner, but probably Adam deveril, Viscount Lynton,(although I really like Mr Chawleigh). I am looking forward to reading your new book Jennifer. Good luck with it.

    Reply
  175. Gosh! How to pick one character from all of Georgette Heyer’s books. I love Frederica, and Freddy Standen, and Mary Challoner, but probably Adam deveril, Viscount Lynton,(although I really like Mr Chawleigh). I am looking forward to reading your new book Jennifer. Good luck with it.

    Reply
  176. Jenny Chawleigh from A Civil Contract has a way of wriggling past the defences. Her stubborn painful love for Adam is very moving. Then again, there is Hero in Friday’s Child… a wonderfully funny debunking of the Romantic convention and Hero is its sparkling,enchanting embodiment

    Reply
  177. Jenny Chawleigh from A Civil Contract has a way of wriggling past the defences. Her stubborn painful love for Adam is very moving. Then again, there is Hero in Friday’s Child… a wonderfully funny debunking of the Romantic convention and Hero is its sparkling,enchanting embodiment

    Reply
  178. Jenny Chawleigh from A Civil Contract has a way of wriggling past the defences. Her stubborn painful love for Adam is very moving. Then again, there is Hero in Friday’s Child… a wonderfully funny debunking of the Romantic convention and Hero is its sparkling,enchanting embodiment

    Reply
  179. Jenny Chawleigh from A Civil Contract has a way of wriggling past the defences. Her stubborn painful love for Adam is very moving. Then again, there is Hero in Friday’s Child… a wonderfully funny debunking of the Romantic convention and Hero is its sparkling,enchanting embodiment

    Reply
  180. Jenny Chawleigh from A Civil Contract has a way of wriggling past the defences. Her stubborn painful love for Adam is very moving. Then again, there is Hero in Friday’s Child… a wonderfully funny debunking of the Romantic convention and Hero is its sparkling,enchanting embodiment

    Reply
  181. Hi Ladies
    These Old Shades was my first and remains an equal favourite alongside Simon the Coldheart which, if you haven’t read it, is a wonderful read.
    Can’t wait to add the GH bio to my bookshelf.
    Sharon Sherry

    Reply
  182. Hi Ladies
    These Old Shades was my first and remains an equal favourite alongside Simon the Coldheart which, if you haven’t read it, is a wonderful read.
    Can’t wait to add the GH bio to my bookshelf.
    Sharon Sherry

    Reply
  183. Hi Ladies
    These Old Shades was my first and remains an equal favourite alongside Simon the Coldheart which, if you haven’t read it, is a wonderful read.
    Can’t wait to add the GH bio to my bookshelf.
    Sharon Sherry

    Reply
  184. Hi Ladies
    These Old Shades was my first and remains an equal favourite alongside Simon the Coldheart which, if you haven’t read it, is a wonderful read.
    Can’t wait to add the GH bio to my bookshelf.
    Sharon Sherry

    Reply
  185. Hi Ladies
    These Old Shades was my first and remains an equal favourite alongside Simon the Coldheart which, if you haven’t read it, is a wonderful read.
    Can’t wait to add the GH bio to my bookshelf.
    Sharon Sherry

    Reply
  186. I thoroughly enjoyed your blog and thank you so much for working so hard to bring such a favourite author like Georgette Heyer alive to us in your book. Reading the other biography simply made me want to know more about this wonderful writer. Great comments too and so hard to single out only one favourite character, especially one not mentioned-or as far as I remember. Since I was a teenager-many years ago now!-mine would still have to be Leonie from These Old Shades and the mother of the Devil’s Cub. As a writer it fascinates me how Heyer maintains Leonie’s character so beautifully through both books.

    Reply
  187. I thoroughly enjoyed your blog and thank you so much for working so hard to bring such a favourite author like Georgette Heyer alive to us in your book. Reading the other biography simply made me want to know more about this wonderful writer. Great comments too and so hard to single out only one favourite character, especially one not mentioned-or as far as I remember. Since I was a teenager-many years ago now!-mine would still have to be Leonie from These Old Shades and the mother of the Devil’s Cub. As a writer it fascinates me how Heyer maintains Leonie’s character so beautifully through both books.

