It’s Boxing Day!

XmasChlo_1
Anne here with reindog… sending all you wintering souls some sunshine from downunder.

The presents are all opened, the heavy Christmas dinner slept off and in the UK , Canada, New Zealand and Australia, it's a public holiday called Boxing Day. It's not anything to do with the pugilistic arts; it's an old tradition of gift-giving from the rich to the poor or dependent. There are many variants of the tradition. In most British churches, an alms box was kept, to which people contributed. It  was opened the day after Christmas and the money divided between the poor. The 26th is also St Stephen's Day, when Good King Wenceslas gave the poor man meat, wine and wood. In England, the rich gave the servants who had worked on Christmas Day a holiday the next day and leftover food from the feast in a box. It's the origin of the Christmas bonus and the custom of leaving out out small gifts for those who deliver to our homes — the paperboy, the postman, the milkman.Hunting

Boxing Day in England is also traditionally the day for the Boxing Day hunt. Here in Australia, we continue the tradition, only without horses, hounds or foxes. It's the noble sport of Bargain Hunting! Most of the big stores have massive sales on Boxing Day – the shops will open at 7 am or sometimes earlier and there will be a huge feeding frenzy as shoppers go wild over bargains.
    For those not interested in shopping, there is cricket. Most north Americans don't understand cricket and don't see the appeal. It's a seemingly slow sport and a match will take all day, with Test Matches (international ones) playing out over three long, generally hot days, but the game ignites powerful passions in such diverse countries as India, Pakistan, the West Indies, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and, of course, the UK. It's one legacy of colonization that wasn't discarded, and these days it's stronger than ever. There's a wonderful reggae song with a chorus that goes, "I don't like cricket, oh, no… I love it!
    Cricket is a passion with many Australian, and the tradition of going to the Boxing Day match in Melbourne, at the MCG (Melbourne Cricket Ground) is long and beloved here. In many families the men go to the cricket while the women hit the shops.
Beach cricket
    And for those who don't do either, there's beach or backyard cricket. All it takes is a bat, a ball — a tennis ball will do — and a rubbish bin or three sticks that will act as the wicket. The bowler aims to get the batter out by bowling the ball and hitting the wicket or forcing the batter to hit a catch, the batting side makes as many runs as possible. 100 runs (known as a century or a ton) is a score any batsman is proud of. There's a song celebrating backyard cricket called "I made a hundred in the back yard at Mum's." Beach cricket was a big feature of my childhood, and this picture by Australian writer illustrator Elizabeth Honey sums it all up perfectly for me.Sh01
    Another big Boxing Day event downunder is the start of the Sydney to Hobart yacht race, a major international ocean-going race that  covers 630 nautical miles (1,170 km) often in very dangerous conditions. Watching the international fleet of competitors sailing out of Sydney harbour accompanied by hundreds of smaller crafts is a stunning sight.


    Whatever you're doing today, whether it's shopping, playing  sport or watching it on TV — or simply curling up with a good book, have a wonderful Boxing Day.

    What do you usually do on 26 December?

70 thoughts on “It’s Boxing Day!”

  1. Really enjoyed the article. The Boxing Day explanations I had been given in the past were vague and imprecise so this was a revelation. As far as what we are doing for Boxing Day, well, this year we will be traveling into Northern Virginia to visit Ft. Myers located in Arlington. Horses still have a place in the military even if its only ceremonial these days and we’re going to the stables to visit the horses there.

    Reply
  2. Really enjoyed the article. The Boxing Day explanations I had been given in the past were vague and imprecise so this was a revelation. As far as what we are doing for Boxing Day, well, this year we will be traveling into Northern Virginia to visit Ft. Myers located in Arlington. Horses still have a place in the military even if its only ceremonial these days and we’re going to the stables to visit the horses there.

    Reply
  3. Really enjoyed the article. The Boxing Day explanations I had been given in the past were vague and imprecise so this was a revelation. As far as what we are doing for Boxing Day, well, this year we will be traveling into Northern Virginia to visit Ft. Myers located in Arlington. Horses still have a place in the military even if its only ceremonial these days and we’re going to the stables to visit the horses there.

