Meet THE HIGHLAND GROOM

Susan Sarah here, on a hot, steamy day in August…

Recently my editor sent me a thick stack of coverflats for my upcoming Sarah Gabriel release, THE HIGHLAND GROOM, which will be out in January, 2009.  Okay, so August is a tad early for a January promo (I’ll be talking more about the book closer to its release date) – but the cover is so stunning that I couldn’t wait to share it with you all! So here you go – a bright feast for the eye on a Monday morning!

Highland_groom_cover I love the gorgeous rendering, the breathtaking detail (see below for a view of the hero and heroine), and the sumptuous golden palette. Those hot, sunny tones may not conjure Scotland immediately (and we’ll forgive the hero’s plaid sash; clearly he has more on his mind than the proper drape of a Highland plaidie), but this cover will be eye-catching on bookstore tables and shelves in cold, gray January.

Whisky_2 The golden tones were also inspired by the clear amber of a whisky dram, since whisky is very much part of the story – not only the illicit whisky that was at one time distilled in the Highland hills and smuggled out of the country, but a very special whisky made according to an old clan recipe, bestowed long ago by the fairies….

Highland_groom THE HIGHLAND GROOM, set in 1823, is the story of Fiona MacCarran, twin sister of James MacCarran, Viscount Struan (the hero of TO WED A HIGHLAND BRIDE) … and Dougal MacGregor, laird of a remote Highland glen and a smuggler of whisky. Dougal has kept a low profile for himself and his glen in order to protect their smuggling enterprise and the secret of the fairy whisky he makes. When a new teacher for the glen school arrives, sent by an Edinburgh charity society, Dougal and his uncles decide to send her away quickly—especially when they learn that her younger brother, Patrick, is a revenue officer in the region. Before the next cargo of whisky can be brought down to Loch Katrine and shipped out of Scotland, Fiona had better be shipped out of Glen Kinloch.

To claim her portion of the vast inheritance that will help her brothers, Fiona MacCarran must marry a wealthy Highlander, and soon. Arriving in the misty, poor Highland glen to teach English to Gaelic speakers, she despairs of finding an acceptable groom there. . . . until she meets the laird. But Dougal MacGregor is just a smuggler and a rogue—yet when he draws her into his arms, she forgets about her family obligations, the dictates of the law, and above all finding that perfect Highland groom. . . 

Highland_groom_detail Moving his finest whiskey—and fast—is the only way Dougal can protect his glen and its people from being bought out. That should be simple, but nothing proves easy with Fiona MacCarran around. He cannot allow himself to be distracted by the lovely schoolmistress—after all, a Highland rebel and a law-abiding Lowland lass could never have a future together. . .or could they? Soon Fiona and Dougal are caught between honor and desire, where the only true victory exists in sweet surrender. . . .

Twahbscan_3 THE HIGHLAND GROOM follows TO WED A HIGHLAND BRIDE, a series in which the four MacCarran siblings—twins James and Fiona, and their brothers Patrick and William—must meet the requirements of the odd clauses in their grandmother’s will: before they can inherit, each of them must carry out a task and meet a condition, mostly involving proof of fairies and finding true love. James, a geology professor as well as a viscount, must complete his grandmother’s book of Highland fairy lore—which he absotively, posilutely does not believe exist—and he must find himself a bride of fairy descent. When he meets whimsical Elspeth MacArthur, a Highland girl and a skilled weaver charms him instantly—and though her family urges her to marry the handsome viscount, she must hide the truth of her birth, and protect her family from an age-old curse that, once awakened, can only be prevented by the sort of love that James offers her, if only she can accept it….

I’ve been blessed with beautiful covers for all my Sarah Gabriel novels. I hope you’ll remember to look for THE HIGHLAND GROOM next January. Meanwhile, what do you think of the new look for the next installment in my series about the MacCarran clan and their fairy legends? And do you think the models, especially the heroine, are the same for HIGHLAND GROOM and HIGHLAND BRIDE? Could be… but she has just the right look for both Elspeth and Fiona, so I’m very pleased.

If you’d like a chance to win a coverflat and an excerpt of THE HIGHLAND GROOM, just leave a comment on this blog. Our Wench Whipster and erstwhile Blogmistress, Sherrie, will draw a winning name at random from that list.

Have a wonderful week!

Susan Sarah

50 thoughts on “Meet THE HIGHLAND GROOM”

  1. I love all your Sarah Gabriel books. I mostly read English Regency, but I’m glad I tried your Scottish books. A good story is a good story, especially one with the type of hero and heroine I like–both strong, decent people who’ve had their hard times, but who try to make their corner of the world a little better. And believe me, sometimes it’s pretty hard to find this type of hero and heroine. Keep them coming.