    Reply
  188. I thoroughly enjoyed your blog and thank you so much for working so hard to bring such a favourite author like Georgette Heyer alive to us in your book. Reading the other biography simply made me want to know more about this wonderful writer. Great comments too and so hard to single out only one favourite character, especially one not mentioned-or as far as I remember. Since I was a teenager-many years ago now!-mine would still have to be Leonie from These Old Shades and the mother of the Devil’s Cub. As a writer it fascinates me how Heyer maintains Leonie’s character so beautifully through both books.

    Reply
  189. I thoroughly enjoyed your blog and thank you so much for working so hard to bring such a favourite author like Georgette Heyer alive to us in your book. Reading the other biography simply made me want to know more about this wonderful writer. Great comments too and so hard to single out only one favourite character, especially one not mentioned-or as far as I remember. Since I was a teenager-many years ago now!-mine would still have to be Leonie from These Old Shades and the mother of the Devil’s Cub. As a writer it fascinates me how Heyer maintains Leonie’s character so beautifully through both books.

    Reply
  190. I thoroughly enjoyed your blog and thank you so much for working so hard to bring such a favourite author like Georgette Heyer alive to us in your book. Reading the other biography simply made me want to know more about this wonderful writer. Great comments too and so hard to single out only one favourite character, especially one not mentioned-or as far as I remember. Since I was a teenager-many years ago now!-mine would still have to be Leonie from These Old Shades and the mother of the Devil’s Cub. As a writer it fascinates me how Heyer maintains Leonie’s character so beautifully through both books.

    Reply
  191. Oh, Minna, I’m almost envious that you are so new to Heyer. Such a wonderful journey before you.
    I’m really enjoying these posts, smiling over the various favorites. it was mean of me to ask, I know, because I can never pick just one or even three Heyer faves.

    Reply
  192. Oh, Minna, I’m almost envious that you are so new to Heyer. Such a wonderful journey before you.
    I’m really enjoying these posts, smiling over the various favorites. it was mean of me to ask, I know, because I can never pick just one or even three Heyer faves.

    Reply
  193. Oh, Minna, I’m almost envious that you are so new to Heyer. Such a wonderful journey before you.
    I’m really enjoying these posts, smiling over the various favorites. it was mean of me to ask, I know, because I can never pick just one or even three Heyer faves.

    Reply
  194. Oh, Minna, I’m almost envious that you are so new to Heyer. Such a wonderful journey before you.
    I’m really enjoying these posts, smiling over the various favorites. it was mean of me to ask, I know, because I can never pick just one or even three Heyer faves.

    Reply
  195. Oh, Minna, I’m almost envious that you are so new to Heyer. Such a wonderful journey before you.
    I’m really enjoying these posts, smiling over the various favorites. it was mean of me to ask, I know, because I can never pick just one or even three Heyer faves.

    Reply
  196. I am SO excited about this book! Georgette Heyer and Jane Austen introduced me to the wonderful world of historical romance when I was nine years old and I have been a huge Heyer fan ever since!
    The very best part is the unprecedented access Jennifer has had to Heyer’s personal papers and to her family, those who knew her best. This will be an amazing and fascinating read I know!
    My favorite Heyer character is Venetia. Many see her as sweet, simple and naive. I don’t. I see her as a woman with great insight into the human condition. It isn’t that she doesn’t see Damerel or his faults. She sees THROUGH them to the man he truly is. She knows the very worst about him and yet she judges him by his actions. There is a deep pool of serenity in her, at the heart of her, that allows her to behave as she does because she KNOWS what is right and true. Her behavior doesn’t seem fiery or outrageous to her because she simply knows it to be right. She knows him to be the one and refuses to settle for less than she deserves. She really is one of the most admirable characters ever written. Imagine a world where we all see each other as we truly are and offer our friendship and love based on that insight.

