Jaded Readers

Anne here, and this week I'm talking about the problem of becoming jaded with your current reading matter. MatisseWoman2

When I find myself reading a well-written book with impatience or lack of attention, I know it's often because I've read too many similar books recently — similar settings or similar tropes and sometimes it's just that I've had enough of a particular genre for a time.

That's when I put that book aside and switch genres for a while, refreshing myself by diving into something completely different.

Sometimes I've read a review of a book where, instead of criticizing the writing, the characters, or the way the plot unfolds, the reviewer criticizes the writer for using a particular trope, saying things like they're bored with regencies, or werewolves, or secret baby plots. That to me also says "jaded reader."

KillingFloorIt can happen to us all. Recently I've been reading thrillers by male writers and English women's fiction, simply because I found myself starting, but not getting into, some romances by authors I normally love. The problem was not with the books, but with me. I needed to get away from romance for a while and plunge into something different. Refreshing my reading palate.

The choice of male thriller writers came to me because when I complained to a writer friend that I was feeling a bit bored with my reading lately, she said, "read some men—they write differently from women." I do, of course, read a lot of male writers—Bernard Cornwell and Terry Pratchett spring to mind— but she suggested some contemporary thriller writers to me, and I now find myself happily working through Lee Child's 'Jack Reacher' series.

Another friend—another romance writer—said she liked to read books from other cultures, that the rich and different cultural settings had the effect of refreshing her reading—and writing—palate. She cited books like The Kite Runner, The God of Small Things, Sacred Games and Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. NgaioMarsh

Other friends said they liked to read books from other eras — one liked books from the 1950's —a wide range of books from the same decade, from Asimov's science fiction novels to Kurt Vonnegut's social satires. Another regularly refreshed her reading palate with a P.G. Wodehouse comedy. A third loved detective novels from the so-called "golden age" of crime fiction (which I think is the 1920's to 40's)—Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler, Dorothy Sayers, Ngaio Marsh and others.

I mentioned this to yet another friend (I am blessed in my friends) who told me her husband had recently been reading Raymond Chandler with huge enjoyment and kept wanting to share snippets. She shared a few that had stuck with her—and these are in her own words, so are not exact quotes:
Thelittlesister— A female character who wore a hat that had been taken from its mother too young.  
—Then there’s the big time boss who kept the hero detective squirming in his chair waiting, while he inspected a box of Cuban cigars for birthmarks.
—They looked shocked as if I’d just risen from the bottom of the ocean with a dead mermaid under my arm.  
—She handed over the twenty dollars reluctantly, like she was giving me her favorite kitten to be drowned.
—The blonde squeezed passed me in the hallway and she smelled like the Taj Mahal looks in the moonlight.  

So naturally now I'm going to have to dig out some Raymond Chandler novels. And it might be time I did a reread of some of my old favorite detective novels as well. I used to love Ngaio Marsh but haven't read her for decades.
And now I'm not feeling so jaded any more.

Do you ever become jaded in your reading habits? And if so, what do you do about it? And if you were suggesting something different for a jaded reader to read, what would you recommend? What are you reading at the moment? Any of the above listed authors or books take your fancy?

275 thoughts on “Jaded Readers”

  1. Anne, I love reading, and like you I read genres other than romance. The ones I enjoy the most are literature and the classics; current best sellers; woman’s fiction involving things like chocolate, cats (or pets in general), tea shops, book clubs, knitting or stitching, etc.; and cosy crime books. I like reading suspense but don’t like all the gory bits, so cosy crimes really suit me. I love the variety but always come back to romance – it refreshes me and recharges me.

    Reply
  2. Anne, I love reading, and like you I read genres other than romance. The ones I enjoy the most are literature and the classics; current best sellers; woman’s fiction involving things like chocolate, cats (or pets in general), tea shops, book clubs, knitting or stitching, etc.; and cosy crime books. I like reading suspense but don’t like all the gory bits, so cosy crimes really suit me. I love the variety but always come back to romance – it refreshes me and recharges me.

    Reply
  3. Anne, I love reading, and like you I read genres other than romance. The ones I enjoy the most are literature and the classics; current best sellers; woman’s fiction involving things like chocolate, cats (or pets in general), tea shops, book clubs, knitting or stitching, etc.; and cosy crime books. I like reading suspense but don’t like all the gory bits, so cosy crimes really suit me. I love the variety but always come back to romance – it refreshes me and recharges me.

    Reply
  4. Anne, I love reading, and like you I read genres other than romance. The ones I enjoy the most are literature and the classics; current best sellers; woman’s fiction involving things like chocolate, cats (or pets in general), tea shops, book clubs, knitting or stitching, etc.; and cosy crime books. I like reading suspense but don’t like all the gory bits, so cosy crimes really suit me. I love the variety but always come back to romance – it refreshes me and recharges me.

    Reply
  5. Anne, I love reading, and like you I read genres other than romance. The ones I enjoy the most are literature and the classics; current best sellers; woman’s fiction involving things like chocolate, cats (or pets in general), tea shops, book clubs, knitting or stitching, etc.; and cosy crime books. I like reading suspense but don’t like all the gory bits, so cosy crimes really suit me. I love the variety but always come back to romance – it refreshes me and recharges me.

    Reply
  6. When I want a break from fiction, I read UFO books and history, particularly social history and biography. The former because UFOs are an enduring mystery, and the latter because I get interested in the bits about how people really lived. In fiction, I read mostly romance, mostly as traditional regency, but I very much like the new subgenre of historical mystery especially if there’s a female on the case and perhaps a bit of romance. Jacqueline Winspear, Anna Dean and Charles Furst are favorites.

    Reply
  7. When I want a break from fiction, I read UFO books and history, particularly social history and biography. The former because UFOs are an enduring mystery, and the latter because I get interested in the bits about how people really lived. In fiction, I read mostly romance, mostly as traditional regency, but I very much like the new subgenre of historical mystery especially if there’s a female on the case and perhaps a bit of romance. Jacqueline Winspear, Anna Dean and Charles Furst are favorites.

    Reply
  8. When I want a break from fiction, I read UFO books and history, particularly social history and biography. The former because UFOs are an enduring mystery, and the latter because I get interested in the bits about how people really lived. In fiction, I read mostly romance, mostly as traditional regency, but I very much like the new subgenre of historical mystery especially if there’s a female on the case and perhaps a bit of romance. Jacqueline Winspear, Anna Dean and Charles Furst are favorites.

    Reply
  9. When I want a break from fiction, I read UFO books and history, particularly social history and biography. The former because UFOs are an enduring mystery, and the latter because I get interested in the bits about how people really lived. In fiction, I read mostly romance, mostly as traditional regency, but I very much like the new subgenre of historical mystery especially if there’s a female on the case and perhaps a bit of romance. Jacqueline Winspear, Anna Dean and Charles Furst are favorites.

    Reply
  10. When I want a break from fiction, I read UFO books and history, particularly social history and biography. The former because UFOs are an enduring mystery, and the latter because I get interested in the bits about how people really lived. In fiction, I read mostly romance, mostly as traditional regency, but I very much like the new subgenre of historical mystery especially if there’s a female on the case and perhaps a bit of romance. Jacqueline Winspear, Anna Dean and Charles Furst are favorites.

    Reply
  11. Malvina, I think you and I have some tastes in common. I like a good thriller/murder mystery/romantic suspense, but when it gets too dark or gory, I’m out of there. I prefer the cosies as well.
    And like you, the variety refreshes me, but I always come back to romance. 🙂

    Reply
  12. Malvina, I think you and I have some tastes in common. I like a good thriller/murder mystery/romantic suspense, but when it gets too dark or gory, I’m out of there. I prefer the cosies as well.
    And like you, the variety refreshes me, but I always come back to romance. 🙂

    Reply
  13. Malvina, I think you and I have some tastes in common. I like a good thriller/murder mystery/romantic suspense, but when it gets too dark or gory, I’m out of there. I prefer the cosies as well.
    And like you, the variety refreshes me, but I always come back to romance. 🙂

    Reply
  14. Malvina, I think you and I have some tastes in common. I like a good thriller/murder mystery/romantic suspense, but when it gets too dark or gory, I’m out of there. I prefer the cosies as well.
    And like you, the variety refreshes me, but I always come back to romance. 🙂

    Reply
  15. Malvina, I think you and I have some tastes in common. I like a good thriller/murder mystery/romantic suspense, but when it gets too dark or gory, I’m out of there. I prefer the cosies as well.
    And like you, the variety refreshes me, but I always come back to romance. 🙂

    Reply
  16. That’s fascinating, Janice. I don’t think I’ve read any UFO books except for one or two of the most famous, and they were decades ago, too. Thanks for those historical mystery recommendations — I ordered a Jacqueline Winspear some time back but I don’t think it’s arrived yet. I particularly remember the name because of Violet Winspear an old time mills and boon (Harlequin) romance writer.

    Reply
  17. That’s fascinating, Janice. I don’t think I’ve read any UFO books except for one or two of the most famous, and they were decades ago, too. Thanks for those historical mystery recommendations — I ordered a Jacqueline Winspear some time back but I don’t think it’s arrived yet. I particularly remember the name because of Violet Winspear an old time mills and boon (Harlequin) romance writer.

    Reply
  18. That’s fascinating, Janice. I don’t think I’ve read any UFO books except for one or two of the most famous, and they were decades ago, too. Thanks for those historical mystery recommendations — I ordered a Jacqueline Winspear some time back but I don’t think it’s arrived yet. I particularly remember the name because of Violet Winspear an old time mills and boon (Harlequin) romance writer.

    Reply
  19. That’s fascinating, Janice. I don’t think I’ve read any UFO books except for one or two of the most famous, and they were decades ago, too. Thanks for those historical mystery recommendations — I ordered a Jacqueline Winspear some time back but I don’t think it’s arrived yet. I particularly remember the name because of Violet Winspear an old time mills and boon (Harlequin) romance writer.

    Reply
  20. That’s fascinating, Janice. I don’t think I’ve read any UFO books except for one or two of the most famous, and they were decades ago, too. Thanks for those historical mystery recommendations — I ordered a Jacqueline Winspear some time back but I don’t think it’s arrived yet. I particularly remember the name because of Violet Winspear an old time mills and boon (Harlequin) romance writer.

    Reply
  21. I enjoy Lee Child too, Anne. I was surprised by that as I don’t usually like hard-bitten action/suspense. I think it’s because of Jack Reacher. He doesn’t go looking for trouble or picking fights just to show how tough he is.
    My variations are SF and F with some cozy mysteries. You might enjoy Sharon Lee and Steve Miller’s Liaden universe books. http://www.korval.com. I’m never sure where to tell people to start as they’ve written forward and backward in their timeline, but Local Custom is one of my favourites and it’s a romance.

    Reply
  22. I enjoy Lee Child too, Anne. I was surprised by that as I don’t usually like hard-bitten action/suspense. I think it’s because of Jack Reacher. He doesn’t go looking for trouble or picking fights just to show how tough he is.
    My variations are SF and F with some cozy mysteries. You might enjoy Sharon Lee and Steve Miller’s Liaden universe books. http://www.korval.com. I’m never sure where to tell people to start as they’ve written forward and backward in their timeline, but Local Custom is one of my favourites and it’s a romance.

    Reply
  23. I enjoy Lee Child too, Anne. I was surprised by that as I don’t usually like hard-bitten action/suspense. I think it’s because of Jack Reacher. He doesn’t go looking for trouble or picking fights just to show how tough he is.
    My variations are SF and F with some cozy mysteries. You might enjoy Sharon Lee and Steve Miller’s Liaden universe books. http://www.korval.com. I’m never sure where to tell people to start as they’ve written forward and backward in their timeline, but Local Custom is one of my favourites and it’s a romance.

    Reply
  24. I enjoy Lee Child too, Anne. I was surprised by that as I don’t usually like hard-bitten action/suspense. I think it’s because of Jack Reacher. He doesn’t go looking for trouble or picking fights just to show how tough he is.
    My variations are SF and F with some cozy mysteries. You might enjoy Sharon Lee and Steve Miller’s Liaden universe books. http://www.korval.com. I’m never sure where to tell people to start as they’ve written forward and backward in their timeline, but Local Custom is one of my favourites and it’s a romance.

    Reply
  25. I enjoy Lee Child too, Anne. I was surprised by that as I don’t usually like hard-bitten action/suspense. I think it’s because of Jack Reacher. He doesn’t go looking for trouble or picking fights just to show how tough he is.
    My variations are SF and F with some cozy mysteries. You might enjoy Sharon Lee and Steve Miller’s Liaden universe books. http://www.korval.com. I’m never sure where to tell people to start as they’ve written forward and backward in their timeline, but Local Custom is one of my favourites and it’s a romance.

    Reply
  26. I read more romance than other genres but I do like to mix it up. I read a fair bit of crime/mystery. I recently found some set in English rural or small town communities which was a nice change. I also read some Scifi – just finished one today, in fact.
    And after I read As You Wish by Cary Elwes about the making of The Princess Bride, I read The Princess Bride, and decided I might read some more memoirs.
    I need to be in the know about Romance for ARRC, but I don’t want to be jaded either.
    I loved Violet Winspear and I wish they’d release some of her books in e format.

    Reply
  27. I read more romance than other genres but I do like to mix it up. I read a fair bit of crime/mystery. I recently found some set in English rural or small town communities which was a nice change. I also read some Scifi – just finished one today, in fact.
    And after I read As You Wish by Cary Elwes about the making of The Princess Bride, I read The Princess Bride, and decided I might read some more memoirs.
    I need to be in the know about Romance for ARRC, but I don’t want to be jaded either.
    I loved Violet Winspear and I wish they’d release some of her books in e format.

    Reply
  28. I read more romance than other genres but I do like to mix it up. I read a fair bit of crime/mystery. I recently found some set in English rural or small town communities which was a nice change. I also read some Scifi – just finished one today, in fact.
    And after I read As You Wish by Cary Elwes about the making of The Princess Bride, I read The Princess Bride, and decided I might read some more memoirs.
    I need to be in the know about Romance for ARRC, but I don’t want to be jaded either.
    I loved Violet Winspear and I wish they’d release some of her books in e format.

