Introducing Kate Forsyth

Anne here, introducing Dr Kate Forsyth, who I first met at a Romance Writers of Australia conference, where she was speaking. I hadn't read her, so before the conference I bought one of her books, Rhiannon's Ride, loved it, and immediately glommed everything she'd written. She's a multi-award-winning author who's written for kids, young adults and adults, and is currently writing historical/fantasy fiction inspired by fairytales. KateForsythPic

Her book BITTER GREENS, a reworking of the fairy tale, Rapunzel, was awarded the 2015 American Libraries Association prize for Best Historical Fiction, and was listed as Library Journal (US) Best Historical Novel, as well as many other awards.  THE WILD GIRL is about Dortchen Wild, who grew up next door to the brothers Grimm and told them some of their most powerful and compelling stories. It's already garnering some wonderful reviews, including a starred review from Booklist.

BitterGreensJuliet Marillier described Bitter Greens as: "one of those books that breaks out of recognized genre moulds – it’s part historical novel, part fairy tale, and part serious examination of gender roles, power and cruelty in 16th and 17th century France and Italy."

Anne: Bitter Greens is a retelling of the Rapunzel story. Why retell such a well known story? And what's new about this retelling for readers?

Kate: Rapunzel is a story that has haunted me since I was a little girl, and I spent a lot of time in hospital after being attacked by a dog as a baby. That was when I first read Grimm's Fairy Tales – the story of a girl locked away in a tower against her will really resonated with me, since I was locked away in a hospital against mine. I’ve loved both fairy tales and retellings of fairy tales ever since, and have long wanted to retell Rapunzel in my own way. But it's a story that is full of challenges, not least of which is writing a compelling and dramatic story about a girl who can only walk a few steps in any direction.

It's also a story that raises a lot of questions. For example, why did the witch want to lock the girl in a tower? Why was Rapunzel’s hair so impossibly long? Why didn’t Rapunzel ask the prince to bring a rope so she could climb down and escape? I wanted to truly engage with these problems, to find answers that would seem real and plausible, rather than simply sidestepping them, as most retellings of the tale seem to do.

I am also – as a writer and storyteller – very interested in the tellers of tales, and so I was fascinated by the life story of Charlotte-Rose de la Force, the woman who wrote the tale as it is best known. I wove together her story with that of her tale she told, to create something new and very different from most fairy tale retellings.

Anne: It's certainly a fresh and fascinating approach. Romance writers and readers still hunger for fairy-tale endings— the happy ones — but these books aren't genre romance and yet they speak to adults of all tastes. Why do you think fairy-tales still have such a strong appeal?  New-Wild-Girl-2

Kate: Fairy tales are stories of true love, triumph and transformation. They arise out of the deepest longings of the human heart, and offer us some hope that these dreams may one day come true. We need dreams, we need to imagine what kind of world we want, we need to have hope that goodness and love can triumph over evil and hatred. Fairy tales both console us and compel us; they give us a star-map for the future and a way of negotiating the dilemmas of the now.

Anne: Beautifully expressed. I was fascinated to realize that both Charlotte-Rose de la Force in Bitter Greens and Dortchen Wild in The Wild Girl were real people and not characters you created. Tell us about them.

Kate: I first discovered Charlotte-Rose de la Force while researching the history of the 'Rapunzel' tale and knew at once I had to tell her story. She was such a strong and fascinating woman, and her life was an absolute gift to a novelist – full of romance and drama. She was cousin to Louis XIV, the Sun King, and maid of honour to the queen; she had affairs with an actor and a wicked marquis; she was implicated in a court scandal involving witches; and she wrote her fairy tale after being banished to a convent for her wicked ways. How could I not write her story?

Originally I planned that Charlotte-Rose's story would be simply a framing device for my primary narrative, the story of the girl and the witch and the tower. But she absolutely took control and insisted that her story was of far more importance, and so ends up being the most important character in the book (and an absolute delight to spend so many years with!)     

Wild-349Similarly, I just stumbled upon the unknown story of the forbidden romance between Wilhelm Grimm and Dortchen Wild. Dortchen grew up next door to the Grimm family, and was best friends with Lotte Grimm, the only girl in the family. She was one of the primary oral sources of the Grimm Brothers' famous fairy tale collection, telling Wilhelm stories such as Hansel & Gretel, The Singing Bone, The Frog King, Six Swans, Rumpelstiltskin, and The Elves & the Shoemaker.

Her father disapproved of the impoverished Grimm brothers and so Dortchen had to meet Wilhelm in secret to tell him her stories – they met in the forest, in the garden, in her sister's summerhouse, at the house of friends – and, of course, feel deeply in love. But marriage was impossible without her father's approval. The story of how they struggled together against poverty, illness, cruelty and the calamitous effects of the Napoleonic War was so deeply moving, I had to tell their story.   

Anne: It's a wonderfully moving tale. (That's a drawing of Dortchen, done by Wilhelm ten years before they married. If you'd like to read more about Dortchen Wild, click here. There's also more on Kate's website

You intensively research your writing, Kate — tell us a little about some of the more fun/interesting aspects of your research.

Kate: The research for my novels can take a very long time (almost seven years for Bitter Greens!) but it is always fascinating. I find out such strange and marvellous things. For example, did you know that, in Venice, women suspected of being witches were buried with a brick jammed into their jaw, to stop them eating their way out of the grave? And at the royal court of Versailles, women each had their own special page-boy who carried their chamber-pot from ballroom to the gambling tables to the dining hall. Whenever a court lady needed to relieve herself, she would beckon him with her fan and the page-boy would trot up, slide the chamber-pot under her voluminous skirts, and she would do her business there and then, wherever she happened to be (underwear had not yet been invented). 

Anne: Extraordinary!  Can we have a short excerpt from Bitter Greens please? 

Kate: Here is the opening paragraph of Bitter Greens:
“I had always been a great talker and teller of tales. 'You should put a lock on that tongue of yours. It's long enough and sharp enough to slit your own throat,' our guardian warned me, the night before I left home to go to the royal court at Versailles … I just laughed. 'Don't you know a woman's tongue is her sword? You wouldn't want me to let my only weapon rust, would you?” 

 You can read the rest of the opening pages here.  

Anne: Charlotte-Rose was an amazing character — fascinating and so strong! Now, changing the subject somewhat, I'm currently tinged a delicate envious green because of where you are at the moment and what you're doing. Tell us about it. Kate writing in the dragon tree_New

Kate: As I write this, I am in the beautiful Cotswolds in the UK. I run a writers' retreat here every year. The retreat is very unusual in that it is aimed for writers at any stage of their creative journey. Some have never written a word, others have been published but are seeking to re-connect with their creativity. The whole course is aimed to inspire the participants, to fling wide the doors of their unconscious, to help them find joy again.

The mornings are spent in class, talking and laughing and sharing and learning. The afternoons are spent in private guided tours to Oxford, the beautiful secret treasures of the Cotswolds, to Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwick Castle, and Stonehenge. On the final night we have a literary dinner with an amazing Mystery Guest at the most beautiful old manor house set in gardens and parklands (it has its own little church). It really is the most wondrous week – some participants describe it as life-changing – and I feel very blessed to be a part of it.

Anne: It sounds blissful — maybe some day I'll be lucky enough to join you. Thank you, Kate for joining us on Word Wenches. (If you'd like to read a much more detailed interview with Kate, there's one here.)

Kate: Thank you, Anne, delighted to be here.

Kate will be giving a copy of either Bitter Greens or The Wild Girl to someone who leaves a response to this question: What's your favorite fairy tale? 

300 thoughts on “Introducing Kate Forsyth”

  1. Wonderful post Anne! Thank you for interviewing Kate Forsyth. I love her books, both adult and YA, and my grandchildren are loving her children’s books. (I bought “Two Selkie Stories from Scotland” just for myself though!) The Cotswolds’ writing retreat does sound wonderful, perhaps one day.

    Reply
  2. Wonderful post Anne! Thank you for interviewing Kate Forsyth. I love her books, both adult and YA, and my grandchildren are loving her children’s books. (I bought “Two Selkie Stories from Scotland” just for myself though!) The Cotswolds’ writing retreat does sound wonderful, perhaps one day.

    Reply
  3. Wonderful post Anne! Thank you for interviewing Kate Forsyth. I love her books, both adult and YA, and my grandchildren are loving her children’s books. (I bought “Two Selkie Stories from Scotland” just for myself though!) The Cotswolds’ writing retreat does sound wonderful, perhaps one day.

    Reply
  4. Wonderful post Anne! Thank you for interviewing Kate Forsyth. I love her books, both adult and YA, and my grandchildren are loving her children’s books. (I bought “Two Selkie Stories from Scotland” just for myself though!) The Cotswolds’ writing retreat does sound wonderful, perhaps one day.

    Reply
  5. Wonderful post Anne! Thank you for interviewing Kate Forsyth. I love her books, both adult and YA, and my grandchildren are loving her children’s books. (I bought “Two Selkie Stories from Scotland” just for myself though!) The Cotswolds’ writing retreat does sound wonderful, perhaps one day.

    Reply
  6. Favorite fairy tale? The Twelve Dancing Princesses. Deep dark secret: when I was in high school I took ballet lessons. One year the recital was a production of this fairy tale and I had a leading role . . . as the prince (in some versions the hero is a soldier). Why? Officially because I was the tallest girl in the advanced class, but the fact that I was also the least well endowed probably had more to do with it!

    Reply
  7. Favorite fairy tale? The Twelve Dancing Princesses. Deep dark secret: when I was in high school I took ballet lessons. One year the recital was a production of this fairy tale and I had a leading role . . . as the prince (in some versions the hero is a soldier). Why? Officially because I was the tallest girl in the advanced class, but the fact that I was also the least well endowed probably had more to do with it!

