Is Costume Drama Coming Back into Fashion?

HatNicola here. Today I’m talking about costume dramas old and new. It seems to me that after a long period with very little historical drama on TV and even less on film, there has been a revival of interest in the genre, at least from some television companies. Hurrah! It’s been a long time coming but to me the new historical series are very welcome and of course they bring with them a modern spin on an old genre.

I have such happy memories of the UK costume dramas of the 1970 and 80s. The Smuggler epic Forsyte Saga had been running for a while when I became old enough to watch “grown up” TV and Upstairs Downstairs was also a feature of our Sunday Night viewing. The ultimate historical drama for me though was Poldark. Based on the novels of Winston Graham, it was for me the epitome of everything that a historical romance should be: the handsome hero, the feisty heroine, the wicked cousin, some smuggling thrown in and lots of passion and angst and intrigue. In those days I didn’t even notice the wobbling film sets and the terrible special effects. It was all about the characters and the story. This was the era of plentiful historical drama. There was Dick Turpin, based on the exploits of the legendary highwayman, and Smuggler, with Oliver
Tobias as a naval officer turned…well, smuggler. There was Arthur of the Britons (Oliver Tobias again, as a young King Arthur) and Robin Hood with Michael Praed, and many more.


Like everything, tastes in TV go in and out of fashion and people have suggested that the wave of historical dramas in the 70s and 80s grew out of a nostalgia for the past caused by the uncertain state of the world, with energy and financial crises, war and terrorism. You could draw a parallel here with the past decade but this time it seems we turned to Sci-fi and vampires and zombies rather than the comfort of the past.

From the late 1980s through the 90s and Noughties there was little that was more unfashionable in the UK than a historical drama. You had to go a long way to find a good one. The films and TV programmes that were made were generally based on classic books by authors such as the Brontes or Jane Austen. That’s still the case, of course. Most historical drama still seems to be adaptations of classics, although Philippa Gregory has had had her books dramatised with The Other Boleyn Girl and The White Queen. New series such as The Tudors and The Borgias set new standards for sex and violence plus the use of modern language for a modern audience. The female roles are noticeably stronger than in the past.

Downton AbbeyPerhaps it is the success of Downton Abbey more than anything else that has given impetus to the revival of historical drama. It’s been so hugely popular on both sides of the Atlantic that it has surely helped the trend towards more period drama.

The announcement that Poldark is to be remade caused a huge flurry of excitement. Filming starts this Poldark month with Aidan Turner taking the role of Ross Poldark and Eleanor Tomlinson as Demelza. Meanwhile Sunday nights on the BBC have been enlivened by The Musketeers, described as “a thrilling world of action, adventure and romance inspired by Dumas’ legendary characters.” And that’s not all – next week the BBC
launches yet another historical drama, Jamaica Inn, based on another
classic novel of smuggling and wrecking in the 18th century, this time by Daphne Du Maurier. Meanwhile over on ITV the drama New Worlds is set in 1680s America and England. It seems that the costume drama is back, at least on the small screen!

Three MusketeersI’m curious to know if you’ve seen the same trend towards period drama in the US, Australia and other parts of the world. Has the “Downton Abbey effect” made a difference? Are there any of the old costume dramas you loved and any of the new ones you have enjoyed – or not?

215 thoughts on “Is Costume Drama Coming Back into Fashion?”

  1. I think it is making a come-back Nicola, and hope it is not just wishful thinking on my part! I am currently enjoying re-runs of The Scarlet Pimpernel in the UK (Drama channel). Costumes to die for (certainly they inspire my writing!)
    Long may it continue.

    Reply
  2. I think it is making a come-back Nicola, and hope it is not just wishful thinking on my part! I am currently enjoying re-runs of The Scarlet Pimpernel in the UK (Drama channel). Costumes to die for (certainly they inspire my writing!)
    Long may it continue.

    Reply
  3. I think it is making a come-back Nicola, and hope it is not just wishful thinking on my part! I am currently enjoying re-runs of The Scarlet Pimpernel in the UK (Drama channel). Costumes to die for (certainly they inspire my writing!)
    Long may it continue.

    Reply
  4. I think it is making a come-back Nicola, and hope it is not just wishful thinking on my part! I am currently enjoying re-runs of The Scarlet Pimpernel in the UK (Drama channel). Costumes to die for (certainly they inspire my writing!)
    Long may it continue.

    Reply
  5. I think it is making a come-back Nicola, and hope it is not just wishful thinking on my part! I am currently enjoying re-runs of The Scarlet Pimpernel in the UK (Drama channel). Costumes to die for (certainly they inspire my writing!)
    Long may it continue.

    Reply
  6. Ooh, I loved The Scarlet Pimpernel, Sarah! Another great adventure based on a classic story. I agree about the costumes. If done well all the details of these programmes can have some really useful – and inspiring – details. I’ve certainly been enjoying the weapons and the, ahem, leather in The Musketeers!

    Reply
  7. Ooh, I loved The Scarlet Pimpernel, Sarah! Another great adventure based on a classic story. I agree about the costumes. If done well all the details of these programmes can have some really useful – and inspiring – details. I’ve certainly been enjoying the weapons and the, ahem, leather in The Musketeers!

    Reply
  8. Ooh, I loved The Scarlet Pimpernel, Sarah! Another great adventure based on a classic story. I agree about the costumes. If done well all the details of these programmes can have some really useful – and inspiring – details. I’ve certainly been enjoying the weapons and the, ahem, leather in The Musketeers!

    Reply
  9. Ooh, I loved The Scarlet Pimpernel, Sarah! Another great adventure based on a classic story. I agree about the costumes. If done well all the details of these programmes can have some really useful – and inspiring – details. I’ve certainly been enjoying the weapons and the, ahem, leather in The Musketeers!

    Reply
  10. Ooh, I loved The Scarlet Pimpernel, Sarah! Another great adventure based on a classic story. I agree about the costumes. If done well all the details of these programmes can have some really useful – and inspiring – details. I’ve certainly been enjoying the weapons and the, ahem, leather in The Musketeers!

    Reply
  11. Going back to the old days in the UK – how about The Pallisers? I was a bit young for it (of course!) but I loved it. I have rather vague memories of Poldark, but that’s probably a good thing so that I can enjoy the remake without yearning for the old one.

    Reply
  12. Going back to the old days in the UK – how about The Pallisers? I was a bit young for it (of course!) but I loved it. I have rather vague memories of Poldark, but that’s probably a good thing so that I can enjoy the remake without yearning for the old one.

    Reply
  13. Going back to the old days in the UK – how about The Pallisers? I was a bit young for it (of course!) but I loved it. I have rather vague memories of Poldark, but that’s probably a good thing so that I can enjoy the remake without yearning for the old one.

    Reply
  14. Going back to the old days in the UK – how about The Pallisers? I was a bit young for it (of course!) but I loved it. I have rather vague memories of Poldark, but that’s probably a good thing so that I can enjoy the remake without yearning for the old one.

    Reply
  15. Going back to the old days in the UK – how about The Pallisers? I was a bit young for it (of course!) but I loved it. I have rather vague memories of Poldark, but that’s probably a good thing so that I can enjoy the remake without yearning for the old one.

    Reply
  16. You know, I’ve tried and I’ve tried, but for the life of me I can’t get into Downton Abbey. I love the costumes (my favourite era for fashion) but all the (9000000) characters I either hate or I find very boring!
    My favourite recent period drama was is the 2008 Sense and Sensibility. It’s a little bit anachronistic, but I think it’s the best Jane Austen adaptation. The lead actors are all age-appropriate and are fantastic as their characters.
    I actually hate a lot of the so-called period drama now. That awful Reign show where the 1500s women are wearing modern strapless prom dresses – what’s the point? How about The Tudors with a slim, dark-haired heartthrob playing Henry the Eighth?!
    Maybe not quite so much at the moment, but for most of the history of television, what was on British television was on Australian television. When I moved to London in 2000 I could keep watching all the same shows I did in Australia. I grew up with the ABC and all their British broadcasting.