    Reply
  4. Really enjoyed the article. The Boxing Day explanations I had been given in the past were vague and imprecise so this was a revelation. As far as what we are doing for Boxing Day, well, this year we will be traveling into Northern Virginia to visit Ft. Myers located in Arlington. Horses still have a place in the military even if its only ceremonial these days and we’re going to the stables to visit the horses there.

    Reply
  5. Really enjoyed the article. The Boxing Day explanations I had been given in the past were vague and imprecise so this was a revelation. As far as what we are doing for Boxing Day, well, this year we will be traveling into Northern Virginia to visit Ft. Myers located in Arlington. Horses still have a place in the military even if its only ceremonial these days and we’re going to the stables to visit the horses there.

    Reply
  6. Anne, for the first time in a long time I spent the entire day on the couch watching the cricket on TV. The men in my house aren’t cricket fans but I love it and I’d worked so hard up till Christmas, I felt I’d deserved a total “bludge”. (Sorry, that’s Oz-speak for doing nothing.)I had a lovely day.
    Feel ready to face the world and writing again now.

    Reply
  7. Anne, for the first time in a long time I spent the entire day on the couch watching the cricket on TV. The men in my house aren’t cricket fans but I love it and I’d worked so hard up till Christmas, I felt I’d deserved a total “bludge”. (Sorry, that’s Oz-speak for doing nothing.)I had a lovely day.
    Feel ready to face the world and writing again now.

    Reply
  8. Anne, for the first time in a long time I spent the entire day on the couch watching the cricket on TV. The men in my house aren’t cricket fans but I love it and I’d worked so hard up till Christmas, I felt I’d deserved a total “bludge”. (Sorry, that’s Oz-speak for doing nothing.)I had a lovely day.
    Feel ready to face the world and writing again now.

    Reply
  9. Anne, for the first time in a long time I spent the entire day on the couch watching the cricket on TV. The men in my house aren’t cricket fans but I love it and I’d worked so hard up till Christmas, I felt I’d deserved a total “bludge”. (Sorry, that’s Oz-speak for doing nothing.)I had a lovely day.
    Feel ready to face the world and writing again now.

    Reply
  10. Anne, for the first time in a long time I spent the entire day on the couch watching the cricket on TV. The men in my house aren’t cricket fans but I love it and I’d worked so hard up till Christmas, I felt I’d deserved a total “bludge”. (Sorry, that’s Oz-speak for doing nothing.)I had a lovely day.
    Feel ready to face the world and writing again now.

    Reply
  11. Robin, visiting the horses at Arlington sounds like a lovely thing to do. I love it that the horses are kept on for ceremonial purposes. Carlton United, a very old Australian beer brewing company, still maintains a couple of their old-fashioned horse teams and wagons for special events, and to see a team of huge, gentle Clydesdales with big, shaggy feet, pulling their wagon through a crowded street is a heartwarming sight. There’s a pic of them here.
    http://flickr.com/photos/hopkinsii/288309237/
    My local police force still maintains a mounted section. They’re used for crowd control at demonstrations or large gatherings, as well as for ceremonial occasions. Here’s a pic:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Victoria_Police,_Mounted.JPG

    Reply
  12. Robin, visiting the horses at Arlington sounds like a lovely thing to do. I love it that the horses are kept on for ceremonial purposes. Carlton United, a very old Australian beer brewing company, still maintains a couple of their old-fashioned horse teams and wagons for special events, and to see a team of huge, gentle Clydesdales with big, shaggy feet, pulling their wagon through a crowded street is a heartwarming sight. There’s a pic of them here.
    http://flickr.com/photos/hopkinsii/288309237/
    My local police force still maintains a mounted section. They’re used for crowd control at demonstrations or large gatherings, as well as for ceremonial occasions. Here’s a pic:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Victoria_Police,_Mounted.JPG

    Reply
  13. Robin, visiting the horses at Arlington sounds like a lovely thing to do. I love it that the horses are kept on for ceremonial purposes. Carlton United, a very old Australian beer brewing company, still maintains a couple of their old-fashioned horse teams and wagons for special events, and to see a team of huge, gentle Clydesdales with big, shaggy feet, pulling their wagon through a crowded street is a heartwarming sight. There’s a pic of them here.
    http://flickr.com/photos/hopkinsii/288309237/
    My local police force still maintains a mounted section. They’re used for crowd control at demonstrations or large gatherings, as well as for ceremonial occasions. Here’s a pic:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Victoria_Police,_Mounted.JPG