    Reply
  2. I love all your Sarah Gabriel books. I mostly read English Regency, but I’m glad I tried your Scottish books. A good story is a good story, especially one with the type of hero and heroine I like–both strong, decent people who’ve had their hard times, but who try to make their corner of the world a little better. And believe me, sometimes it’s pretty hard to find this type of hero and heroine. Keep them coming.

    Reply
  3. I love all your Sarah Gabriel books. I mostly read English Regency, but I’m glad I tried your Scottish books. A good story is a good story, especially one with the type of hero and heroine I like–both strong, decent people who’ve had their hard times, but who try to make their corner of the world a little better. And believe me, sometimes it’s pretty hard to find this type of hero and heroine. Keep them coming.

    Reply
  4. I love all your Sarah Gabriel books. I mostly read English Regency, but I’m glad I tried your Scottish books. A good story is a good story, especially one with the type of hero and heroine I like–both strong, decent people who’ve had their hard times, but who try to make their corner of the world a little better. And believe me, sometimes it’s pretty hard to find this type of hero and heroine. Keep them coming.

    Reply
  5. I love all your Sarah Gabriel books. I mostly read English Regency, but I’m glad I tried your Scottish books. A good story is a good story, especially one with the type of hero and heroine I like–both strong, decent people who’ve had their hard times, but who try to make their corner of the world a little better. And believe me, sometimes it’s pretty hard to find this type of hero and heroine. Keep them coming.

    Reply
  6. Beautiful cover, Susan Sarah! I love the sunset colors, though I hadn’t thought of the whiskey connection until you pointed it out. Was that your idea, or the art director’s?

    Reply
  7. Beautiful cover, Susan Sarah! I love the sunset colors, though I hadn’t thought of the whiskey connection until you pointed it out. Was that your idea, or the art director’s?

    Reply
  8. Beautiful cover, Susan Sarah! I love the sunset colors, though I hadn’t thought of the whiskey connection until you pointed it out. Was that your idea, or the art director’s?

    Reply
  9. Beautiful cover, Susan Sarah! I love the sunset colors, though I hadn’t thought of the whiskey connection until you pointed it out. Was that your idea, or the art director’s?

    Reply
  10. Beautiful cover, Susan Sarah! I love the sunset colors, though I hadn’t thought of the whiskey connection until you pointed it out. Was that your idea, or the art director’s?

    Reply
  11. Linda, thank you, it’s very good to know that you like the Sarah Gabriels so much. I often prefer writing more down-to-earth heroes and heroines. And it’s one reason that I love writing stories set in Scotland.
    Susan, while I didn’t suggest that golden theme to the art dept., I’m glad they chose that — it really does suit a whisky book.
    Whisky, whiskey … I spelled it throughout the ms. with an “ey” and the copyeditor changed it all to a “y.” The difference is locale, really, whether it’s Ireland, Scotland or USA, but publishing houses have their House Style, and that word is apparently on their list.
    Susan

    Reply
  12. Linda, thank you, it’s very good to know that you like the Sarah Gabriels so much. I often prefer writing more down-to-earth heroes and heroines. And it’s one reason that I love writing stories set in Scotland.
    Susan, while I didn’t suggest that golden theme to the art dept., I’m glad they chose that — it really does suit a whisky book.
    Whisky, whiskey … I spelled it throughout the ms. with an “ey” and the copyeditor changed it all to a “y.” The difference is locale, really, whether it’s Ireland, Scotland or USA, but publishing houses have their House Style, and that word is apparently on their list.
    Susan

    Reply
  13. Linda, thank you, it’s very good to know that you like the Sarah Gabriels so much. I often prefer writing more down-to-earth heroes and heroines. And it’s one reason that I love writing stories set in Scotland.
    Susan, while I didn’t suggest that golden theme to the art dept., I’m glad they chose that — it really does suit a whisky book.
    Whisky, whiskey … I spelled it throughout the ms. with an “ey” and the copyeditor changed it all to a “y.” The difference is locale, really, whether it’s Ireland, Scotland or USA, but publishing houses have their House Style, and that word is apparently on their list.
    Susan

    Reply
  14. Linda, thank you, it’s very good to know that you like the Sarah Gabriels so much. I often prefer writing more down-to-earth heroes and heroines. And it’s one reason that I love writing stories set in Scotland.
    Susan, while I didn’t suggest that golden theme to the art dept., I’m glad they chose that — it really does suit a whisky book.
    Whisky, whiskey … I spelled it throughout the ms. with an “ey” and the copyeditor changed it all to a “y.” The difference is locale, really, whether it’s Ireland, Scotland or USA, but publishing houses have their House Style, and that word is apparently on their list.
    Susan