    Reply
  17. You know, I’ve tried and I’ve tried, but for the life of me I can’t get into Downton Abbey. I love the costumes (my favourite era for fashion) but all the (9000000) characters I either hate or I find very boring!
    My favourite recent period drama was is the 2008 Sense and Sensibility. It’s a little bit anachronistic, but I think it’s the best Jane Austen adaptation. The lead actors are all age-appropriate and are fantastic as their characters.
    I actually hate a lot of the so-called period drama now. That awful Reign show where the 1500s women are wearing modern strapless prom dresses – what’s the point? How about The Tudors with a slim, dark-haired heartthrob playing Henry the Eighth?!
    Maybe not quite so much at the moment, but for most of the history of television, what was on British television was on Australian television. When I moved to London in 2000 I could keep watching all the same shows I did in Australia. I grew up with the ABC and all their British broadcasting.

    Reply
  18. You know, I’ve tried and I’ve tried, but for the life of me I can’t get into Downton Abbey. I love the costumes (my favourite era for fashion) but all the (9000000) characters I either hate or I find very boring!
    My favourite recent period drama was is the 2008 Sense and Sensibility. It’s a little bit anachronistic, but I think it’s the best Jane Austen adaptation. The lead actors are all age-appropriate and are fantastic as their characters.
    I actually hate a lot of the so-called period drama now. That awful Reign show where the 1500s women are wearing modern strapless prom dresses – what’s the point? How about The Tudors with a slim, dark-haired heartthrob playing Henry the Eighth?!
    Maybe not quite so much at the moment, but for most of the history of television, what was on British television was on Australian television. When I moved to London in 2000 I could keep watching all the same shows I did in Australia. I grew up with the ABC and all their British broadcasting.

    Reply
  19. You know, I’ve tried and I’ve tried, but for the life of me I can’t get into Downton Abbey. I love the costumes (my favourite era for fashion) but all the (9000000) characters I either hate or I find very boring!
    My favourite recent period drama was is the 2008 Sense and Sensibility. It’s a little bit anachronistic, but I think it’s the best Jane Austen adaptation. The lead actors are all age-appropriate and are fantastic as their characters.
    I actually hate a lot of the so-called period drama now. That awful Reign show where the 1500s women are wearing modern strapless prom dresses – what’s the point? How about The Tudors with a slim, dark-haired heartthrob playing Henry the Eighth?!
    Maybe not quite so much at the moment, but for most of the history of television, what was on British television was on Australian television. When I moved to London in 2000 I could keep watching all the same shows I did in Australia. I grew up with the ABC and all their British broadcasting.

    Reply
  20. You know, I’ve tried and I’ve tried, but for the life of me I can’t get into Downton Abbey. I love the costumes (my favourite era for fashion) but all the (9000000) characters I either hate or I find very boring!
    My favourite recent period drama was is the 2008 Sense and Sensibility. It’s a little bit anachronistic, but I think it’s the best Jane Austen adaptation. The lead actors are all age-appropriate and are fantastic as their characters.
    I actually hate a lot of the so-called period drama now. That awful Reign show where the 1500s women are wearing modern strapless prom dresses – what’s the point? How about The Tudors with a slim, dark-haired heartthrob playing Henry the Eighth?!
    Maybe not quite so much at the moment, but for most of the history of television, what was on British television was on Australian television. When I moved to London in 2000 I could keep watching all the same shows I did in Australia. I grew up with the ABC and all their British broadcasting.

    Reply
  21. Oh, yes, the Pallisers was another wonderful series. I only have the vaguest memories of it now (so young, of course!) but I was enthralled at the time.
    That’s a good point about remakes, HJ. If you are too fond of the original it makes it very difficult to enjoy a new version unless it is equally as good in a different way. I feel much the same about books that are adapted. Still shudder over the TV version of Frenchman’s Creek!

    Reply
  22. Oh, yes, the Pallisers was another wonderful series. I only have the vaguest memories of it now (so young, of course!) but I was enthralled at the time.
    That’s a good point about remakes, HJ. If you are too fond of the original it makes it very difficult to enjoy a new version unless it is equally as good in a different way. I feel much the same about books that are adapted. Still shudder over the TV version of Frenchman’s Creek!

    Reply
  23. Oh, yes, the Pallisers was another wonderful series. I only have the vaguest memories of it now (so young, of course!) but I was enthralled at the time.
    That’s a good point about remakes, HJ. If you are too fond of the original it makes it very difficult to enjoy a new version unless it is equally as good in a different way. I feel much the same about books that are adapted. Still shudder over the TV version of Frenchman’s Creek!

    Reply
  24. Oh, yes, the Pallisers was another wonderful series. I only have the vaguest memories of it now (so young, of course!) but I was enthralled at the time.
    That’s a good point about remakes, HJ. If you are too fond of the original it makes it very difficult to enjoy a new version unless it is equally as good in a different way. I feel much the same about books that are adapted. Still shudder over the TV version of Frenchman’s Creek!

    Reply
  25. Oh, yes, the Pallisers was another wonderful series. I only have the vaguest memories of it now (so young, of course!) but I was enthralled at the time.
    That’s a good point about remakes, HJ. If you are too fond of the original it makes it very difficult to enjoy a new version unless it is equally as good in a different way. I feel much the same about books that are adapted. Still shudder over the TV version of Frenchman’s Creek!

    Reply
  26. I had to suspend disbelief a great deal to enjoy The Tudors, Sonya. I think it was consciously anachronistic in a lot of places which seems often to be the style now. The Musketeers had a similar approach, especially to the dialogue, which was witty but very modern.
    Fortunately the show with the prom dresses has passed me by!
    There is nothing more disappointing than bad costume drama IMO. But the good stuff is wonderful. That film version of Sense and Sensibility was great.

    Reply
  27. I had to suspend disbelief a great deal to enjoy The Tudors, Sonya. I think it was consciously anachronistic in a lot of places which seems often to be the style now. The Musketeers had a similar approach, especially to the dialogue, which was witty but very modern.
    Fortunately the show with the prom dresses has passed me by!
    There is nothing more disappointing than bad costume drama IMO. But the good stuff is wonderful. That film version of Sense and Sensibility was great.

    Reply
  28. I had to suspend disbelief a great deal to enjoy The Tudors, Sonya. I think it was consciously anachronistic in a lot of places which seems often to be the style now. The Musketeers had a similar approach, especially to the dialogue, which was witty but very modern.
    Fortunately the show with the prom dresses has passed me by!
    There is nothing more disappointing than bad costume drama IMO. But the good stuff is wonderful. That film version of Sense and Sensibility was great.

    Reply
  29. I had to suspend disbelief a great deal to enjoy The Tudors, Sonya. I think it was consciously anachronistic in a lot of places which seems often to be the style now. The Musketeers had a similar approach, especially to the dialogue, which was witty but very modern.
    Fortunately the show with the prom dresses has passed me by!
    There is nothing more disappointing than bad costume drama IMO. But the good stuff is wonderful. That film version of Sense and Sensibility was great.

    Reply
  30. I had to suspend disbelief a great deal to enjoy The Tudors, Sonya. I think it was consciously anachronistic in a lot of places which seems often to be the style now. The Musketeers had a similar approach, especially to the dialogue, which was witty but very modern.
    Fortunately the show with the prom dresses has passed me by!
    There is nothing more disappointing than bad costume drama IMO. But the good stuff is wonderful. That film version of Sense and Sensibility was great.