    Reply
  197. I am SO excited about this book! Georgette Heyer and Jane Austen introduced me to the wonderful world of historical romance when I was nine years old and I have been a huge Heyer fan ever since!
    The very best part is the unprecedented access Jennifer has had to Heyer’s personal papers and to her family, those who knew her best. This will be an amazing and fascinating read I know!
    My favorite Heyer character is Venetia. Many see her as sweet, simple and naive. I don’t. I see her as a woman with great insight into the human condition. It isn’t that she doesn’t see Damerel or his faults. She sees THROUGH them to the man he truly is. She knows the very worst about him and yet she judges him by his actions. There is a deep pool of serenity in her, at the heart of her, that allows her to behave as she does because she KNOWS what is right and true. Her behavior doesn’t seem fiery or outrageous to her because she simply knows it to be right. She knows him to be the one and refuses to settle for less than she deserves. She really is one of the most admirable characters ever written. Imagine a world where we all see each other as we truly are and offer our friendship and love based on that insight.

    Reply
  198. I am SO excited about this book! Georgette Heyer and Jane Austen introduced me to the wonderful world of historical romance when I was nine years old and I have been a huge Heyer fan ever since!
    The very best part is the unprecedented access Jennifer has had to Heyer’s personal papers and to her family, those who knew her best. This will be an amazing and fascinating read I know!
    My favorite Heyer character is Venetia. Many see her as sweet, simple and naive. I don’t. I see her as a woman with great insight into the human condition. It isn’t that she doesn’t see Damerel or his faults. She sees THROUGH them to the man he truly is. She knows the very worst about him and yet she judges him by his actions. There is a deep pool of serenity in her, at the heart of her, that allows her to behave as she does because she KNOWS what is right and true. Her behavior doesn’t seem fiery or outrageous to her because she simply knows it to be right. She knows him to be the one and refuses to settle for less than she deserves. She really is one of the most admirable characters ever written. Imagine a world where we all see each other as we truly are and offer our friendship and love based on that insight.

    Reply
  199. I am SO excited about this book! Georgette Heyer and Jane Austen introduced me to the wonderful world of historical romance when I was nine years old and I have been a huge Heyer fan ever since!
    The very best part is the unprecedented access Jennifer has had to Heyer’s personal papers and to her family, those who knew her best. This will be an amazing and fascinating read I know!
    My favorite Heyer character is Venetia. Many see her as sweet, simple and naive. I don’t. I see her as a woman with great insight into the human condition. It isn’t that she doesn’t see Damerel or his faults. She sees THROUGH them to the man he truly is. She knows the very worst about him and yet she judges him by his actions. There is a deep pool of serenity in her, at the heart of her, that allows her to behave as she does because she KNOWS what is right and true. Her behavior doesn’t seem fiery or outrageous to her because she simply knows it to be right. She knows him to be the one and refuses to settle for less than she deserves. She really is one of the most admirable characters ever written. Imagine a world where we all see each other as we truly are and offer our friendship and love based on that insight.

    Reply
  200. I am SO excited about this book! Georgette Heyer and Jane Austen introduced me to the wonderful world of historical romance when I was nine years old and I have been a huge Heyer fan ever since!
    The very best part is the unprecedented access Jennifer has had to Heyer’s personal papers and to her family, those who knew her best. This will be an amazing and fascinating read I know!
    My favorite Heyer character is Venetia. Many see her as sweet, simple and naive. I don’t. I see her as a woman with great insight into the human condition. It isn’t that she doesn’t see Damerel or his faults. She sees THROUGH them to the man he truly is. She knows the very worst about him and yet she judges him by his actions. There is a deep pool of serenity in her, at the heart of her, that allows her to behave as she does because she KNOWS what is right and true. Her behavior doesn’t seem fiery or outrageous to her because she simply knows it to be right. She knows him to be the one and refuses to settle for less than she deserves. She really is one of the most admirable characters ever written. Imagine a world where we all see each other as we truly are and offer our friendship and love based on that insight.