    Reply
  14. Robin, visiting the horses at Arlington sounds like a lovely thing to do. I love it that the horses are kept on for ceremonial purposes. Carlton United, a very old Australian beer brewing company, still maintains a couple of their old-fashioned horse teams and wagons for special events, and to see a team of huge, gentle Clydesdales with big, shaggy feet, pulling their wagon through a crowded street is a heartwarming sight. There’s a pic of them here.
    http://flickr.com/photos/hopkinsii/288309237/
    My local police force still maintains a mounted section. They’re used for crowd control at demonstrations or large gatherings, as well as for ceremonial occasions. Here’s a pic:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Victoria_Police,_Mounted.JPG

    Reply
  15. Robin, visiting the horses at Arlington sounds like a lovely thing to do. I love it that the horses are kept on for ceremonial purposes. Carlton United, a very old Australian beer brewing company, still maintains a couple of their old-fashioned horse teams and wagons for special events, and to see a team of huge, gentle Clydesdales with big, shaggy feet, pulling their wagon through a crowded street is a heartwarming sight. There’s a pic of them here.
    http://flickr.com/photos/hopkinsii/288309237/
    My local police force still maintains a mounted section. They’re used for crowd control at demonstrations or large gatherings, as well as for ceremonial occasions. Here’s a pic:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Victoria_Police,_Mounted.JPG

    Reply
  16. There is certainly something about Clydesdales! Like your Carlton company, the Budweiser beer company maintains several teams and wagons that they send around for special events. The Clydesdales are just insanely patient. According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budweiser_Clydesdales ), the horses live in an historic brick and stained glass stable built in 1885–nice work if you can get it!
    As for Boxing Day Aussie style–I’ll take the horses or the sailboats over the cricket. When I lived in England, our apartment overlooked the cricket pitch of a public park. As nearly as I could tell, nothing ever happened. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  17. There is certainly something about Clydesdales! Like your Carlton company, the Budweiser beer company maintains several teams and wagons that they send around for special events. The Clydesdales are just insanely patient. According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budweiser_Clydesdales ), the horses live in an historic brick and stained glass stable built in 1885–nice work if you can get it!
    As for Boxing Day Aussie style–I’ll take the horses or the sailboats over the cricket. When I lived in England, our apartment overlooked the cricket pitch of a public park. As nearly as I could tell, nothing ever happened. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  18. There is certainly something about Clydesdales! Like your Carlton company, the Budweiser beer company maintains several teams and wagons that they send around for special events. The Clydesdales are just insanely patient. According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budweiser_Clydesdales ), the horses live in an historic brick and stained glass stable built in 1885–nice work if you can get it!
    As for Boxing Day Aussie style–I’ll take the horses or the sailboats over the cricket. When I lived in England, our apartment overlooked the cricket pitch of a public park. As nearly as I could tell, nothing ever happened. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  19. There is certainly something about Clydesdales! Like your Carlton company, the Budweiser beer company maintains several teams and wagons that they send around for special events. The Clydesdales are just insanely patient. According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budweiser_Clydesdales ), the horses live in an historic brick and stained glass stable built in 1885–nice work if you can get it!
    As for Boxing Day Aussie style–I’ll take the horses or the sailboats over the cricket. When I lived in England, our apartment overlooked the cricket pitch of a public park. As nearly as I could tell, nothing ever happened. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  20. There is certainly something about Clydesdales! Like your Carlton company, the Budweiser beer company maintains several teams and wagons that they send around for special events. The Clydesdales are just insanely patient. According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budweiser_Clydesdales ), the horses live in an historic brick and stained glass stable built in 1885–nice work if you can get it!
    As for Boxing Day Aussie style–I’ll take the horses or the sailboats over the cricket. When I lived in England, our apartment overlooked the cricket pitch of a public park. As nearly as I could tell, nothing ever happened. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  21. ” As nearly as I could tell, nothing ever happened. :)”
    Mary Jo, that’s probably sacrilege. It’s a perfect way to pass an afternoon siting in the sun, drinking beer… and discussing strategy. When it gets really slow the spectators chant stuff, often very funny.
    My Dad was cricket obsessed — he played competitively for years and in later years watched and listened to every match he could. The long summer cross country trips of my childhood were always accompanied by cricket on the radio. (I fell in love with the West Indian commentators.) And anytime we passed a cricket match, the car would slow to a crawl while my mother repeated, “Jack, watch the road!” with no expectation of being listened to until the ball was played. It’s an addiction.
    The only time I’ve ever been interested in cricket was many moons ago when some friends of mine formed a team in a local competition, and I became their regular scorekeeper. I had to watch everything then. Before that I used to take a book to the cricket. Also sacrilege 😉
    I just watched a wonderful movie called “Slumdog Millionaire” set in India, where the little slum kids were playing cricket on the runway of the airport, and being chased off. Cricket came up at least 4 or 5 times in the movie.