    Reply
  8. Favorite fairy tale? The Twelve Dancing Princesses. Deep dark secret: when I was in high school I took ballet lessons. One year the recital was a production of this fairy tale and I had a leading role . . . as the prince (in some versions the hero is a soldier). Why? Officially because I was the tallest girl in the advanced class, but the fact that I was also the least well endowed probably had more to do with it!

    Reply
  9. Favorite fairy tale? The Twelve Dancing Princesses. Deep dark secret: when I was in high school I took ballet lessons. One year the recital was a production of this fairy tale and I had a leading role . . . as the prince (in some versions the hero is a soldier). Why? Officially because I was the tallest girl in the advanced class, but the fact that I was also the least well endowed probably had more to do with it!

    Reply
  10. Favorite fairy tale? The Twelve Dancing Princesses. Deep dark secret: when I was in high school I took ballet lessons. One year the recital was a production of this fairy tale and I had a leading role . . . as the prince (in some versions the hero is a soldier). Why? Officially because I was the tallest girl in the advanced class, but the fact that I was also the least well endowed probably had more to do with it!

    Reply
  11. Oh, the Cotswolds. I’m very jealous – what a gorgeous place to be.
    I always loved the drama and tragedy of The Little Mermaid, and so when Disney released their version I went to the cinema (still a child) so excited.
    And they gave it a happy ending! And there were singing fish! Even as a child I was disgusted! Now I meet so many people who think that is the real story, and it drives me insane.

    Reply
  12. Oh, the Cotswolds. I’m very jealous – what a gorgeous place to be.
    I always loved the drama and tragedy of The Little Mermaid, and so when Disney released their version I went to the cinema (still a child) so excited.
    And they gave it a happy ending! And there were singing fish! Even as a child I was disgusted! Now I meet so many people who think that is the real story, and it drives me insane.

    Reply
  13. Oh, the Cotswolds. I’m very jealous – what a gorgeous place to be.
    I always loved the drama and tragedy of The Little Mermaid, and so when Disney released their version I went to the cinema (still a child) so excited.
    And they gave it a happy ending! And there were singing fish! Even as a child I was disgusted! Now I meet so many people who think that is the real story, and it drives me insane.

    Reply
  14. Oh, the Cotswolds. I’m very jealous – what a gorgeous place to be.
    I always loved the drama and tragedy of The Little Mermaid, and so when Disney released their version I went to the cinema (still a child) so excited.
    And they gave it a happy ending! And there were singing fish! Even as a child I was disgusted! Now I meet so many people who think that is the real story, and it drives me insane.

    Reply
  15. Oh, the Cotswolds. I’m very jealous – what a gorgeous place to be.
    I always loved the drama and tragedy of The Little Mermaid, and so when Disney released their version I went to the cinema (still a child) so excited.
    And they gave it a happy ending! And there were singing fish! Even as a child I was disgusted! Now I meet so many people who think that is the real story, and it drives me insane.

    Reply
  16. Anne, how wonderful of you to bring Dr. Kate Forsyth to us! I regret to say I was unfamiliar with her work, but that obviously MUST change! These stories woven of history and fairy tale and deep thought sound enchanting. As for the Cotwolds–sigh. I lived two years in Oxford, and I so miss the Cotswolds!!!
    I have no particular favorite fairy tale–I devoured Greek and Romance myths and legends indiscriminately. Loved them all.

    Reply
  17. Anne, how wonderful of you to bring Dr. Kate Forsyth to us! I regret to say I was unfamiliar with her work, but that obviously MUST change! These stories woven of history and fairy tale and deep thought sound enchanting. As for the Cotwolds–sigh. I lived two years in Oxford, and I so miss the Cotswolds!!!
    I have no particular favorite fairy tale–I devoured Greek and Romance myths and legends indiscriminately. Loved them all.

    Reply
  18. Anne, how wonderful of you to bring Dr. Kate Forsyth to us! I regret to say I was unfamiliar with her work, but that obviously MUST change! These stories woven of history and fairy tale and deep thought sound enchanting. As for the Cotwolds–sigh. I lived two years in Oxford, and I so miss the Cotswolds!!!
    I have no particular favorite fairy tale–I devoured Greek and Romance myths and legends indiscriminately. Loved them all.

    Reply
  19. Anne, how wonderful of you to bring Dr. Kate Forsyth to us! I regret to say I was unfamiliar with her work, but that obviously MUST change! These stories woven of history and fairy tale and deep thought sound enchanting. As for the Cotwolds–sigh. I lived two years in Oxford, and I so miss the Cotswolds!!!
    I have no particular favorite fairy tale–I devoured Greek and Romance myths and legends indiscriminately. Loved them all.

    Reply
  20. Anne, how wonderful of you to bring Dr. Kate Forsyth to us! I regret to say I was unfamiliar with her work, but that obviously MUST change! These stories woven of history and fairy tale and deep thought sound enchanting. As for the Cotwolds–sigh. I lived two years in Oxford, and I so miss the Cotswolds!!!
    I have no particular favorite fairy tale–I devoured Greek and Romance myths and legends indiscriminately. Loved them all.

    Reply
  21. I have always liked the story of Rapunzel, and am interested now in reading Bitter Greens. But like Mary Jo, I have always been more partial to Greek and Roman mythology ever since I was a child than I was to fairy tales. But having 2 daughters, we have read our fair share of princess stories, Disney and otherwise.

    Reply
  22. I have always liked the story of Rapunzel, and am interested now in reading Bitter Greens. But like Mary Jo, I have always been more partial to Greek and Roman mythology ever since I was a child than I was to fairy tales. But having 2 daughters, we have read our fair share of princess stories, Disney and otherwise.

    Reply
  23. I have always liked the story of Rapunzel, and am interested now in reading Bitter Greens. But like Mary Jo, I have always been more partial to Greek and Roman mythology ever since I was a child than I was to fairy tales. But having 2 daughters, we have read our fair share of princess stories, Disney and otherwise.

    Reply
  24. I have always liked the story of Rapunzel, and am interested now in reading Bitter Greens. But like Mary Jo, I have always been more partial to Greek and Roman mythology ever since I was a child than I was to fairy tales. But having 2 daughters, we have read our fair share of princess stories, Disney and otherwise.

    Reply
  25. I have always liked the story of Rapunzel, and am interested now in reading Bitter Greens. But like Mary Jo, I have always been more partial to Greek and Roman mythology ever since I was a child than I was to fairy tales. But having 2 daughters, we have read our fair share of princess stories, Disney and otherwise.

    Reply
  26. Favorite Story: Rumpelstiltskin
    I always thought it was so unfair that a girl’s dad got her into the bad situation of having to “turn straw into gold.” She did what she had to do to stay alive (make a bargain with the imp!) Then when she became a queen, and the Imp came back for her child she was PROACTIVE and went out to find his name herself. You could tell she wasn’t quick to adopt the styles of pampered royalty. I liked that she took control of her own future since she wasn’t able to do this as a child.

    Reply
  27. Favorite Story: Rumpelstiltskin
    I always thought it was so unfair that a girl’s dad got her into the bad situation of having to “turn straw into gold.” She did what she had to do to stay alive (make a bargain with the imp!) Then when she became a queen, and the Imp came back for her child she was PROACTIVE and went out to find his name herself. You could tell she wasn’t quick to adopt the styles of pampered royalty. I liked that she took control of her own future since she wasn’t able to do this as a child.

    Reply
  28. Favorite Story: Rumpelstiltskin
    I always thought it was so unfair that a girl’s dad got her into the bad situation of having to “turn straw into gold.” She did what she had to do to stay alive (make a bargain with the imp!) Then when she became a queen, and the Imp came back for her child she was PROACTIVE and went out to find his name herself. You could tell she wasn’t quick to adopt the styles of pampered royalty. I liked that she took control of her own future since she wasn’t able to do this as a child.

    Reply
  29. Favorite Story: Rumpelstiltskin
    I always thought it was so unfair that a girl’s dad got her into the bad situation of having to “turn straw into gold.” She did what she had to do to stay alive (make a bargain with the imp!) Then when she became a queen, and the Imp came back for her child she was PROACTIVE and went out to find his name herself. You could tell she wasn’t quick to adopt the styles of pampered royalty. I liked that she took control of her own future since she wasn’t able to do this as a child.

    Reply
  30. Favorite Story: Rumpelstiltskin
    I always thought it was so unfair that a girl’s dad got her into the bad situation of having to “turn straw into gold.” She did what she had to do to stay alive (make a bargain with the imp!) Then when she became a queen, and the Imp came back for her child she was PROACTIVE and went out to find his name herself. You could tell she wasn’t quick to adopt the styles of pampered royalty. I liked that she took control of her own future since she wasn’t able to do this as a child.

    Reply
  31. Thanks for the introduction to an author I look forward to getting know. The fairy tale I most relate to is ‘King Thunderbolt’. It is a lesser known story of a princess who turns her nose up to every suitor. Her father says she has to marry the very next man who offers for her hand. The man is a poor slob. She goes home with him, passing lush farm lands and beautiful estates. It is all the property of King Thunderbolt, a suitor she was particularly harsh in refusing. In the end she corrects her selfish ways. The begger turns out to be King Thunderbolt. They live happily ever after. I don’t think I was a selfish child, but the story resonanted with me.

    Reply
  32. Thanks for the introduction to an author I look forward to getting know. The fairy tale I most relate to is ‘King Thunderbolt’. It is a lesser known story of a princess who turns her nose up to every suitor. Her father says she has to marry the very next man who offers for her hand. The man is a poor slob. She goes home with him, passing lush farm lands and beautiful estates. It is all the property of King Thunderbolt, a suitor she was particularly harsh in refusing. In the end she corrects her selfish ways. The begger turns out to be King Thunderbolt. They live happily ever after. I don’t think I was a selfish child, but the story resonanted with me.