    Reply
  201. Dfficult to identify favorite Heyer characters – so many good ones! I love Sir Tristram and Sarah Thane from Talisman Ring but I think my absolute favorite is Sophy.
    Daunts is the best bookshop in the whole world! Have a lovely time there, and at all the launches. Looking forward to reading the biography…

    Reply
  202. Dfficult to identify favorite Heyer characters – so many good ones! I love Sir Tristram and Sarah Thane from Talisman Ring but I think my absolute favorite is Sophy.
    Daunts is the best bookshop in the whole world! Have a lovely time there, and at all the launches. Looking forward to reading the biography…

    Reply
  203. Dfficult to identify favorite Heyer characters – so many good ones! I love Sir Tristram and Sarah Thane from Talisman Ring but I think my absolute favorite is Sophy.
    Daunts is the best bookshop in the whole world! Have a lovely time there, and at all the launches. Looking forward to reading the biography…

    Reply
  204. Dfficult to identify favorite Heyer characters – so many good ones! I love Sir Tristram and Sarah Thane from Talisman Ring but I think my absolute favorite is Sophy.
    Daunts is the best bookshop in the whole world! Have a lovely time there, and at all the launches. Looking forward to reading the biography…

    Reply
  205. Dfficult to identify favorite Heyer characters – so many good ones! I love Sir Tristram and Sarah Thane from Talisman Ring but I think my absolute favorite is Sophy.
    Daunts is the best bookshop in the whole world! Have a lovely time there, and at all the launches. Looking forward to reading the biography…

    Reply
  206. The first Heyer book I read was “Unknown Ajax” so I would have to say that my favorite character would have to be Hugo Darracott. I wanted all my heroes to be like him after I read it.

    Reply
  207. The first Heyer book I read was “Unknown Ajax” so I would have to say that my favorite character would have to be Hugo Darracott. I wanted all my heroes to be like him after I read it.

    Reply
  208. The first Heyer book I read was “Unknown Ajax” so I would have to say that my favorite character would have to be Hugo Darracott. I wanted all my heroes to be like him after I read it.

    Reply
  209. The first Heyer book I read was “Unknown Ajax” so I would have to say that my favorite character would have to be Hugo Darracott. I wanted all my heroes to be like him after I read it.

    Reply
  210. The first Heyer book I read was “Unknown Ajax” so I would have to say that my favorite character would have to be Hugo Darracott. I wanted all my heroes to be like him after I read it.

    Reply
  211. The comment I left yesterday never appeared, so maybe Georgette disapproved! Jennifer, thanks so much for visiting, and Anne, thanks for the lovely interview.
    I won’t even try to pick a favorite character–but I will say that Americans made keen for the book and unwilling to wait a year should be able to order it from the UK site, The Book Depository dot com, and get it not only discounted but with free shipping. I, for one, am NOT willing to wait!

    Reply
  212. The comment I left yesterday never appeared, so maybe Georgette disapproved! Jennifer, thanks so much for visiting, and Anne, thanks for the lovely interview.
    I won’t even try to pick a favorite character–but I will say that Americans made keen for the book and unwilling to wait a year should be able to order it from the UK site, The Book Depository dot com, and get it not only discounted but with free shipping. I, for one, am NOT willing to wait!

    Reply
  213. The comment I left yesterday never appeared, so maybe Georgette disapproved! Jennifer, thanks so much for visiting, and Anne, thanks for the lovely interview.
    I won’t even try to pick a favorite character–but I will say that Americans made keen for the book and unwilling to wait a year should be able to order it from the UK site, The Book Depository dot com, and get it not only discounted but with free shipping. I, for one, am NOT willing to wait!

    Reply
  214. The comment I left yesterday never appeared, so maybe Georgette disapproved! Jennifer, thanks so much for visiting, and Anne, thanks for the lovely interview.
    I won’t even try to pick a favorite character–but I will say that Americans made keen for the book and unwilling to wait a year should be able to order it from the UK site, The Book Depository dot com, and get it not only discounted but with free shipping. I, for one, am NOT willing to wait!

