Irish Favorites

109196939.thm 161308Sláinte! Susan here, writing this on St. Patrick's Day (or just after St. Paddy's Day, if it's the 18th where you are) – and wearin' the green and some Connemara marble for good luck. Being at least half Irish, according to DNA and family, I love this holiday. Most of the Wenches have a dab to a dominance of Irish genes, too, so Éirinn go Brách from all of us. In honor of Ireland and the good St. Patrick, we've chosen some of our favorite Irish things – places, books, and more – to share with you. And we hope you'll share your Irish favorites with us! 

Cliffs of moher mjp

Ashford castle

Mary Jo's Irish favorites:

Place to stay:  Ashford Castle!

Fish and chips: Crackpots in Kinsale (cracking, cracking good time, and similar usages seem to be related to the Irish Gaelic word "craic," pronounced krak, which means something wonderful, entertaining, a great time – "craic" is still commonly used in Ireland.) 

Location: The Cliffs of Moher – Stunning, magnificent po int on the far west coast of Ireland. See photo above. 

109197874.thbIrish Actor: Pierce Brosnan 

Traditional Irish song:  The Minstrel Boy, set to Londonderry Air

Irish Musical:  Riverdance (check out Reel Around the Sun)

 

Waterville Golf Club-rainbow

Andrea's Irish favorites: 

Golf course: Waterville Golf Links (and an Irish rainbow!) Sheen Falls Lodge

Place to stay: Sheen Falls Lodge

Walking trails: Killarney National Park  

 

Irish_wri3

Anne's Irish favorite: 

An Irish whiskey called Writers Tears

Said to be soft and sweet with notes of honey, citrus, vanilla, apple, caramel, and oak. (I have to try a sip  – or, as Mary Jo remarked, at least keep a bottle on the shelf!)

 

Kells triskele

 

And my own favorites: 

Favorite Irish books: 

The Book of Kells, Trinity College Library, Dublin  – Created in the late 8th century by Irish monks, the Book of Kells presents the Gospels in four incredible volumes of illumination and handscript on vellum. One of the true treasures of ancient Ireland, it very recently became available to view online! 

Other favorite Irish books:  Angela's Ashes, Frank McCourt _ Thomas Cahill, How the Irish Saved Civilization _ Lady Gregory's Complete Irish Mythology

Favorite Irish pub (this side of the pond): An Poitin Stil in Baltimore! 

Favorite Irish music: anything on an Irish harp, including tunes by Turlough O'Carolan (played by Derek Bell, Patrick Ball, and others) – also The Cranberries, and The Commitments ,,,,

Favorite Irish actors: Colin Farrell, Saoirse Ronan, Pierce Brosnan, Liam Neeson, Aiden Gillan, Evanna Lynch ….

And lastly, my favorite Irish proverbs:

May those who love us, love us — And for those who don't love us,
May God turn their hearts, and if He doesn't turn their hearts,
May He turn their ankles — so we will know them by their limping! 

Saint Patrick's Day may be over, and it's just one day a year — but the wonderful, irrepressible Irish spirit is forever. Do you have some Irish favorites too? Please share! 

Irish proverb

95 thoughts on “Irish Favorites”

  1. Wonderful choices. I don’t have much to offer.
    The Instant-Pot community on Facebook was having trouble with how to cook Corned Beef and Cabbage (which is really an American dish, as I’m sure many of you know. When they were asking for other Irish dishes, I offered Colcannon, which is mashed potatoes, with greens. I use spinach, the traditional is kale, and someone in the discussion mentioned cabbage. I like this dish at any time of the year.

    Reply
  2. Wonderful choices. I don’t have much to offer.
    The Instant-Pot community on Facebook was having trouble with how to cook Corned Beef and Cabbage (which is really an American dish, as I’m sure many of you know. When they were asking for other Irish dishes, I offered Colcannon, which is mashed potatoes, with greens. I use spinach, the traditional is kale, and someone in the discussion mentioned cabbage. I like this dish at any time of the year.