    Reply
  29. I read more romance than other genres but I do like to mix it up. I read a fair bit of crime/mystery. I recently found some set in English rural or small town communities which was a nice change. I also read some Scifi – just finished one today, in fact.
    And after I read As You Wish by Cary Elwes about the making of The Princess Bride, I read The Princess Bride, and decided I might read some more memoirs.
    I need to be in the know about Romance for ARRC, but I don’t want to be jaded either.
    I loved Violet Winspear and I wish they’d release some of her books in e format.

    Reply
  30. I read more romance than other genres but I do like to mix it up. I read a fair bit of crime/mystery. I recently found some set in English rural or small town communities which was a nice change. I also read some Scifi – just finished one today, in fact.
    And after I read As You Wish by Cary Elwes about the making of The Princess Bride, I read The Princess Bride, and decided I might read some more memoirs.
    I need to be in the know about Romance for ARRC, but I don’t want to be jaded either.
    I loved Violet Winspear and I wish they’d release some of her books in e format.

    Reply
  31. Yes, I’ve dropped romance for a binge of SF&F. Since those two are such vast categories, I can bounce among a whole bunch of sub-genres. I’ve also gotten into political suspense, but there’s only so many ways to kill off or threaten the president. I haven’t ever gotten into mysteries, perhaps I need to try cozies. What I miss is finding that odd novel that fits into no category. Here I’m thinking of the Mrs. ‘arris books in the 70s or 80s.

    Reply
  32. Yes, I’ve dropped romance for a binge of SF&F. Since those two are such vast categories, I can bounce among a whole bunch of sub-genres. I’ve also gotten into political suspense, but there’s only so many ways to kill off or threaten the president. I haven’t ever gotten into mysteries, perhaps I need to try cozies. What I miss is finding that odd novel that fits into no category. Here I’m thinking of the Mrs. ‘arris books in the 70s or 80s.

    Reply
  33. Yes, I’ve dropped romance for a binge of SF&F. Since those two are such vast categories, I can bounce among a whole bunch of sub-genres. I’ve also gotten into political suspense, but there’s only so many ways to kill off or threaten the president. I haven’t ever gotten into mysteries, perhaps I need to try cozies. What I miss is finding that odd novel that fits into no category. Here I’m thinking of the Mrs. ‘arris books in the 70s or 80s.

    Reply
  34. Yes, I’ve dropped romance for a binge of SF&F. Since those two are such vast categories, I can bounce among a whole bunch of sub-genres. I’ve also gotten into political suspense, but there’s only so many ways to kill off or threaten the president. I haven’t ever gotten into mysteries, perhaps I need to try cozies. What I miss is finding that odd novel that fits into no category. Here I’m thinking of the Mrs. ‘arris books in the 70s or 80s.

    Reply
  35. Yes, I’ve dropped romance for a binge of SF&F. Since those two are such vast categories, I can bounce among a whole bunch of sub-genres. I’ve also gotten into political suspense, but there’s only so many ways to kill off or threaten the president. I haven’t ever gotten into mysteries, perhaps I need to try cozies. What I miss is finding that odd novel that fits into no category. Here I’m thinking of the Mrs. ‘arris books in the 70s or 80s.

    Reply
  36. Jo I agree with you about Jack Reacher. I think I also like the fact that he likes women — he doesn’t just use them, as so many of the other male thriller/heroes seem to. In fact he often steps in to help them. He’s kind of a modern “lone ranger” really.
    Thanks for those recommendation. I’ve just ordered Local Custom.

    Reply
  37. Jo I agree with you about Jack Reacher. I think I also like the fact that he likes women — he doesn’t just use them, as so many of the other male thriller/heroes seem to. In fact he often steps in to help them. He’s kind of a modern “lone ranger” really.
    Thanks for those recommendation. I’ve just ordered Local Custom.

    Reply
  38. Jo I agree with you about Jack Reacher. I think I also like the fact that he likes women — he doesn’t just use them, as so many of the other male thriller/heroes seem to. In fact he often steps in to help them. He’s kind of a modern “lone ranger” really.
    Thanks for those recommendation. I’ve just ordered Local Custom.

    Reply
  39. Jo I agree with you about Jack Reacher. I think I also like the fact that he likes women — he doesn’t just use them, as so many of the other male thriller/heroes seem to. In fact he often steps in to help them. He’s kind of a modern “lone ranger” really.
    Thanks for those recommendation. I’ve just ordered Local Custom.

    Reply
  40. Jo I agree with you about Jack Reacher. I think I also like the fact that he likes women — he doesn’t just use them, as so many of the other male thriller/heroes seem to. In fact he often steps in to help them. He’s kind of a modern “lone ranger” really.
    Thanks for those recommendation. I’ve just ordered Local Custom.

    Reply
  41. Oh, Shannon, I remember those Paul Gallico Mrs ‘arris books — my mother loved them and I read them, too. But I suspect they’d be sadly dated now.
    I used to read a lot of SF&F books too, and have only just started to return to them lately. And again, as with crime, there are so many new authors to discover.

    Reply
  42. Elaine, thanks for that. I used to read a lot of crime before I discovered romance, and didn’t read it for years. The result of that is I have a lovely lot of new authors to discover. And I blush to confess I’ve never seen or read The Princess Bride — Mary Jo’s post the other day has prompted me to rectify that omission. As for Violet Winspear, why not write to Mills and Boon about putting out her in e-books — it might give them the nudge they need.

    Reply
  43. Oh, Shannon, I remember those Paul Gallico Mrs ‘arris books — my mother loved them and I read them, too. But I suspect they’d be sadly dated now.
    I used to read a lot of SF&F books too, and have only just started to return to them lately. And again, as with crime, there are so many new authors to discover.

    Reply
  44. Elaine, thanks for that. I used to read a lot of crime before I discovered romance, and didn’t read it for years. The result of that is I have a lovely lot of new authors to discover. And I blush to confess I’ve never seen or read The Princess Bride — Mary Jo’s post the other day has prompted me to rectify that omission. As for Violet Winspear, why not write to Mills and Boon about putting out her in e-books — it might give them the nudge they need.

    Reply
  45. Oh, Shannon, I remember those Paul Gallico Mrs ‘arris books — my mother loved them and I read them, too. But I suspect they’d be sadly dated now.
    I used to read a lot of SF&F books too, and have only just started to return to them lately. And again, as with crime, there are so many new authors to discover.

    Reply
  46. Elaine, thanks for that. I used to read a lot of crime before I discovered romance, and didn’t read it for years. The result of that is I have a lovely lot of new authors to discover. And I blush to confess I’ve never seen or read The Princess Bride — Mary Jo’s post the other day has prompted me to rectify that omission. As for Violet Winspear, why not write to Mills and Boon about putting out her in e-books — it might give them the nudge they need.

    Reply
  47. Oh, Shannon, I remember those Paul Gallico Mrs ‘arris books — my mother loved them and I read them, too. But I suspect they’d be sadly dated now.
    I used to read a lot of SF&F books too, and have only just started to return to them lately. And again, as with crime, there are so many new authors to discover.

    Reply
  48. Elaine, thanks for that. I used to read a lot of crime before I discovered romance, and didn’t read it for years. The result of that is I have a lovely lot of new authors to discover. And I blush to confess I’ve never seen or read The Princess Bride — Mary Jo’s post the other day has prompted me to rectify that omission. As for Violet Winspear, why not write to Mills and Boon about putting out her in e-books — it might give them the nudge they need.

    Reply
  49. Oh, Shannon, I remember those Paul Gallico Mrs ‘arris books — my mother loved them and I read them, too. But I suspect they’d be sadly dated now.
    I used to read a lot of SF&F books too, and have only just started to return to them lately. And again, as with crime, there are so many new authors to discover.

    Reply
  50. Elaine, thanks for that. I used to read a lot of crime before I discovered romance, and didn’t read it for years. The result of that is I have a lovely lot of new authors to discover. And I blush to confess I’ve never seen or read The Princess Bride — Mary Jo’s post the other day has prompted me to rectify that omission. As for Violet Winspear, why not write to Mills and Boon about putting out her in e-books — it might give them the nudge they need.

    Reply
  51. I try to switch genres when I’m in a rut, however, as I’ve aged I have found it is harder to read books written by men. I’m not fond of their treatment of women. I usually aim toward a good mystery and love the Anna Huber series. If I’m really stuck, I always turn to some biography on a royal.

    Reply
  52. I try to switch genres when I’m in a rut, however, as I’ve aged I have found it is harder to read books written by men. I’m not fond of their treatment of women. I usually aim toward a good mystery and love the Anna Huber series. If I’m really stuck, I always turn to some biography on a royal.

    Reply
  53. I try to switch genres when I’m in a rut, however, as I’ve aged I have found it is harder to read books written by men. I’m not fond of their treatment of women. I usually aim toward a good mystery and love the Anna Huber series. If I’m really stuck, I always turn to some biography on a royal.

    Reply
  54. I try to switch genres when I’m in a rut, however, as I’ve aged I have found it is harder to read books written by men. I’m not fond of their treatment of women. I usually aim toward a good mystery and love the Anna Huber series. If I’m really stuck, I always turn to some biography on a royal.

    Reply
  55. I try to switch genres when I’m in a rut, however, as I’ve aged I have found it is harder to read books written by men. I’m not fond of their treatment of women. I usually aim toward a good mystery and love the Anna Huber series. If I’m really stuck, I always turn to some biography on a royal.

    Reply
  56. When the historical romances start to blur together (or start to interfere with what I’m writing), I generally turn to straight history or memoirs. That’s not an entire switch—it’s more like research for the future—but it’s a different kind of writing and reading.

    Reply
  57. When the historical romances start to blur together (or start to interfere with what I’m writing), I generally turn to straight history or memoirs. That’s not an entire switch—it’s more like research for the future—but it’s a different kind of writing and reading.

    Reply
  58. When the historical romances start to blur together (or start to interfere with what I’m writing), I generally turn to straight history or memoirs. That’s not an entire switch—it’s more like research for the future—but it’s a different kind of writing and reading.

    Reply
  59. When the historical romances start to blur together (or start to interfere with what I’m writing), I generally turn to straight history or memoirs. That’s not an entire switch—it’s more like research for the future—but it’s a different kind of writing and reading.

    Reply
  60. When the historical romances start to blur together (or start to interfere with what I’m writing), I generally turn to straight history or memoirs. That’s not an entire switch—it’s more like research for the future—but it’s a different kind of writing and reading.

    Reply
  61. I’ve been mostly a fiction reader my whole life–any genre except horror–but I have been feeling a bit jaded lately, so I’ve been reading more non-fiction lately. Outside of research books, it tends to be biography or memoir, I guess: Churchill, Cary Elwes on making The Princess Bride, Terry Pratchett’s non-fiction collection.
    I’ve never been inspired to read Raymond Chandler, but I do like the sound of the quips you quoted! Good humor is always a lure, no matter what the genre.

    Reply
  62. I’ve been mostly a fiction reader my whole life–any genre except horror–but I have been feeling a bit jaded lately, so I’ve been reading more non-fiction lately. Outside of research books, it tends to be biography or memoir, I guess: Churchill, Cary Elwes on making The Princess Bride, Terry Pratchett’s non-fiction collection.
    I’ve never been inspired to read Raymond Chandler, but I do like the sound of the quips you quoted! Good humor is always a lure, no matter what the genre.

    Reply
  63. I’ve been mostly a fiction reader my whole life–any genre except horror–but I have been feeling a bit jaded lately, so I’ve been reading more non-fiction lately. Outside of research books, it tends to be biography or memoir, I guess: Churchill, Cary Elwes on making The Princess Bride, Terry Pratchett’s non-fiction collection.
    I’ve never been inspired to read Raymond Chandler, but I do like the sound of the quips you quoted! Good humor is always a lure, no matter what the genre.

    Reply
  64. I’ve been mostly a fiction reader my whole life–any genre except horror–but I have been feeling a bit jaded lately, so I’ve been reading more non-fiction lately. Outside of research books, it tends to be biography or memoir, I guess: Churchill, Cary Elwes on making The Princess Bride, Terry Pratchett’s non-fiction collection.
    I’ve never been inspired to read Raymond Chandler, but I do like the sound of the quips you quoted! Good humor is always a lure, no matter what the genre.

    Reply
  65. I’ve been mostly a fiction reader my whole life–any genre except horror–but I have been feeling a bit jaded lately, so I’ve been reading more non-fiction lately. Outside of research books, it tends to be biography or memoir, I guess: Churchill, Cary Elwes on making The Princess Bride, Terry Pratchett’s non-fiction collection.
    I’ve never been inspired to read Raymond Chandler, but I do like the sound of the quips you quoted! Good humor is always a lure, no matter what the genre.

    Reply
  66. I’ve come to accept that jaded phases are going to come; they are a natural part of the reading process. If I can’t get into my favorite historical romances for a spell, then time to try something else for a while.
    Most recently, that has been realistic young adult romance, full of the intense emotion I crave. Best example so far is Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell. The Girls at the Kingfisher Club, by Genevieve Valentine, a retelling of the classic Twelve Dancing Princesses fairytale, set in 1920s NYC, while not romance, gave me a yen for romances in that setting, so this may be my way back to historical romance. It all comes together.

    Reply
  67. I’ve come to accept that jaded phases are going to come; they are a natural part of the reading process. If I can’t get into my favorite historical romances for a spell, then time to try something else for a while.
    Most recently, that has been realistic young adult romance, full of the intense emotion I crave. Best example so far is Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell. The Girls at the Kingfisher Club, by Genevieve Valentine, a retelling of the classic Twelve Dancing Princesses fairytale, set in 1920s NYC, while not romance, gave me a yen for romances in that setting, so this may be my way back to historical romance. It all comes together.