    Reply
  215. The comment I left yesterday never appeared, so maybe Georgette disapproved! Jennifer, thanks so much for visiting, and Anne, thanks for the lovely interview.
    I won’t even try to pick a favorite character–but I will say that Americans made keen for the book and unwilling to wait a year should be able to order it from the UK site, The Book Depository dot com, and get it not only discounted but with free shipping. I, for one, am NOT willing to wait!

    Reply
  216. Oooh, I LOVE Hugo Darracott and I only have to think about that final, wonderful denouement with the family all rallying around to protect Richmond and Claude finally the centre of attention and when Hugo sticks the pin in him and I am laughing! (And I love Lady Aurelia, too). And Louisa is right about Venetia, which must surely rate as one of Heyer’s finest novels. Superb! And, Minna, you are lucky because if you like one Georgette Heyer novel (and you have some great suggestions here of where to start reading), then you have many many wonderful books to read.

    Reply
  217. Oooh, I LOVE Hugo Darracott and I only have to think about that final, wonderful denouement with the family all rallying around to protect Richmond and Claude finally the centre of attention and when Hugo sticks the pin in him and I am laughing! (And I love Lady Aurelia, too). And Louisa is right about Venetia, which must surely rate as one of Heyer’s finest novels. Superb! And, Minna, you are lucky because if you like one Georgette Heyer novel (and you have some great suggestions here of where to start reading), then you have many many wonderful books to read.

    Reply
  218. Oooh, I LOVE Hugo Darracott and I only have to think about that final, wonderful denouement with the family all rallying around to protect Richmond and Claude finally the centre of attention and when Hugo sticks the pin in him and I am laughing! (And I love Lady Aurelia, too). And Louisa is right about Venetia, which must surely rate as one of Heyer’s finest novels. Superb! And, Minna, you are lucky because if you like one Georgette Heyer novel (and you have some great suggestions here of where to start reading), then you have many many wonderful books to read.

    Reply
  219. Oooh, I LOVE Hugo Darracott and I only have to think about that final, wonderful denouement with the family all rallying around to protect Richmond and Claude finally the centre of attention and when Hugo sticks the pin in him and I am laughing! (And I love Lady Aurelia, too). And Louisa is right about Venetia, which must surely rate as one of Heyer’s finest novels. Superb! And, Minna, you are lucky because if you like one Georgette Heyer novel (and you have some great suggestions here of where to start reading), then you have many many wonderful books to read.

    Reply
  220. Oooh, I LOVE Hugo Darracott and I only have to think about that final, wonderful denouement with the family all rallying around to protect Richmond and Claude finally the centre of attention and when Hugo sticks the pin in him and I am laughing! (And I love Lady Aurelia, too). And Louisa is right about Venetia, which must surely rate as one of Heyer’s finest novels. Superb! And, Minna, you are lucky because if you like one Georgette Heyer novel (and you have some great suggestions here of where to start reading), then you have many many wonderful books to read.

    Reply
  221. Having just bought Mary Jo’s new novel ‘Dark Passage’ I heartily endorse her comments about Book Depository and I hope Georgette’s American readers know about it too so they won’t have to wait for the biography. I can’t wait to hear what readers think of it and especially of the bits from Georgette’s own pen. Lots of lovely little revelations about her novels!

    Reply
  222. Having just bought Mary Jo’s new novel ‘Dark Passage’ I heartily endorse her comments about Book Depository and I hope Georgette’s American readers know about it too so they won’t have to wait for the biography. I can’t wait to hear what readers think of it and especially of the bits from Georgette’s own pen. Lots of lovely little revelations about her novels!

    Reply
  223. Having just bought Mary Jo’s new novel ‘Dark Passage’ I heartily endorse her comments about Book Depository and I hope Georgette’s American readers know about it too so they won’t have to wait for the biography. I can’t wait to hear what readers think of it and especially of the bits from Georgette’s own pen. Lots of lovely little revelations about her novels!