    Reply
  3. Wonderful choices. I don’t have much to offer.
    The Instant-Pot community on Facebook was having trouble with how to cook Corned Beef and Cabbage (which is really an American dish, as I’m sure many of you know. When they were asking for other Irish dishes, I offered Colcannon, which is mashed potatoes, with greens. I use spinach, the traditional is kale, and someone in the discussion mentioned cabbage. I like this dish at any time of the year.

    Reply
  4. Wonderful choices. I don’t have much to offer.
    The Instant-Pot community on Facebook was having trouble with how to cook Corned Beef and Cabbage (which is really an American dish, as I’m sure many of you know. When they were asking for other Irish dishes, I offered Colcannon, which is mashed potatoes, with greens. I use spinach, the traditional is kale, and someone in the discussion mentioned cabbage. I like this dish at any time of the year.

    Reply
  5. Wonderful choices. I don’t have much to offer.
    The Instant-Pot community on Facebook was having trouble with how to cook Corned Beef and Cabbage (which is really an American dish, as I’m sure many of you know. When they were asking for other Irish dishes, I offered Colcannon, which is mashed potatoes, with greens. I use spinach, the traditional is kale, and someone in the discussion mentioned cabbage. I like this dish at any time of the year.

    Reply
  6. I make Shepherds pie on St Patrick’s Day, but don’t know if it really is an Irish dish. I love the flavor of Irish breakfast tea, very strong!! Visiting Ireland is on my bucket list. The photos are beautiful, thanks for sharing them.

    Reply
  7. I make Shepherds pie on St Patrick’s Day, but don’t know if it really is an Irish dish. I love the flavor of Irish breakfast tea, very strong!! Visiting Ireland is on my bucket list. The photos are beautiful, thanks for sharing them.

    Reply
  8. I make Shepherds pie on St Patrick’s Day, but don’t know if it really is an Irish dish. I love the flavor of Irish breakfast tea, very strong!! Visiting Ireland is on my bucket list. The photos are beautiful, thanks for sharing them.

    Reply
  9. I make Shepherds pie on St Patrick’s Day, but don’t know if it really is an Irish dish. I love the flavor of Irish breakfast tea, very strong!! Visiting Ireland is on my bucket list. The photos are beautiful, thanks for sharing them.

    Reply
  10. I make Shepherds pie on St Patrick’s Day, but don’t know if it really is an Irish dish. I love the flavor of Irish breakfast tea, very strong!! Visiting Ireland is on my bucket list. The photos are beautiful, thanks for sharing them.

    Reply
  11. Writers’ Tears is a lovely whiskey, and not too horrifically pricy. We’ve family in Connemara so spend a reasonable amount of time out there, most of the pubs locally seem to have an impressive (and rotating) selection of whiskeys, which I’ve made it my mission to work my way through. The Writers’ Tears Red Head, from sherry casks, was a particular highlight.

    Reply
  12. Writers’ Tears is a lovely whiskey, and not too horrifically pricy. We’ve family in Connemara so spend a reasonable amount of time out there, most of the pubs locally seem to have an impressive (and rotating) selection of whiskeys, which I’ve made it my mission to work my way through. The Writers’ Tears Red Head, from sherry casks, was a particular highlight.

    Reply
  13. Writers’ Tears is a lovely whiskey, and not too horrifically pricy. We’ve family in Connemara so spend a reasonable amount of time out there, most of the pubs locally seem to have an impressive (and rotating) selection of whiskeys, which I’ve made it my mission to work my way through. The Writers’ Tears Red Head, from sherry casks, was a particular highlight.

    Reply
  14. Writers’ Tears is a lovely whiskey, and not too horrifically pricy. We’ve family in Connemara so spend a reasonable amount of time out there, most of the pubs locally seem to have an impressive (and rotating) selection of whiskeys, which I’ve made it my mission to work my way through. The Writers’ Tears Red Head, from sherry casks, was a particular highlight.

    Reply
  15. Writers’ Tears is a lovely whiskey, and not too horrifically pricy. We’ve family in Connemara so spend a reasonable amount of time out there, most of the pubs locally seem to have an impressive (and rotating) selection of whiskeys, which I’ve made it my mission to work my way through. The Writers’ Tears Red Head, from sherry casks, was a particular highlight.