    Reply
  68. I’ve come to accept that jaded phases are going to come; they are a natural part of the reading process. If I can’t get into my favorite historical romances for a spell, then time to try something else for a while.
    Most recently, that has been realistic young adult romance, full of the intense emotion I crave. Best example so far is Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell. The Girls at the Kingfisher Club, by Genevieve Valentine, a retelling of the classic Twelve Dancing Princesses fairytale, set in 1920s NYC, while not romance, gave me a yen for romances in that setting, so this may be my way back to historical romance. It all comes together.

    Reply
  69. I’ve come to accept that jaded phases are going to come; they are a natural part of the reading process. If I can’t get into my favorite historical romances for a spell, then time to try something else for a while.
    Most recently, that has been realistic young adult romance, full of the intense emotion I crave. Best example so far is Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell. The Girls at the Kingfisher Club, by Genevieve Valentine, a retelling of the classic Twelve Dancing Princesses fairytale, set in 1920s NYC, while not romance, gave me a yen for romances in that setting, so this may be my way back to historical romance. It all comes together.

    Reply
  70. I’ve come to accept that jaded phases are going to come; they are a natural part of the reading process. If I can’t get into my favorite historical romances for a spell, then time to try something else for a while.
    Most recently, that has been realistic young adult romance, full of the intense emotion I crave. Best example so far is Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell. The Girls at the Kingfisher Club, by Genevieve Valentine, a retelling of the classic Twelve Dancing Princesses fairytale, set in 1920s NYC, while not romance, gave me a yen for romances in that setting, so this may be my way back to historical romance. It all comes together.

    Reply
  71. I have my Prozac shelf for when I am stressed or jaded. On it are my Golden Age Mystery writers like Christie, Sayers, Marsh, Allingham and Wentworth. I have my complete set of Heyer including mysteries, some modern cozy mysteries, a large selection of Biggles & Ellis Peters. On another shelf I have my Anne McCaffrey collection and some Asimov, JK Rowling and Tolkien and some YA like Cassandra Clare. If I still want romance but can’t cope with the modern world I go to my vintage M&B collection.

    Reply
  72. I have my Prozac shelf for when I am stressed or jaded. On it are my Golden Age Mystery writers like Christie, Sayers, Marsh, Allingham and Wentworth. I have my complete set of Heyer including mysteries, some modern cozy mysteries, a large selection of Biggles & Ellis Peters. On another shelf I have my Anne McCaffrey collection and some Asimov, JK Rowling and Tolkien and some YA like Cassandra Clare. If I still want romance but can’t cope with the modern world I go to my vintage M&B collection.

    Reply
  73. I have my Prozac shelf for when I am stressed or jaded. On it are my Golden Age Mystery writers like Christie, Sayers, Marsh, Allingham and Wentworth. I have my complete set of Heyer including mysteries, some modern cozy mysteries, a large selection of Biggles & Ellis Peters. On another shelf I have my Anne McCaffrey collection and some Asimov, JK Rowling and Tolkien and some YA like Cassandra Clare. If I still want romance but can’t cope with the modern world I go to my vintage M&B collection.

    Reply
  74. I have my Prozac shelf for when I am stressed or jaded. On it are my Golden Age Mystery writers like Christie, Sayers, Marsh, Allingham and Wentworth. I have my complete set of Heyer including mysteries, some modern cozy mysteries, a large selection of Biggles & Ellis Peters. On another shelf I have my Anne McCaffrey collection and some Asimov, JK Rowling and Tolkien and some YA like Cassandra Clare. If I still want romance but can’t cope with the modern world I go to my vintage M&B collection.

    Reply
  75. I have my Prozac shelf for when I am stressed or jaded. On it are my Golden Age Mystery writers like Christie, Sayers, Marsh, Allingham and Wentworth. I have my complete set of Heyer including mysteries, some modern cozy mysteries, a large selection of Biggles & Ellis Peters. On another shelf I have my Anne McCaffrey collection and some Asimov, JK Rowling and Tolkien and some YA like Cassandra Clare. If I still want romance but can’t cope with the modern world I go to my vintage M&B collection.

    Reply
  76. I rarely reach the jaded stage because I almost always am reading a non-fiction work and a book of poetry and sometimes a cozy mystery too as I read romance novels, reading one in the morning, one at night, one in the car, and so on. Today, for example, I expect to complete True Pretenses, historical romance by Rose Lerner, and to read a bit more in Lincoln and the Power of the Press by Harold Holzer, a look at Lincoln’s relationship with the popular press, and a few more poems in Mark Strand’s Collected Poems. If I get jaded with romance in spite of this variety, my cure is rereading a true golden oldie from a keeper shelf, one of the books that I have been rereading happily for decades such as a book from Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series or an old trad Regency from one of my never-fail triumvirate of Balogh, Beverley, and Putney. The rereading reminds me of why I fell in love with romance fiction all those years ago.

    Reply
  77. I rarely reach the jaded stage because I almost always am reading a non-fiction work and a book of poetry and sometimes a cozy mystery too as I read romance novels, reading one in the morning, one at night, one in the car, and so on. Today, for example, I expect to complete True Pretenses, historical romance by Rose Lerner, and to read a bit more in Lincoln and the Power of the Press by Harold Holzer, a look at Lincoln’s relationship with the popular press, and a few more poems in Mark Strand’s Collected Poems. If I get jaded with romance in spite of this variety, my cure is rereading a true golden oldie from a keeper shelf, one of the books that I have been rereading happily for decades such as a book from Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series or an old trad Regency from one of my never-fail triumvirate of Balogh, Beverley, and Putney. The rereading reminds me of why I fell in love with romance fiction all those years ago.

    Reply
  78. I rarely reach the jaded stage because I almost always am reading a non-fiction work and a book of poetry and sometimes a cozy mystery too as I read romance novels, reading one in the morning, one at night, one in the car, and so on. Today, for example, I expect to complete True Pretenses, historical romance by Rose Lerner, and to read a bit more in Lincoln and the Power of the Press by Harold Holzer, a look at Lincoln’s relationship with the popular press, and a few more poems in Mark Strand’s Collected Poems. If I get jaded with romance in spite of this variety, my cure is rereading a true golden oldie from a keeper shelf, one of the books that I have been rereading happily for decades such as a book from Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series or an old trad Regency from one of my never-fail triumvirate of Balogh, Beverley, and Putney. The rereading reminds me of why I fell in love with romance fiction all those years ago.

    Reply
  79. I rarely reach the jaded stage because I almost always am reading a non-fiction work and a book of poetry and sometimes a cozy mystery too as I read romance novels, reading one in the morning, one at night, one in the car, and so on. Today, for example, I expect to complete True Pretenses, historical romance by Rose Lerner, and to read a bit more in Lincoln and the Power of the Press by Harold Holzer, a look at Lincoln’s relationship with the popular press, and a few more poems in Mark Strand’s Collected Poems. If I get jaded with romance in spite of this variety, my cure is rereading a true golden oldie from a keeper shelf, one of the books that I have been rereading happily for decades such as a book from Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series or an old trad Regency from one of my never-fail triumvirate of Balogh, Beverley, and Putney. The rereading reminds me of why I fell in love with romance fiction all those years ago.

    Reply
  80. I rarely reach the jaded stage because I almost always am reading a non-fiction work and a book of poetry and sometimes a cozy mystery too as I read romance novels, reading one in the morning, one at night, one in the car, and so on. Today, for example, I expect to complete True Pretenses, historical romance by Rose Lerner, and to read a bit more in Lincoln and the Power of the Press by Harold Holzer, a look at Lincoln’s relationship with the popular press, and a few more poems in Mark Strand’s Collected Poems. If I get jaded with romance in spite of this variety, my cure is rereading a true golden oldie from a keeper shelf, one of the books that I have been rereading happily for decades such as a book from Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series or an old trad Regency from one of my never-fail triumvirate of Balogh, Beverley, and Putney. The rereading reminds me of why I fell in love with romance fiction all those years ago.

    Reply
  81. I often cleanse my reading palate by reading one of my husband’s picks.
    Most recently I read a Star Wars novel about Obi-wan Kenobi (one of the more
    Intriguing characters in the saga). I was pleasantly surprised by the story, and how much I enjoyed it. But I was definitely ready to go back to my more usual genres when I was finished.

    Reply
  82. I often cleanse my reading palate by reading one of my husband’s picks.
    Most recently I read a Star Wars novel about Obi-wan Kenobi (one of the more
    Intriguing characters in the saga). I was pleasantly surprised by the story, and how much I enjoyed it. But I was definitely ready to go back to my more usual genres when I was finished.

    Reply
  83. I often cleanse my reading palate by reading one of my husband’s picks.
    Most recently I read a Star Wars novel about Obi-wan Kenobi (one of the more
    Intriguing characters in the saga). I was pleasantly surprised by the story, and how much I enjoyed it. But I was definitely ready to go back to my more usual genres when I was finished.

    Reply
  84. I often cleanse my reading palate by reading one of my husband’s picks.
    Most recently I read a Star Wars novel about Obi-wan Kenobi (one of the more
    Intriguing characters in the saga). I was pleasantly surprised by the story, and how much I enjoyed it. But I was definitely ready to go back to my more usual genres when I was finished.

    Reply
  85. I often cleanse my reading palate by reading one of my husband’s picks.
    Most recently I read a Star Wars novel about Obi-wan Kenobi (one of the more
    Intriguing characters in the saga). I was pleasantly surprised by the story, and how much I enjoyed it. But I was definitely ready to go back to my more usual genres when I was finished.

    Reply
  86. I understand that jaded feeling so well. Sometimes I know that I shouldn’t even begin a new book by a favorite author because I’m feeling “over stuffed” of that genre.
    Yep…switch it up by changing genre. I used to read tons of SF and Fantasy but kind of got out of it. A couple of new authors have sneaked into my reading recently by accident and that is fun.
    My usual reading fare alternates between Regency/Historical romance, contemporary romance, Western romance, cozies. Some paranormal romance.
    If I’ve had enough of the new stuff, it is definitely time to go back and start reading all my keepers. Georgette Heyer, Jayne Anne Krentz/Amanda Quick/Jayne Castle, Mary Jo Putney, Lisa Kleypas. Mary Stewart. Linda Howard (MacKenzie series), Anne McCaffrey
    Sometimes I take a break and just listen to my favorite Mrs. Pollifax, Dick Francis or Rosamund Pilcher books. Listening to them being read for some reason clears my brain also. Of course, they have to be read by the correct reader….Dick Francis by Simon Preebles, Mrs. Pollifax by Barbara Rosenblat and the Rosamund Pilcher by the reader I first heard for each of her books.
    Non-fiction does clear the cobwebs also.

    Reply
  87. I understand that jaded feeling so well. Sometimes I know that I shouldn’t even begin a new book by a favorite author because I’m feeling “over stuffed” of that genre.
    Yep…switch it up by changing genre. I used to read tons of SF and Fantasy but kind of got out of it. A couple of new authors have sneaked into my reading recently by accident and that is fun.
    My usual reading fare alternates between Regency/Historical romance, contemporary romance, Western romance, cozies. Some paranormal romance.
    If I’ve had enough of the new stuff, it is definitely time to go back and start reading all my keepers. Georgette Heyer, Jayne Anne Krentz/Amanda Quick/Jayne Castle, Mary Jo Putney, Lisa Kleypas. Mary Stewart. Linda Howard (MacKenzie series), Anne McCaffrey
    Sometimes I take a break and just listen to my favorite Mrs. Pollifax, Dick Francis or Rosamund Pilcher books. Listening to them being read for some reason clears my brain also. Of course, they have to be read by the correct reader….Dick Francis by Simon Preebles, Mrs. Pollifax by Barbara Rosenblat and the Rosamund Pilcher by the reader I first heard for each of her books.
    Non-fiction does clear the cobwebs also.

    Reply
  88. I understand that jaded feeling so well. Sometimes I know that I shouldn’t even begin a new book by a favorite author because I’m feeling “over stuffed” of that genre.
    Yep…switch it up by changing genre. I used to read tons of SF and Fantasy but kind of got out of it. A couple of new authors have sneaked into my reading recently by accident and that is fun.
    My usual reading fare alternates between Regency/Historical romance, contemporary romance, Western romance, cozies. Some paranormal romance.
    If I’ve had enough of the new stuff, it is definitely time to go back and start reading all my keepers. Georgette Heyer, Jayne Anne Krentz/Amanda Quick/Jayne Castle, Mary Jo Putney, Lisa Kleypas. Mary Stewart. Linda Howard (MacKenzie series), Anne McCaffrey
    Sometimes I take a break and just listen to my favorite Mrs. Pollifax, Dick Francis or Rosamund Pilcher books. Listening to them being read for some reason clears my brain also. Of course, they have to be read by the correct reader….Dick Francis by Simon Preebles, Mrs. Pollifax by Barbara Rosenblat and the Rosamund Pilcher by the reader I first heard for each of her books.
    Non-fiction does clear the cobwebs also.

    Reply
  89. I understand that jaded feeling so well. Sometimes I know that I shouldn’t even begin a new book by a favorite author because I’m feeling “over stuffed” of that genre.
    Yep…switch it up by changing genre. I used to read tons of SF and Fantasy but kind of got out of it. A couple of new authors have sneaked into my reading recently by accident and that is fun.
    My usual reading fare alternates between Regency/Historical romance, contemporary romance, Western romance, cozies. Some paranormal romance.
    If I’ve had enough of the new stuff, it is definitely time to go back and start reading all my keepers. Georgette Heyer, Jayne Anne Krentz/Amanda Quick/Jayne Castle, Mary Jo Putney, Lisa Kleypas. Mary Stewart. Linda Howard (MacKenzie series), Anne McCaffrey
    Sometimes I take a break and just listen to my favorite Mrs. Pollifax, Dick Francis or Rosamund Pilcher books. Listening to them being read for some reason clears my brain also. Of course, they have to be read by the correct reader….Dick Francis by Simon Preebles, Mrs. Pollifax by Barbara Rosenblat and the Rosamund Pilcher by the reader I first heard for each of her books.
    Non-fiction does clear the cobwebs also.