    Reply
  31. Nicola–
    Your post brings back so many fond memories! I hope you’re right that costume drama is enjoying a revival, because if well done it’s tremendous fun. I enjoyed the first Poldark, but the new Ross looks very authentically smoldery, so I lood forward to it. In the US, Western filled a large part of the costume drama market, though there doesn’t seem to be much of a revival in that area. It’s a form the British do so very, very well.
    And now I’m thinking of the Six Wives of Henry VIII…

    Reply
  32. Nicola–
    Your post brings back so many fond memories! I hope you’re right that costume drama is enjoying a revival, because if well done it’s tremendous fun. I enjoyed the first Poldark, but the new Ross looks very authentically smoldery, so I lood forward to it. In the US, Western filled a large part of the costume drama market, though there doesn’t seem to be much of a revival in that area. It’s a form the British do so very, very well.
    And now I’m thinking of the Six Wives of Henry VIII…

    Reply
  33. Nicola–
    Your post brings back so many fond memories! I hope you’re right that costume drama is enjoying a revival, because if well done it’s tremendous fun. I enjoyed the first Poldark, but the new Ross looks very authentically smoldery, so I lood forward to it. In the US, Western filled a large part of the costume drama market, though there doesn’t seem to be much of a revival in that area. It’s a form the British do so very, very well.
    And now I’m thinking of the Six Wives of Henry VIII…

    Reply
  34. Nicola–
    Your post brings back so many fond memories! I hope you’re right that costume drama is enjoying a revival, because if well done it’s tremendous fun. I enjoyed the first Poldark, but the new Ross looks very authentically smoldery, so I lood forward to it. In the US, Western filled a large part of the costume drama market, though there doesn’t seem to be much of a revival in that area. It’s a form the British do so very, very well.
    And now I’m thinking of the Six Wives of Henry VIII…

    Reply
  35. Nicola–
    Your post brings back so many fond memories! I hope you’re right that costume drama is enjoying a revival, because if well done it’s tremendous fun. I enjoyed the first Poldark, but the new Ross looks very authentically smoldery, so I lood forward to it. In the US, Western filled a large part of the costume drama market, though there doesn’t seem to be much of a revival in that area. It’s a form the British do so very, very well.
    And now I’m thinking of the Six Wives of Henry VIII…

    Reply
  36. I do think they have made a good choice for the new Ross Poldark, Mary Jo. Definitely smouldering! I don’t know if the BBC programme about the Pre-Raphaelites was shown in the US but Aidan Turner played Rossetti in that and did a pretty good job of it!

    Reply
  37. I do think they have made a good choice for the new Ross Poldark, Mary Jo. Definitely smouldering! I don’t know if the BBC programme about the Pre-Raphaelites was shown in the US but Aidan Turner played Rossetti in that and did a pretty good job of it!

    Reply
  38. I do think they have made a good choice for the new Ross Poldark, Mary Jo. Definitely smouldering! I don’t know if the BBC programme about the Pre-Raphaelites was shown in the US but Aidan Turner played Rossetti in that and did a pretty good job of it!

    Reply
  39. I do think they have made a good choice for the new Ross Poldark, Mary Jo. Definitely smouldering! I don’t know if the BBC programme about the Pre-Raphaelites was shown in the US but Aidan Turner played Rossetti in that and did a pretty good job of it!

    Reply
  40. I do think they have made a good choice for the new Ross Poldark, Mary Jo. Definitely smouldering! I don’t know if the BBC programme about the Pre-Raphaelites was shown in the US but Aidan Turner played Rossetti in that and did a pretty good job of it!

    Reply
  41. The new Ross Poldark looks suitably yummy and i did enjoy the Musketeers- or must get beers as my irreverent other half called it ! Though the budget couldn’t have run to too many extras as there always seemed to be a dirth of servants about and it didn’t always tie in with early seventeenth century French History as I remember it.Still it definitely enlivened a Sunday evening !We had Moonfleet on over Christmas as well -smugglers and dastardly deeds on the Dorset coast and long enough since I read the book not to compare .

    Reply
  42. The new Ross Poldark looks suitably yummy and i did enjoy the Musketeers- or must get beers as my irreverent other half called it ! Though the budget couldn’t have run to too many extras as there always seemed to be a dirth of servants about and it didn’t always tie in with early seventeenth century French History as I remember it.Still it definitely enlivened a Sunday evening !We had Moonfleet on over Christmas as well -smugglers and dastardly deeds on the Dorset coast and long enough since I read the book not to compare .

    Reply
  43. The new Ross Poldark looks suitably yummy and i did enjoy the Musketeers- or must get beers as my irreverent other half called it ! Though the budget couldn’t have run to too many extras as there always seemed to be a dirth of servants about and it didn’t always tie in with early seventeenth century French History as I remember it.Still it definitely enlivened a Sunday evening !We had Moonfleet on over Christmas as well -smugglers and dastardly deeds on the Dorset coast and long enough since I read the book not to compare .

    Reply
  44. The new Ross Poldark looks suitably yummy and i did enjoy the Musketeers- or must get beers as my irreverent other half called it ! Though the budget couldn’t have run to too many extras as there always seemed to be a dirth of servants about and it didn’t always tie in with early seventeenth century French History as I remember it.Still it definitely enlivened a Sunday evening !We had Moonfleet on over Christmas as well -smugglers and dastardly deeds on the Dorset coast and long enough since I read the book not to compare .

    Reply
  45. The new Ross Poldark looks suitably yummy and i did enjoy the Musketeers- or must get beers as my irreverent other half called it ! Though the budget couldn’t have run to too many extras as there always seemed to be a dirth of servants about and it didn’t always tie in with early seventeenth century French History as I remember it.Still it definitely enlivened a Sunday evening !We had Moonfleet on over Christmas as well -smugglers and dastardly deeds on the Dorset coast and long enough since I read the book not to compare .

    Reply
  46. *smug smile* I picked Aidan Turner out as suitable for breeches roles a while back and that note – with his picture- still gets lots of hits on my blog. Smoulder + breeches + silk dresses and fans… and leather; costume dramas have all the good ingredients. Of course it needs a good director but the way the leather-clad musketeers have swept all before them shows there is a real place for new versions of historical tales. I can’t wait!!

    Reply
  47. *smug smile* I picked Aidan Turner out as suitable for breeches roles a while back and that note – with his picture- still gets lots of hits on my blog. Smoulder + breeches + silk dresses and fans… and leather; costume dramas have all the good ingredients. Of course it needs a good director but the way the leather-clad musketeers have swept all before them shows there is a real place for new versions of historical tales. I can’t wait!!

    Reply
  48. *smug smile* I picked Aidan Turner out as suitable for breeches roles a while back and that note – with his picture- still gets lots of hits on my blog. Smoulder + breeches + silk dresses and fans… and leather; costume dramas have all the good ingredients. Of course it needs a good director but the way the leather-clad musketeers have swept all before them shows there is a real place for new versions of historical tales. I can’t wait!!

    Reply
  49. *smug smile* I picked Aidan Turner out as suitable for breeches roles a while back and that note – with his picture- still gets lots of hits on my blog. Smoulder + breeches + silk dresses and fans… and leather; costume dramas have all the good ingredients. Of course it needs a good director but the way the leather-clad musketeers have swept all before them shows there is a real place for new versions of historical tales. I can’t wait!!

    Reply
  50. *smug smile* I picked Aidan Turner out as suitable for breeches roles a while back and that note – with his picture- still gets lots of hits on my blog. Smoulder + breeches + silk dresses and fans… and leather; costume dramas have all the good ingredients. Of course it needs a good director but the way the leather-clad musketeers have swept all before them shows there is a real place for new versions of historical tales. I can’t wait!!