    Reply
  33. Thanks for the introduction to an author I look forward to getting know. The fairy tale I most relate to is ‘King Thunderbolt’. It is a lesser known story of a princess who turns her nose up to every suitor. Her father says she has to marry the very next man who offers for her hand. The man is a poor slob. She goes home with him, passing lush farm lands and beautiful estates. It is all the property of King Thunderbolt, a suitor she was particularly harsh in refusing. In the end she corrects her selfish ways. The begger turns out to be King Thunderbolt. They live happily ever after. I don’t think I was a selfish child, but the story resonanted with me.

    Reply
  34. Thanks for the introduction to an author I look forward to getting know. The fairy tale I most relate to is ‘King Thunderbolt’. It is a lesser known story of a princess who turns her nose up to every suitor. Her father says she has to marry the very next man who offers for her hand. The man is a poor slob. She goes home with him, passing lush farm lands and beautiful estates. It is all the property of King Thunderbolt, a suitor she was particularly harsh in refusing. In the end she corrects her selfish ways. The begger turns out to be King Thunderbolt. They live happily ever after. I don’t think I was a selfish child, but the story resonanted with me.

    Reply
  35. Thanks for the introduction to an author I look forward to getting know. The fairy tale I most relate to is ‘King Thunderbolt’. It is a lesser known story of a princess who turns her nose up to every suitor. Her father says she has to marry the very next man who offers for her hand. The man is a poor slob. She goes home with him, passing lush farm lands and beautiful estates. It is all the property of King Thunderbolt, a suitor she was particularly harsh in refusing. In the end she corrects her selfish ways. The begger turns out to be King Thunderbolt. They live happily ever after. I don’t think I was a selfish child, but the story resonanted with me.

    Reply
  36. What a beautiful and insightful interview with Dr. Forsyth. Her perspective is so fascinating, I feel compelled to read her books now.
    I always loved the story of Rapunzel. When I was a child, my hair was almost to my tailbone, and I thought, if I were Rapunzel I would anchor my hair to the side of the window I looked out of and use it to save myself. Why wait for someone to do it for me.
    My hair made me feel beautiful and strong, so I felt Rapunzel should accept herself this way, too.

    Reply
  37. What a beautiful and insightful interview with Dr. Forsyth. Her perspective is so fascinating, I feel compelled to read her books now.
    I always loved the story of Rapunzel. When I was a child, my hair was almost to my tailbone, and I thought, if I were Rapunzel I would anchor my hair to the side of the window I looked out of and use it to save myself. Why wait for someone to do it for me.
    My hair made me feel beautiful and strong, so I felt Rapunzel should accept herself this way, too.

    Reply
  38. What a beautiful and insightful interview with Dr. Forsyth. Her perspective is so fascinating, I feel compelled to read her books now.
    I always loved the story of Rapunzel. When I was a child, my hair was almost to my tailbone, and I thought, if I were Rapunzel I would anchor my hair to the side of the window I looked out of and use it to save myself. Why wait for someone to do it for me.
    My hair made me feel beautiful and strong, so I felt Rapunzel should accept herself this way, too.

    Reply
  39. What a beautiful and insightful interview with Dr. Forsyth. Her perspective is so fascinating, I feel compelled to read her books now.
    I always loved the story of Rapunzel. When I was a child, my hair was almost to my tailbone, and I thought, if I were Rapunzel I would anchor my hair to the side of the window I looked out of and use it to save myself. Why wait for someone to do it for me.
    My hair made me feel beautiful and strong, so I felt Rapunzel should accept herself this way, too.

    Reply
  40. What a beautiful and insightful interview with Dr. Forsyth. Her perspective is so fascinating, I feel compelled to read her books now.
    I always loved the story of Rapunzel. When I was a child, my hair was almost to my tailbone, and I thought, if I were Rapunzel I would anchor my hair to the side of the window I looked out of and use it to save myself. Why wait for someone to do it for me.
    My hair made me feel beautiful and strong, so I felt Rapunzel should accept herself this way, too.

    Reply
  41. My favourite fairy tale has always been the Twelve Dancing Princesses. For some reason it always just captured my imagination. I think because of the “secret world” the princesses enter. Secret and hidden worlds have always intrigued me.

    Reply
  42. My favourite fairy tale has always been the Twelve Dancing Princesses. For some reason it always just captured my imagination. I think because of the “secret world” the princesses enter. Secret and hidden worlds have always intrigued me.

    Reply
  43. My favourite fairy tale has always been the Twelve Dancing Princesses. For some reason it always just captured my imagination. I think because of the “secret world” the princesses enter. Secret and hidden worlds have always intrigued me.

    Reply
  44. My favourite fairy tale has always been the Twelve Dancing Princesses. For some reason it always just captured my imagination. I think because of the “secret world” the princesses enter. Secret and hidden worlds have always intrigued me.

    Reply
  45. My favourite fairy tale has always been the Twelve Dancing Princesses. For some reason it always just captured my imagination. I think because of the “secret world” the princesses enter. Secret and hidden worlds have always intrigued me.

    Reply
  46. Thanks for the interview. Bitter Greens and The Wild Girl both sound fascinating. I just added them to my wish list.
    On a personal level, my favorite fairy tale is Beauty and the Beast. I count both of Robin McKinley’s retellings, Beauty and Rose Daughter, and Eloisa James’s romance novel re-vision, When Beauty Tamed the Beast as favorites. As a researcher, I find all the versions of Cinderella (as many as 1500 by some accounts) compelling. There’s a line from Suzy Boggus’s song “Hey, Cinderella” that I find accurate and haunting: “Still we walk in that fabled shadow.”

    Reply
  47. Thanks for the interview. Bitter Greens and The Wild Girl both sound fascinating. I just added them to my wish list.
    On a personal level, my favorite fairy tale is Beauty and the Beast. I count both of Robin McKinley’s retellings, Beauty and Rose Daughter, and Eloisa James’s romance novel re-vision, When Beauty Tamed the Beast as favorites. As a researcher, I find all the versions of Cinderella (as many as 1500 by some accounts) compelling. There’s a line from Suzy Boggus’s song “Hey, Cinderella” that I find accurate and haunting: “Still we walk in that fabled shadow.”

    Reply
  48. Thanks for the interview. Bitter Greens and The Wild Girl both sound fascinating. I just added them to my wish list.
    On a personal level, my favorite fairy tale is Beauty and the Beast. I count both of Robin McKinley’s retellings, Beauty and Rose Daughter, and Eloisa James’s romance novel re-vision, When Beauty Tamed the Beast as favorites. As a researcher, I find all the versions of Cinderella (as many as 1500 by some accounts) compelling. There’s a line from Suzy Boggus’s song “Hey, Cinderella” that I find accurate and haunting: “Still we walk in that fabled shadow.”

    Reply
  49. Thanks for the interview. Bitter Greens and The Wild Girl both sound fascinating. I just added them to my wish list.
    On a personal level, my favorite fairy tale is Beauty and the Beast. I count both of Robin McKinley’s retellings, Beauty and Rose Daughter, and Eloisa James’s romance novel re-vision, When Beauty Tamed the Beast as favorites. As a researcher, I find all the versions of Cinderella (as many as 1500 by some accounts) compelling. There’s a line from Suzy Boggus’s song “Hey, Cinderella” that I find accurate and haunting: “Still we walk in that fabled shadow.”

    Reply
  50. Thanks for the interview. Bitter Greens and The Wild Girl both sound fascinating. I just added them to my wish list.
    On a personal level, my favorite fairy tale is Beauty and the Beast. I count both of Robin McKinley’s retellings, Beauty and Rose Daughter, and Eloisa James’s romance novel re-vision, When Beauty Tamed the Beast as favorites. As a researcher, I find all the versions of Cinderella (as many as 1500 by some accounts) compelling. There’s a line from Suzy Boggus’s song “Hey, Cinderella” that I find accurate and haunting: “Still we walk in that fabled shadow.”

    Reply
  51. I grew up on fairy tales, and not always the sanitized versions. I think my favorite is probably Hansel and Gretel because of the way the siblings worked together to overcome the danger they were in, and find their way back home. Also, I admired the fact that they supported and encouraged each other throughout the tale.

    Reply
  52. I grew up on fairy tales, and not always the sanitized versions. I think my favorite is probably Hansel and Gretel because of the way the siblings worked together to overcome the danger they were in, and find their way back home. Also, I admired the fact that they supported and encouraged each other throughout the tale.

    Reply
  53. I grew up on fairy tales, and not always the sanitized versions. I think my favorite is probably Hansel and Gretel because of the way the siblings worked together to overcome the danger they were in, and find their way back home. Also, I admired the fact that they supported and encouraged each other throughout the tale.

    Reply
  54. I grew up on fairy tales, and not always the sanitized versions. I think my favorite is probably Hansel and Gretel because of the way the siblings worked together to overcome the danger they were in, and find their way back home. Also, I admired the fact that they supported and encouraged each other throughout the tale.

    Reply
  55. I grew up on fairy tales, and not always the sanitized versions. I think my favorite is probably Hansel and Gretel because of the way the siblings worked together to overcome the danger they were in, and find their way back home. Also, I admired the fact that they supported and encouraged each other throughout the tale.

    Reply
  56. This was a wonderful interview. Both “Bitter Greens” and “The Wild Girl” sound very interesting.
    As for favorite fairy tales, I don’t have only one! I read all the fairy tales, folk tales, myths, and legends I could find as I was growing up. I checked out many of the Rainbow books from our library.
    There was one story called “The King of the Peacocks” included in a early children’s book (a predecessor to the Little Golden Books) which I have always loved, and which I’ll mention because I will always remember it and I don’t believe it is well known.