    Reply
  90. I understand that jaded feeling so well. Sometimes I know that I shouldn’t even begin a new book by a favorite author because I’m feeling “over stuffed” of that genre.
    Yep…switch it up by changing genre. I used to read tons of SF and Fantasy but kind of got out of it. A couple of new authors have sneaked into my reading recently by accident and that is fun.
    My usual reading fare alternates between Regency/Historical romance, contemporary romance, Western romance, cozies. Some paranormal romance.
    If I’ve had enough of the new stuff, it is definitely time to go back and start reading all my keepers. Georgette Heyer, Jayne Anne Krentz/Amanda Quick/Jayne Castle, Mary Jo Putney, Lisa Kleypas. Mary Stewart. Linda Howard (MacKenzie series), Anne McCaffrey
    Sometimes I take a break and just listen to my favorite Mrs. Pollifax, Dick Francis or Rosamund Pilcher books. Listening to them being read for some reason clears my brain also. Of course, they have to be read by the correct reader….Dick Francis by Simon Preebles, Mrs. Pollifax by Barbara Rosenblat and the Rosamund Pilcher by the reader I first heard for each of her books.
    Non-fiction does clear the cobwebs also.

    Reply
  91. I’ve been the jaded reader for about six months. Only a few romances have held my attention. Instead, I’ve received rec’s from people I trust, and therefore just finished Emily St. John Mandel’s beautiful dystopian tale, Station Eleven. Now I’m headed of on holiday and feel ready to jump back into a romance.
    Raymond Chandler wrote with such a clipped, specific voice. I remember tearing through his books when I was on college breaks.

    Reply
  92. I’ve been the jaded reader for about six months. Only a few romances have held my attention. Instead, I’ve received rec’s from people I trust, and therefore just finished Emily St. John Mandel’s beautiful dystopian tale, Station Eleven. Now I’m headed of on holiday and feel ready to jump back into a romance.
    Raymond Chandler wrote with such a clipped, specific voice. I remember tearing through his books when I was on college breaks.

    Reply
  93. I’ve been the jaded reader for about six months. Only a few romances have held my attention. Instead, I’ve received rec’s from people I trust, and therefore just finished Emily St. John Mandel’s beautiful dystopian tale, Station Eleven. Now I’m headed of on holiday and feel ready to jump back into a romance.
    Raymond Chandler wrote with such a clipped, specific voice. I remember tearing through his books when I was on college breaks.

    Reply
  94. I’ve been the jaded reader for about six months. Only a few romances have held my attention. Instead, I’ve received rec’s from people I trust, and therefore just finished Emily St. John Mandel’s beautiful dystopian tale, Station Eleven. Now I’m headed of on holiday and feel ready to jump back into a romance.
    Raymond Chandler wrote with such a clipped, specific voice. I remember tearing through his books when I was on college breaks.

    Reply
  95. I’ve been the jaded reader for about six months. Only a few romances have held my attention. Instead, I’ve received rec’s from people I trust, and therefore just finished Emily St. John Mandel’s beautiful dystopian tale, Station Eleven. Now I’m headed of on holiday and feel ready to jump back into a romance.
    Raymond Chandler wrote with such a clipped, specific voice. I remember tearing through his books when I was on college breaks.

    Reply
  96. Kay, I agree with you about the way some male authors view/portray women — it's a real turn-off. But I've found some good ones lately. I haven't read the Anna Huber series, but it keeps getting recommended so it won't be long, I suspect. Thanks.

    Reply
  97. Kay, I agree with you about the way some male authors view/portray women — it's a real turn-off. But I've found some good ones lately. I haven't read the Anna Huber series, but it keeps getting recommended so it won't be long, I suspect. Thanks.

    Reply
  98. Kay, I agree with you about the way some male authors view/portray women — it's a real turn-off. But I've found some good ones lately. I haven't read the Anna Huber series, but it keeps getting recommended so it won't be long, I suspect. Thanks.

    Reply
  99. Kay, I agree with you about the way some male authors view/portray women — it's a real turn-off. But I've found some good ones lately. I haven't read the Anna Huber series, but it keeps getting recommended so it won't be long, I suspect. Thanks.

    Reply
  100. Kay, I agree with you about the way some male authors view/portray women — it's a real turn-off. But I've found some good ones lately. I haven't read the Anna Huber series, but it keeps getting recommended so it won't be long, I suspect. Thanks.

    Reply
  101. Interesting, Lillian. I mainly do my historical research reading in the context of a current manuscript, or else when I'm browsing for a future idea/inspiration. That said, I have a couple of history books here than are waiting for me, and calling to me for no particular purpose at all.
    But fiction has always been my escape.

    Reply
  102. Interesting, Lillian. I mainly do my historical research reading in the context of a current manuscript, or else when I'm browsing for a future idea/inspiration. That said, I have a couple of history books here than are waiting for me, and calling to me for no particular purpose at all.
    But fiction has always been my escape.

    Reply
  103. Interesting, Lillian. I mainly do my historical research reading in the context of a current manuscript, or else when I'm browsing for a future idea/inspiration. That said, I have a couple of history books here than are waiting for me, and calling to me for no particular purpose at all.
    But fiction has always been my escape.

    Reply
  104. Interesting, Lillian. I mainly do my historical research reading in the context of a current manuscript, or else when I'm browsing for a future idea/inspiration. That said, I have a couple of history books here than are waiting for me, and calling to me for no particular purpose at all.
    But fiction has always been my escape.

    Reply
  105. Interesting, Lillian. I mainly do my historical research reading in the context of a current manuscript, or else when I'm browsing for a future idea/inspiration. That said, I have a couple of history books here than are waiting for me, and calling to me for no particular purpose at all.
    But fiction has always been my escape.

    Reply
  106. Mary Jo, that's pretty much been my attitude to Chandler, but I was also drawn in by those quotes — I love a playful attitude to language. And my friend's husband was nicely enthusiastic. He said he'd become interested after a mention of something about Chandler's life in a newspaper, and he looked him up, found him interesting as a person, and started reading him. And enjoying him. So, we'll see if I feel the same. And I have earlier confessed that I've never read or seen the Princess Bride, and your post made me think I'll have to rectify that omission. Soon. *g*

    Reply
  107. Mary Jo, that's pretty much been my attitude to Chandler, but I was also drawn in by those quotes — I love a playful attitude to language. And my friend's husband was nicely enthusiastic. He said he'd become interested after a mention of something about Chandler's life in a newspaper, and he looked him up, found him interesting as a person, and started reading him. And enjoying him. So, we'll see if I feel the same. And I have earlier confessed that I've never read or seen the Princess Bride, and your post made me think I'll have to rectify that omission. Soon. *g*

    Reply
  108. Mary Jo, that's pretty much been my attitude to Chandler, but I was also drawn in by those quotes — I love a playful attitude to language. And my friend's husband was nicely enthusiastic. He said he'd become interested after a mention of something about Chandler's life in a newspaper, and he looked him up, found him interesting as a person, and started reading him. And enjoying him. So, we'll see if I feel the same. And I have earlier confessed that I've never read or seen the Princess Bride, and your post made me think I'll have to rectify that omission. Soon. *g*

    Reply
  109. Mary Jo, that's pretty much been my attitude to Chandler, but I was also drawn in by those quotes — I love a playful attitude to language. And my friend's husband was nicely enthusiastic. He said he'd become interested after a mention of something about Chandler's life in a newspaper, and he looked him up, found him interesting as a person, and started reading him. And enjoying him. So, we'll see if I feel the same. And I have earlier confessed that I've never read or seen the Princess Bride, and your post made me think I'll have to rectify that omission. Soon. *g*

    Reply
  110. Mary Jo, that's pretty much been my attitude to Chandler, but I was also drawn in by those quotes — I love a playful attitude to language. And my friend's husband was nicely enthusiastic. He said he'd become interested after a mention of something about Chandler's life in a newspaper, and he looked him up, found him interesting as a person, and started reading him. And enjoying him. So, we'll see if I feel the same. And I have earlier confessed that I've never read or seen the Princess Bride, and your post made me think I'll have to rectify that omission. Soon. *g*

    Reply
  111. Sounds like I'd love your "prozac" shelf, Fiona. I, too have a complete set of Heyers and quite a lot of the 'golden age" detective story writers, not to mention my keeper bookcase and the one full of my childhood favorites — like old friends, familiar and beloved. But when I'm jaded I usually need to find something new-to-me and different. Thanks. See you at ARRC.

    Reply
  112. Sounds like I'd love your "prozac" shelf, Fiona. I, too have a complete set of Heyers and quite a lot of the 'golden age" detective story writers, not to mention my keeper bookcase and the one full of my childhood favorites — like old friends, familiar and beloved. But when I'm jaded I usually need to find something new-to-me and different. Thanks. See you at ARRC.

    Reply
  113. Sounds like I'd love your "prozac" shelf, Fiona. I, too have a complete set of Heyers and quite a lot of the 'golden age" detective story writers, not to mention my keeper bookcase and the one full of my childhood favorites — like old friends, familiar and beloved. But when I'm jaded I usually need to find something new-to-me and different. Thanks. See you at ARRC.

    Reply
  114. Sounds like I'd love your "prozac" shelf, Fiona. I, too have a complete set of Heyers and quite a lot of the 'golden age" detective story writers, not to mention my keeper bookcase and the one full of my childhood favorites — like old friends, familiar and beloved. But when I'm jaded I usually need to find something new-to-me and different. Thanks. See you at ARRC.

    Reply
  115. Sounds like I'd love your "prozac" shelf, Fiona. I, too have a complete set of Heyers and quite a lot of the 'golden age" detective story writers, not to mention my keeper bookcase and the one full of my childhood favorites — like old friends, familiar and beloved. But when I'm jaded I usually need to find something new-to-me and different. Thanks. See you at ARRC.

    Reply
  116. Janga, yes, I can see you really keep you brain constantly refreshed with that kind of variety. I don't read poetry nearly as often as I used to.
    I sometimes feel for reviewers, who have to read so many books for review, regardless of their mood or the state of their reading palate — it must be very difficult to keep up the openeness and keep the jadedness at bay. Rose Lerner is a writer I haven't read, but who I've heard recommended before. Another one for the list. Thank you.

    Reply
  117. Janga, yes, I can see you really keep you brain constantly refreshed with that kind of variety. I don't read poetry nearly as often as I used to.
    I sometimes feel for reviewers, who have to read so many books for review, regardless of their mood or the state of their reading palate — it must be very difficult to keep up the openeness and keep the jadedness at bay. Rose Lerner is a writer I haven't read, but who I've heard recommended before. Another one for the list. Thank you.

    Reply
  118. Janga, yes, I can see you really keep you brain constantly refreshed with that kind of variety. I don't read poetry nearly as often as I used to.
    I sometimes feel for reviewers, who have to read so many books for review, regardless of their mood or the state of their reading palate — it must be very difficult to keep up the openeness and keep the jadedness at bay. Rose Lerner is a writer I haven't read, but who I've heard recommended before. Another one for the list. Thank you.

    Reply
  119. Janga, yes, I can see you really keep you brain constantly refreshed with that kind of variety. I don't read poetry nearly as often as I used to.
    I sometimes feel for reviewers, who have to read so many books for review, regardless of their mood or the state of their reading palate — it must be very difficult to keep up the openeness and keep the jadedness at bay. Rose Lerner is a writer I haven't read, but who I've heard recommended before. Another one for the list. Thank you.

    Reply
  120. Janga, yes, I can see you really keep you brain constantly refreshed with that kind of variety. I don't read poetry nearly as often as I used to.
    I sometimes feel for reviewers, who have to read so many books for review, regardless of their mood or the state of their reading palate — it must be very difficult to keep up the openeness and keep the jadedness at bay. Rose Lerner is a writer I haven't read, but who I've heard recommended before. Another one for the list. Thank you.

    Reply
  121. Jana that's interesting. A publisher once told me about an author who sold very well because she was the kind of writer women read — and then handed to their husbands. I don't know many that work the other way around.

    Reply
  122. Jana that's interesting. A publisher once told me about an author who sold very well because she was the kind of writer women read — and then handed to their husbands. I don't know many that work the other way around.

    Reply
  123. Jana that's interesting. A publisher once told me about an author who sold very well because she was the kind of writer women read — and then handed to their husbands. I don't know many that work the other way around.

    Reply
  124. Jana that's interesting. A publisher once told me about an author who sold very well because she was the kind of writer women read — and then handed to their husbands. I don't know many that work the other way around.

    Reply
  125. Jana that's interesting. A publisher once told me about an author who sold very well because she was the kind of writer women read — and then handed to their husbands. I don't know many that work the other way around.

    Reply
  126. Vicki, I think we have similar tastes in old favorites. I too reread many of the authors you mentioned — don't know how many times I've read Mackenzie's Mountain *g* and AQ, MJP, Kleypas, Heyer, Stewart etc — all in my keeper bookshelves. I have all of Dick Francis's books as well, though I've never heard him on audio book. Might check out my library to see if they have them. Thanks.

    Reply
  127. Vicki, I think we have similar tastes in old favorites. I too reread many of the authors you mentioned — don't know how many times I've read Mackenzie's Mountain *g* and AQ, MJP, Kleypas, Heyer, Stewart etc — all in my keeper bookshelves. I have all of Dick Francis's books as well, though I've never heard him on audio book. Might check out my library to see if they have them. Thanks.

    Reply
  128. Vicki, I think we have similar tastes in old favorites. I too reread many of the authors you mentioned — don't know how many times I've read Mackenzie's Mountain *g* and AQ, MJP, Kleypas, Heyer, Stewart etc — all in my keeper bookshelves. I have all of Dick Francis's books as well, though I've never heard him on audio book. Might check out my library to see if they have them. Thanks.