    Reply
  51. I’m certain the popularity of Downton Abbey has and will spur more costume dramas in the future. I do like Downton Abbey, having watched the first four seasons on DVD, but I do hope every aspiring writer in the business doesn’t suddenly decide to write Edwardian set romance in the hope of hitching their wagon to the Downton Abbey star.
    I love costume dramas. I am eagerly awaiting the arrival of the second season of Ripper Street on DVD. It’s a great series and I’ve learned lots of interesting things about the Jack the Ripper era in London’s history.
    I haven’t seen The Musketeers yet, but I have always been a fan of the novel.
    I believe a series about spies during the American Revolution is due to debut soon. Should be interesting!

    Reply
  52. I’m certain the popularity of Downton Abbey has and will spur more costume dramas in the future. I do like Downton Abbey, having watched the first four seasons on DVD, but I do hope every aspiring writer in the business doesn’t suddenly decide to write Edwardian set romance in the hope of hitching their wagon to the Downton Abbey star.
    I love costume dramas. I am eagerly awaiting the arrival of the second season of Ripper Street on DVD. It’s a great series and I’ve learned lots of interesting things about the Jack the Ripper era in London’s history.
    I haven’t seen The Musketeers yet, but I have always been a fan of the novel.
    I believe a series about spies during the American Revolution is due to debut soon. Should be interesting!

    Reply
  53. I’m certain the popularity of Downton Abbey has and will spur more costume dramas in the future. I do like Downton Abbey, having watched the first four seasons on DVD, but I do hope every aspiring writer in the business doesn’t suddenly decide to write Edwardian set romance in the hope of hitching their wagon to the Downton Abbey star.
    I love costume dramas. I am eagerly awaiting the arrival of the second season of Ripper Street on DVD. It’s a great series and I’ve learned lots of interesting things about the Jack the Ripper era in London’s history.
    I haven’t seen The Musketeers yet, but I have always been a fan of the novel.
    I believe a series about spies during the American Revolution is due to debut soon. Should be interesting!

    Reply
  54. I’m certain the popularity of Downton Abbey has and will spur more costume dramas in the future. I do like Downton Abbey, having watched the first four seasons on DVD, but I do hope every aspiring writer in the business doesn’t suddenly decide to write Edwardian set romance in the hope of hitching their wagon to the Downton Abbey star.
    I love costume dramas. I am eagerly awaiting the arrival of the second season of Ripper Street on DVD. It’s a great series and I’ve learned lots of interesting things about the Jack the Ripper era in London’s history.
    I haven’t seen The Musketeers yet, but I have always been a fan of the novel.
    I believe a series about spies during the American Revolution is due to debut soon. Should be interesting!

    Reply
  55. I’m certain the popularity of Downton Abbey has and will spur more costume dramas in the future. I do like Downton Abbey, having watched the first four seasons on DVD, but I do hope every aspiring writer in the business doesn’t suddenly decide to write Edwardian set romance in the hope of hitching their wagon to the Downton Abbey star.
    I love costume dramas. I am eagerly awaiting the arrival of the second season of Ripper Street on DVD. It’s a great series and I’ve learned lots of interesting things about the Jack the Ripper era in London’s history.
    I haven’t seen The Musketeers yet, but I have always been a fan of the novel.
    I believe a series about spies during the American Revolution is due to debut soon. Should be interesting!

    Reply
  56. I love costume dramas. Unfortunately, they are not made by American TV companies. We must rely on British TV to fill the gap — and what a wonderful job they do!! Thank you, thank you. (and to PBS for bringing them here). It seems, though, that we do not get all that are made –how sad.

    Reply
  57. I love costume dramas. Unfortunately, they are not made by American TV companies. We must rely on British TV to fill the gap — and what a wonderful job they do!! Thank you, thank you. (and to PBS for bringing them here). It seems, though, that we do not get all that are made –how sad.

    Reply
  58. I love costume dramas. Unfortunately, they are not made by American TV companies. We must rely on British TV to fill the gap — and what a wonderful job they do!! Thank you, thank you. (and to PBS for bringing them here). It seems, though, that we do not get all that are made –how sad.

    Reply
  59. I love costume dramas. Unfortunately, they are not made by American TV companies. We must rely on British TV to fill the gap — and what a wonderful job they do!! Thank you, thank you. (and to PBS for bringing them here). It seems, though, that we do not get all that are made –how sad.

    Reply
  60. I love costume dramas. Unfortunately, they are not made by American TV companies. We must rely on British TV to fill the gap — and what a wonderful job they do!! Thank you, thank you. (and to PBS for bringing them here). It seems, though, that we do not get all that are made –how sad.

    Reply
  61. I’m not a TV viewer, but a number of years ago the silent movie version of the Three Musketeers was serialised here in Australia and it was great. The Musketeers spent most of the time galloping across the screen, and then the words in a little baloon appeared on the next screen, all accompanied by music from one of the Eastern European symphony orchestras. The film had been re-mastered to modern music. It was great. I actually taped it on VHS, all (about) 30 episodes. I will eventually get around to having it put on DVD so I can watch it again without having to fiddle with cords and machines. The only costume drama I can think of that is currently on local TV, apart from Downton Abbey of course, is the Vikings. I catch a bit of it now and then. There are probably more but I can’t think of them.

    Reply
  62. I’m not a TV viewer, but a number of years ago the silent movie version of the Three Musketeers was serialised here in Australia and it was great. The Musketeers spent most of the time galloping across the screen, and then the words in a little baloon appeared on the next screen, all accompanied by music from one of the Eastern European symphony orchestras. The film had been re-mastered to modern music. It was great. I actually taped it on VHS, all (about) 30 episodes. I will eventually get around to having it put on DVD so I can watch it again without having to fiddle with cords and machines. The only costume drama I can think of that is currently on local TV, apart from Downton Abbey of course, is the Vikings. I catch a bit of it now and then. There are probably more but I can’t think of them.

    Reply
  63. I’m not a TV viewer, but a number of years ago the silent movie version of the Three Musketeers was serialised here in Australia and it was great. The Musketeers spent most of the time galloping across the screen, and then the words in a little baloon appeared on the next screen, all accompanied by music from one of the Eastern European symphony orchestras. The film had been re-mastered to modern music. It was great. I actually taped it on VHS, all (about) 30 episodes. I will eventually get around to having it put on DVD so I can watch it again without having to fiddle with cords and machines. The only costume drama I can think of that is currently on local TV, apart from Downton Abbey of course, is the Vikings. I catch a bit of it now and then. There are probably more but I can’t think of them.

    Reply
  64. I’m not a TV viewer, but a number of years ago the silent movie version of the Three Musketeers was serialised here in Australia and it was great. The Musketeers spent most of the time galloping across the screen, and then the words in a little baloon appeared on the next screen, all accompanied by music from one of the Eastern European symphony orchestras. The film had been re-mastered to modern music. It was great. I actually taped it on VHS, all (about) 30 episodes. I will eventually get around to having it put on DVD so I can watch it again without having to fiddle with cords and machines. The only costume drama I can think of that is currently on local TV, apart from Downton Abbey of course, is the Vikings. I catch a bit of it now and then. There are probably more but I can’t think of them.

    Reply
  65. I’m not a TV viewer, but a number of years ago the silent movie version of the Three Musketeers was serialised here in Australia and it was great. The Musketeers spent most of the time galloping across the screen, and then the words in a little baloon appeared on the next screen, all accompanied by music from one of the Eastern European symphony orchestras. The film had been re-mastered to modern music. It was great. I actually taped it on VHS, all (about) 30 episodes. I will eventually get around to having it put on DVD so I can watch it again without having to fiddle with cords and machines. The only costume drama I can think of that is currently on local TV, apart from Downton Abbey of course, is the Vikings. I catch a bit of it now and then. There are probably more but I can’t think of them.