    Reply
  16. Home made scone with butter and jam were yesterday’s lunch and they were delicious. My grandmother was from northwest County Mayo, so I love visiting Bangor Erris and the Bellmullet peninsula. Another stop is always Doolin, County Clare, where the locals gather for the most wonderful music evenings and staying at Seaview House a lovely B&B overlooking the picturesque seaside town. Hope to get back to Ireland soon!

    Reply
  17. Home made scone with butter and jam were yesterday’s lunch and they were delicious. My grandmother was from northwest County Mayo, so I love visiting Bangor Erris and the Bellmullet peninsula. Another stop is always Doolin, County Clare, where the locals gather for the most wonderful music evenings and staying at Seaview House a lovely B&B overlooking the picturesque seaside town. Hope to get back to Ireland soon!

    Reply
  18. Home made scone with butter and jam were yesterday’s lunch and they were delicious. My grandmother was from northwest County Mayo, so I love visiting Bangor Erris and the Bellmullet peninsula. Another stop is always Doolin, County Clare, where the locals gather for the most wonderful music evenings and staying at Seaview House a lovely B&B overlooking the picturesque seaside town. Hope to get back to Ireland soon!

    Reply
  19. Home made scone with butter and jam were yesterday’s lunch and they were delicious. My grandmother was from northwest County Mayo, so I love visiting Bangor Erris and the Bellmullet peninsula. Another stop is always Doolin, County Clare, where the locals gather for the most wonderful music evenings and staying at Seaview House a lovely B&B overlooking the picturesque seaside town. Hope to get back to Ireland soon!

    Reply
  20. Home made scone with butter and jam were yesterday’s lunch and they were delicious. My grandmother was from northwest County Mayo, so I love visiting Bangor Erris and the Bellmullet peninsula. Another stop is always Doolin, County Clare, where the locals gather for the most wonderful music evenings and staying at Seaview House a lovely B&B overlooking the picturesque seaside town. Hope to get back to Ireland soon!

    Reply
  21. As I live in Ireland I’ll just say, ‘top of the morning to all’ and ‘May the road rise with you and the wind always be at your back and may the good Lord hold you in the hollow of his hand’:)

    Reply
  22. As I live in Ireland I’ll just say, ‘top of the morning to all’ and ‘May the road rise with you and the wind always be at your back and may the good Lord hold you in the hollow of his hand’:)

    Reply
  23. As I live in Ireland I’ll just say, ‘top of the morning to all’ and ‘May the road rise with you and the wind always be at your back and may the good Lord hold you in the hollow of his hand’:)

    Reply
  24. As I live in Ireland I’ll just say, ‘top of the morning to all’ and ‘May the road rise with you and the wind always be at your back and may the good Lord hold you in the hollow of his hand’:)

    Reply
  25. As I live in Ireland I’ll just say, ‘top of the morning to all’ and ‘May the road rise with you and the wind always be at your back and may the good Lord hold you in the hollow of his hand’:)

    Reply
  26. For an Irish book, my recommendation would be Thomas Flanagan’s The Year of the French, which is almost unbearably sad, as you know the disaster that is looming.
    For an Irish food, my favorite is Irish soda bread. I like it with caraway seeds as well as raisins, but we rarely have it at all because my Irish husband dislikes it. It always reminds him of interminable and boring Sunday afternoon visits to or from relatives.
    And for an Irish poet, who else but William Butler Yeats?

    Reply
  27. For an Irish book, my recommendation would be Thomas Flanagan’s The Year of the French, which is almost unbearably sad, as you know the disaster that is looming.
    For an Irish food, my favorite is Irish soda bread. I like it with caraway seeds as well as raisins, but we rarely have it at all because my Irish husband dislikes it. It always reminds him of interminable and boring Sunday afternoon visits to or from relatives.
    And for an Irish poet, who else but William Butler Yeats?

    Reply
  28. For an Irish book, my recommendation would be Thomas Flanagan’s The Year of the French, which is almost unbearably sad, as you know the disaster that is looming.
    For an Irish food, my favorite is Irish soda bread. I like it with caraway seeds as well as raisins, but we rarely have it at all because my Irish husband dislikes it. It always reminds him of interminable and boring Sunday afternoon visits to or from relatives.
    And for an Irish poet, who else but William Butler Yeats?