    Reply
  129. Vicki, I think we have similar tastes in old favorites. I too reread many of the authors you mentioned — don't know how many times I've read Mackenzie's Mountain *g* and AQ, MJP, Kleypas, Heyer, Stewart etc — all in my keeper bookshelves. I have all of Dick Francis's books as well, though I've never heard him on audio book. Might check out my library to see if they have them. Thanks.

    Reply
  130. Vicki, I think we have similar tastes in old favorites. I too reread many of the authors you mentioned — don't know how many times I've read Mackenzie's Mountain *g* and AQ, MJP, Kleypas, Heyer, Stewart etc — all in my keeper bookshelves. I have all of Dick Francis's books as well, though I've never heard him on audio book. Might check out my library to see if they have them. Thanks.

    Reply
  131. Karen, it's awful when you're feeling jaded, isn't it? For me it's like feeling off-color or ill — I've always had a book on the go, ever since I was able to read, and it feels so wrong when nothing seems to appeal. Fab that you found your cure. I might try it too. Thanks.

    Reply
  132. Karen, it's awful when you're feeling jaded, isn't it? For me it's like feeling off-color or ill — I've always had a book on the go, ever since I was able to read, and it feels so wrong when nothing seems to appeal. Fab that you found your cure. I might try it too. Thanks.

    Reply
  133. Karen, it's awful when you're feeling jaded, isn't it? For me it's like feeling off-color or ill — I've always had a book on the go, ever since I was able to read, and it feels so wrong when nothing seems to appeal. Fab that you found your cure. I might try it too. Thanks.

    Reply
  134. Karen, it's awful when you're feeling jaded, isn't it? For me it's like feeling off-color or ill — I've always had a book on the go, ever since I was able to read, and it feels so wrong when nothing seems to appeal. Fab that you found your cure. I might try it too. Thanks.

    Reply
  135. Karen, it's awful when you're feeling jaded, isn't it? For me it's like feeling off-color or ill — I've always had a book on the go, ever since I was able to read, and it feels so wrong when nothing seems to appeal. Fab that you found your cure. I might try it too. Thanks.

    Reply
  136. I reread Daphne DuMaurier’s short story “The Bird’s”. Her writing is brilliant, sparse and haunting. It is not a romance and has none of the biting wit I usually like, but Nat Hocken is a hero in the best sense. Damaged by war, he is quiet and thoughtful; his nature is ultimately protective and capable as he struggles to deal with the eerily menacing events that threaten his world. The movie ruined it. It should be done again by someone who loves and understands the nature and setting of this beautiful tale.

    Reply
  137. I reread Daphne DuMaurier’s short story “The Bird’s”. Her writing is brilliant, sparse and haunting. It is not a romance and has none of the biting wit I usually like, but Nat Hocken is a hero in the best sense. Damaged by war, he is quiet and thoughtful; his nature is ultimately protective and capable as he struggles to deal with the eerily menacing events that threaten his world. The movie ruined it. It should be done again by someone who loves and understands the nature and setting of this beautiful tale.

    Reply
  138. I reread Daphne DuMaurier’s short story “The Bird’s”. Her writing is brilliant, sparse and haunting. It is not a romance and has none of the biting wit I usually like, but Nat Hocken is a hero in the best sense. Damaged by war, he is quiet and thoughtful; his nature is ultimately protective and capable as he struggles to deal with the eerily menacing events that threaten his world. The movie ruined it. It should be done again by someone who loves and understands the nature and setting of this beautiful tale.

    Reply
  139. I reread Daphne DuMaurier’s short story “The Bird’s”. Her writing is brilliant, sparse and haunting. It is not a romance and has none of the biting wit I usually like, but Nat Hocken is a hero in the best sense. Damaged by war, he is quiet and thoughtful; his nature is ultimately protective and capable as he struggles to deal with the eerily menacing events that threaten his world. The movie ruined it. It should be done again by someone who loves and understands the nature and setting of this beautiful tale.

    Reply
  140. I reread Daphne DuMaurier’s short story “The Bird’s”. Her writing is brilliant, sparse and haunting. It is not a romance and has none of the biting wit I usually like, but Nat Hocken is a hero in the best sense. Damaged by war, he is quiet and thoughtful; his nature is ultimately protective and capable as he struggles to deal with the eerily menacing events that threaten his world. The movie ruined it. It should be done again by someone who loves and understands the nature and setting of this beautiful tale.

    Reply
  141. I wondered about the name too, Anne, since Violet Winspear is the only other Winspear I ever heard of. The bio note on her dust jacket says she’s from the UK originally, now living in California. Her most recent book is a standalone.

    Reply
  142. I wondered about the name too, Anne, since Violet Winspear is the only other Winspear I ever heard of. The bio note on her dust jacket says she’s from the UK originally, now living in California. Her most recent book is a standalone.

    Reply
  143. I wondered about the name too, Anne, since Violet Winspear is the only other Winspear I ever heard of. The bio note on her dust jacket says she’s from the UK originally, now living in California. Her most recent book is a standalone.

    Reply
  144. I wondered about the name too, Anne, since Violet Winspear is the only other Winspear I ever heard of. The bio note on her dust jacket says she’s from the UK originally, now living in California. Her most recent book is a standalone.

    Reply
  145. I wondered about the name too, Anne, since Violet Winspear is the only other Winspear I ever heard of. The bio note on her dust jacket says she’s from the UK originally, now living in California. Her most recent book is a standalone.

    Reply
  146. Rose Lerner is not only a great writer, but does very fun interviews too. The recent joint discussion with her and Theresa Romain at both of their blogs was great(they both had new releases this month) and also the podcast interview of Lerner a few weeks ago at the Smart Bitches, Trashy Books website. I totally adored Lerner’s first book, In for a Penny.

    Reply
  147. Rose Lerner is not only a great writer, but does very fun interviews too. The recent joint discussion with her and Theresa Romain at both of their blogs was great(they both had new releases this month) and also the podcast interview of Lerner a few weeks ago at the Smart Bitches, Trashy Books website. I totally adored Lerner’s first book, In for a Penny.

    Reply
  148. Rose Lerner is not only a great writer, but does very fun interviews too. The recent joint discussion with her and Theresa Romain at both of their blogs was great(they both had new releases this month) and also the podcast interview of Lerner a few weeks ago at the Smart Bitches, Trashy Books website. I totally adored Lerner’s first book, In for a Penny.

    Reply
  149. Rose Lerner is not only a great writer, but does very fun interviews too. The recent joint discussion with her and Theresa Romain at both of their blogs was great(they both had new releases this month) and also the podcast interview of Lerner a few weeks ago at the Smart Bitches, Trashy Books website. I totally adored Lerner’s first book, In for a Penny.

    Reply
  150. Rose Lerner is not only a great writer, but does very fun interviews too. The recent joint discussion with her and Theresa Romain at both of their blogs was great(they both had new releases this month) and also the podcast interview of Lerner a few weeks ago at the Smart Bitches, Trashy Books website. I totally adored Lerner’s first book, In for a Penny.

    Reply
  151. I had no idea Raymond Chandler’s writing was so witty!
    When I get burnt out on romance, it’s usually because too many are set in the Regency era, as much as I love it. Sometimes I’ll read a couple of medievals for a change and historical mysteries. Lately it’s been easier to find books set in the Edwardian & WW I era(thank you, Downton Abbey!) as well as the roaring 20’s. Some sci-fi authors I’ve enjoyed are Lindsay Buroker, Lois McMaster Bujold, Sharon Lee/Steve Miller, and Connie Willis. I love to read travel books, everything from Ian Frazier’s “Travels in Siberia” to “As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning” by Laurie Lee. And 20th C. history, especially about World War II. I’ve started reading “Eastern Approaches” by Fitzroy MacLean and it’s hair-raising and hilarious.
    Speaking of books about other cultures, “A Bollywood Affair” by Sonali Dev is on my TBR list, I’ve heard great things about it.

    Reply
  152. I had no idea Raymond Chandler’s writing was so witty!
    When I get burnt out on romance, it’s usually because too many are set in the Regency era, as much as I love it. Sometimes I’ll read a couple of medievals for a change and historical mysteries. Lately it’s been easier to find books set in the Edwardian & WW I era(thank you, Downton Abbey!) as well as the roaring 20’s. Some sci-fi authors I’ve enjoyed are Lindsay Buroker, Lois McMaster Bujold, Sharon Lee/Steve Miller, and Connie Willis. I love to read travel books, everything from Ian Frazier’s “Travels in Siberia” to “As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning” by Laurie Lee. And 20th C. history, especially about World War II. I’ve started reading “Eastern Approaches” by Fitzroy MacLean and it’s hair-raising and hilarious.
    Speaking of books about other cultures, “A Bollywood Affair” by Sonali Dev is on my TBR list, I’ve heard great things about it.

    Reply
  153. I had no idea Raymond Chandler’s writing was so witty!
    When I get burnt out on romance, it’s usually because too many are set in the Regency era, as much as I love it. Sometimes I’ll read a couple of medievals for a change and historical mysteries. Lately it’s been easier to find books set in the Edwardian & WW I era(thank you, Downton Abbey!) as well as the roaring 20’s. Some sci-fi authors I’ve enjoyed are Lindsay Buroker, Lois McMaster Bujold, Sharon Lee/Steve Miller, and Connie Willis. I love to read travel books, everything from Ian Frazier’s “Travels in Siberia” to “As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning” by Laurie Lee. And 20th C. history, especially about World War II. I’ve started reading “Eastern Approaches” by Fitzroy MacLean and it’s hair-raising and hilarious.
    Speaking of books about other cultures, “A Bollywood Affair” by Sonali Dev is on my TBR list, I’ve heard great things about it.

    Reply
  154. I had no idea Raymond Chandler’s writing was so witty!
    When I get burnt out on romance, it’s usually because too many are set in the Regency era, as much as I love it. Sometimes I’ll read a couple of medievals for a change and historical mysteries. Lately it’s been easier to find books set in the Edwardian & WW I era(thank you, Downton Abbey!) as well as the roaring 20’s. Some sci-fi authors I’ve enjoyed are Lindsay Buroker, Lois McMaster Bujold, Sharon Lee/Steve Miller, and Connie Willis. I love to read travel books, everything from Ian Frazier’s “Travels in Siberia” to “As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning” by Laurie Lee. And 20th C. history, especially about World War II. I’ve started reading “Eastern Approaches” by Fitzroy MacLean and it’s hair-raising and hilarious.
    Speaking of books about other cultures, “A Bollywood Affair” by Sonali Dev is on my TBR list, I’ve heard great things about it.

    Reply
  155. I had no idea Raymond Chandler’s writing was so witty!
    When I get burnt out on romance, it’s usually because too many are set in the Regency era, as much as I love it. Sometimes I’ll read a couple of medievals for a change and historical mysteries. Lately it’s been easier to find books set in the Edwardian & WW I era(thank you, Downton Abbey!) as well as the roaring 20’s. Some sci-fi authors I’ve enjoyed are Lindsay Buroker, Lois McMaster Bujold, Sharon Lee/Steve Miller, and Connie Willis. I love to read travel books, everything from Ian Frazier’s “Travels in Siberia” to “As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning” by Laurie Lee. And 20th C. history, especially about World War II. I’ve started reading “Eastern Approaches” by Fitzroy MacLean and it’s hair-raising and hilarious.
    Speaking of books about other cultures, “A Bollywood Affair” by Sonali Dev is on my TBR list, I’ve heard great things about it.

    Reply
  156. We recently powered through the Hunger Games books at our house. The pace and precision of the first book in particular is a fantastic palate cleanser. Good futuristic speculative fiction is often my best pick-me-up. Margaret Atwood’s Madadam series pepped me up no end.
    However, in terms of getting out of reading ruts, I think that today, I have struck gold – with my first pair of multifocals 🙂 I picked them up this morning, They’re the biggest, least stylish glasses I’ve ever owned, but Oh. The. Bliss. I feel like reading anything, and everything. And it’s only a week and a bit to the end of school holidays. *rubs hands together in anticipation*

    Reply
  157. We recently powered through the Hunger Games books at our house. The pace and precision of the first book in particular is a fantastic palate cleanser. Good futuristic speculative fiction is often my best pick-me-up. Margaret Atwood’s Madadam series pepped me up no end.
    However, in terms of getting out of reading ruts, I think that today, I have struck gold – with my first pair of multifocals 🙂 I picked them up this morning, They’re the biggest, least stylish glasses I’ve ever owned, but Oh. The. Bliss. I feel like reading anything, and everything. And it’s only a week and a bit to the end of school holidays. *rubs hands together in anticipation*

    Reply
  158. We recently powered through the Hunger Games books at our house. The pace and precision of the first book in particular is a fantastic palate cleanser. Good futuristic speculative fiction is often my best pick-me-up. Margaret Atwood’s Madadam series pepped me up no end.
    However, in terms of getting out of reading ruts, I think that today, I have struck gold – with my first pair of multifocals 🙂 I picked them up this morning, They’re the biggest, least stylish glasses I’ve ever owned, but Oh. The. Bliss. I feel like reading anything, and everything. And it’s only a week and a bit to the end of school holidays. *rubs hands together in anticipation*

    Reply
  159. We recently powered through the Hunger Games books at our house. The pace and precision of the first book in particular is a fantastic palate cleanser. Good futuristic speculative fiction is often my best pick-me-up. Margaret Atwood’s Madadam series pepped me up no end.
    However, in terms of getting out of reading ruts, I think that today, I have struck gold – with my first pair of multifocals 🙂 I picked them up this morning, They’re the biggest, least stylish glasses I’ve ever owned, but Oh. The. Bliss. I feel like reading anything, and everything. And it’s only a week and a bit to the end of school holidays. *rubs hands together in anticipation*

    Reply
  160. We recently powered through the Hunger Games books at our house. The pace and precision of the first book in particular is a fantastic palate cleanser. Good futuristic speculative fiction is often my best pick-me-up. Margaret Atwood’s Madadam series pepped me up no end.
    However, in terms of getting out of reading ruts, I think that today, I have struck gold – with my first pair of multifocals 🙂 I picked them up this morning, They’re the biggest, least stylish glasses I’ve ever owned, but Oh. The. Bliss. I feel like reading anything, and everything. And it’s only a week and a bit to the end of school holidays. *rubs hands together in anticipation*

    Reply
  161. When I can’t get into any romances, either contemporary or historical, I’ll frequently go to mysteries: Heyer, Sayers, Christie, Dick Francis. If those don’t work then I start reading my cookbooks – I particularly enjoy reading cookbooks written by chefs I’ve seen on TV as I can hear their voices as I read the recipes. Favourites are Nigella Lawson, Gordon Ramsay, Julia Child and Emeril Lagasse. Also read in the past year are several non-fiction books: “Wicked Plants” and “The Drunken Botanist”, both by Amy Stewart and Sam Kean’s “The Disappearing Spoon” which is all about the periodic table of the elements – who knew that could actually be interesting and amusing?