    Reply
  224. Having just bought Mary Jo’s new novel ‘Dark Passage’ I heartily endorse her comments about Book Depository and I hope Georgette’s American readers know about it too so they won’t have to wait for the biography. I can’t wait to hear what readers think of it and especially of the bits from Georgette’s own pen. Lots of lovely little revelations about her novels!

    Reply
  225. Having just bought Mary Jo’s new novel ‘Dark Passage’ I heartily endorse her comments about Book Depository and I hope Georgette’s American readers know about it too so they won’t have to wait for the biography. I can’t wait to hear what readers think of it and especially of the bits from Georgette’s own pen. Lots of lovely little revelations about her novels!

    Reply
  226. Ooh, I’m torn between Sir Anthony from “The Masqueraders” or Sylvester. If I had to choose, I’d have to pick Sir Anthony.
    Though, honestly, it’s hard to exclude those gentlemen’s ladies: both Prudence and Phoebe are such good characters – if they were real, wouldn’t you want to be friends with them?
    I’m looking forward to reading the biography!

    Reply
  227. Ooh, I’m torn between Sir Anthony from “The Masqueraders” or Sylvester. If I had to choose, I’d have to pick Sir Anthony.
    Though, honestly, it’s hard to exclude those gentlemen’s ladies: both Prudence and Phoebe are such good characters – if they were real, wouldn’t you want to be friends with them?
    I’m looking forward to reading the biography!

    Reply
  228. Ooh, I’m torn between Sir Anthony from “The Masqueraders” or Sylvester. If I had to choose, I’d have to pick Sir Anthony.
    Though, honestly, it’s hard to exclude those gentlemen’s ladies: both Prudence and Phoebe are such good characters – if they were real, wouldn’t you want to be friends with them?
    I’m looking forward to reading the biography!

    Reply
  229. Ooh, I’m torn between Sir Anthony from “The Masqueraders” or Sylvester. If I had to choose, I’d have to pick Sir Anthony.
    Though, honestly, it’s hard to exclude those gentlemen’s ladies: both Prudence and Phoebe are such good characters – if they were real, wouldn’t you want to be friends with them?
    I’m looking forward to reading the biography!

    Reply
  230. Ooh, I’m torn between Sir Anthony from “The Masqueraders” or Sylvester. If I had to choose, I’d have to pick Sir Anthony.
    Though, honestly, it’s hard to exclude those gentlemen’s ladies: both Prudence and Phoebe are such good characters – if they were real, wouldn’t you want to be friends with them?
    I’m looking forward to reading the biography!

    Reply
  231. Freddy Standen. I didn’t realize it until I typed it but he embodies the grace and wit and potential of all of Heyer’s characters ~ even if it comes as a surprise to them. Thank you so much for this interview.

    Reply
  232. Freddy Standen. I didn’t realize it until I typed it but he embodies the grace and wit and potential of all of Heyer’s characters ~ even if it comes as a surprise to them. Thank you so much for this interview.

    Reply
  233. Freddy Standen. I didn’t realize it until I typed it but he embodies the grace and wit and potential of all of Heyer’s characters ~ even if it comes as a surprise to them. Thank you so much for this interview.

    Reply
  234. Freddy Standen. I didn’t realize it until I typed it but he embodies the grace and wit and potential of all of Heyer’s characters ~ even if it comes as a surprise to them. Thank you so much for this interview.

    Reply
  235. Freddy Standen. I didn’t realize it until I typed it but he embodies the grace and wit and potential of all of Heyer’s characters ~ even if it comes as a surprise to them. Thank you so much for this interview.

    Reply
  236. My favourite Heyer character is probably the Duke of Avon from These Old Shades. His sense of humour was just so amusing to me, and it’s also my favourite Heyer book overall.
    I really like some of the characters from her mysteries as well; I like some of her mysteries better than her romances, actually.