    Reply
  57. This was a wonderful interview. Both “Bitter Greens” and “The Wild Girl” sound very interesting.
    As for favorite fairy tales, I don’t have only one! I read all the fairy tales, folk tales, myths, and legends I could find as I was growing up. I checked out many of the Rainbow books from our library.
    There was one story called “The King of the Peacocks” included in a early children’s book (a predecessor to the Little Golden Books) which I have always loved, and which I’ll mention because I will always remember it and I don’t believe it is well known.

    Reply
  58. This was a wonderful interview. Both “Bitter Greens” and “The Wild Girl” sound very interesting.
    As for favorite fairy tales, I don’t have only one! I read all the fairy tales, folk tales, myths, and legends I could find as I was growing up. I checked out many of the Rainbow books from our library.
    There was one story called “The King of the Peacocks” included in a early children’s book (a predecessor to the Little Golden Books) which I have always loved, and which I’ll mention because I will always remember it and I don’t believe it is well known.

    Reply
  59. This was a wonderful interview. Both “Bitter Greens” and “The Wild Girl” sound very interesting.
    As for favorite fairy tales, I don’t have only one! I read all the fairy tales, folk tales, myths, and legends I could find as I was growing up. I checked out many of the Rainbow books from our library.
    There was one story called “The King of the Peacocks” included in a early children’s book (a predecessor to the Little Golden Books) which I have always loved, and which I’ll mention because I will always remember it and I don’t believe it is well known.

    Reply
  60. This was a wonderful interview. Both “Bitter Greens” and “The Wild Girl” sound very interesting.
    As for favorite fairy tales, I don’t have only one! I read all the fairy tales, folk tales, myths, and legends I could find as I was growing up. I checked out many of the Rainbow books from our library.
    There was one story called “The King of the Peacocks” included in a early children’s book (a predecessor to the Little Golden Books) which I have always loved, and which I’ll mention because I will always remember it and I don’t believe it is well known.

    Reply
  61. Kathy, so many young girls were pushed into "Prince" roles for that reason — I have a good friend who is only now learning to dance as a girl, because all through school, being tall and slender, she was given the boy's role. She and her husband have for years battled over who gets to lead. LOL

    Reply
  62. Kathy, so many young girls were pushed into "Prince" roles for that reason — I have a good friend who is only now learning to dance as a girl, because all through school, being tall and slender, she was given the boy's role. She and her husband have for years battled over who gets to lead. LOL

    Reply
  63. Kathy, so many young girls were pushed into "Prince" roles for that reason — I have a good friend who is only now learning to dance as a girl, because all through school, being tall and slender, she was given the boy's role. She and her husband have for years battled over who gets to lead. LOL

    Reply
  64. Kathy, so many young girls were pushed into "Prince" roles for that reason — I have a good friend who is only now learning to dance as a girl, because all through school, being tall and slender, she was given the boy's role. She and her husband have for years battled over who gets to lead. LOL

    Reply
  65. Kathy, so many young girls were pushed into "Prince" roles for that reason — I have a good friend who is only now learning to dance as a girl, because all through school, being tall and slender, she was given the boy's role. She and her husband have for years battled over who gets to lead. LOL

    Reply
  66. Thanks, Denise — as a child I was fed all kinds of fairy and folk tales, as well as the myths of ancient cultures. One of the things I like about Kate's books is that she brings in the real people who wove these tales — until then, I never realized that they existed.

    Reply
  67. Thanks, Denise — as a child I was fed all kinds of fairy and folk tales, as well as the myths of ancient cultures. One of the things I like about Kate's books is that she brings in the real people who wove these tales — until then, I never realized that they existed.

    Reply
  68. Thanks, Denise — as a child I was fed all kinds of fairy and folk tales, as well as the myths of ancient cultures. One of the things I like about Kate's books is that she brings in the real people who wove these tales — until then, I never realized that they existed.

    Reply
  69. Thanks, Denise — as a child I was fed all kinds of fairy and folk tales, as well as the myths of ancient cultures. One of the things I like about Kate's books is that she brings in the real people who wove these tales — until then, I never realized that they existed.

    Reply
  70. Thanks, Denise — as a child I was fed all kinds of fairy and folk tales, as well as the myths of ancient cultures. One of the things I like about Kate's books is that she brings in the real people who wove these tales — until then, I never realized that they existed.

    Reply
  71. The stories are amazing, Mary Jo. Kate's research and writing of Bitter Greens was part of her doctoral studies, and we're the richer for it, I think. The two real women in the stories are fascinating in themselves.

    Reply
  72. The stories are amazing, Mary Jo. Kate's research and writing of Bitter Greens was part of her doctoral studies, and we're the richer for it, I think. The two real women in the stories are fascinating in themselves.

    Reply
  73. The stories are amazing, Mary Jo. Kate's research and writing of Bitter Greens was part of her doctoral studies, and we're the richer for it, I think. The two real women in the stories are fascinating in themselves.

    Reply
  74. The stories are amazing, Mary Jo. Kate's research and writing of Bitter Greens was part of her doctoral studies, and we're the richer for it, I think. The two real women in the stories are fascinating in themselves.

    Reply
  75. The stories are amazing, Mary Jo. Kate's research and writing of Bitter Greens was part of her doctoral studies, and we're the richer for it, I think. The two real women in the stories are fascinating in themselves.

    Reply
  76. Peggy, I've never heard of King Thunderbolt, though that story resonates with me, too, and I've seen a number of variations of it. The first one I thought of was a children's picture book Princess Smartypants, by Babette Cole, in which she turns her nose up at all her princely suits and sets them various tasks. It's funny and cute and modern, and I won't spoil the ending by telling it.

    Reply
  77. Peggy, I've never heard of King Thunderbolt, though that story resonates with me, too, and I've seen a number of variations of it. The first one I thought of was a children's picture book Princess Smartypants, by Babette Cole, in which she turns her nose up at all her princely suits and sets them various tasks. It's funny and cute and modern, and I won't spoil the ending by telling it.

    Reply
  78. Peggy, I've never heard of King Thunderbolt, though that story resonates with me, too, and I've seen a number of variations of it. The first one I thought of was a children's picture book Princess Smartypants, by Babette Cole, in which she turns her nose up at all her princely suits and sets them various tasks. It's funny and cute and modern, and I won't spoil the ending by telling it.

    Reply
  79. Peggy, I've never heard of King Thunderbolt, though that story resonates with me, too, and I've seen a number of variations of it. The first one I thought of was a children's picture book Princess Smartypants, by Babette Cole, in which she turns her nose up at all her princely suits and sets them various tasks. It's funny and cute and modern, and I won't spoil the ending by telling it.

    Reply
  80. Peggy, I've never heard of King Thunderbolt, though that story resonates with me, too, and I've seen a number of variations of it. The first one I thought of was a children's picture book Princess Smartypants, by Babette Cole, in which she turns her nose up at all her princely suits and sets them various tasks. It's funny and cute and modern, and I won't spoil the ending by telling it.

    Reply
  81. Thanks, Brittany — yes Rumpelstiltskin is a great story, I agree. I remember as a child aching with the unfairness of it. Those fairy tale girls weren't blessed in their parents, were they? Much like our romance heroines 🙂

    Reply
  82. Thanks, Brittany — yes Rumpelstiltskin is a great story, I agree. I remember as a child aching with the unfairness of it. Those fairy tale girls weren't blessed in their parents, were they? Much like our romance heroines 🙂

    Reply
  83. Thanks, Brittany — yes Rumpelstiltskin is a great story, I agree. I remember as a child aching with the unfairness of it. Those fairy tale girls weren't blessed in their parents, were they? Much like our romance heroines 🙂

    Reply
  84. Thanks, Brittany — yes Rumpelstiltskin is a great story, I agree. I remember as a child aching with the unfairness of it. Those fairy tale girls weren't blessed in their parents, were they? Much like our romance heroines 🙂

    Reply
  85. Thanks, Brittany — yes Rumpelstiltskin is a great story, I agree. I remember as a child aching with the unfairness of it. Those fairy tale girls weren't blessed in their parents, were they? Much like our romance heroines 🙂

    Reply
  86. Lovely story Patricia. I had very long hair as a child, too– I could sit on it — but Rapunzel was in a tower, and I always thought "ouch!" when the prince climbed up her hair. I love how we all see the same thing so differently. Kate's interpretation will surprise you, I think.

    Reply
  87. Lovely story Patricia. I had very long hair as a child, too– I could sit on it — but Rapunzel was in a tower, and I always thought "ouch!" when the prince climbed up her hair. I love how we all see the same thing so differently. Kate's interpretation will surprise you, I think.

    Reply
  88. Lovely story Patricia. I had very long hair as a child, too– I could sit on it — but Rapunzel was in a tower, and I always thought "ouch!" when the prince climbed up her hair. I love how we all see the same thing so differently. Kate's interpretation will surprise you, I think.

    Reply
  89. Lovely story Patricia. I had very long hair as a child, too– I could sit on it — but Rapunzel was in a tower, and I always thought "ouch!" when the prince climbed up her hair. I love how we all see the same thing so differently. Kate's interpretation will surprise you, I think.

    Reply
  90. Lovely story Patricia. I had very long hair as a child, too– I could sit on it — but Rapunzel was in a tower, and I always thought "ouch!" when the prince climbed up her hair. I love how we all see the same thing so differently. Kate's interpretation will surprise you, I think.

    Reply
  91. I'd forgotten the Twelve Dancing Princesses until it was mentioned here, Claire. I looked it up and remembered it then. Another beautiful tale, but also a sad one for the eldest princess. I didn't like so many of the stories where girls who just wanted to have fun were "bad" — and I always hated how princesses had to marry whoever their father said — an old soldier, a beggar, an apprentice, a prince. No wonder I became a romance writer and let girls choose for themselves.