    Reply
  162. When I can’t get into any romances, either contemporary or historical, I’ll frequently go to mysteries: Heyer, Sayers, Christie, Dick Francis. If those don’t work then I start reading my cookbooks – I particularly enjoy reading cookbooks written by chefs I’ve seen on TV as I can hear their voices as I read the recipes. Favourites are Nigella Lawson, Gordon Ramsay, Julia Child and Emeril Lagasse. Also read in the past year are several non-fiction books: “Wicked Plants” and “The Drunken Botanist”, both by Amy Stewart and Sam Kean’s “The Disappearing Spoon” which is all about the periodic table of the elements – who knew that could actually be interesting and amusing?

    Reply
  163. When I can’t get into any romances, either contemporary or historical, I’ll frequently go to mysteries: Heyer, Sayers, Christie, Dick Francis. If those don’t work then I start reading my cookbooks – I particularly enjoy reading cookbooks written by chefs I’ve seen on TV as I can hear their voices as I read the recipes. Favourites are Nigella Lawson, Gordon Ramsay, Julia Child and Emeril Lagasse. Also read in the past year are several non-fiction books: “Wicked Plants” and “The Drunken Botanist”, both by Amy Stewart and Sam Kean’s “The Disappearing Spoon” which is all about the periodic table of the elements – who knew that could actually be interesting and amusing?

    Reply
  164. When I can’t get into any romances, either contemporary or historical, I’ll frequently go to mysteries: Heyer, Sayers, Christie, Dick Francis. If those don’t work then I start reading my cookbooks – I particularly enjoy reading cookbooks written by chefs I’ve seen on TV as I can hear their voices as I read the recipes. Favourites are Nigella Lawson, Gordon Ramsay, Julia Child and Emeril Lagasse. Also read in the past year are several non-fiction books: “Wicked Plants” and “The Drunken Botanist”, both by Amy Stewart and Sam Kean’s “The Disappearing Spoon” which is all about the periodic table of the elements – who knew that could actually be interesting and amusing?

    Reply
  165. When I can’t get into any romances, either contemporary or historical, I’ll frequently go to mysteries: Heyer, Sayers, Christie, Dick Francis. If those don’t work then I start reading my cookbooks – I particularly enjoy reading cookbooks written by chefs I’ve seen on TV as I can hear their voices as I read the recipes. Favourites are Nigella Lawson, Gordon Ramsay, Julia Child and Emeril Lagasse. Also read in the past year are several non-fiction books: “Wicked Plants” and “The Drunken Botanist”, both by Amy Stewart and Sam Kean’s “The Disappearing Spoon” which is all about the periodic table of the elements – who knew that could actually be interesting and amusing?

    Reply
  166. Don’t forget Josephine Tey! Her mystery (well, sort of mystery) Daughter of Time started me reading her work as well as Christie and Marsh. A Canadian, Peter Robinson, writes excellent police procedurals set in the north of England.
    And if you’re going to dip into the SF pond, read anything by Lois McMaster Bujold – her series about Miles Vorkosigan does include a romance but it’s a long time coming, though worth it when you get there.
    And finally (I can hear your sigh of relief) if you haven’t read Doroth Dunnett, any Dorothy Dunnett, then do, but prepare to be subsumed for some time!
    Cheers and good reading, from a retired librarian! 🙂

    Reply
  167. Don’t forget Josephine Tey! Her mystery (well, sort of mystery) Daughter of Time started me reading her work as well as Christie and Marsh. A Canadian, Peter Robinson, writes excellent police procedurals set in the north of England.
    And if you’re going to dip into the SF pond, read anything by Lois McMaster Bujold – her series about Miles Vorkosigan does include a romance but it’s a long time coming, though worth it when you get there.
    And finally (I can hear your sigh of relief) if you haven’t read Doroth Dunnett, any Dorothy Dunnett, then do, but prepare to be subsumed for some time!
    Cheers and good reading, from a retired librarian! 🙂

    Reply
  168. Don’t forget Josephine Tey! Her mystery (well, sort of mystery) Daughter of Time started me reading her work as well as Christie and Marsh. A Canadian, Peter Robinson, writes excellent police procedurals set in the north of England.
    And if you’re going to dip into the SF pond, read anything by Lois McMaster Bujold – her series about Miles Vorkosigan does include a romance but it’s a long time coming, though worth it when you get there.
    And finally (I can hear your sigh of relief) if you haven’t read Doroth Dunnett, any Dorothy Dunnett, then do, but prepare to be subsumed for some time!
    Cheers and good reading, from a retired librarian! 🙂

    Reply
  169. Don’t forget Josephine Tey! Her mystery (well, sort of mystery) Daughter of Time started me reading her work as well as Christie and Marsh. A Canadian, Peter Robinson, writes excellent police procedurals set in the north of England.
    And if you’re going to dip into the SF pond, read anything by Lois McMaster Bujold – her series about Miles Vorkosigan does include a romance but it’s a long time coming, though worth it when you get there.
    And finally (I can hear your sigh of relief) if you haven’t read Doroth Dunnett, any Dorothy Dunnett, then do, but prepare to be subsumed for some time!
    Cheers and good reading, from a retired librarian! 🙂

    Reply
  170. Don’t forget Josephine Tey! Her mystery (well, sort of mystery) Daughter of Time started me reading her work as well as Christie and Marsh. A Canadian, Peter Robinson, writes excellent police procedurals set in the north of England.
    And if you’re going to dip into the SF pond, read anything by Lois McMaster Bujold – her series about Miles Vorkosigan does include a romance but it’s a long time coming, though worth it when you get there.
    And finally (I can hear your sigh of relief) if you haven’t read Doroth Dunnett, any Dorothy Dunnett, then do, but prepare to be subsumed for some time!
    Cheers and good reading, from a retired librarian! 🙂

    Reply
  171. I like to read books set in England between the wars. I’m thinking of Diary of a Provincial Lady and sequels; the Mapp/Lucia books by E F Bensen; Angela Thirkell (whose work extended post-World-War-II). And from the 1950’s, Barbara Pym. And I always go back to Heyer – just finished rereading False Colours! More cheers from another retired librarian!

    Reply
  172. I like to read books set in England between the wars. I’m thinking of Diary of a Provincial Lady and sequels; the Mapp/Lucia books by E F Bensen; Angela Thirkell (whose work extended post-World-War-II). And from the 1950’s, Barbara Pym. And I always go back to Heyer – just finished rereading False Colours! More cheers from another retired librarian!

    Reply
  173. I like to read books set in England between the wars. I’m thinking of Diary of a Provincial Lady and sequels; the Mapp/Lucia books by E F Bensen; Angela Thirkell (whose work extended post-World-War-II). And from the 1950’s, Barbara Pym. And I always go back to Heyer – just finished rereading False Colours! More cheers from another retired librarian!

    Reply
  174. I like to read books set in England between the wars. I’m thinking of Diary of a Provincial Lady and sequels; the Mapp/Lucia books by E F Bensen; Angela Thirkell (whose work extended post-World-War-II). And from the 1950’s, Barbara Pym. And I always go back to Heyer – just finished rereading False Colours! More cheers from another retired librarian!

    Reply
  175. I like to read books set in England between the wars. I’m thinking of Diary of a Provincial Lady and sequels; the Mapp/Lucia books by E F Bensen; Angela Thirkell (whose work extended post-World-War-II). And from the 1950’s, Barbara Pym. And I always go back to Heyer – just finished rereading False Colours! More cheers from another retired librarian!

    Reply
  176. Linda, I just read Tom Holt's addition to the E.F. Benson Mapp and Lucia books — Lucia in Wartime and Lucia Triumphant — not quite EF Benson, but still most enjoyable. I enjoy Barbara Pym, too, though it's been a while since I read her. Have you read Eva Ibbotson's books for adults, set more or less between the wars. Beautiful books. I did an interview with her a few years ago. http://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2009/06/meet-eva-ibbotson.html I acquired all her books as used editions and then to my delight, they reissues them, some with changed titles, and looking like YA books, but they are adult romances most definitely — though not in the sense of sexiness. They are, like Heyer, entirely non-explicit. If you haven't tried them, you have a treat in store.

    Reply
  177. Linda, I just read Tom Holt's addition to the E.F. Benson Mapp and Lucia books — Lucia in Wartime and Lucia Triumphant — not quite EF Benson, but still most enjoyable. I enjoy Barbara Pym, too, though it's been a while since I read her. Have you read Eva Ibbotson's books for adults, set more or less between the wars. Beautiful books. I did an interview with her a few years ago. http://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2009/06/meet-eva-ibbotson.html I acquired all her books as used editions and then to my delight, they reissues them, some with changed titles, and looking like YA books, but they are adult romances most definitely — though not in the sense of sexiness. They are, like Heyer, entirely non-explicit. If you haven't tried them, you have a treat in store.

    Reply
  178. Linda, I just read Tom Holt's addition to the E.F. Benson Mapp and Lucia books — Lucia in Wartime and Lucia Triumphant — not quite EF Benson, but still most enjoyable. I enjoy Barbara Pym, too, though it's been a while since I read her. Have you read Eva Ibbotson's books for adults, set more or less between the wars. Beautiful books. I did an interview with her a few years ago. http://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2009/06/meet-eva-ibbotson.html I acquired all her books as used editions and then to my delight, they reissues them, some with changed titles, and looking like YA books, but they are adult romances most definitely — though not in the sense of sexiness. They are, like Heyer, entirely non-explicit. If you haven't tried them, you have a treat in store.

    Reply
  179. Linda, I just read Tom Holt's addition to the E.F. Benson Mapp and Lucia books — Lucia in Wartime and Lucia Triumphant — not quite EF Benson, but still most enjoyable. I enjoy Barbara Pym, too, though it's been a while since I read her. Have you read Eva Ibbotson's books for adults, set more or less between the wars. Beautiful books. I did an interview with her a few years ago. http://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2009/06/meet-eva-ibbotson.html I acquired all her books as used editions and then to my delight, they reissues them, some with changed titles, and looking like YA books, but they are adult romances most definitely — though not in the sense of sexiness. They are, like Heyer, entirely non-explicit. If you haven't tried them, you have a treat in store.

    Reply
  180. Linda, I just read Tom Holt's addition to the E.F. Benson Mapp and Lucia books — Lucia in Wartime and Lucia Triumphant — not quite EF Benson, but still most enjoyable. I enjoy Barbara Pym, too, though it's been a while since I read her. Have you read Eva Ibbotson's books for adults, set more or less between the wars. Beautiful books. I did an interview with her a few years ago. http://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2009/06/meet-eva-ibbotson.html I acquired all her books as used editions and then to my delight, they reissues them, some with changed titles, and looking like YA books, but they are adult romances most definitely — though not in the sense of sexiness. They are, like Heyer, entirely non-explicit. If you haven't tried them, you have a treat in store.

    Reply
  181. Madge, Daughter of Time was my first Josephine Tey, too and started me reading her. I've read the Miles Vorkosian series, too, though not for ages. But I've never heard of Peter Robinson, so thanks for that recommendation. And i recently started a Dorothy Dunnett glom, having finally "clicked" with her. I tried reading her many years ago, and couldn't get into her at all, but this time I persisted past the first 50 pages of Game of Kings and suddenly I was in the book and unable to put it down. Finally I understand what others have been telling me all these years. *g* Thanks for dropping past.

    Reply
  182. Madge, Daughter of Time was my first Josephine Tey, too and started me reading her. I've read the Miles Vorkosian series, too, though not for ages. But I've never heard of Peter Robinson, so thanks for that recommendation. And i recently started a Dorothy Dunnett glom, having finally "clicked" with her. I tried reading her many years ago, and couldn't get into her at all, but this time I persisted past the first 50 pages of Game of Kings and suddenly I was in the book and unable to put it down. Finally I understand what others have been telling me all these years. *g* Thanks for dropping past.

    Reply
  183. Madge, Daughter of Time was my first Josephine Tey, too and started me reading her. I've read the Miles Vorkosian series, too, though not for ages. But I've never heard of Peter Robinson, so thanks for that recommendation. And i recently started a Dorothy Dunnett glom, having finally "clicked" with her. I tried reading her many years ago, and couldn't get into her at all, but this time I persisted past the first 50 pages of Game of Kings and suddenly I was in the book and unable to put it down. Finally I understand what others have been telling me all these years. *g* Thanks for dropping past.

    Reply
  184. Madge, Daughter of Time was my first Josephine Tey, too and started me reading her. I've read the Miles Vorkosian series, too, though not for ages. But I've never heard of Peter Robinson, so thanks for that recommendation. And i recently started a Dorothy Dunnett glom, having finally "clicked" with her. I tried reading her many years ago, and couldn't get into her at all, but this time I persisted past the first 50 pages of Game of Kings and suddenly I was in the book and unable to put it down. Finally I understand what others have been telling me all these years. *g* Thanks for dropping past.