    Reply
  29. For an Irish book, my recommendation would be Thomas Flanagan’s The Year of the French, which is almost unbearably sad, as you know the disaster that is looming.
    For an Irish food, my favorite is Irish soda bread. I like it with caraway seeds as well as raisins, but we rarely have it at all because my Irish husband dislikes it. It always reminds him of interminable and boring Sunday afternoon visits to or from relatives.
    And for an Irish poet, who else but William Butler Yeats?

    Reply
  30. For an Irish book, my recommendation would be Thomas Flanagan’s The Year of the French, which is almost unbearably sad, as you know the disaster that is looming.
    For an Irish food, my favorite is Irish soda bread. I like it with caraway seeds as well as raisins, but we rarely have it at all because my Irish husband dislikes it. It always reminds him of interminable and boring Sunday afternoon visits to or from relatives.
    And for an Irish poet, who else but William Butler Yeats?

    Reply
  31. I travelled to Northern Ireland with my dear friend during “the troubles”. This was a unique experience as we experienced the difficulty of life during those years and did see much that was destroyed during the flare-ups. We also drove into the countryside so she could show me her home town of Derry. I loved her family and still keep in touch with the ones that remain. Sadly my dear friend passed away. Everyone we met was so kind, hugged me on arrival and departure, fed me too well. All those tea times were a joy.
    I love the old Irish folk songs and the lovely accents. I do want to return to see how N Ireland has healed and to see Ireland’s “40 shades of green” (song by Johnny Cash).

    Reply
  32. I travelled to Northern Ireland with my dear friend during “the troubles”. This was a unique experience as we experienced the difficulty of life during those years and did see much that was destroyed during the flare-ups. We also drove into the countryside so she could show me her home town of Derry. I loved her family and still keep in touch with the ones that remain. Sadly my dear friend passed away. Everyone we met was so kind, hugged me on arrival and departure, fed me too well. All those tea times were a joy.
    I love the old Irish folk songs and the lovely accents. I do want to return to see how N Ireland has healed and to see Ireland’s “40 shades of green” (song by Johnny Cash).

    Reply
  33. I travelled to Northern Ireland with my dear friend during “the troubles”. This was a unique experience as we experienced the difficulty of life during those years and did see much that was destroyed during the flare-ups. We also drove into the countryside so she could show me her home town of Derry. I loved her family and still keep in touch with the ones that remain. Sadly my dear friend passed away. Everyone we met was so kind, hugged me on arrival and departure, fed me too well. All those tea times were a joy.
    I love the old Irish folk songs and the lovely accents. I do want to return to see how N Ireland has healed and to see Ireland’s “40 shades of green” (song by Johnny Cash).

    Reply
  34. I travelled to Northern Ireland with my dear friend during “the troubles”. This was a unique experience as we experienced the difficulty of life during those years and did see much that was destroyed during the flare-ups. We also drove into the countryside so she could show me her home town of Derry. I loved her family and still keep in touch with the ones that remain. Sadly my dear friend passed away. Everyone we met was so kind, hugged me on arrival and departure, fed me too well. All those tea times were a joy.
    I love the old Irish folk songs and the lovely accents. I do want to return to see how N Ireland has healed and to see Ireland’s “40 shades of green” (song by Johnny Cash).

    Reply
  35. I travelled to Northern Ireland with my dear friend during “the troubles”. This was a unique experience as we experienced the difficulty of life during those years and did see much that was destroyed during the flare-ups. We also drove into the countryside so she could show me her home town of Derry. I loved her family and still keep in touch with the ones that remain. Sadly my dear friend passed away. Everyone we met was so kind, hugged me on arrival and departure, fed me too well. All those tea times were a joy.
    I love the old Irish folk songs and the lovely accents. I do want to return to see how N Ireland has healed and to see Ireland’s “40 shades of green” (song by Johnny Cash).

    Reply
  36. Any part of Ireland is my favorite, at the time I am there.
    Any Irish pub, also my favorite while I am in it.
    And a drink that I learned about while in Ireland and love, but do not drink too often, is Mini Guinness (Baby Guinness) which is usually 3 parts coffee liqueur with 1 part Irish Cream slowly poured on the top, so that it looks like a miniature glass of Guinness Stout. (I also love Guinness Stout).