    Reply
  66. Haha! That’s a very appropriate comment by your other half, Jo! The Musketeers definitely brightened my Sunday evenings, even with the anachronisms. Moonfleet! I love Moonfleet. It would be wonderful if they remade it.

    Reply
  67. Haha! That’s a very appropriate comment by your other half, Jo! The Musketeers definitely brightened my Sunday evenings, even with the anachronisms. Moonfleet! I love Moonfleet. It would be wonderful if they remade it.

    Reply
  68. Haha! That’s a very appropriate comment by your other half, Jo! The Musketeers definitely brightened my Sunday evenings, even with the anachronisms. Moonfleet! I love Moonfleet. It would be wonderful if they remade it.

    Reply
  69. Haha! That’s a very appropriate comment by your other half, Jo! The Musketeers definitely brightened my Sunday evenings, even with the anachronisms. Moonfleet! I love Moonfleet. It would be wonderful if they remade it.

    Reply
  70. Haha! That’s a very appropriate comment by your other half, Jo! The Musketeers definitely brightened my Sunday evenings, even with the anachronisms. Moonfleet! I love Moonfleet. It would be wonderful if they remade it.

    Reply
  71. I hope we get that series about spies during the American Revolution, Louisa. That sounds as though it would be fascinating. I’d love to see more American-set period drama on our screens here.

    Reply
  72. I hope we get that series about spies during the American Revolution, Louisa. That sounds as though it would be fascinating. I’d love to see more American-set period drama on our screens here.

    Reply
  73. I hope we get that series about spies during the American Revolution, Louisa. That sounds as though it would be fascinating. I’d love to see more American-set period drama on our screens here.

    Reply
  74. I hope we get that series about spies during the American Revolution, Louisa. That sounds as though it would be fascinating. I’d love to see more American-set period drama on our screens here.

    Reply
  75. I hope we get that series about spies during the American Revolution, Louisa. That sounds as though it would be fascinating. I’d love to see more American-set period drama on our screens here.

    Reply
  76. In the US, we’ve a new series – TURN – Based on Alexander Rose’s book Washington’s Spies, AMC’s TURN tells the untold story of America’s first spy ring. A historical thriller set during the Revolutionary War, TURN
    Set during the 1770’s….pretty cool Can watch on computer via AMC -American Movie Channel..

    Reply
  77. In the US, we’ve a new series – TURN – Based on Alexander Rose’s book Washington’s Spies, AMC’s TURN tells the untold story of America’s first spy ring. A historical thriller set during the Revolutionary War, TURN
    Set during the 1770’s….pretty cool Can watch on computer via AMC -American Movie Channel..

    Reply
  78. In the US, we’ve a new series – TURN – Based on Alexander Rose’s book Washington’s Spies, AMC’s TURN tells the untold story of America’s first spy ring. A historical thriller set during the Revolutionary War, TURN
    Set during the 1770’s….pretty cool Can watch on computer via AMC -American Movie Channel..

    Reply
  79. In the US, we’ve a new series – TURN – Based on Alexander Rose’s book Washington’s Spies, AMC’s TURN tells the untold story of America’s first spy ring. A historical thriller set during the Revolutionary War, TURN
    Set during the 1770’s….pretty cool Can watch on computer via AMC -American Movie Channel..

    Reply
  80. In the US, we’ve a new series – TURN – Based on Alexander Rose’s book Washington’s Spies, AMC’s TURN tells the untold story of America’s first spy ring. A historical thriller set during the Revolutionary War, TURN
    Set during the 1770’s….pretty cool Can watch on computer via AMC -American Movie Channel..

    Reply
  81. I love the new costume drama Nicolas Le Floch. I found it on MHz Networks. It’s a French series that takes place in 18th century Paris. Check it out, I don’t think you will be disappointed.

    Reply
  82. I love the new costume drama Nicolas Le Floch. I found it on MHz Networks. It’s a French series that takes place in 18th century Paris. Check it out, I don’t think you will be disappointed.

    Reply
  83. I love the new costume drama Nicolas Le Floch. I found it on MHz Networks. It’s a French series that takes place in 18th century Paris. Check it out, I don’t think you will be disappointed.

    Reply
  84. I love the new costume drama Nicolas Le Floch. I found it on MHz Networks. It’s a French series that takes place in 18th century Paris. Check it out, I don’t think you will be disappointed.

    Reply
  85. I love the new costume drama Nicolas Le Floch. I found it on MHz Networks. It’s a French series that takes place in 18th century Paris. Check it out, I don’t think you will be disappointed.

    Reply
  86. I don’t think all the costume dramas you mentioned made it to the U.S., although I fondly remember “Upstairs, Downstairs”. My favorite old series, although it is a much different era, was “I, Claudius”, based on the Robert Graves book. The cast was excellent, and the story I believe was mostly true!

    Reply
  87. I don’t think all the costume dramas you mentioned made it to the U.S., although I fondly remember “Upstairs, Downstairs”. My favorite old series, although it is a much different era, was “I, Claudius”, based on the Robert Graves book. The cast was excellent, and the story I believe was mostly true!

    Reply
  88. I don’t think all the costume dramas you mentioned made it to the U.S., although I fondly remember “Upstairs, Downstairs”. My favorite old series, although it is a much different era, was “I, Claudius”, based on the Robert Graves book. The cast was excellent, and the story I believe was mostly true!

    Reply
  89. I don’t think all the costume dramas you mentioned made it to the U.S., although I fondly remember “Upstairs, Downstairs”. My favorite old series, although it is a much different era, was “I, Claudius”, based on the Robert Graves book. The cast was excellent, and the story I believe was mostly true!

    Reply
  90. I don’t think all the costume dramas you mentioned made it to the U.S., although I fondly remember “Upstairs, Downstairs”. My favorite old series, although it is a much different era, was “I, Claudius”, based on the Robert Graves book. The cast was excellent, and the story I believe was mostly true!

    Reply
  91. My favorite will always be The Duchess of Duke Street, which ran here in the U.S. in the late 70s, and took us from the late Victoiran years through the Edwardian period and into the 1920s. The story was wonderfully romantic, the characters vivid, and the sets and costumes quite splendid. I received the full series on DVD for Christmas a few years ago, and I have watched it twice–with certain episodes receiving multiple viewings. Gemma James and Christopher Cazenove never had better roles, and as much as I enjoyed the 2008 Sense and Sensibility, seeing Gemma James as Eleanor’s and Marianne’s mother was a shock! And I couldn’t agree more with Alison’s comment–if it wasn’t for British historical series, we’d see very few costume dramas here!

    Reply
  92. My favorite will always be The Duchess of Duke Street, which ran here in the U.S. in the late 70s, and took us from the late Victoiran years through the Edwardian period and into the 1920s. The story was wonderfully romantic, the characters vivid, and the sets and costumes quite splendid. I received the full series on DVD for Christmas a few years ago, and I have watched it twice–with certain episodes receiving multiple viewings. Gemma James and Christopher Cazenove never had better roles, and as much as I enjoyed the 2008 Sense and Sensibility, seeing Gemma James as Eleanor’s and Marianne’s mother was a shock! And I couldn’t agree more with Alison’s comment–if it wasn’t for British historical series, we’d see very few costume dramas here!