    Reply
  185. Madge, Daughter of Time was my first Josephine Tey, too and started me reading her. I've read the Miles Vorkosian series, too, though not for ages. But I've never heard of Peter Robinson, so thanks for that recommendation. And i recently started a Dorothy Dunnett glom, having finally "clicked" with her. I tried reading her many years ago, and couldn't get into her at all, but this time I persisted past the first 50 pages of Game of Kings and suddenly I was in the book and unable to put it down. Finally I understand what others have been telling me all these years. *g* Thanks for dropping past.

    Reply
  186. That's an interesting alternative, Lorraine. I often leaf through my cookbooks, and I know I read Elizabeth David for the writing, not just the recipes, but I don't do it widely. You're right though — it's the writing and the personalities that come through that make them interesting. I follow a couple of foodie/cooks blogs for that very reason — rarely do I use the recipes, but I enjoy the writing. David Lebovitz is a blog I read for that reason. I will have to read "The Disappearing Spoon" — the idea of the periodic table being fascinating sounds . . . fascinating. *g* Thanks. 

    Reply
  187. That's an interesting alternative, Lorraine. I often leaf through my cookbooks, and I know I read Elizabeth David for the writing, not just the recipes, but I don't do it widely. You're right though — it's the writing and the personalities that come through that make them interesting. I follow a couple of foodie/cooks blogs for that very reason — rarely do I use the recipes, but I enjoy the writing. David Lebovitz is a blog I read for that reason. I will have to read "The Disappearing Spoon" — the idea of the periodic table being fascinating sounds . . . fascinating. *g* Thanks. 

    Reply
  188. That's an interesting alternative, Lorraine. I often leaf through my cookbooks, and I know I read Elizabeth David for the writing, not just the recipes, but I don't do it widely. You're right though — it's the writing and the personalities that come through that make them interesting. I follow a couple of foodie/cooks blogs for that very reason — rarely do I use the recipes, but I enjoy the writing. David Lebovitz is a blog I read for that reason. I will have to read "The Disappearing Spoon" — the idea of the periodic table being fascinating sounds . . . fascinating. *g* Thanks. 

    Reply
  189. That's an interesting alternative, Lorraine. I often leaf through my cookbooks, and I know I read Elizabeth David for the writing, not just the recipes, but I don't do it widely. You're right though — it's the writing and the personalities that come through that make them interesting. I follow a couple of foodie/cooks blogs for that very reason — rarely do I use the recipes, but I enjoy the writing. David Lebovitz is a blog I read for that reason. I will have to read "The Disappearing Spoon" — the idea of the periodic table being fascinating sounds . . . fascinating. *g* Thanks. 

    Reply
  190. That's an interesting alternative, Lorraine. I often leaf through my cookbooks, and I know I read Elizabeth David for the writing, not just the recipes, but I don't do it widely. You're right though — it's the writing and the personalities that come through that make them interesting. I follow a couple of foodie/cooks blogs for that very reason — rarely do I use the recipes, but I enjoy the writing. David Lebovitz is a blog I read for that reason. I will have to read "The Disappearing Spoon" — the idea of the periodic table being fascinating sounds . . . fascinating. *g* Thanks. 

    Reply
  191. Shannon, you're the first person I've heard of who loves their first pair of multi-focals! Most people take a while to get used to them, I believe. Lovely that you love yours. I have the hunger games books but haven't started on them yet. Am a bit of a wimp about violence and not sure I'll enjoy them. Love Margaret Atwood, but don't know the Maddaddam series — will chase them up.. Enjoy the long weekend and your excellent new glasses!

    Reply
  192. Shannon, you're the first person I've heard of who loves their first pair of multi-focals! Most people take a while to get used to them, I believe. Lovely that you love yours. I have the hunger games books but haven't started on them yet. Am a bit of a wimp about violence and not sure I'll enjoy them. Love Margaret Atwood, but don't know the Maddaddam series — will chase them up.. Enjoy the long weekend and your excellent new glasses!

    Reply
  193. Shannon, you're the first person I've heard of who loves their first pair of multi-focals! Most people take a while to get used to them, I believe. Lovely that you love yours. I have the hunger games books but haven't started on them yet. Am a bit of a wimp about violence and not sure I'll enjoy them. Love Margaret Atwood, but don't know the Maddaddam series — will chase them up.. Enjoy the long weekend and your excellent new glasses!

    Reply
  194. Shannon, you're the first person I've heard of who loves their first pair of multi-focals! Most people take a while to get used to them, I believe. Lovely that you love yours. I have the hunger games books but haven't started on them yet. Am a bit of a wimp about violence and not sure I'll enjoy them. Love Margaret Atwood, but don't know the Maddaddam series — will chase them up.. Enjoy the long weekend and your excellent new glasses!

    Reply
  195. Shannon, you're the first person I've heard of who loves their first pair of multi-focals! Most people take a while to get used to them, I believe. Lovely that you love yours. I have the hunger games books but haven't started on them yet. Am a bit of a wimp about violence and not sure I'll enjoy them. Love Margaret Atwood, but don't know the Maddaddam series — will chase them up.. Enjoy the long weekend and your excellent new glasses!

    Reply
  196. Karin, I didn't know he was witty either — these quotes (or references to them) that my friend gave me have made me think I might have to read him now.
    My mother was a huge reader of travel books. I've read that Laurie Lee one, though I've never really thought of it as a travel book (though it is.) I have yet to read Bill Bryson, who many people have recommended. Eastern Approaches sounds like something I might look up, too — thanks.

    Reply
  197. Karin, I didn't know he was witty either — these quotes (or references to them) that my friend gave me have made me think I might have to read him now.
    My mother was a huge reader of travel books. I've read that Laurie Lee one, though I've never really thought of it as a travel book (though it is.) I have yet to read Bill Bryson, who many people have recommended. Eastern Approaches sounds like something I might look up, too — thanks.

    Reply
  198. Karin, I didn't know he was witty either — these quotes (or references to them) that my friend gave me have made me think I might have to read him now.
    My mother was a huge reader of travel books. I've read that Laurie Lee one, though I've never really thought of it as a travel book (though it is.) I have yet to read Bill Bryson, who many people have recommended. Eastern Approaches sounds like something I might look up, too — thanks.

    Reply
  199. Karin, I didn't know he was witty either — these quotes (or references to them) that my friend gave me have made me think I might have to read him now.
    My mother was a huge reader of travel books. I've read that Laurie Lee one, though I've never really thought of it as a travel book (though it is.) I have yet to read Bill Bryson, who many people have recommended. Eastern Approaches sounds like something I might look up, too — thanks.

    Reply
  200. Karin, I didn't know he was witty either — these quotes (or references to them) that my friend gave me have made me think I might have to read him now.
    My mother was a huge reader of travel books. I've read that Laurie Lee one, though I've never really thought of it as a travel book (though it is.) I have yet to read Bill Bryson, who many people have recommended. Eastern Approaches sounds like something I might look up, too — thanks.

    Reply
  201. Thanks for these recommendations, Karin — I've chased them up and for anyone who's interested here is the Rose Lerner interview on Smart Bitches: http://smartbitchestrashybooks.com/podcast/121-talking-historicals-with-rose-lerner/
    And the mutual interviews with Rose Lerner and Theresa Roman are here:
    http://theresaromain.com/2015/01/09/a-chat-with-rose-lerner/
    and here
    http://roselerner.com/blog/2015/01/09/welcome-theresa-romain-and-her-awesome-books/

    Reply
  202. Thanks for these recommendations, Karin — I've chased them up and for anyone who's interested here is the Rose Lerner interview on Smart Bitches: http://smartbitchestrashybooks.com/podcast/121-talking-historicals-with-rose-lerner/
    And the mutual interviews with Rose Lerner and Theresa Roman are here:
    http://theresaromain.com/2015/01/09/a-chat-with-rose-lerner/
    and here
    http://roselerner.com/blog/2015/01/09/welcome-theresa-romain-and-her-awesome-books/

    Reply
  203. Thanks for these recommendations, Karin — I've chased them up and for anyone who's interested here is the Rose Lerner interview on Smart Bitches: http://smartbitchestrashybooks.com/podcast/121-talking-historicals-with-rose-lerner/
    And the mutual interviews with Rose Lerner and Theresa Roman are here:
    http://theresaromain.com/2015/01/09/a-chat-with-rose-lerner/
    and here
    http://roselerner.com/blog/2015/01/09/welcome-theresa-romain-and-her-awesome-books/

    Reply
  204. Thanks for these recommendations, Karin — I've chased them up and for anyone who's interested here is the Rose Lerner interview on Smart Bitches: http://smartbitchestrashybooks.com/podcast/121-talking-historicals-with-rose-lerner/
    And the mutual interviews with Rose Lerner and Theresa Roman are here:
    http://theresaromain.com/2015/01/09/a-chat-with-rose-lerner/
    and here
    http://roselerner.com/blog/2015/01/09/welcome-theresa-romain-and-her-awesome-books/

    Reply
  205. Thanks for these recommendations, Karin — I've chased them up and for anyone who's interested here is the Rose Lerner interview on Smart Bitches: http://smartbitchestrashybooks.com/podcast/121-talking-historicals-with-rose-lerner/
    And the mutual interviews with Rose Lerner and Theresa Roman are here:
    http://theresaromain.com/2015/01/09/a-chat-with-rose-lerner/
    and here
    http://roselerner.com/blog/2015/01/09/welcome-theresa-romain-and-her-awesome-books/

    Reply
  206. Cathy I rent a response to this yesterday, but it hasn’t come through for some reason. I’ve never read the birds, but I do understand what you’re saying. I don’t think movies can ever replicate the experience of books — it’s the nature of the medium — movies are visual, whereas books happen inside the imagination, and are therefore only limited by that. We can read character’s thoughts, sense their emotions etc, whereas movies can’t go there. But after your description, I’m going to have to read the story — thank you.

    Reply
  207. Cathy I rent a response to this yesterday, but it hasn’t come through for some reason. I’ve never read the birds, but I do understand what you’re saying. I don’t think movies can ever replicate the experience of books — it’s the nature of the medium — movies are visual, whereas books happen inside the imagination, and are therefore only limited by that. We can read character’s thoughts, sense their emotions etc, whereas movies can’t go there. But after your description, I’m going to have to read the story — thank you.

    Reply
  208. Cathy I rent a response to this yesterday, but it hasn’t come through for some reason. I’ve never read the birds, but I do understand what you’re saying. I don’t think movies can ever replicate the experience of books — it’s the nature of the medium — movies are visual, whereas books happen inside the imagination, and are therefore only limited by that. We can read character’s thoughts, sense their emotions etc, whereas movies can’t go there. But after your description, I’m going to have to read the story — thank you.

    Reply
  209. Cathy I rent a response to this yesterday, but it hasn’t come through for some reason. I’ve never read the birds, but I do understand what you’re saying. I don’t think movies can ever replicate the experience of books — it’s the nature of the medium — movies are visual, whereas books happen inside the imagination, and are therefore only limited by that. We can read character’s thoughts, sense their emotions etc, whereas movies can’t go there. But after your description, I’m going to have to read the story — thank you.

    Reply
  210. Cathy I rent a response to this yesterday, but it hasn’t come through for some reason. I’ve never read the birds, but I do understand what you’re saying. I don’t think movies can ever replicate the experience of books — it’s the nature of the medium — movies are visual, whereas books happen inside the imagination, and are therefore only limited by that. We can read character’s thoughts, sense their emotions etc, whereas movies can’t go there. But after your description, I’m going to have to read the story — thank you.

    Reply
  211. Oh, Linda, you have a gorrrgeous journey of discovery ahead of you. She's a beautiful write and her stories are lovely.
    I'm just sorry she only write a handful of the adult stories, but I suppose her children's stories did so well, it must have been a difficult choice to make.

    Reply
  212. Oh, Linda, you have a gorrrgeous journey of discovery ahead of you. She's a beautiful write and her stories are lovely.
    I'm just sorry she only write a handful of the adult stories, but I suppose her children's stories did so well, it must have been a difficult choice to make.

    Reply
  213. Oh, Linda, you have a gorrrgeous journey of discovery ahead of you. She's a beautiful write and her stories are lovely.
    I'm just sorry she only write a handful of the adult stories, but I suppose her children's stories did so well, it must have been a difficult choice to make.

    Reply
  214. Oh, Linda, you have a gorrrgeous journey of discovery ahead of you. She's a beautiful write and her stories are lovely.
    I'm just sorry she only write a handful of the adult stories, but I suppose her children's stories did so well, it must have been a difficult choice to make.

    Reply
  215. Oh, Linda, you have a gorrrgeous journey of discovery ahead of you. She's a beautiful write and her stories are lovely.
    I'm just sorry she only write a handful of the adult stories, but I suppose her children's stories did so well, it must have been a difficult choice to make.

    Reply
  216. Thank-you for reminding me of Ngaio Marsh, I haven’t read her since my teens. Will search out some of her books. With so many recommendations for new books/authors I have more on my wishlist than there are hours available to read!

    Reply
  217. Thank-you for reminding me of Ngaio Marsh, I haven’t read her since my teens. Will search out some of her books. With so many recommendations for new books/authors I have more on my wishlist than there are hours available to read!

    Reply
  218. Thank-you for reminding me of Ngaio Marsh, I haven’t read her since my teens. Will search out some of her books. With so many recommendations for new books/authors I have more on my wishlist than there are hours available to read!

    Reply
  219. Thank-you for reminding me of Ngaio Marsh, I haven’t read her since my teens. Will search out some of her books. With so many recommendations for new books/authors I have more on my wishlist than there are hours available to read!

    Reply
  220. Thank-you for reminding me of Ngaio Marsh, I haven’t read her since my teens. Will search out some of her books. With so many recommendations for new books/authors I have more on my wishlist than there are hours available to read!