    Reply
  37. Any part of Ireland is my favorite, at the time I am there.
    Any Irish pub, also my favorite while I am in it.
    And a drink that I learned about while in Ireland and love, but do not drink too often, is Mini Guinness (Baby Guinness) which is usually 3 parts coffee liqueur with 1 part Irish Cream slowly poured on the top, so that it looks like a miniature glass of Guinness Stout. (I also love Guinness Stout).

    Reply
  38. Any part of Ireland is my favorite, at the time I am there.
    Any Irish pub, also my favorite while I am in it.
    And a drink that I learned about while in Ireland and love, but do not drink too often, is Mini Guinness (Baby Guinness) which is usually 3 parts coffee liqueur with 1 part Irish Cream slowly poured on the top, so that it looks like a miniature glass of Guinness Stout. (I also love Guinness Stout).

    Reply
  39. Any part of Ireland is my favorite, at the time I am there.
    Any Irish pub, also my favorite while I am in it.
    And a drink that I learned about while in Ireland and love, but do not drink too often, is Mini Guinness (Baby Guinness) which is usually 3 parts coffee liqueur with 1 part Irish Cream slowly poured on the top, so that it looks like a miniature glass of Guinness Stout. (I also love Guinness Stout).

    Reply
  40. Any part of Ireland is my favorite, at the time I am there.
    Any Irish pub, also my favorite while I am in it.
    And a drink that I learned about while in Ireland and love, but do not drink too often, is Mini Guinness (Baby Guinness) which is usually 3 parts coffee liqueur with 1 part Irish Cream slowly poured on the top, so that it looks like a miniature glass of Guinness Stout. (I also love Guinness Stout).

    Reply
  41. Oooh, thanks, Jenny. I’m contemplating buying a bottle to take to my annual writers’ retreat in a week or so. Not sure which versions have made it to Oz, but I’m looking forward to it.

    Reply
  42. Oooh, thanks, Jenny. I’m contemplating buying a bottle to take to my annual writers’ retreat in a week or so. Not sure which versions have made it to Oz, but I’m looking forward to it.

    Reply
  43. Oooh, thanks, Jenny. I’m contemplating buying a bottle to take to my annual writers’ retreat in a week or so. Not sure which versions have made it to Oz, but I’m looking forward to it.

    Reply
  44. Oooh, thanks, Jenny. I’m contemplating buying a bottle to take to my annual writers’ retreat in a week or so. Not sure which versions have made it to Oz, but I’m looking forward to it.

    Reply
  45. Oooh, thanks, Jenny. I’m contemplating buying a bottle to take to my annual writers’ retreat in a week or so. Not sure which versions have made it to Oz, but I’m looking forward to it.

    Reply
  46. Irish breakfast tea is great – I love strong black tea too. And my husband loves shepherd’s pie, though I’ve never attempted to make it. Hope you make it to Ireland someday soon, Maryellen!

    Reply
  47. Irish breakfast tea is great – I love strong black tea too. And my husband loves shepherd’s pie, though I’ve never attempted to make it. Hope you make it to Ireland someday soon, Maryellen!

    Reply
  48. Irish breakfast tea is great – I love strong black tea too. And my husband loves shepherd’s pie, though I’ve never attempted to make it. Hope you make it to Ireland someday soon, Maryellen!

    Reply
  49. Irish breakfast tea is great – I love strong black tea too. And my husband loves shepherd’s pie, though I’ve never attempted to make it. Hope you make it to Ireland someday soon, Maryellen!

    Reply
  50. Irish breakfast tea is great – I love strong black tea too. And my husband loves shepherd’s pie, though I’ve never attempted to make it. Hope you make it to Ireland someday soon, Maryellen!

    Reply
  51. Scones with butter and jam, that’s a great way to celebrate St. Patrick’s day (with some of Maryellen’s strong Irish breakfast tea!). Love the locations, Denise – my maternal grandfather was born in County Cork, though raised in NY State. I hope I can visit County Cork one day, it would mean a lot to the family!