    Reply
  93. My favorite will always be The Duchess of Duke Street, which ran here in the U.S. in the late 70s, and took us from the late Victoiran years through the Edwardian period and into the 1920s. The story was wonderfully romantic, the characters vivid, and the sets and costumes quite splendid. I received the full series on DVD for Christmas a few years ago, and I have watched it twice–with certain episodes receiving multiple viewings. Gemma James and Christopher Cazenove never had better roles, and as much as I enjoyed the 2008 Sense and Sensibility, seeing Gemma James as Eleanor’s and Marianne’s mother was a shock! And I couldn’t agree more with Alison’s comment–if it wasn’t for British historical series, we’d see very few costume dramas here!

    Reply
  94. My favorite will always be The Duchess of Duke Street, which ran here in the U.S. in the late 70s, and took us from the late Victoiran years through the Edwardian period and into the 1920s. The story was wonderfully romantic, the characters vivid, and the sets and costumes quite splendid. I received the full series on DVD for Christmas a few years ago, and I have watched it twice–with certain episodes receiving multiple viewings. Gemma James and Christopher Cazenove never had better roles, and as much as I enjoyed the 2008 Sense and Sensibility, seeing Gemma James as Eleanor’s and Marianne’s mother was a shock! And I couldn’t agree more with Alison’s comment–if it wasn’t for British historical series, we’d see very few costume dramas here!

    Reply
  95. My favorite will always be The Duchess of Duke Street, which ran here in the U.S. in the late 70s, and took us from the late Victoiran years through the Edwardian period and into the 1920s. The story was wonderfully romantic, the characters vivid, and the sets and costumes quite splendid. I received the full series on DVD for Christmas a few years ago, and I have watched it twice–with certain episodes receiving multiple viewings. Gemma James and Christopher Cazenove never had better roles, and as much as I enjoyed the 2008 Sense and Sensibility, seeing Gemma James as Eleanor’s and Marianne’s mother was a shock! And I couldn’t agree more with Alison’s comment–if it wasn’t for British historical series, we’d see very few costume dramas here!

    Reply
  96. I’m looking forward to the TV version of the first Outlander book by Diana Gabaldon which is right now being filmed in Scotland by Starz.

    Reply
  97. I’m looking forward to the TV version of the first Outlander book by Diana Gabaldon which is right now being filmed in Scotland by Starz.

    Reply
  98. I’m looking forward to the TV version of the first Outlander book by Diana Gabaldon which is right now being filmed in Scotland by Starz.

    Reply
  99. I’m looking forward to the TV version of the first Outlander book by Diana Gabaldon which is right now being filmed in Scotland by Starz.

    Reply
  100. I’m looking forward to the TV version of the first Outlander book by Diana Gabaldon which is right now being filmed in Scotland by Starz.

    Reply
  101. TURN is really well done, and enhanced by the lack of big name stars. At one time I was really into the Revolution and read a lot on the espionage. The character of Simcoe is suitably bad considering how he ended up post-war. I’m waiting for my personal hero, Robert Townsend.

    Reply
  102. TURN is really well done, and enhanced by the lack of big name stars. At one time I was really into the Revolution and read a lot on the espionage. The character of Simcoe is suitably bad considering how he ended up post-war. I’m waiting for my personal hero, Robert Townsend.

    Reply
  103. TURN is really well done, and enhanced by the lack of big name stars. At one time I was really into the Revolution and read a lot on the espionage. The character of Simcoe is suitably bad considering how he ended up post-war. I’m waiting for my personal hero, Robert Townsend.

    Reply
  104. TURN is really well done, and enhanced by the lack of big name stars. At one time I was really into the Revolution and read a lot on the espionage. The character of Simcoe is suitably bad considering how he ended up post-war. I’m waiting for my personal hero, Robert Townsend.

    Reply
  105. TURN is really well done, and enhanced by the lack of big name stars. At one time I was really into the Revolution and read a lot on the espionage. The character of Simcoe is suitably bad considering how he ended up post-war. I’m waiting for my personal hero, Robert Townsend.

    Reply
  106. I think it’s a worldwide trend. Downton Abby and The Tudors are seen everywhere! Or The Vikings.
    All the TV series you have already mentioned are seen in Spain as well. So I will mention a few of the ones that you’d probably haven’t seen yet, as they are Spanish (although I know some of them have been sold to foreign channels).
    The most appreciated in the last few years:
    ‘Isabel’ which is set in the 15th century and it’s very Tudor-like, a lot of political intrigue and sex, about Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand of Aragon.
    ‘Águila Roja’ (This is ‘Read Eagle’) cloak & dagger adventures in the 17th century.
    ‘Gran Hotel’ (Grand Hotel) a soap opera set in 1905 kind of ‘Spanish Edwardian times’.
    Lots of TV series are set in the first half of the 20th century. Two of the most popular are ‘El tiempo entre costuras’ (The book that inspired this series was translated as ‘The Seamstress’) and ‘Amar en tiempos revueltos’ (I would translate it as ‘To Love in Troubled Times’).
    Some of the series are different, because of the setting, for instance ‘Hispania’ (Roman times), or ‘Toledo’ (Middle Ages).
    A couple of funny details for the wenches. First, the plot of ‘Bandolera’: Andalusia, 19 th century, a young English woman who pursues her dreams of becoming a writer and travels to Spain in search of adventure… Second, the series set during our Independence War against the French army (yes, the Peninsular War): ‘Curro Jiménez’ in the 1970s, it was ‘the’ TV series of my childhood.
    You can find a list of the best historical series & mini-series in this Spanish poll – I’m sure you will easily recognize the majority of the titles. http://listas.20minutos.es/lista/series-de-epoca-360312/ North & South, Pride & Prejudice and Downton Abby are the favourites!

    Reply
  107. I think it’s a worldwide trend. Downton Abby and The Tudors are seen everywhere! Or The Vikings.
    All the TV series you have already mentioned are seen in Spain as well. So I will mention a few of the ones that you’d probably haven’t seen yet, as they are Spanish (although I know some of them have been sold to foreign channels).
    The most appreciated in the last few years:
    ‘Isabel’ which is set in the 15th century and it’s very Tudor-like, a lot of political intrigue and sex, about Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand of Aragon.
    ‘Águila Roja’ (This is ‘Read Eagle’) cloak & dagger adventures in the 17th century.
    ‘Gran Hotel’ (Grand Hotel) a soap opera set in 1905 kind of ‘Spanish Edwardian times’.
    Lots of TV series are set in the first half of the 20th century. Two of the most popular are ‘El tiempo entre costuras’ (The book that inspired this series was translated as ‘The Seamstress’) and ‘Amar en tiempos revueltos’ (I would translate it as ‘To Love in Troubled Times’).
    Some of the series are different, because of the setting, for instance ‘Hispania’ (Roman times), or ‘Toledo’ (Middle Ages).
    A couple of funny details for the wenches. First, the plot of ‘Bandolera’: Andalusia, 19 th century, a young English woman who pursues her dreams of becoming a writer and travels to Spain in search of adventure… Second, the series set during our Independence War against the French army (yes, the Peninsular War): ‘Curro Jiménez’ in the 1970s, it was ‘the’ TV series of my childhood.
    You can find a list of the best historical series & mini-series in this Spanish poll – I’m sure you will easily recognize the majority of the titles. http://listas.20minutos.es/lista/series-de-epoca-360312/ North & South, Pride & Prejudice and Downton Abby are the favourites!