    Reply
  221. I haven't seen it, Janice. I don't have a TV at the moment and only occasionally watch i-view TV on my computer.
    If it's not on ABC TV (Australia's version of the BBC) I don't see it. Can't stand the ad's on the commercial stations. Can't turn them down on the computer like I could on the TV.

    Reply
  222. I haven't seen it, Janice. I don't have a TV at the moment and only occasionally watch i-view TV on my computer.
    If it's not on ABC TV (Australia's version of the BBC) I don't see it. Can't stand the ad's on the commercial stations. Can't turn them down on the computer like I could on the TV.

    Reply
  223. I haven't seen it, Janice. I don't have a TV at the moment and only occasionally watch i-view TV on my computer.
    If it's not on ABC TV (Australia's version of the BBC) I don't see it. Can't stand the ad's on the commercial stations. Can't turn them down on the computer like I could on the TV.

    Reply
  224. I haven't seen it, Janice. I don't have a TV at the moment and only occasionally watch i-view TV on my computer.
    If it's not on ABC TV (Australia's version of the BBC) I don't see it. Can't stand the ad's on the commercial stations. Can't turn them down on the computer like I could on the TV.

    Reply
  225. I haven't seen it, Janice. I don't have a TV at the moment and only occasionally watch i-view TV on my computer.
    If it's not on ABC TV (Australia's version of the BBC) I don't see it. Can't stand the ad's on the commercial stations. Can't turn them down on the computer like I could on the TV.

    Reply
  226. Anne, can I recommend three authors guaranteed to refresh the jaded palate. They have all written series – so if you like them, you have plenty to go at. For a cross genre Regency/Fantasy/Spy series try the Glamourist Histories by Mary Robinette Kowal. Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s SF Retrieval Artist series is totally addictive (start with The Disappeared) and for something exotic but extremely witty try Colin Cotterill’s Dr. Siri Paiboun mysteries – he’s a 70 yr old coroner in 1970s Laos. Start with The Coroner’s Lunch and just keep on slurping them up! Happy reading.

    Reply
  227. Anne, can I recommend three authors guaranteed to refresh the jaded palate. They have all written series – so if you like them, you have plenty to go at. For a cross genre Regency/Fantasy/Spy series try the Glamourist Histories by Mary Robinette Kowal. Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s SF Retrieval Artist series is totally addictive (start with The Disappeared) and for something exotic but extremely witty try Colin Cotterill’s Dr. Siri Paiboun mysteries – he’s a 70 yr old coroner in 1970s Laos. Start with The Coroner’s Lunch and just keep on slurping them up! Happy reading.

    Reply
  228. Anne, can I recommend three authors guaranteed to refresh the jaded palate. They have all written series – so if you like them, you have plenty to go at. For a cross genre Regency/Fantasy/Spy series try the Glamourist Histories by Mary Robinette Kowal. Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s SF Retrieval Artist series is totally addictive (start with The Disappeared) and for something exotic but extremely witty try Colin Cotterill’s Dr. Siri Paiboun mysteries – he’s a 70 yr old coroner in 1970s Laos. Start with The Coroner’s Lunch and just keep on slurping them up! Happy reading.

    Reply
  229. Anne, can I recommend three authors guaranteed to refresh the jaded palate. They have all written series – so if you like them, you have plenty to go at. For a cross genre Regency/Fantasy/Spy series try the Glamourist Histories by Mary Robinette Kowal. Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s SF Retrieval Artist series is totally addictive (start with The Disappeared) and for something exotic but extremely witty try Colin Cotterill’s Dr. Siri Paiboun mysteries – he’s a 70 yr old coroner in 1970s Laos. Start with The Coroner’s Lunch and just keep on slurping them up! Happy reading.

    Reply
  230. Anne, can I recommend three authors guaranteed to refresh the jaded palate. They have all written series – so if you like them, you have plenty to go at. For a cross genre Regency/Fantasy/Spy series try the Glamourist Histories by Mary Robinette Kowal. Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s SF Retrieval Artist series is totally addictive (start with The Disappeared) and for something exotic but extremely witty try Colin Cotterill’s Dr. Siri Paiboun mysteries – he’s a 70 yr old coroner in 1970s Laos. Start with The Coroner’s Lunch and just keep on slurping them up! Happy reading.

    Reply
  231. Not at all like the movie, it is symbolic; the silence of the birds was very different from Hitchcock’s amplified screams. Thanks for your thoughtful reply. I hope you like it.

    Reply
  232. Not at all like the movie, it is symbolic; the silence of the birds was very different from Hitchcock’s amplified screams. Thanks for your thoughtful reply. I hope you like it.

    Reply
  233. Not at all like the movie, it is symbolic; the silence of the birds was very different from Hitchcock’s amplified screams. Thanks for your thoughtful reply. I hope you like it.

    Reply
  234. Not at all like the movie, it is symbolic; the silence of the birds was very different from Hitchcock’s amplified screams. Thanks for your thoughtful reply. I hope you like it.

    Reply
  235. Not at all like the movie, it is symbolic; the silence of the birds was very different from Hitchcock’s amplified screams. Thanks for your thoughtful reply. I hope you like it.

    Reply
  236. Somehow, I missed this thread when Anee first posted. I SO glad I found it today!
    I’m fascinated by how many overlaps there are in the reading tastes here.Almost every poster has mentioned one or more of my favorite authors, as well as suggestions for new ones to try!
    I would like to add Madeleine L’Engle to the list; most of her books are fascinating mixtures of theology, fantasy, and adventure. I discovered them along with my children as they were first published.
    And a joking remostrance to which ever poster recommend her stand-by trilogy of Beverley, Putney, and Balogh. They are mine also, but how could we NOT like them? Only Mary Balogh isn’t a Word Wench!

    Reply
  237. Somehow, I missed this thread when Anee first posted. I SO glad I found it today!
    I’m fascinated by how many overlaps there are in the reading tastes here.Almost every poster has mentioned one or more of my favorite authors, as well as suggestions for new ones to try!
    I would like to add Madeleine L’Engle to the list; most of her books are fascinating mixtures of theology, fantasy, and adventure. I discovered them along with my children as they were first published.
    And a joking remostrance to which ever poster recommend her stand-by trilogy of Beverley, Putney, and Balogh. They are mine also, but how could we NOT like them? Only Mary Balogh isn’t a Word Wench!

    Reply
  238. Somehow, I missed this thread when Anee first posted. I SO glad I found it today!
    I’m fascinated by how many overlaps there are in the reading tastes here.Almost every poster has mentioned one or more of my favorite authors, as well as suggestions for new ones to try!
    I would like to add Madeleine L’Engle to the list; most of her books are fascinating mixtures of theology, fantasy, and adventure. I discovered them along with my children as they were first published.
    And a joking remostrance to which ever poster recommend her stand-by trilogy of Beverley, Putney, and Balogh. They are mine also, but how could we NOT like them? Only Mary Balogh isn’t a Word Wench!

    Reply
  239. Somehow, I missed this thread when Anee first posted. I SO glad I found it today!
    I’m fascinated by how many overlaps there are in the reading tastes here.Almost every poster has mentioned one or more of my favorite authors, as well as suggestions for new ones to try!
    I would like to add Madeleine L’Engle to the list; most of her books are fascinating mixtures of theology, fantasy, and adventure. I discovered them along with my children as they were first published.
    And a joking remostrance to which ever poster recommend her stand-by trilogy of Beverley, Putney, and Balogh. They are mine also, but how could we NOT like them? Only Mary Balogh isn’t a Word Wench!

    Reply
  240. Somehow, I missed this thread when Anee first posted. I SO glad I found it today!
    I’m fascinated by how many overlaps there are in the reading tastes here.Almost every poster has mentioned one or more of my favorite authors, as well as suggestions for new ones to try!
    I would like to add Madeleine L’Engle to the list; most of her books are fascinating mixtures of theology, fantasy, and adventure. I discovered them along with my children as they were first published.
    And a joking remostrance to which ever poster recommend her stand-by trilogy of Beverley, Putney, and Balogh. They are mine also, but how could we NOT like them? Only Mary Balogh isn’t a Word Wench!

    Reply
  241. I have to agree with all of the recommendations here; all wonderful, all well-loved. But I wish that somehow we could get readers in general to recognize the jaded phenomenon in themselves. It is so annoying to be picking through reviews of books to find the good ones and be seeing one star reviews of really good authors because the reader thinks the author and/or series isn’t worth their time when it is quite often just that they haven’t given themselves a break from that author or that genre. (I also have a problem not judging readers for handing out one star reviews for a book because ‘it just wasn’t my cup of tea”.)

    Reply
  242. I have to agree with all of the recommendations here; all wonderful, all well-loved. But I wish that somehow we could get readers in general to recognize the jaded phenomenon in themselves. It is so annoying to be picking through reviews of books to find the good ones and be seeing one star reviews of really good authors because the reader thinks the author and/or series isn’t worth their time when it is quite often just that they haven’t given themselves a break from that author or that genre. (I also have a problem not judging readers for handing out one star reviews for a book because ‘it just wasn’t my cup of tea”.)

    Reply
  243. I have to agree with all of the recommendations here; all wonderful, all well-loved. But I wish that somehow we could get readers in general to recognize the jaded phenomenon in themselves. It is so annoying to be picking through reviews of books to find the good ones and be seeing one star reviews of really good authors because the reader thinks the author and/or series isn’t worth their time when it is quite often just that they haven’t given themselves a break from that author or that genre. (I also have a problem not judging readers for handing out one star reviews for a book because ‘it just wasn’t my cup of tea”.)

    Reply
  244. I have to agree with all of the recommendations here; all wonderful, all well-loved. But I wish that somehow we could get readers in general to recognize the jaded phenomenon in themselves. It is so annoying to be picking through reviews of books to find the good ones and be seeing one star reviews of really good authors because the reader thinks the author and/or series isn’t worth their time when it is quite often just that they haven’t given themselves a break from that author or that genre. (I also have a problem not judging readers for handing out one star reviews for a book because ‘it just wasn’t my cup of tea”.)

    Reply
  245. I have to agree with all of the recommendations here; all wonderful, all well-loved. But I wish that somehow we could get readers in general to recognize the jaded phenomenon in themselves. It is so annoying to be picking through reviews of books to find the good ones and be seeing one star reviews of really good authors because the reader thinks the author and/or series isn’t worth their time when it is quite often just that they haven’t given themselves a break from that author or that genre. (I also have a problem not judging readers for handing out one star reviews for a book because ‘it just wasn’t my cup of tea”.)

    Reply
  246. Hope, I think that's very true. I did refer to that phenomenon briefly, but I was really talking about reviewers, who often don't get a choice in what they read, and have to read and review a lot, so don't get a chance to refresh their palate. But you're right about a number of readers, too. If a book's not my cup of tea, I will put it aside or give it away, but I would never trash it. But some readers feel the need to put every little thought down where the world can read it. So I take all reviews with a grain of salt, and I don't let them influence my buying choice. Thanks for your comment.

    Reply
  247. Hope, I think that's very true. I did refer to that phenomenon briefly, but I was really talking about reviewers, who often don't get a choice in what they read, and have to read and review a lot, so don't get a chance to refresh their palate. But you're right about a number of readers, too. If a book's not my cup of tea, I will put it aside or give it away, but I would never trash it. But some readers feel the need to put every little thought down where the world can read it. So I take all reviews with a grain of salt, and I don't let them influence my buying choice. Thanks for your comment.

    Reply
  248. Hope, I think that's very true. I did refer to that phenomenon briefly, but I was really talking about reviewers, who often don't get a choice in what they read, and have to read and review a lot, so don't get a chance to refresh their palate. But you're right about a number of readers, too. If a book's not my cup of tea, I will put it aside or give it away, but I would never trash it. But some readers feel the need to put every little thought down where the world can read it. So I take all reviews with a grain of salt, and I don't let them influence my buying choice. Thanks for your comment.

    Reply
  249. Hope, I think that's very true. I did refer to that phenomenon briefly, but I was really talking about reviewers, who often don't get a choice in what they read, and have to read and review a lot, so don't get a chance to refresh their palate. But you're right about a number of readers, too. If a book's not my cup of tea, I will put it aside or give it away, but I would never trash it. But some readers feel the need to put every little thought down where the world can read it. So I take all reviews with a grain of salt, and I don't let them influence my buying choice. Thanks for your comment.

    Reply
  250. Hope, I think that's very true. I did refer to that phenomenon briefly, but I was really talking about reviewers, who often don't get a choice in what they read, and have to read and review a lot, so don't get a chance to refresh their palate. But you're right about a number of readers, too. If a book's not my cup of tea, I will put it aside or give it away, but I would never trash it. But some readers feel the need to put every little thought down where the world can read it. So I take all reviews with a grain of salt, and I don't let them influence my buying choice. Thanks for your comment.

    Reply
  251. Thanks for those recommendations, Sue — I’ve recently started reading Madeleine L’Engle too. And wouldn’t it be lovely if Mary Balogh was a word wench? She is an honorary Word Wench, though, which is nearly as good. 🙂

    Reply
  252. Thanks for those recommendations, Sue — I’ve recently started reading Madeleine L’Engle too. And wouldn’t it be lovely if Mary Balogh was a word wench? She is an honorary Word Wench, though, which is nearly as good. 🙂

    Reply
  253. Thanks for those recommendations, Sue — I’ve recently started reading Madeleine L’Engle too. And wouldn’t it be lovely if Mary Balogh was a word wench? She is an honorary Word Wench, though, which is nearly as good. 🙂

    Reply
  254. Thanks for those recommendations, Sue — I’ve recently started reading Madeleine L’Engle too. And wouldn’t it be lovely if Mary Balogh was a word wench? She is an honorary Word Wench, though, which is nearly as good. 🙂

    Reply
  255. Thanks for those recommendations, Sue — I’ve recently started reading Madeleine L’Engle too. And wouldn’t it be lovely if Mary Balogh was a word wench? She is an honorary Word Wench, though, which is nearly as good. 🙂

    Reply

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