    Reply
  15. Linda, thank you, it’s very good to know that you like the Sarah Gabriels so much. I often prefer writing more down-to-earth heroes and heroines. And it’s one reason that I love writing stories set in Scotland.
    Susan, while I didn’t suggest that golden theme to the art dept., I’m glad they chose that — it really does suit a whisky book.
    Whisky, whiskey … I spelled it throughout the ms. with an “ey” and the copyeditor changed it all to a “y.” The difference is locale, really, whether it’s Ireland, Scotland or USA, but publishing houses have their House Style, and that word is apparently on their list.
    Susan

    Reply
  16. Susan Sarah, I too love your Sarah Gabriel books. I never read Scotland-set books before yours, and you really converted me.
    The cover flat of “Stealing Sophie” you were kind enough to send my way several years ago is still framed and hanging in my eldest daughter’s room. I appreciate your covers because the hero and heroine are (mostly) pictured with (most of) their clothes (mostly) on.
    This new cover for “Highland Groom” is very lovely, but the pose seems a little bit “not found in nature” to me. . .oh well, that’s art (and business) I suppose!
    Thank you for writing and keep em coming!
    Blessings, Melinda

    Reply
  17. Susan Sarah, I too love your Sarah Gabriel books. I never read Scotland-set books before yours, and you really converted me.
    The cover flat of “Stealing Sophie” you were kind enough to send my way several years ago is still framed and hanging in my eldest daughter’s room. I appreciate your covers because the hero and heroine are (mostly) pictured with (most of) their clothes (mostly) on.
    This new cover for “Highland Groom” is very lovely, but the pose seems a little bit “not found in nature” to me. . .oh well, that’s art (and business) I suppose!
    Thank you for writing and keep em coming!
    Blessings, Melinda

    Reply
  18. Susan Sarah, I too love your Sarah Gabriel books. I never read Scotland-set books before yours, and you really converted me.
    The cover flat of “Stealing Sophie” you were kind enough to send my way several years ago is still framed and hanging in my eldest daughter’s room. I appreciate your covers because the hero and heroine are (mostly) pictured with (most of) their clothes (mostly) on.
    This new cover for “Highland Groom” is very lovely, but the pose seems a little bit “not found in nature” to me. . .oh well, that’s art (and business) I suppose!
    Thank you for writing and keep em coming!
    Blessings, Melinda

    Reply
  19. Susan Sarah, I too love your Sarah Gabriel books. I never read Scotland-set books before yours, and you really converted me.
    The cover flat of “Stealing Sophie” you were kind enough to send my way several years ago is still framed and hanging in my eldest daughter’s room. I appreciate your covers because the hero and heroine are (mostly) pictured with (most of) their clothes (mostly) on.
    This new cover for “Highland Groom” is very lovely, but the pose seems a little bit “not found in nature” to me. . .oh well, that’s art (and business) I suppose!
    Thank you for writing and keep em coming!
    Blessings, Melinda

    Reply
  20. Susan Sarah, I too love your Sarah Gabriel books. I never read Scotland-set books before yours, and you really converted me.
    The cover flat of “Stealing Sophie” you were kind enough to send my way several years ago is still framed and hanging in my eldest daughter’s room. I appreciate your covers because the hero and heroine are (mostly) pictured with (most of) their clothes (mostly) on.
    This new cover for “Highland Groom” is very lovely, but the pose seems a little bit “not found in nature” to me. . .oh well, that’s art (and business) I suppose!
    Thank you for writing and keep em coming!
    Blessings, Melinda

    Reply
  21. Susan, LOVE the cover! Almost like looking through a rich, crystal whiskey at the characters. As for the pose, it strikes me as very natural, like they’re looking out over the lock, she’s standing behind him, shielded from the wind, when he says something romantic and turns his head to bestow a kiss.
    Nice!

    Reply
  22. Susan, LOVE the cover! Almost like looking through a rich, crystal whiskey at the characters. As for the pose, it strikes me as very natural, like they’re looking out over the lock, she’s standing behind him, shielded from the wind, when he says something romantic and turns his head to bestow a kiss.
    Nice!

    Reply
  23. Susan, LOVE the cover! Almost like looking through a rich, crystal whiskey at the characters. As for the pose, it strikes me as very natural, like they’re looking out over the lock, she’s standing behind him, shielded from the wind, when he says something romantic and turns his head to bestow a kiss.
    Nice!