    Reply
  108. I think it’s a worldwide trend. Downton Abby and The Tudors are seen everywhere! Or The Vikings.
    All the TV series you have already mentioned are seen in Spain as well. So I will mention a few of the ones that you’d probably haven’t seen yet, as they are Spanish (although I know some of them have been sold to foreign channels).
    The most appreciated in the last few years:
    ‘Isabel’ which is set in the 15th century and it’s very Tudor-like, a lot of political intrigue and sex, about Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand of Aragon.
    ‘Águila Roja’ (This is ‘Read Eagle’) cloak & dagger adventures in the 17th century.
    ‘Gran Hotel’ (Grand Hotel) a soap opera set in 1905 kind of ‘Spanish Edwardian times’.
    Lots of TV series are set in the first half of the 20th century. Two of the most popular are ‘El tiempo entre costuras’ (The book that inspired this series was translated as ‘The Seamstress’) and ‘Amar en tiempos revueltos’ (I would translate it as ‘To Love in Troubled Times’).
    Some of the series are different, because of the setting, for instance ‘Hispania’ (Roman times), or ‘Toledo’ (Middle Ages).
    A couple of funny details for the wenches. First, the plot of ‘Bandolera’: Andalusia, 19 th century, a young English woman who pursues her dreams of becoming a writer and travels to Spain in search of adventure… Second, the series set during our Independence War against the French army (yes, the Peninsular War): ‘Curro Jiménez’ in the 1970s, it was ‘the’ TV series of my childhood.
    You can find a list of the best historical series & mini-series in this Spanish poll – I’m sure you will easily recognize the majority of the titles. http://listas.20minutos.es/lista/series-de-epoca-360312/ North & South, Pride & Prejudice and Downton Abby are the favourites!

    Reply
  109. I think it’s a worldwide trend. Downton Abby and The Tudors are seen everywhere! Or The Vikings.
    All the TV series you have already mentioned are seen in Spain as well. So I will mention a few of the ones that you’d probably haven’t seen yet, as they are Spanish (although I know some of them have been sold to foreign channels).
    The most appreciated in the last few years:
    ‘Isabel’ which is set in the 15th century and it’s very Tudor-like, a lot of political intrigue and sex, about Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand of Aragon.
    ‘Águila Roja’ (This is ‘Read Eagle’) cloak & dagger adventures in the 17th century.
    ‘Gran Hotel’ (Grand Hotel) a soap opera set in 1905 kind of ‘Spanish Edwardian times’.
    Lots of TV series are set in the first half of the 20th century. Two of the most popular are ‘El tiempo entre costuras’ (The book that inspired this series was translated as ‘The Seamstress’) and ‘Amar en tiempos revueltos’ (I would translate it as ‘To Love in Troubled Times’).
    Some of the series are different, because of the setting, for instance ‘Hispania’ (Roman times), or ‘Toledo’ (Middle Ages).
    A couple of funny details for the wenches. First, the plot of ‘Bandolera’: Andalusia, 19 th century, a young English woman who pursues her dreams of becoming a writer and travels to Spain in search of adventure… Second, the series set during our Independence War against the French army (yes, the Peninsular War): ‘Curro Jiménez’ in the 1970s, it was ‘the’ TV series of my childhood.
    You can find a list of the best historical series & mini-series in this Spanish poll – I’m sure you will easily recognize the majority of the titles. http://listas.20minutos.es/lista/series-de-epoca-360312/ North & South, Pride & Prejudice and Downton Abby are the favourites!

    Reply
  110. I think it’s a worldwide trend. Downton Abby and The Tudors are seen everywhere! Or The Vikings.
    All the TV series you have already mentioned are seen in Spain as well. So I will mention a few of the ones that you’d probably haven’t seen yet, as they are Spanish (although I know some of them have been sold to foreign channels).
    The most appreciated in the last few years:
    ‘Isabel’ which is set in the 15th century and it’s very Tudor-like, a lot of political intrigue and sex, about Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand of Aragon.
    ‘Águila Roja’ (This is ‘Read Eagle’) cloak & dagger adventures in the 17th century.
    ‘Gran Hotel’ (Grand Hotel) a soap opera set in 1905 kind of ‘Spanish Edwardian times’.
    Lots of TV series are set in the first half of the 20th century. Two of the most popular are ‘El tiempo entre costuras’ (The book that inspired this series was translated as ‘The Seamstress’) and ‘Amar en tiempos revueltos’ (I would translate it as ‘To Love in Troubled Times’).
    Some of the series are different, because of the setting, for instance ‘Hispania’ (Roman times), or ‘Toledo’ (Middle Ages).
    A couple of funny details for the wenches. First, the plot of ‘Bandolera’: Andalusia, 19 th century, a young English woman who pursues her dreams of becoming a writer and travels to Spain in search of adventure… Second, the series set during our Independence War against the French army (yes, the Peninsular War): ‘Curro Jiménez’ in the 1970s, it was ‘the’ TV series of my childhood.
    You can find a list of the best historical series & mini-series in this Spanish poll – I’m sure you will easily recognize the majority of the titles. http://listas.20minutos.es/lista/series-de-epoca-360312/ North & South, Pride & Prejudice and Downton Abby are the favourites!

    Reply
  111. I was just going to wail that we Americans are so far behind the historical tv/movie trend that we’ll never catch up, but one just occurred to me. Nicola, have you heard of ‘Turn’? (a-la Turncoat). It’s an American produced spy program based on the Revolutionary war. I haven’t had a chance to watch it, but I love the time period and find it remarkably under-utilized in American programing considering its based on our very own history. The production values look great (costumes, etc) and the cinematography looks wonderful. Not sure if it’s as good as the reviews, but we’ll see if its a hit. I’m hopeful it will be, if only to encourage more American historical tv shows (that don’t have to do with the wild west and gunslingers!)

    Reply
  112. I was just going to wail that we Americans are so far behind the historical tv/movie trend that we’ll never catch up, but one just occurred to me. Nicola, have you heard of ‘Turn’? (a-la Turncoat). It’s an American produced spy program based on the Revolutionary war. I haven’t had a chance to watch it, but I love the time period and find it remarkably under-utilized in American programing considering its based on our very own history. The production values look great (costumes, etc) and the cinematography looks wonderful. Not sure if it’s as good as the reviews, but we’ll see if its a hit. I’m hopeful it will be, if only to encourage more American historical tv shows (that don’t have to do with the wild west and gunslingers!)

    Reply
  113. I was just going to wail that we Americans are so far behind the historical tv/movie trend that we’ll never catch up, but one just occurred to me. Nicola, have you heard of ‘Turn’? (a-la Turncoat). It’s an American produced spy program based on the Revolutionary war. I haven’t had a chance to watch it, but I love the time period and find it remarkably under-utilized in American programing considering its based on our very own history. The production values look great (costumes, etc) and the cinematography looks wonderful. Not sure if it’s as good as the reviews, but we’ll see if its a hit. I’m hopeful it will be, if only to encourage more American historical tv shows (that don’t have to do with the wild west and gunslingers!)

    Reply
  114. I was just going to wail that we Americans are so far behind the historical tv/movie trend that we’ll never catch up, but one just occurred to me. Nicola, have you heard of ‘Turn’? (a-la Turncoat). It’s an American produced spy program based on the Revolutionary war. I haven’t had a chance to watch it, but I love the time period and find it remarkably under-utilized in American programing considering its based on our very own history. The production values look great (costumes, etc) and the cinematography looks wonderful. Not sure if it’s as good as the reviews, but we’ll see if its a hit. I’m hopeful it will be, if only to encourage more American historical tv shows (that don’t have to do with the wild west and gunslingers!)

    Reply
  115. I was just going to wail that we Americans are so far behind the historical tv/movie trend that we’ll never catch up, but one just occurred to me. Nicola, have you heard of ‘Turn’? (a-la Turncoat). It’s an American produced spy program based on the Revolutionary war. I haven’t had a chance to watch it, but I love the time period and find it remarkably under-utilized in American programing considering its based on our very own history. The production values look great (costumes, etc) and the cinematography looks wonderful. Not sure if it’s as good as the reviews, but we’ll see if its a hit. I’m hopeful it will be, if only to encourage more American historical tv shows (that don’t have to do with the wild west and gunslingers!)