    Reply
  92. I'd forgotten the Twelve Dancing Princesses until it was mentioned here, Claire. I looked it up and remembered it then. Another beautiful tale, but also a sad one for the eldest princess. I didn't like so many of the stories where girls who just wanted to have fun were "bad" — and I always hated how princesses had to marry whoever their father said — an old soldier, a beggar, an apprentice, a prince. No wonder I became a romance writer and let girls choose for themselves.

    Reply
  93. I'd forgotten the Twelve Dancing Princesses until it was mentioned here, Claire. I looked it up and remembered it then. Another beautiful tale, but also a sad one for the eldest princess. I didn't like so many of the stories where girls who just wanted to have fun were "bad" — and I always hated how princesses had to marry whoever their father said — an old soldier, a beggar, an apprentice, a prince. No wonder I became a romance writer and let girls choose for themselves.

    Reply
  94. I'd forgotten the Twelve Dancing Princesses until it was mentioned here, Claire. I looked it up and remembered it then. Another beautiful tale, but also a sad one for the eldest princess. I didn't like so many of the stories where girls who just wanted to have fun were "bad" — and I always hated how princesses had to marry whoever their father said — an old soldier, a beggar, an apprentice, a prince. No wonder I became a romance writer and let girls choose for themselves.

    Reply
  95. I'd forgotten the Twelve Dancing Princesses until it was mentioned here, Claire. I looked it up and remembered it then. Another beautiful tale, but also a sad one for the eldest princess. I didn't like so many of the stories where girls who just wanted to have fun were "bad" — and I always hated how princesses had to marry whoever their father said — an old soldier, a beggar, an apprentice, a prince. No wonder I became a romance writer and let girls choose for themselves.

    Reply
  96. Wonderful comments — yes, I went on a glom of Robin McKinley's retelling of various fairytales, and I loved Eloisa's "House" beast, too. I think Beauty and the Beast is one of my faves, too — it's one of the stories where the girl gets into trouble because of her father, but she makes the real choice herself, and I always felt there was real love there. I had a Beauty and the Beast story planned for one of my hero's little sisters — (Dory in Perfect Waltz) but have never got around to writing it.

    Reply
  97. Wonderful comments — yes, I went on a glom of Robin McKinley's retelling of various fairytales, and I loved Eloisa's "House" beast, too. I think Beauty and the Beast is one of my faves, too — it's one of the stories where the girl gets into trouble because of her father, but she makes the real choice herself, and I always felt there was real love there. I had a Beauty and the Beast story planned for one of my hero's little sisters — (Dory in Perfect Waltz) but have never got around to writing it.

    Reply
  98. Wonderful comments — yes, I went on a glom of Robin McKinley's retelling of various fairytales, and I loved Eloisa's "House" beast, too. I think Beauty and the Beast is one of my faves, too — it's one of the stories where the girl gets into trouble because of her father, but she makes the real choice herself, and I always felt there was real love there. I had a Beauty and the Beast story planned for one of my hero's little sisters — (Dory in Perfect Waltz) but have never got around to writing it.

    Reply
  99. Wonderful comments — yes, I went on a glom of Robin McKinley's retelling of various fairytales, and I loved Eloisa's "House" beast, too. I think Beauty and the Beast is one of my faves, too — it's one of the stories where the girl gets into trouble because of her father, but she makes the real choice herself, and I always felt there was real love there. I had a Beauty and the Beast story planned for one of my hero's little sisters — (Dory in Perfect Waltz) but have never got around to writing it.

    Reply
  100. Wonderful comments — yes, I went on a glom of Robin McKinley's retelling of various fairytales, and I loved Eloisa's "House" beast, too. I think Beauty and the Beast is one of my faves, too — it's one of the stories where the girl gets into trouble because of her father, but she makes the real choice herself, and I always felt there was real love there. I had a Beauty and the Beast story planned for one of my hero's little sisters — (Dory in Perfect Waltz) but have never got around to writing it.

    Reply
  101. Claire, yes, I had the grim (in all senses) stories, too, and Hansel and Gretel were very clever and resourceful, and when walking through the woods I often thing of small white pebbles. But I always used to fret about what they would be going home to. Baaad parents!

    Reply
  102. Claire, yes, I had the grim (in all senses) stories, too, and Hansel and Gretel were very clever and resourceful, and when walking through the woods I often thing of small white pebbles. But I always used to fret about what they would be going home to. Baaad parents!

    Reply
  103. Claire, yes, I had the grim (in all senses) stories, too, and Hansel and Gretel were very clever and resourceful, and when walking through the woods I often thing of small white pebbles. But I always used to fret about what they would be going home to. Baaad parents!

    Reply
  104. Claire, yes, I had the grim (in all senses) stories, too, and Hansel and Gretel were very clever and resourceful, and when walking through the woods I often thing of small white pebbles. But I always used to fret about what they would be going home to. Baaad parents!

    Reply
  105. Claire, yes, I had the grim (in all senses) stories, too, and Hansel and Gretel were very clever and resourceful, and when walking through the woods I often thing of small white pebbles. But I always used to fret about what they would be going home to. Baaad parents!

    Reply
  106. Oh, I know Disney would never do anything that wasn’t 200% singing and dancing happy. I just wish they wouldn’t destroy the classics. Even at seven I decided I hated Disney!
    There’s a less-known animated version from the early Eighties that is ten times the movie the Disney one is.

    Reply
  107. Oh, I know Disney would never do anything that wasn’t 200% singing and dancing happy. I just wish they wouldn’t destroy the classics. Even at seven I decided I hated Disney!
    There’s a less-known animated version from the early Eighties that is ten times the movie the Disney one is.

    Reply
  108. Oh, I know Disney would never do anything that wasn’t 200% singing and dancing happy. I just wish they wouldn’t destroy the classics. Even at seven I decided I hated Disney!
    There’s a less-known animated version from the early Eighties that is ten times the movie the Disney one is.

    Reply
  109. Oh, I know Disney would never do anything that wasn’t 200% singing and dancing happy. I just wish they wouldn’t destroy the classics. Even at seven I decided I hated Disney!
    There’s a less-known animated version from the early Eighties that is ten times the movie the Disney one is.

    Reply
  110. Oh, I know Disney would never do anything that wasn’t 200% singing and dancing happy. I just wish they wouldn’t destroy the classics. Even at seven I decided I hated Disney!
    There’s a less-known animated version from the early Eighties that is ten times the movie the Disney one is.

    Reply
  111. Yes, I know — I saw the Saving Mr Banks/Mary Poppins movie, and wondered about the Travis character they portrayed. Having never read the books as a kid, I bought some of them. They were about a sharp, slightly dark and unpredictable Mary Poppins — nothing like the Disney version — and I had some sympathy for the writer.

    Reply
  112. Yes, I know — I saw the Saving Mr Banks/Mary Poppins movie, and wondered about the Travis character they portrayed. Having never read the books as a kid, I bought some of them. They were about a sharp, slightly dark and unpredictable Mary Poppins — nothing like the Disney version — and I had some sympathy for the writer.

    Reply
  113. Yes, I know — I saw the Saving Mr Banks/Mary Poppins movie, and wondered about the Travis character they portrayed. Having never read the books as a kid, I bought some of them. They were about a sharp, slightly dark and unpredictable Mary Poppins — nothing like the Disney version — and I had some sympathy for the writer.

    Reply
  114. Yes, I know — I saw the Saving Mr Banks/Mary Poppins movie, and wondered about the Travis character they portrayed. Having never read the books as a kid, I bought some of them. They were about a sharp, slightly dark and unpredictable Mary Poppins — nothing like the Disney version — and I had some sympathy for the writer.

    Reply
  115. Yes, I know — I saw the Saving Mr Banks/Mary Poppins movie, and wondered about the Travis character they portrayed. Having never read the books as a kid, I bought some of them. They were about a sharp, slightly dark and unpredictable Mary Poppins — nothing like the Disney version — and I had some sympathy for the writer.

    Reply
  116. I don’t know what name is official for it, but I’ve always liked the Wife of Bath’s tale, about the loathly lady and the knight forced to wed her. At the end both the knight and the lady got what they most wanted 🙂

    Reply
  117. I don’t know what name is official for it, but I’ve always liked the Wife of Bath’s tale, about the loathly lady and the knight forced to wed her. At the end both the knight and the lady got what they most wanted 🙂

    Reply
  118. I don’t know what name is official for it, but I’ve always liked the Wife of Bath’s tale, about the loathly lady and the knight forced to wed her. At the end both the knight and the lady got what they most wanted 🙂

    Reply
  119. I don’t know what name is official for it, but I’ve always liked the Wife of Bath’s tale, about the loathly lady and the knight forced to wed her. At the end both the knight and the lady got what they most wanted 🙂

    Reply
  120. I don’t know what name is official for it, but I’ve always liked the Wife of Bath’s tale, about the loathly lady and the knight forced to wed her. At the end both the knight and the lady got what they most wanted 🙂

    Reply
  121. My favorite fairy tale has always been Cinderella (something about rags to riches, maybe, and the evil stepmom and stepsisters getting their comeuppance).
    I’d love to win one of these books! My youngest daughter went on a bedtime story bender with Paul O. Zelinsky’s picture book of Rapunzel a couple years ago, and I got drawn into the drama of it too, especially the idea of the prince coming her in secret and wooing her when she was so sheltered and innocent…too innocent to even understand why her dress was “fitting so tight.”
    Thanks for introducing me to this new author.