    Reply
  237. My favourite Heyer character is probably the Duke of Avon from These Old Shades. His sense of humour was just so amusing to me, and it’s also my favourite Heyer book overall.
    I really like some of the characters from her mysteries as well; I like some of her mysteries better than her romances, actually.

    Reply
  238. My favourite Heyer character is probably the Duke of Avon from These Old Shades. His sense of humour was just so amusing to me, and it’s also my favourite Heyer book overall.
    I really like some of the characters from her mysteries as well; I like some of her mysteries better than her romances, actually.

    Reply
  239. My favourite Heyer character is probably the Duke of Avon from These Old Shades. His sense of humour was just so amusing to me, and it’s also my favourite Heyer book overall.
    I really like some of the characters from her mysteries as well; I like some of her mysteries better than her romances, actually.

    Reply
  240. My favourite Heyer character is probably the Duke of Avon from These Old Shades. His sense of humour was just so amusing to me, and it’s also my favourite Heyer book overall.
    I really like some of the characters from her mysteries as well; I like some of her mysteries better than her romances, actually.

    Reply
  241. I guess Georgette Heyer was my first inroad to classic romance, along with Jane Aiken Hodge and Daphne du Maurier. As a very prolific reader I can say I have read all Heyer’s books, even the mysteries…
    My favorite character – it’s a toughie but I have a certain fondness for Philip Jettan from “Powder and Patch” who turns the tables on those who think he is a dull stick, but manages to retain his humor and his pride as he teaches those he loves a lesson about appearances and the expections of others.

    Reply
  242. I guess Georgette Heyer was my first inroad to classic romance, along with Jane Aiken Hodge and Daphne du Maurier. As a very prolific reader I can say I have read all Heyer’s books, even the mysteries…
    My favorite character – it’s a toughie but I have a certain fondness for Philip Jettan from “Powder and Patch” who turns the tables on those who think he is a dull stick, but manages to retain his humor and his pride as he teaches those he loves a lesson about appearances and the expections of others.

    Reply
  243. I guess Georgette Heyer was my first inroad to classic romance, along with Jane Aiken Hodge and Daphne du Maurier. As a very prolific reader I can say I have read all Heyer’s books, even the mysteries…
    My favorite character – it’s a toughie but I have a certain fondness for Philip Jettan from “Powder and Patch” who turns the tables on those who think he is a dull stick, but manages to retain his humor and his pride as he teaches those he loves a lesson about appearances and the expections of others.

    Reply
  244. I guess Georgette Heyer was my first inroad to classic romance, along with Jane Aiken Hodge and Daphne du Maurier. As a very prolific reader I can say I have read all Heyer’s books, even the mysteries…
    My favorite character – it’s a toughie but I have a certain fondness for Philip Jettan from “Powder and Patch” who turns the tables on those who think he is a dull stick, but manages to retain his humor and his pride as he teaches those he loves a lesson about appearances and the expections of others.

    Reply
  245. I guess Georgette Heyer was my first inroad to classic romance, along with Jane Aiken Hodge and Daphne du Maurier. As a very prolific reader I can say I have read all Heyer’s books, even the mysteries…
    My favorite character – it’s a toughie but I have a certain fondness for Philip Jettan from “Powder and Patch” who turns the tables on those who think he is a dull stick, but manages to retain his humor and his pride as he teaches those he loves a lesson about appearances and the expections of others.

    Reply
  246. Chiming in here WAY late, but what a marvelous interview Jennifer and Anne. What an amazing time you must have had with her son—-and what wonderful photos! Can’t wait to read the book.
    (Sigh, I am just going to miss the big Regency Day in London by 2 weeks. Sigh. Wish I could be there.)

    Reply
  247. Chiming in here WAY late, but what a marvelous interview Jennifer and Anne. What an amazing time you must have had with her son—-and what wonderful photos! Can’t wait to read the book.
    (Sigh, I am just going to miss the big Regency Day in London by 2 weeks. Sigh. Wish I could be there.)