    Reply
  24. Susan, LOVE the cover! Almost like looking through a rich, crystal whiskey at the characters. As for the pose, it strikes me as very natural, like they’re looking out over the lock, she’s standing behind him, shielded from the wind, when he says something romantic and turns his head to bestow a kiss.
    Nice!

    Reply
  25. Susan, LOVE the cover! Almost like looking through a rich, crystal whiskey at the characters. As for the pose, it strikes me as very natural, like they’re looking out over the lock, she’s standing behind him, shielded from the wind, when he says something romantic and turns his head to bestow a kiss.
    Nice!

    Reply
  26. Hmm, I think I spell whiskey – ey. I wonder what that says about my locale? I would never have equated the colour of the book with the drink, but then again, I’m not much of a drinker.
    The cover looks lovely – the colours very different from anything I’ve seen lately (but maybe I don’t get out much), but the pose looks a little unnatural, and surely she must be standing on a rock to be able to reach his cheek from that position 😉

    Reply
  27. Hmm, I think I spell whiskey – ey. I wonder what that says about my locale? I would never have equated the colour of the book with the drink, but then again, I’m not much of a drinker.
    The cover looks lovely – the colours very different from anything I’ve seen lately (but maybe I don’t get out much), but the pose looks a little unnatural, and surely she must be standing on a rock to be able to reach his cheek from that position 😉

    Reply
  28. Hmm, I think I spell whiskey – ey. I wonder what that says about my locale? I would never have equated the colour of the book with the drink, but then again, I’m not much of a drinker.
    The cover looks lovely – the colours very different from anything I’ve seen lately (but maybe I don’t get out much), but the pose looks a little unnatural, and surely she must be standing on a rock to be able to reach his cheek from that position 😉

    Reply
  29. Hmm, I think I spell whiskey – ey. I wonder what that says about my locale? I would never have equated the colour of the book with the drink, but then again, I’m not much of a drinker.
    The cover looks lovely – the colours very different from anything I’ve seen lately (but maybe I don’t get out much), but the pose looks a little unnatural, and surely she must be standing on a rock to be able to reach his cheek from that position 😉

    Reply
  30. Hmm, I think I spell whiskey – ey. I wonder what that says about my locale? I would never have equated the colour of the book with the drink, but then again, I’m not much of a drinker.
    The cover looks lovely – the colours very different from anything I’ve seen lately (but maybe I don’t get out much), but the pose looks a little unnatural, and surely she must be standing on a rock to be able to reach his cheek from that position 😉

    Reply
  31. I agree the pose is a bit unusual and would take a little thought to adapt in real life (and I love Melinda’s assessment that it’s a pose “not found in Nature” *g*). Since more than one scene in the book involves steep, rocky Highland hillsides, this could be what’s going on here. Looks to me as if Dougal is standing slightly below Fiona on the hillside, and she’s leaning forward to whisper and leave a kiss as he leans back to accommodate her … hey, works for me. I think it’s very romantic with that spin on it!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  32. I agree the pose is a bit unusual and would take a little thought to adapt in real life (and I love Melinda’s assessment that it’s a pose “not found in Nature” *g*). Since more than one scene in the book involves steep, rocky Highland hillsides, this could be what’s going on here. Looks to me as if Dougal is standing slightly below Fiona on the hillside, and she’s leaning forward to whisper and leave a kiss as he leans back to accommodate her … hey, works for me. I think it’s very romantic with that spin on it!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  33. I agree the pose is a bit unusual and would take a little thought to adapt in real life (and I love Melinda’s assessment that it’s a pose “not found in Nature” *g*). Since more than one scene in the book involves steep, rocky Highland hillsides, this could be what’s going on here. Looks to me as if Dougal is standing slightly below Fiona on the hillside, and she’s leaning forward to whisper and leave a kiss as he leans back to accommodate her … hey, works for me. I think it’s very romantic with that spin on it!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  34. I agree the pose is a bit unusual and would take a little thought to adapt in real life (and I love Melinda’s assessment that it’s a pose “not found in Nature” *g*). Since more than one scene in the book involves steep, rocky Highland hillsides, this could be what’s going on here. Looks to me as if Dougal is standing slightly below Fiona on the hillside, and she’s leaning forward to whisper and leave a kiss as he leans back to accommodate her … hey, works for me. I think it’s very romantic with that spin on it!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  35. I agree the pose is a bit unusual and would take a little thought to adapt in real life (and I love Melinda’s assessment that it’s a pose “not found in Nature” *g*). Since more than one scene in the book involves steep, rocky Highland hillsides, this could be what’s going on here. Looks to me as if Dougal is standing slightly below Fiona on the hillside, and she’s leaning forward to whisper and leave a kiss as he leans back to accommodate her … hey, works for me. I think it’s very romantic with that spin on it!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  36. Also, it’s great to know that some of you are Scottish converts, even venturing over to visit from Regencyland, after trying the Sarah Gabriel stories. There’s nothing quite like a Highland holiday! 😉
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  37. Also, it’s great to know that some of you are Scottish converts, even venturing over to visit from Regencyland, after trying the Sarah Gabriel stories. There’s nothing quite like a Highland holiday! 😉
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  38. Also, it’s great to know that some of you are Scottish converts, even venturing over to visit from Regencyland, after trying the Sarah Gabriel stories. There’s nothing quite like a Highland holiday! 😉
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  39. Also, it’s great to know that some of you are Scottish converts, even venturing over to visit from Regencyland, after trying the Sarah Gabriel stories. There’s nothing quite like a Highland holiday! 😉
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  40. Also, it’s great to know that some of you are Scottish converts, even venturing over to visit from Regencyland, after trying the Sarah Gabriel stories. There’s nothing quite like a Highland holiday! 😉
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  41. I love, love, love Highland romances and To Wed was no exception. I love the scene in the rain after the fairies…okay I won’t give it away for anyone who hasn’t read it, but that scene and the whole story were wonderful.
    On the cover art, I’m afraid I’m the dissenting voice here. I prefer plain covers or covers of scenery b/c I want the characters left entirely to my own imagination. Plus, things like the sash, for example, and incorrect period details really bother me! And, I think it kind of misrepresents the books, in a way, because there’s a lot more to the stories than just their clothes falling off. The story is not simply a vehicle for sex scenes, right? Anyway, that’s all just my opinion.
    Keep the Highland stories coming! 🙂