    Reply
  122. My favorite fairy tale has always been Cinderella (something about rags to riches, maybe, and the evil stepmom and stepsisters getting their comeuppance).
    I’d love to win one of these books! My youngest daughter went on a bedtime story bender with Paul O. Zelinsky’s picture book of Rapunzel a couple years ago, and I got drawn into the drama of it too, especially the idea of the prince coming her in secret and wooing her when she was so sheltered and innocent…too innocent to even understand why her dress was “fitting so tight.”
    Thanks for introducing me to this new author.

    Reply
  123. My favorite fairy tale has always been Cinderella (something about rags to riches, maybe, and the evil stepmom and stepsisters getting their comeuppance).
    I’d love to win one of these books! My youngest daughter went on a bedtime story bender with Paul O. Zelinsky’s picture book of Rapunzel a couple years ago, and I got drawn into the drama of it too, especially the idea of the prince coming her in secret and wooing her when she was so sheltered and innocent…too innocent to even understand why her dress was “fitting so tight.”
    Thanks for introducing me to this new author.

    Reply
  124. My favorite fairy tale has always been Cinderella (something about rags to riches, maybe, and the evil stepmom and stepsisters getting their comeuppance).
    I’d love to win one of these books! My youngest daughter went on a bedtime story bender with Paul O. Zelinsky’s picture book of Rapunzel a couple years ago, and I got drawn into the drama of it too, especially the idea of the prince coming her in secret and wooing her when she was so sheltered and innocent…too innocent to even understand why her dress was “fitting so tight.”
    Thanks for introducing me to this new author.

    Reply
  125. My favorite fairy tale has always been Cinderella (something about rags to riches, maybe, and the evil stepmom and stepsisters getting their comeuppance).
    I’d love to win one of these books! My youngest daughter went on a bedtime story bender with Paul O. Zelinsky’s picture book of Rapunzel a couple years ago, and I got drawn into the drama of it too, especially the idea of the prince coming her in secret and wooing her when she was so sheltered and innocent…too innocent to even understand why her dress was “fitting so tight.”
    Thanks for introducing me to this new author.

    Reply
  126. What a great interview. What fascinating insights into familiar stories. Can’t wait to read these books. Thank you both for bringing this fascinating information to us!

    Reply
  127. What a great interview. What fascinating insights into familiar stories. Can’t wait to read these books. Thank you both for bringing this fascinating information to us!

    Reply
  128. What a great interview. What fascinating insights into familiar stories. Can’t wait to read these books. Thank you both for bringing this fascinating information to us!

    Reply
  129. What a great interview. What fascinating insights into familiar stories. Can’t wait to read these books. Thank you both for bringing this fascinating information to us!

    Reply
  130. What a great interview. What fascinating insights into familiar stories. Can’t wait to read these books. Thank you both for bringing this fascinating information to us!

    Reply
  131. Great interview ! I have added these books to my wish list.
    My favorite was always The Emperor’s New Clothes , when I was younger I thought it was great that it was a kid that pointed out the foolishness and now that I’m older it has even more meaning 🙂 I also really loved Stone Soup and still think that is a great story too ,not sure if it counts as a fairy tale though.

    Reply
  132. Great interview ! I have added these books to my wish list.
    My favorite was always The Emperor’s New Clothes , when I was younger I thought it was great that it was a kid that pointed out the foolishness and now that I’m older it has even more meaning 🙂 I also really loved Stone Soup and still think that is a great story too ,not sure if it counts as a fairy tale though.

    Reply
  133. Great interview ! I have added these books to my wish list.
    My favorite was always The Emperor’s New Clothes , when I was younger I thought it was great that it was a kid that pointed out the foolishness and now that I’m older it has even more meaning 🙂 I also really loved Stone Soup and still think that is a great story too ,not sure if it counts as a fairy tale though.

    Reply
  134. Great interview ! I have added these books to my wish list.
    My favorite was always The Emperor’s New Clothes , when I was younger I thought it was great that it was a kid that pointed out the foolishness and now that I’m older it has even more meaning 🙂 I also really loved Stone Soup and still think that is a great story too ,not sure if it counts as a fairy tale though.

    Reply
  135. Great interview ! I have added these books to my wish list.
    My favorite was always The Emperor’s New Clothes , when I was younger I thought it was great that it was a kid that pointed out the foolishness and now that I’m older it has even more meaning 🙂 I also really loved Stone Soup and still think that is a great story too ,not sure if it counts as a fairy tale though.

    Reply
  136. What a lovely posting – thanks for the introduction to Bitter Greens and The Wild Girl. I think my favorite fairy tale – The Ugly Duckling. For various reasons I identified strongly with the story. And I have always wanted a happy ending.
    If I ever would get the chance, I would go to that workshop in the Cotswalds. It sounds like an wonderful time.

    Reply
  137. What a lovely posting – thanks for the introduction to Bitter Greens and The Wild Girl. I think my favorite fairy tale – The Ugly Duckling. For various reasons I identified strongly with the story. And I have always wanted a happy ending.
    If I ever would get the chance, I would go to that workshop in the Cotswalds. It sounds like an wonderful time.

    Reply
  138. What a lovely posting – thanks for the introduction to Bitter Greens and The Wild Girl. I think my favorite fairy tale – The Ugly Duckling. For various reasons I identified strongly with the story. And I have always wanted a happy ending.
    If I ever would get the chance, I would go to that workshop in the Cotswalds. It sounds like an wonderful time.

    Reply
  139. What a lovely posting – thanks for the introduction to Bitter Greens and The Wild Girl. I think my favorite fairy tale – The Ugly Duckling. For various reasons I identified strongly with the story. And I have always wanted a happy ending.
    If I ever would get the chance, I would go to that workshop in the Cotswalds. It sounds like an wonderful time.

    Reply
  140. What a lovely posting – thanks for the introduction to Bitter Greens and The Wild Girl. I think my favorite fairy tale – The Ugly Duckling. For various reasons I identified strongly with the story. And I have always wanted a happy ending.
    If I ever would get the chance, I would go to that workshop in the Cotswalds. It sounds like an wonderful time.

    Reply
  141. Enjoyed reading the interview, and I’m adding the books to my to-read list. I love fairy tales (and mythology); Cinderella is a favorite, but it’s hard to choose! I also like the Robin McKinley books (that Janga mentioned), and Donna Jo Napoli’s as well.
    And, like many others, I wish I could attend the writing workshop in the Cotswolds. I haven’t been there in over 20 years, and I look forward to returning. 🙂

    Reply
  142. Enjoyed reading the interview, and I’m adding the books to my to-read list. I love fairy tales (and mythology); Cinderella is a favorite, but it’s hard to choose! I also like the Robin McKinley books (that Janga mentioned), and Donna Jo Napoli’s as well.
    And, like many others, I wish I could attend the writing workshop in the Cotswolds. I haven’t been there in over 20 years, and I look forward to returning. 🙂

    Reply
  143. Enjoyed reading the interview, and I’m adding the books to my to-read list. I love fairy tales (and mythology); Cinderella is a favorite, but it’s hard to choose! I also like the Robin McKinley books (that Janga mentioned), and Donna Jo Napoli’s as well.
    And, like many others, I wish I could attend the writing workshop in the Cotswolds. I haven’t been there in over 20 years, and I look forward to returning. 🙂

    Reply
  144. Enjoyed reading the interview, and I’m adding the books to my to-read list. I love fairy tales (and mythology); Cinderella is a favorite, but it’s hard to choose! I also like the Robin McKinley books (that Janga mentioned), and Donna Jo Napoli’s as well.
    And, like many others, I wish I could attend the writing workshop in the Cotswolds. I haven’t been there in over 20 years, and I look forward to returning. 🙂

    Reply
  145. Enjoyed reading the interview, and I’m adding the books to my to-read list. I love fairy tales (and mythology); Cinderella is a favorite, but it’s hard to choose! I also like the Robin McKinley books (that Janga mentioned), and Donna Jo Napoli’s as well.
    And, like many others, I wish I could attend the writing workshop in the Cotswolds. I haven’t been there in over 20 years, and I look forward to returning. 🙂

    Reply
  146. My favorite fairy tale has always been The Twelve Dancing Princesses. I’m not sure why, but somehow it resonates with me.

    Reply
  147. My favorite fairy tale has always been The Twelve Dancing Princesses. I’m not sure why, but somehow it resonates with me.

    Reply
  148. My favorite fairy tale has always been The Twelve Dancing Princesses. I’m not sure why, but somehow it resonates with me.

    Reply
  149. My favorite fairy tale has always been The Twelve Dancing Princesses. I’m not sure why, but somehow it resonates with me.

    Reply
  150. My favorite fairy tale has always been The Twelve Dancing Princesses. I’m not sure why, but somehow it resonates with me.

    Reply
  151. I haven't seen the Zelinsky story — but I do love the many variations on those classic fairytale themes. I'm pretty fond of a Cinderella story, though I always want to twist the tale. A few of my own stories have had a Cinderella element though — I think there's a universal appeal in the rags-to-riches story. Thanks Annabel.

    Reply
  152. I haven't seen the Zelinsky story — but I do love the many variations on those classic fairytale themes. I'm pretty fond of a Cinderella story, though I always want to twist the tale. A few of my own stories have had a Cinderella element though — I think there's a universal appeal in the rags-to-riches story. Thanks Annabel.

    Reply
  153. I haven't seen the Zelinsky story — but I do love the many variations on those classic fairytale themes. I'm pretty fond of a Cinderella story, though I always want to twist the tale. A few of my own stories have had a Cinderella element though — I think there's a universal appeal in the rags-to-riches story. Thanks Annabel.

    Reply
  154. I haven't seen the Zelinsky story — but I do love the many variations on those classic fairytale themes. I'm pretty fond of a Cinderella story, though I always want to twist the tale. A few of my own stories have had a Cinderella element though — I think there's a universal appeal in the rags-to-riches story. Thanks Annabel.