    Reply
  22. ” As nearly as I could tell, nothing ever happened. :)”
    Mary Jo, that’s probably sacrilege. It’s a perfect way to pass an afternoon siting in the sun, drinking beer… and discussing strategy. When it gets really slow the spectators chant stuff, often very funny.
    My Dad was cricket obsessed — he played competitively for years and in later years watched and listened to every match he could. The long summer cross country trips of my childhood were always accompanied by cricket on the radio. (I fell in love with the West Indian commentators.) And anytime we passed a cricket match, the car would slow to a crawl while my mother repeated, “Jack, watch the road!” with no expectation of being listened to until the ball was played. It’s an addiction.
    The only time I’ve ever been interested in cricket was many moons ago when some friends of mine formed a team in a local competition, and I became their regular scorekeeper. I had to watch everything then. Before that I used to take a book to the cricket. Also sacrilege 😉
    I just watched a wonderful movie called “Slumdog Millionaire” set in India, where the little slum kids were playing cricket on the runway of the airport, and being chased off. Cricket came up at least 4 or 5 times in the movie.

    Reply
  23. ” As nearly as I could tell, nothing ever happened. :)”
    Mary Jo, that’s probably sacrilege. It’s a perfect way to pass an afternoon siting in the sun, drinking beer… and discussing strategy. When it gets really slow the spectators chant stuff, often very funny.
    My Dad was cricket obsessed — he played competitively for years and in later years watched and listened to every match he could. The long summer cross country trips of my childhood were always accompanied by cricket on the radio. (I fell in love with the West Indian commentators.) And anytime we passed a cricket match, the car would slow to a crawl while my mother repeated, “Jack, watch the road!” with no expectation of being listened to until the ball was played. It’s an addiction.
    The only time I’ve ever been interested in cricket was many moons ago when some friends of mine formed a team in a local competition, and I became their regular scorekeeper. I had to watch everything then. Before that I used to take a book to the cricket. Also sacrilege 😉
    I just watched a wonderful movie called “Slumdog Millionaire” set in India, where the little slum kids were playing cricket on the runway of the airport, and being chased off. Cricket came up at least 4 or 5 times in the movie.

    Reply
  24. ” As nearly as I could tell, nothing ever happened. :)”
    Mary Jo, that’s probably sacrilege. It’s a perfect way to pass an afternoon siting in the sun, drinking beer… and discussing strategy. When it gets really slow the spectators chant stuff, often very funny.
    My Dad was cricket obsessed — he played competitively for years and in later years watched and listened to every match he could. The long summer cross country trips of my childhood were always accompanied by cricket on the radio. (I fell in love with the West Indian commentators.) And anytime we passed a cricket match, the car would slow to a crawl while my mother repeated, “Jack, watch the road!” with no expectation of being listened to until the ball was played. It’s an addiction.
    The only time I’ve ever been interested in cricket was many moons ago when some friends of mine formed a team in a local competition, and I became their regular scorekeeper. I had to watch everything then. Before that I used to take a book to the cricket. Also sacrilege 😉
    I just watched a wonderful movie called “Slumdog Millionaire” set in India, where the little slum kids were playing cricket on the runway of the airport, and being chased off. Cricket came up at least 4 or 5 times in the movie.