    Reply
  52. Scones with butter and jam, that’s a great way to celebrate St. Patrick’s day (with some of Maryellen’s strong Irish breakfast tea!). Love the locations, Denise – my maternal grandfather was born in County Cork, though raised in NY State. I hope I can visit County Cork one day, it would mean a lot to the family!

    Reply
  53. Scones with butter and jam, that’s a great way to celebrate St. Patrick’s day (with some of Maryellen’s strong Irish breakfast tea!). Love the locations, Denise – my maternal grandfather was born in County Cork, though raised in NY State. I hope I can visit County Cork one day, it would mean a lot to the family!

    Reply
  54. Scones with butter and jam, that’s a great way to celebrate St. Patrick’s day (with some of Maryellen’s strong Irish breakfast tea!). Love the locations, Denise – my maternal grandfather was born in County Cork, though raised in NY State. I hope I can visit County Cork one day, it would mean a lot to the family!

    Reply
  55. Scones with butter and jam, that’s a great way to celebrate St. Patrick’s day (with some of Maryellen’s strong Irish breakfast tea!). Love the locations, Denise – my maternal grandfather was born in County Cork, though raised in NY State. I hope I can visit County Cork one day, it would mean a lot to the family!

    Reply
  56. Thank you, Teresa – you’re our resident expert on St. Patrick’s Day for sure! 😉 I so love Irish proverbs and sayings for their poetry and poignancy and wit. Top o’ the morning to you as well!

    Reply
  57. Thank you, Teresa – you’re our resident expert on St. Patrick’s Day for sure! 😉 I so love Irish proverbs and sayings for their poetry and poignancy and wit. Top o’ the morning to you as well!

    Reply
  58. Thank you, Teresa – you’re our resident expert on St. Patrick’s Day for sure! 😉 I so love Irish proverbs and sayings for their poetry and poignancy and wit. Top o’ the morning to you as well!

    Reply
  59. Thank you, Teresa – you’re our resident expert on St. Patrick’s Day for sure! 😉 I so love Irish proverbs and sayings for their poetry and poignancy and wit. Top o’ the morning to you as well!

    Reply
  60. Thank you, Teresa – you’re our resident expert on St. Patrick’s Day for sure! 😉 I so love Irish proverbs and sayings for their poetry and poignancy and wit. Top o’ the morning to you as well!

    Reply
  61. The Year of the French, yes! I read it years ago. A powerful novel and a powerful writer. And Yeats, absolutely. I must try some soda bread the next time we go to that great pub in Baltimore – the closest we can get for now. 😉

    Reply
  62. The Year of the French, yes! I read it years ago. A powerful novel and a powerful writer. And Yeats, absolutely. I must try some soda bread the next time we go to that great pub in Baltimore – the closest we can get for now. 😉

    Reply
  63. The Year of the French, yes! I read it years ago. A powerful novel and a powerful writer. And Yeats, absolutely. I must try some soda bread the next time we go to that great pub in Baltimore – the closest we can get for now. 😉

    Reply
  64. The Year of the French, yes! I read it years ago. A powerful novel and a powerful writer. And Yeats, absolutely. I must try some soda bread the next time we go to that great pub in Baltimore – the closest we can get for now. 😉

    Reply
  65. The Year of the French, yes! I read it years ago. A powerful novel and a powerful writer. And Yeats, absolutely. I must try some soda bread the next time we go to that great pub in Baltimore – the closest we can get for now. 😉

    Reply
  66. That’s a great story, Margot, thanks for sharing that memory. A lot of healing has happened in Ireland since then, I think. I hope you get the chance to go over there to see for yourself!

    Reply
  67. That’s a great story, Margot, thanks for sharing that memory. A lot of healing has happened in Ireland since then, I think. I hope you get the chance to go over there to see for yourself!

    Reply
  68. That’s a great story, Margot, thanks for sharing that memory. A lot of healing has happened in Ireland since then, I think. I hope you get the chance to go over there to see for yourself!

    Reply
  69. That’s a great story, Margot, thanks for sharing that memory. A lot of healing has happened in Ireland since then, I think. I hope you get the chance to go over there to see for yourself!

    Reply
  70. That’s a great story, Margot, thanks for sharing that memory. A lot of healing has happened in Ireland since then, I think. I hope you get the chance to go over there to see for yourself!

    Reply

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