    Reply
  155. I haven't seen the Zelinsky story — but I do love the many variations on those classic fairytale themes. I'm pretty fond of a Cinderella story, though I always want to twist the tale. A few of my own stories have had a Cinderella element though — I think there's a universal appeal in the rags-to-riches story. Thanks Annabel.

    Reply
  156. Good point, Crystal — there's a difference between folk tales and fairy tales I guess, though I'm not sure what the difference is exactly. I also loved both of those stories you mentioned — both about the triumph of common sense over pretension and "spin" — and both, I think as relevant today as ever.

    Reply
  157. Good point, Crystal — there's a difference between folk tales and fairy tales I guess, though I'm not sure what the difference is exactly. I also loved both of those stories you mentioned — both about the triumph of common sense over pretension and "spin" — and both, I think as relevant today as ever.

    Reply
  158. Good point, Crystal — there's a difference between folk tales and fairy tales I guess, though I'm not sure what the difference is exactly. I also loved both of those stories you mentioned — both about the triumph of common sense over pretension and "spin" — and both, I think as relevant today as ever.

    Reply
  159. Good point, Crystal — there's a difference between folk tales and fairy tales I guess, though I'm not sure what the difference is exactly. I also loved both of those stories you mentioned — both about the triumph of common sense over pretension and "spin" — and both, I think as relevant today as ever.

    Reply
  160. Good point, Crystal — there's a difference between folk tales and fairy tales I guess, though I'm not sure what the difference is exactly. I also loved both of those stories you mentioned — both about the triumph of common sense over pretension and "spin" — and both, I think as relevant today as ever.

    Reply
  161. Annette, it sounds like a lovely writing retreat, doesn't it? And Kate does it every year — the details are probably on her website. The Ugly Duckling is a favorite story of mine — and lots of other romance writers and readers, as well. I think the stories that resonate in that way and also have a happy ending have so much to teach children. And remind adults.

    Reply
  162. Annette, it sounds like a lovely writing retreat, doesn't it? And Kate does it every year — the details are probably on her website. The Ugly Duckling is a favorite story of mine — and lots of other romance writers and readers, as well. I think the stories that resonate in that way and also have a happy ending have so much to teach children. And remind adults.

    Reply
  163. Annette, it sounds like a lovely writing retreat, doesn't it? And Kate does it every year — the details are probably on her website. The Ugly Duckling is a favorite story of mine — and lots of other romance writers and readers, as well. I think the stories that resonate in that way and also have a happy ending have so much to teach children. And remind adults.

    Reply
  164. Annette, it sounds like a lovely writing retreat, doesn't it? And Kate does it every year — the details are probably on her website. The Ugly Duckling is a favorite story of mine — and lots of other romance writers and readers, as well. I think the stories that resonate in that way and also have a happy ending have so much to teach children. And remind adults.

    Reply
  165. Annette, it sounds like a lovely writing retreat, doesn't it? And Kate does it every year — the details are probably on her website. The Ugly Duckling is a favorite story of mine — and lots of other romance writers and readers, as well. I think the stories that resonate in that way and also have a happy ending have so much to teach children. And remind adults.

    Reply
  166. Thanks, Reina — yes I glommed the Robin McKinley books a couple of years ago.
    Have you tried Juliet Marillier? Wonderful writer who does gorgeous fairytale stories with a romance at the heart of every one.
    I haven't heard of  Donna Jo Napoli — thanks for the recommendation.

    Reply
  167. Thanks, Reina — yes I glommed the Robin McKinley books a couple of years ago.
    Have you tried Juliet Marillier? Wonderful writer who does gorgeous fairytale stories with a romance at the heart of every one.
    I haven't heard of  Donna Jo Napoli — thanks for the recommendation.

    Reply
  168. Thanks, Reina — yes I glommed the Robin McKinley books a couple of years ago.
    Have you tried Juliet Marillier? Wonderful writer who does gorgeous fairytale stories with a romance at the heart of every one.
    I haven't heard of  Donna Jo Napoli — thanks for the recommendation.

    Reply
  169. Thanks, Reina — yes I glommed the Robin McKinley books a couple of years ago.
    Have you tried Juliet Marillier? Wonderful writer who does gorgeous fairytale stories with a romance at the heart of every one.
    I haven't heard of  Donna Jo Napoli — thanks for the recommendation.

    Reply
  170. Thanks, Reina — yes I glommed the Robin McKinley books a couple of years ago.
    Have you tried Juliet Marillier? Wonderful writer who does gorgeous fairytale stories with a romance at the heart of every one.
    I haven't heard of  Donna Jo Napoli — thanks for the recommendation.

    Reply
  171. While I’m one of the Beauty and the Beast fans, I love another story that isn’t as well known. It’s called “Salt Dearer Than Gold,” and it starts with a King Lear-like setup. When the heroine is rejected by her father, she wanders until she is taken in by dwarves who live in an underground kingdom where they mine salt. And when they realize what has happened to the heroine, all the salt slowly disappears from the land….
    I remember reading his as a young girl and being struck by all that salt did and does for us (preservative, taste, etc.), and as I grew older the parallels to Lear and Snow White and other stories became more interesting. It’s a great fairy tale.

    Reply
  172. While I’m one of the Beauty and the Beast fans, I love another story that isn’t as well known. It’s called “Salt Dearer Than Gold,” and it starts with a King Lear-like setup. When the heroine is rejected by her father, she wanders until she is taken in by dwarves who live in an underground kingdom where they mine salt. And when they realize what has happened to the heroine, all the salt slowly disappears from the land….
    I remember reading his as a young girl and being struck by all that salt did and does for us (preservative, taste, etc.), and as I grew older the parallels to Lear and Snow White and other stories became more interesting. It’s a great fairy tale.

    Reply
  173. While I’m one of the Beauty and the Beast fans, I love another story that isn’t as well known. It’s called “Salt Dearer Than Gold,” and it starts with a King Lear-like setup. When the heroine is rejected by her father, she wanders until she is taken in by dwarves who live in an underground kingdom where they mine salt. And when they realize what has happened to the heroine, all the salt slowly disappears from the land….
    I remember reading his as a young girl and being struck by all that salt did and does for us (preservative, taste, etc.), and as I grew older the parallels to Lear and Snow White and other stories became more interesting. It’s a great fairy tale.

    Reply
  174. While I’m one of the Beauty and the Beast fans, I love another story that isn’t as well known. It’s called “Salt Dearer Than Gold,” and it starts with a King Lear-like setup. When the heroine is rejected by her father, she wanders until she is taken in by dwarves who live in an underground kingdom where they mine salt. And when they realize what has happened to the heroine, all the salt slowly disappears from the land….
    I remember reading his as a young girl and being struck by all that salt did and does for us (preservative, taste, etc.), and as I grew older the parallels to Lear and Snow White and other stories became more interesting. It’s a great fairy tale.

    Reply
  175. While I’m one of the Beauty and the Beast fans, I love another story that isn’t as well known. It’s called “Salt Dearer Than Gold,” and it starts with a King Lear-like setup. When the heroine is rejected by her father, she wanders until she is taken in by dwarves who live in an underground kingdom where they mine salt. And when they realize what has happened to the heroine, all the salt slowly disappears from the land….
    I remember reading his as a young girl and being struck by all that salt did and does for us (preservative, taste, etc.), and as I grew older the parallels to Lear and Snow White and other stories became more interesting. It’s a great fairy tale.

    Reply
  176. ML, it's a favorite of mine, too — in fact every time I forget to put a pinch of salt in my morning porridge (oatmeal) I think of that story. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  177. ML, it's a favorite of mine, too — in fact every time I forget to put a pinch of salt in my morning porridge (oatmeal) I think of that story. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  178. ML, it's a favorite of mine, too — in fact every time I forget to put a pinch of salt in my morning porridge (oatmeal) I think of that story. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  179. ML, it's a favorite of mine, too — in fact every time I forget to put a pinch of salt in my morning porridge (oatmeal) I think of that story. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  180. ML, it's a favorite of mine, too — in fact every time I forget to put a pinch of salt in my morning porridge (oatmeal) I think of that story. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  181. Kate, I’m a fan of your books, thankyou! My favourite fairy tale is always Beauty & the Beast. I love the way the ‘beauty’ can always see the real person inside the ‘beast’. Keep writing, you’re so inspirational for us all.

    Reply
  182. Kate, I’m a fan of your books, thankyou! My favourite fairy tale is always Beauty & the Beast. I love the way the ‘beauty’ can always see the real person inside the ‘beast’. Keep writing, you’re so inspirational for us all.

    Reply
  183. Kate, I’m a fan of your books, thankyou! My favourite fairy tale is always Beauty & the Beast. I love the way the ‘beauty’ can always see the real person inside the ‘beast’. Keep writing, you’re so inspirational for us all.

    Reply
  184. Kate, I’m a fan of your books, thankyou! My favourite fairy tale is always Beauty & the Beast. I love the way the ‘beauty’ can always see the real person inside the ‘beast’. Keep writing, you’re so inspirational for us all.

    Reply
  185. Kate, I’m a fan of your books, thankyou! My favourite fairy tale is always Beauty & the Beast. I love the way the ‘beauty’ can always see the real person inside the ‘beast’. Keep writing, you’re so inspirational for us all.

    Reply
  186. Suppose I am rather late to the comments but I wanted to mention Puss in Boots. Love that story -the miller’s son is an idiot but the cat was wonderful. I’m now adding Dr. Forsyth to my list of books/authors to track down. The Wild Girl sounds so interesting. And, my favorite modern take is Deerskin by Robin McKinley, a retelling of the Perrault classic- gutwrenching every time.