    Reply
  25. ” As nearly as I could tell, nothing ever happened. :)”
    Mary Jo, that’s probably sacrilege. It’s a perfect way to pass an afternoon siting in the sun, drinking beer… and discussing strategy. When it gets really slow the spectators chant stuff, often very funny.
    My Dad was cricket obsessed — he played competitively for years and in later years watched and listened to every match he could. The long summer cross country trips of my childhood were always accompanied by cricket on the radio. (I fell in love with the West Indian commentators.) And anytime we passed a cricket match, the car would slow to a crawl while my mother repeated, “Jack, watch the road!” with no expectation of being listened to until the ball was played. It’s an addiction.
    The only time I’ve ever been interested in cricket was many moons ago when some friends of mine formed a team in a local competition, and I became their regular scorekeeper. I had to watch everything then. Before that I used to take a book to the cricket. Also sacrilege 😉
    I just watched a wonderful movie called “Slumdog Millionaire” set in India, where the little slum kids were playing cricket on the runway of the airport, and being chased off. Cricket came up at least 4 or 5 times in the movie.

    Reply
  26. Great explanation of Boxing Day, Anne. Well for us it is my brother’s birthday, so usually someone stops by and since everyone’s in a lazy mood, it’s usually a barbie or devouring the greek sweets my mum has made. Yum. We’re not fans of cricket *duck* so if the tv is on, it’s usually to a movie or some or other documentary on the Discovery channels.

    Reply
  27. Great explanation of Boxing Day, Anne. Well for us it is my brother’s birthday, so usually someone stops by and since everyone’s in a lazy mood, it’s usually a barbie or devouring the greek sweets my mum has made. Yum. We’re not fans of cricket *duck* so if the tv is on, it’s usually to a movie or some or other documentary on the Discovery channels.

    Reply
  28. Great explanation of Boxing Day, Anne. Well for us it is my brother’s birthday, so usually someone stops by and since everyone’s in a lazy mood, it’s usually a barbie or devouring the greek sweets my mum has made. Yum. We’re not fans of cricket *duck* so if the tv is on, it’s usually to a movie or some or other documentary on the Discovery channels.

    Reply
  29. Great explanation of Boxing Day, Anne. Well for us it is my brother’s birthday, so usually someone stops by and since everyone’s in a lazy mood, it’s usually a barbie or devouring the greek sweets my mum has made. Yum. We’re not fans of cricket *duck* so if the tv is on, it’s usually to a movie or some or other documentary on the Discovery channels.

    Reply
  30. Great explanation of Boxing Day, Anne. Well for us it is my brother’s birthday, so usually someone stops by and since everyone’s in a lazy mood, it’s usually a barbie or devouring the greek sweets my mum has made. Yum. We’re not fans of cricket *duck* so if the tv is on, it’s usually to a movie or some or other documentary on the Discovery channels.

    Reply
  31. Eleni, I don’t watch cricket either, so there’s no need to duck unless someone is throwing something else at you 😉
    Hope your brother had a great day.
    Your mum’s Greek sweets sound yum.

    Reply
  32. Eleni, I don’t watch cricket either, so there’s no need to duck unless someone is throwing something else at you 😉
    Hope your brother had a great day.
    Your mum’s Greek sweets sound yum.

    Reply
  33. Eleni, I don’t watch cricket either, so there’s no need to duck unless someone is throwing something else at you 😉
    Hope your brother had a great day.
    Your mum’s Greek sweets sound yum.

    Reply
  34. Eleni, I don’t watch cricket either, so there’s no need to duck unless someone is throwing something else at you 😉
    Hope your brother had a great day.
    Your mum’s Greek sweets sound yum.

    Reply
  35. Eleni, I don’t watch cricket either, so there’s no need to duck unless someone is throwing something else at you 😉
    Hope your brother had a great day.
    Your mum’s Greek sweets sound yum.