    Reply
  42. I love, love, love Highland romances and To Wed was no exception. I love the scene in the rain after the fairies…okay I won’t give it away for anyone who hasn’t read it, but that scene and the whole story were wonderful.
    On the cover art, I’m afraid I’m the dissenting voice here. I prefer plain covers or covers of scenery b/c I want the characters left entirely to my own imagination. Plus, things like the sash, for example, and incorrect period details really bother me! And, I think it kind of misrepresents the books, in a way, because there’s a lot more to the stories than just their clothes falling off. The story is not simply a vehicle for sex scenes, right? Anyway, that’s all just my opinion.
    Keep the Highland stories coming! 🙂

    Reply
  43. I love, love, love Highland romances and To Wed was no exception. I love the scene in the rain after the fairies…okay I won’t give it away for anyone who hasn’t read it, but that scene and the whole story were wonderful.
    On the cover art, I’m afraid I’m the dissenting voice here. I prefer plain covers or covers of scenery b/c I want the characters left entirely to my own imagination. Plus, things like the sash, for example, and incorrect period details really bother me! And, I think it kind of misrepresents the books, in a way, because there’s a lot more to the stories than just their clothes falling off. The story is not simply a vehicle for sex scenes, right? Anyway, that’s all just my opinion.
    Keep the Highland stories coming! 🙂

    Reply
  44. I love, love, love Highland romances and To Wed was no exception. I love the scene in the rain after the fairies…okay I won’t give it away for anyone who hasn’t read it, but that scene and the whole story were wonderful.
    On the cover art, I’m afraid I’m the dissenting voice here. I prefer plain covers or covers of scenery b/c I want the characters left entirely to my own imagination. Plus, things like the sash, for example, and incorrect period details really bother me! And, I think it kind of misrepresents the books, in a way, because there’s a lot more to the stories than just their clothes falling off. The story is not simply a vehicle for sex scenes, right? Anyway, that’s all just my opinion.
    Keep the Highland stories coming! 🙂

    Reply
  45. I love, love, love Highland romances and To Wed was no exception. I love the scene in the rain after the fairies…okay I won’t give it away for anyone who hasn’t read it, but that scene and the whole story were wonderful.
    On the cover art, I’m afraid I’m the dissenting voice here. I prefer plain covers or covers of scenery b/c I want the characters left entirely to my own imagination. Plus, things like the sash, for example, and incorrect period details really bother me! And, I think it kind of misrepresents the books, in a way, because there’s a lot more to the stories than just their clothes falling off. The story is not simply a vehicle for sex scenes, right? Anyway, that’s all just my opinion.
    Keep the Highland stories coming! 🙂

    Reply

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