    Reply
  187. Suppose I am rather late to the comments but I wanted to mention Puss in Boots. Love that story -the miller’s son is an idiot but the cat was wonderful. I’m now adding Dr. Forsyth to my list of books/authors to track down. The Wild Girl sounds so interesting. And, my favorite modern take is Deerskin by Robin McKinley, a retelling of the Perrault classic- gutwrenching every time.

    Reply
  188. Suppose I am rather late to the comments but I wanted to mention Puss in Boots. Love that story -the miller’s son is an idiot but the cat was wonderful. I’m now adding Dr. Forsyth to my list of books/authors to track down. The Wild Girl sounds so interesting. And, my favorite modern take is Deerskin by Robin McKinley, a retelling of the Perrault classic- gutwrenching every time.

    Reply
  189. Suppose I am rather late to the comments but I wanted to mention Puss in Boots. Love that story -the miller’s son is an idiot but the cat was wonderful. I’m now adding Dr. Forsyth to my list of books/authors to track down. The Wild Girl sounds so interesting. And, my favorite modern take is Deerskin by Robin McKinley, a retelling of the Perrault classic- gutwrenching every time.

    Reply
  190. Suppose I am rather late to the comments but I wanted to mention Puss in Boots. Love that story -the miller’s son is an idiot but the cat was wonderful. I’m now adding Dr. Forsyth to my list of books/authors to track down. The Wild Girl sounds so interesting. And, my favorite modern take is Deerskin by Robin McKinley, a retelling of the Perrault classic- gutwrenching every time.

    Reply
  191. Denise, congratulations! You have been selected to win the Kate Forsyth book.
    Please email either me (Anne Gracie) or Melissa (our blog coordinator) with a postal address and also the choice of which of Kate’s books you’d like — Bitter Greens or The Wild Girl.
    Thanks for visiting the Word Wench blog, and adding to the conversation
    Anne Gracie

    Reply
  192. Denise, congratulations! You have been selected to win the Kate Forsyth book.
    Please email either me (Anne Gracie) or Melissa (our blog coordinator) with a postal address and also the choice of which of Kate’s books you’d like — Bitter Greens or The Wild Girl.
    Thanks for visiting the Word Wench blog, and adding to the conversation
    Anne Gracie

    Reply
  193. Denise, congratulations! You have been selected to win the Kate Forsyth book.
    Please email either me (Anne Gracie) or Melissa (our blog coordinator) with a postal address and also the choice of which of Kate’s books you’d like — Bitter Greens or The Wild Girl.
    Thanks for visiting the Word Wench blog, and adding to the conversation
    Anne Gracie

    Reply
  194. Denise, congratulations! You have been selected to win the Kate Forsyth book.
    Please email either me (Anne Gracie) or Melissa (our blog coordinator) with a postal address and also the choice of which of Kate’s books you’d like — Bitter Greens or The Wild Girl.
    Thanks for visiting the Word Wench blog, and adding to the conversation
    Anne Gracie

    Reply
  195. Denise, congratulations! You have been selected to win the Kate Forsyth book.
    Please email either me (Anne Gracie) or Melissa (our blog coordinator) with a postal address and also the choice of which of Kate’s books you’d like — Bitter Greens or The Wild Girl.
    Thanks for visiting the Word Wench blog, and adding to the conversation
    Anne Gracie

    Reply
  196. Hello,
    I like fairy tales, but as I have said many times before, my fascination lies with your research. And in this case, the chamber-pot. I have a few icky questions. I’d hate to hurt sensibilities. I hope to be forgiven in the name to research.
    1. If the ladies with their elaborate gowns took care of business wherever they were, what
    happens if they have their periods, and a bowel movement? What about hygiene? How
    do they cleanup down there ? And their hands.
    2. Would the page boy clean the chamber pot after each use and be back ready and waiting
    for the next call, or carry around the same smelly one? Hopefully with a strong sturdy
    cover.
    It took a long while for hygiene standards to set in Europe and Asia as they are today. But those days were probably a story by themselves.

    Reply
  197. Hello,
    I like fairy tales, but as I have said many times before, my fascination lies with your research. And in this case, the chamber-pot. I have a few icky questions. I’d hate to hurt sensibilities. I hope to be forgiven in the name to research.
    1. If the ladies with their elaborate gowns took care of business wherever they were, what
    happens if they have their periods, and a bowel movement? What about hygiene? How
    do they cleanup down there ? And their hands.
    2. Would the page boy clean the chamber pot after each use and be back ready and waiting
    for the next call, or carry around the same smelly one? Hopefully with a strong sturdy
    cover.
    It took a long while for hygiene standards to set in Europe and Asia as they are today. But those days were probably a story by themselves.

    Reply
  198. Hello,
    I like fairy tales, but as I have said many times before, my fascination lies with your research. And in this case, the chamber-pot. I have a few icky questions. I’d hate to hurt sensibilities. I hope to be forgiven in the name to research.
    1. If the ladies with their elaborate gowns took care of business wherever they were, what
    happens if they have their periods, and a bowel movement? What about hygiene? How
    do they cleanup down there ? And their hands.
    2. Would the page boy clean the chamber pot after each use and be back ready and waiting
    for the next call, or carry around the same smelly one? Hopefully with a strong sturdy
    cover.
    It took a long while for hygiene standards to set in Europe and Asia as they are today. But those days were probably a story by themselves.

    Reply
  199. Hello,
    I like fairy tales, but as I have said many times before, my fascination lies with your research. And in this case, the chamber-pot. I have a few icky questions. I’d hate to hurt sensibilities. I hope to be forgiven in the name to research.
    1. If the ladies with their elaborate gowns took care of business wherever they were, what
    happens if they have their periods, and a bowel movement? What about hygiene? How
    do they cleanup down there ? And their hands.
    2. Would the page boy clean the chamber pot after each use and be back ready and waiting
    for the next call, or carry around the same smelly one? Hopefully with a strong sturdy
    cover.
    It took a long while for hygiene standards to set in Europe and Asia as they are today. But those days were probably a story by themselves.

    Reply
  200. Hello,
    I like fairy tales, but as I have said many times before, my fascination lies with your research. And in this case, the chamber-pot. I have a few icky questions. I’d hate to hurt sensibilities. I hope to be forgiven in the name to research.
    1. If the ladies with their elaborate gowns took care of business wherever they were, what
    happens if they have their periods, and a bowel movement? What about hygiene? How
    do they cleanup down there ? And their hands.
    2. Would the page boy clean the chamber pot after each use and be back ready and waiting
    for the next call, or carry around the same smelly one? Hopefully with a strong sturdy
    cover.
    It took a long while for hygiene standards to set in Europe and Asia as they are today. But those days were probably a story by themselves.

    Reply
  201. I don’t mind addressing the subject,and I include bodily functions in my books whenever they’re relavant. Otherwise the characters can seem rather ethereal!
    I don’t know how things were done at Versailles. I could guess that the page boy handed the used vessel off to a lower minion and took a fresh one. Then the lower minion
    to a lower, etc etc. But that’s because I know Versailles was a crazy place.
    Re bowel movements, most people only have one a day and don’t have urgency, so I assume the lady or gentleman would slip away for that. Though it’s easier for men to piss in a corner, a bowel movement would have been more difficult for them as they did have nether garments to deal with.
    Why do we never consider that for our heroes? *G*

    Reply
  202. I don’t mind addressing the subject,and I include bodily functions in my books whenever they’re relavant. Otherwise the characters can seem rather ethereal!
    I don’t know how things were done at Versailles. I could guess that the page boy handed the used vessel off to a lower minion and took a fresh one. Then the lower minion
    to a lower, etc etc. But that’s because I know Versailles was a crazy place.
    Re bowel movements, most people only have one a day and don’t have urgency, so I assume the lady or gentleman would slip away for that. Though it’s easier for men to piss in a corner, a bowel movement would have been more difficult for them as they did have nether garments to deal with.
    Why do we never consider that for our heroes? *G*

    Reply
  203. I don’t mind addressing the subject,and I include bodily functions in my books whenever they’re relavant. Otherwise the characters can seem rather ethereal!
    I don’t know how things were done at Versailles. I could guess that the page boy handed the used vessel off to a lower minion and took a fresh one. Then the lower minion
    to a lower, etc etc. But that’s because I know Versailles was a crazy place.
    Re bowel movements, most people only have one a day and don’t have urgency, so I assume the lady or gentleman would slip away for that. Though it’s easier for men to piss in a corner, a bowel movement would have been more difficult for them as they did have nether garments to deal with.
    Why do we never consider that for our heroes? *G*

    Reply
  204. I don’t mind addressing the subject,and I include bodily functions in my books whenever they’re relavant. Otherwise the characters can seem rather ethereal!
    I don’t know how things were done at Versailles. I could guess that the page boy handed the used vessel off to a lower minion and took a fresh one. Then the lower minion
    to a lower, etc etc. But that’s because I know Versailles was a crazy place.
    Re bowel movements, most people only have one a day and don’t have urgency, so I assume the lady or gentleman would slip away for that. Though it’s easier for men to piss in a corner, a bowel movement would have been more difficult for them as they did have nether garments to deal with.
    Why do we never consider that for our heroes? *G*

    Reply
  205. I don’t mind addressing the subject,and I include bodily functions in my books whenever they’re relavant. Otherwise the characters can seem rather ethereal!
    I don’t know how things were done at Versailles. I could guess that the page boy handed the used vessel off to a lower minion and took a fresh one. Then the lower minion
    to a lower, etc etc. But that’s because I know Versailles was a crazy place.
    Re bowel movements, most people only have one a day and don’t have urgency, so I assume the lady or gentleman would slip away for that. Though it’s easier for men to piss in a corner, a bowel movement would have been more difficult for them as they did have nether garments to deal with.
    Why do we never consider that for our heroes? *G*

    Reply

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