    Reply
  248. Chiming in here WAY late, but what a marvelous interview Jennifer and Anne. What an amazing time you must have had with her son—-and what wonderful photos! Can’t wait to read the book.
    (Sigh, I am just going to miss the big Regency Day in London by 2 weeks. Sigh. Wish I could be there.)

    Reply
  249. Chiming in here WAY late, but what a marvelous interview Jennifer and Anne. What an amazing time you must have had with her son—-and what wonderful photos! Can’t wait to read the book.
    (Sigh, I am just going to miss the big Regency Day in London by 2 weeks. Sigh. Wish I could be there.)

    Reply
  250. Chiming in here WAY late, but what a marvelous interview Jennifer and Anne. What an amazing time you must have had with her son—-and what wonderful photos! Can’t wait to read the book.
    (Sigh, I am just going to miss the big Regency Day in London by 2 weeks. Sigh. Wish I could be there.)

    Reply
  251. Kitten from Fridays Child because she’s so sweet, Jenny because she’s solid and knows who she is and what is really, in the end, of value, all the assorted ‘secondary’ characters like the grandmothers, aunts, younger brothers, uncles etc. who provide such laughter, wisdom and charm. Will order immediately – have read the Hodge bio, of course, and this looks to fill in so many blank spaces. Great interview!

    Reply
  252. Kitten from Fridays Child because she’s so sweet, Jenny because she’s solid and knows who she is and what is really, in the end, of value, all the assorted ‘secondary’ characters like the grandmothers, aunts, younger brothers, uncles etc. who provide such laughter, wisdom and charm. Will order immediately – have read the Hodge bio, of course, and this looks to fill in so many blank spaces. Great interview!

    Reply
  253. Kitten from Fridays Child because she’s so sweet, Jenny because she’s solid and knows who she is and what is really, in the end, of value, all the assorted ‘secondary’ characters like the grandmothers, aunts, younger brothers, uncles etc. who provide such laughter, wisdom and charm. Will order immediately – have read the Hodge bio, of course, and this looks to fill in so many blank spaces. Great interview!

    Reply
  254. Kitten from Fridays Child because she’s so sweet, Jenny because she’s solid and knows who she is and what is really, in the end, of value, all the assorted ‘secondary’ characters like the grandmothers, aunts, younger brothers, uncles etc. who provide such laughter, wisdom and charm. Will order immediately – have read the Hodge bio, of course, and this looks to fill in so many blank spaces. Great interview!

    Reply
  255. Kitten from Fridays Child because she’s so sweet, Jenny because she’s solid and knows who she is and what is really, in the end, of value, all the assorted ‘secondary’ characters like the grandmothers, aunts, younger brothers, uncles etc. who provide such laughter, wisdom and charm. Will order immediately – have read the Hodge bio, of course, and this looks to fill in so many blank spaces. Great interview!

    Reply
  256. I read many of Georgette Heyers books when I was a teenager, it was a “few” years ago so I don’t remember names. I recently pulled an old box of my books out of the attic & it included some of Heyer’s books – this prompts me to pull them out & re-read them.

    Reply
  257. I read many of Georgette Heyers books when I was a teenager, it was a “few” years ago so I don’t remember names. I recently pulled an old box of my books out of the attic & it included some of Heyer’s books – this prompts me to pull them out & re-read them.

    Reply
  258. I read many of Georgette Heyers books when I was a teenager, it was a “few” years ago so I don’t remember names. I recently pulled an old box of my books out of the attic & it included some of Heyer’s books – this prompts me to pull them out & re-read them.

    Reply
  259. I read many of Georgette Heyers books when I was a teenager, it was a “few” years ago so I don’t remember names. I recently pulled an old box of my books out of the attic & it included some of Heyer’s books – this prompts me to pull them out & re-read them.

    Reply
  260. I read many of Georgette Heyers books when I was a teenager, it was a “few” years ago so I don’t remember names. I recently pulled an old box of my books out of the attic & it included some of Heyer’s books – this prompts me to pull them out & re-read them.

    Reply

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