    Reply
  36. I know nothing about cricket, but I belong to a football-mad family. Much holiday conversation revolves around the bowl games–the ones that have been played, are being played, and will be played within the next week–and what’s wrong or right with who got the bids and why the right or wrong team will probably end up as national champions. So I can understand sports as part of Christmas traditions. 🙂

    Reply
  37. I know nothing about cricket, but I belong to a football-mad family. Much holiday conversation revolves around the bowl games–the ones that have been played, are being played, and will be played within the next week–and what’s wrong or right with who got the bids and why the right or wrong team will probably end up as national champions. So I can understand sports as part of Christmas traditions. 🙂

    Reply
  38. I know nothing about cricket, but I belong to a football-mad family. Much holiday conversation revolves around the bowl games–the ones that have been played, are being played, and will be played within the next week–and what’s wrong or right with who got the bids and why the right or wrong team will probably end up as national champions. So I can understand sports as part of Christmas traditions. 🙂

    Reply
  39. I know nothing about cricket, but I belong to a football-mad family. Much holiday conversation revolves around the bowl games–the ones that have been played, are being played, and will be played within the next week–and what’s wrong or right with who got the bids and why the right or wrong team will probably end up as national champions. So I can understand sports as part of Christmas traditions. 🙂

    Reply
  40. I know nothing about cricket, but I belong to a football-mad family. Much holiday conversation revolves around the bowl games–the ones that have been played, are being played, and will be played within the next week–and what’s wrong or right with who got the bids and why the right or wrong team will probably end up as national champions. So I can understand sports as part of Christmas traditions. 🙂

    Reply
  41. Love your take on how we’ve changed the hunt to a bargain hunt. lol.
    We do a second christmas with the other side of the family on Boxing Day. BBQ and more presents. So by the day after Boxing Day, I’m ready to fall in a mangled heap. This Boxing Day I made Anne’s Impossible Pie for everyone. It was yum!

    Reply
  42. Love your take on how we’ve changed the hunt to a bargain hunt. lol.
    We do a second christmas with the other side of the family on Boxing Day. BBQ and more presents. So by the day after Boxing Day, I’m ready to fall in a mangled heap. This Boxing Day I made Anne’s Impossible Pie for everyone. It was yum!

    Reply
  43. Love your take on how we’ve changed the hunt to a bargain hunt. lol.
    We do a second christmas with the other side of the family on Boxing Day. BBQ and more presents. So by the day after Boxing Day, I’m ready to fall in a mangled heap. This Boxing Day I made Anne’s Impossible Pie for everyone. It was yum!

    Reply
  44. Love your take on how we’ve changed the hunt to a bargain hunt. lol.
    We do a second christmas with the other side of the family on Boxing Day. BBQ and more presents. So by the day after Boxing Day, I’m ready to fall in a mangled heap. This Boxing Day I made Anne’s Impossible Pie for everyone. It was yum!

    Reply
  45. Love your take on how we’ve changed the hunt to a bargain hunt. lol.
    We do a second christmas with the other side of the family on Boxing Day. BBQ and more presents. So by the day after Boxing Day, I’m ready to fall in a mangled heap. This Boxing Day I made Anne’s Impossible Pie for everyone. It was yum!

    Reply
  46. Janga, I must say I like the way sport crosses cultures and generations. In his last years Dad was a bit too shaky to play sport, but he happily sat and watched the cricket, and every male in the family, and quite a few females joined him to watch, and he didn’t feel left out in the slightest.
    Robyn, it’s a good idea to split Christmas over Boxing Day as well. So many people try to have two Christmases on the one day and it’s stressful – not least in trying to do justice to two Christmas dinners. LOL.
    I’m glad you enjoyed the pie. For anyone who’s interested, it’s a coconut cream caramel variation on “impossible pie.” Impossible, not because it’s difficult — it’s actually dead easy — but because the pie crust forms in the cooking. The recipe is here:
    http://tinyurl.com/9waldb

    Reply
  47. Janga, I must say I like the way sport crosses cultures and generations. In his last years Dad was a bit too shaky to play sport, but he happily sat and watched the cricket, and every male in the family, and quite a few females joined him to watch, and he didn’t feel left out in the slightest.
    Robyn, it’s a good idea to split Christmas over Boxing Day as well. So many people try to have two Christmases on the one day and it’s stressful – not least in trying to do justice to two Christmas dinners. LOL.
    I’m glad you enjoyed the pie. For anyone who’s interested, it’s a coconut cream caramel variation on “impossible pie.” Impossible, not because it’s difficult — it’s actually dead easy — but because the pie crust forms in the cooking. The recipe is here:
    http://tinyurl.com/9waldb