    Reply
  116. I also loved the Duchess of Duke St, and many others. Has anyone mentioned the Uk North and South? A lot of people get it mixed up with the US series of the same name, but Richard Armitage as the northern mill owner is wonderful.
    We’ve had a few Australian historical series, too, but the best one, RUSH, was filmed — crazily— in B&W for the first series, so I don’t think it ever survived to make the DVD scene. Mostly we get the Uk shows, which are generally wonderful.

    Reply
  117. I also loved the Duchess of Duke St, and many others. Has anyone mentioned the Uk North and South? A lot of people get it mixed up with the US series of the same name, but Richard Armitage as the northern mill owner is wonderful.
    We’ve had a few Australian historical series, too, but the best one, RUSH, was filmed — crazily— in B&W for the first series, so I don’t think it ever survived to make the DVD scene. Mostly we get the Uk shows, which are generally wonderful.

    Reply
  118. I also loved the Duchess of Duke St, and many others. Has anyone mentioned the Uk North and South? A lot of people get it mixed up with the US series of the same name, but Richard Armitage as the northern mill owner is wonderful.
    We’ve had a few Australian historical series, too, but the best one, RUSH, was filmed — crazily— in B&W for the first series, so I don’t think it ever survived to make the DVD scene. Mostly we get the Uk shows, which are generally wonderful.

    Reply
  119. I also loved the Duchess of Duke St, and many others. Has anyone mentioned the Uk North and South? A lot of people get it mixed up with the US series of the same name, but Richard Armitage as the northern mill owner is wonderful.
    We’ve had a few Australian historical series, too, but the best one, RUSH, was filmed — crazily— in B&W for the first series, so I don’t think it ever survived to make the DVD scene. Mostly we get the Uk shows, which are generally wonderful.

    Reply
  120. I also loved the Duchess of Duke St, and many others. Has anyone mentioned the Uk North and South? A lot of people get it mixed up with the US series of the same name, but Richard Armitage as the northern mill owner is wonderful.
    We’ve had a few Australian historical series, too, but the best one, RUSH, was filmed — crazily— in B&W for the first series, so I don’t think it ever survived to make the DVD scene. Mostly we get the Uk shows, which are generally wonderful.

    Reply
  121. I loved the old Poldark. I finally got the DVD’s of the two seasons a couple of years back. I don’t watch much TV or movies these days, so even though I was looking forward to seeing them again, it took me awhile. I’ll certainly look forward to a new set if it makes it over to the US, and hope I’m not disappointed in the casting! I bought all the Poldark books also — Winston Graham took the series beyond the books that were filmed the first time around to the next generation. I had bought the first six at the time of the broadcast of the series, and now it’s a little hard to get the books, but I persisted and bought them all. They are also fascinating for the more in-depth view of life in Cornwall at the time — and for some insight into how writing historical novels has changed!
    I also was interested to read that Jamaica Inn is being filmed. One of my all-time favorite historical novels! Another TV series I loved from the same period as Poldark and Duchess of Duke Street was Flambards — set in the Edwardian through the First World War. (Have the DVDs of that show also!)
    And one that I’ve never been able to buy DVDs viewable in the states that I also loved was A Horseman Riding by, from a series by R.E. Delderfield.
    Thanks for the walk through Memory Lane and the preview of things to come!

    Reply
  122. I loved the old Poldark. I finally got the DVD’s of the two seasons a couple of years back. I don’t watch much TV or movies these days, so even though I was looking forward to seeing them again, it took me awhile. I’ll certainly look forward to a new set if it makes it over to the US, and hope I’m not disappointed in the casting! I bought all the Poldark books also — Winston Graham took the series beyond the books that were filmed the first time around to the next generation. I had bought the first six at the time of the broadcast of the series, and now it’s a little hard to get the books, but I persisted and bought them all. They are also fascinating for the more in-depth view of life in Cornwall at the time — and for some insight into how writing historical novels has changed!
    I also was interested to read that Jamaica Inn is being filmed. One of my all-time favorite historical novels! Another TV series I loved from the same period as Poldark and Duchess of Duke Street was Flambards — set in the Edwardian through the First World War. (Have the DVDs of that show also!)
    And one that I’ve never been able to buy DVDs viewable in the states that I also loved was A Horseman Riding by, from a series by R.E. Delderfield.
    Thanks for the walk through Memory Lane and the preview of things to come!

    Reply
  123. I loved the old Poldark. I finally got the DVD’s of the two seasons a couple of years back. I don’t watch much TV or movies these days, so even though I was looking forward to seeing them again, it took me awhile. I’ll certainly look forward to a new set if it makes it over to the US, and hope I’m not disappointed in the casting! I bought all the Poldark books also — Winston Graham took the series beyond the books that were filmed the first time around to the next generation. I had bought the first six at the time of the broadcast of the series, and now it’s a little hard to get the books, but I persisted and bought them all. They are also fascinating for the more in-depth view of life in Cornwall at the time — and for some insight into how writing historical novels has changed!
    I also was interested to read that Jamaica Inn is being filmed. One of my all-time favorite historical novels! Another TV series I loved from the same period as Poldark and Duchess of Duke Street was Flambards — set in the Edwardian through the First World War. (Have the DVDs of that show also!)
    And one that I’ve never been able to buy DVDs viewable in the states that I also loved was A Horseman Riding by, from a series by R.E. Delderfield.
    Thanks for the walk through Memory Lane and the preview of things to come!

    Reply
  124. I loved the old Poldark. I finally got the DVD’s of the two seasons a couple of years back. I don’t watch much TV or movies these days, so even though I was looking forward to seeing them again, it took me awhile. I’ll certainly look forward to a new set if it makes it over to the US, and hope I’m not disappointed in the casting! I bought all the Poldark books also — Winston Graham took the series beyond the books that were filmed the first time around to the next generation. I had bought the first six at the time of the broadcast of the series, and now it’s a little hard to get the books, but I persisted and bought them all. They are also fascinating for the more in-depth view of life in Cornwall at the time — and for some insight into how writing historical novels has changed!
    I also was interested to read that Jamaica Inn is being filmed. One of my all-time favorite historical novels! Another TV series I loved from the same period as Poldark and Duchess of Duke Street was Flambards — set in the Edwardian through the First World War. (Have the DVDs of that show also!)
    And one that I’ve never been able to buy DVDs viewable in the states that I also loved was A Horseman Riding by, from a series by R.E. Delderfield.
    Thanks for the walk through Memory Lane and the preview of things to come!

    Reply
  125. I loved the old Poldark. I finally got the DVD’s of the two seasons a couple of years back. I don’t watch much TV or movies these days, so even though I was looking forward to seeing them again, it took me awhile. I’ll certainly look forward to a new set if it makes it over to the US, and hope I’m not disappointed in the casting! I bought all the Poldark books also — Winston Graham took the series beyond the books that were filmed the first time around to the next generation. I had bought the first six at the time of the broadcast of the series, and now it’s a little hard to get the books, but I persisted and bought them all. They are also fascinating for the more in-depth view of life in Cornwall at the time — and for some insight into how writing historical novels has changed!
    I also was interested to read that Jamaica Inn is being filmed. One of my all-time favorite historical novels! Another TV series I loved from the same period as Poldark and Duchess of Duke Street was Flambards — set in the Edwardian through the First World War. (Have the DVDs of that show also!)
    And one that I’ve never been able to buy DVDs viewable in the states that I also loved was A Horseman Riding by, from a series by R.E. Delderfield.
    Thanks for the walk through Memory Lane and the preview of things to come!

    Reply

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