    Reply
  48. Janga, I must say I like the way sport crosses cultures and generations. In his last years Dad was a bit too shaky to play sport, but he happily sat and watched the cricket, and every male in the family, and quite a few females joined him to watch, and he didn’t feel left out in the slightest.
    Robyn, it’s a good idea to split Christmas over Boxing Day as well. So many people try to have two Christmases on the one day and it’s stressful – not least in trying to do justice to two Christmas dinners. LOL.
    I’m glad you enjoyed the pie. For anyone who’s interested, it’s a coconut cream caramel variation on “impossible pie.” Impossible, not because it’s difficult — it’s actually dead easy — but because the pie crust forms in the cooking. The recipe is here:
    http://tinyurl.com/9waldb

    Reply
  49. Janga, I must say I like the way sport crosses cultures and generations. In his last years Dad was a bit too shaky to play sport, but he happily sat and watched the cricket, and every male in the family, and quite a few females joined him to watch, and he didn’t feel left out in the slightest.
    Robyn, it’s a good idea to split Christmas over Boxing Day as well. So many people try to have two Christmases on the one day and it’s stressful – not least in trying to do justice to two Christmas dinners. LOL.
    I’m glad you enjoyed the pie. For anyone who’s interested, it’s a coconut cream caramel variation on “impossible pie.” Impossible, not because it’s difficult — it’s actually dead easy — but because the pie crust forms in the cooking. The recipe is here:
    http://tinyurl.com/9waldb

    Reply
  50. Janga, I must say I like the way sport crosses cultures and generations. In his last years Dad was a bit too shaky to play sport, but he happily sat and watched the cricket, and every male in the family, and quite a few females joined him to watch, and he didn’t feel left out in the slightest.
    Robyn, it’s a good idea to split Christmas over Boxing Day as well. So many people try to have two Christmases on the one day and it’s stressful – not least in trying to do justice to two Christmas dinners. LOL.
    I’m glad you enjoyed the pie. For anyone who’s interested, it’s a coconut cream caramel variation on “impossible pie.” Impossible, not because it’s difficult — it’s actually dead easy — but because the pie crust forms in the cooking. The recipe is here:
    http://tinyurl.com/9waldb

    Reply
  51. What a wonderful post! Thanks for the glimpses into Christmas in your world, and especially for the photo of Sydney Harbor.
    I have a soft spot for cricket thanks to a One of the Best Days Ever, when my partner took me to a cricket match in a local park and spread an English picnic out for us to eat beneath an umbrella while it rained and rained. I don’t get it, mind, but I still think it’s wonderful

    Reply
  52. What a wonderful post! Thanks for the glimpses into Christmas in your world, and especially for the photo of Sydney Harbor.
    I have a soft spot for cricket thanks to a One of the Best Days Ever, when my partner took me to a cricket match in a local park and spread an English picnic out for us to eat beneath an umbrella while it rained and rained. I don’t get it, mind, but I still think it’s wonderful

    Reply
  53. What a wonderful post! Thanks for the glimpses into Christmas in your world, and especially for the photo of Sydney Harbor.
    I have a soft spot for cricket thanks to a One of the Best Days Ever, when my partner took me to a cricket match in a local park and spread an English picnic out for us to eat beneath an umbrella while it rained and rained. I don’t get it, mind, but I still think it’s wonderful

    Reply
  54. What a wonderful post! Thanks for the glimpses into Christmas in your world, and especially for the photo of Sydney Harbor.
    I have a soft spot for cricket thanks to a One of the Best Days Ever, when my partner took me to a cricket match in a local park and spread an English picnic out for us to eat beneath an umbrella while it rained and rained. I don’t get it, mind, but I still think it’s wonderful

    Reply
  55. What a wonderful post! Thanks for the glimpses into Christmas in your world, and especially for the photo of Sydney Harbor.
    I have a soft spot for cricket thanks to a One of the Best Days Ever, when my partner took me to a cricket match in a local park and spread an English picnic out for us to eat beneath an umbrella while it rained and rained. I don’t get it, mind, but I still think it’s wonderful

    Reply

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