Interview with Linda Fildew, Senior Editor Harlequin Historical.

 Anne here, with an interview with my last editor at Harlequin, Linda Fildew. Based at the London office of Harlequin Enterprises, Linda is the editor in charge of Harlequin Historical (Nth America) and Mills and Boon Historical (UK.) The historicals have huge world-wide appeal and come out in a range of countries. Waifin Japan
LindaFildew_2  Linda, welcome!

Thank you for inviting me on to the Word Wenches blog, Anne.  I’m looking forward to answering as many questions as I can.  

Linda, you’ve worked at Mills & Boon for many years. Can you tell us how you started out and how things have changed in that time?

OldcoverM&B I came to publishing because of a love of books, and I’ve been at Harlequin Mills & Boon all my working life.  Quite amazing, I know!  I joined just as Mills & Boon launched its historical programme, then called Masquerade, and was part of the team which got this off the ground. I still have a photo of myself dressed in Regency costume at the launch party!  I’ve worked in a number of editorial acquisition roles on the contemporary side of the business and am most happy to be back now with my first love, Historicals, where I am Senior Editor.  This means I have responsibility for the acquisition of between 72-82 original historical books a year which first appear across North America’s Harlequin Historical and UK’s Mills & Boon Historical lines.  Mills & Boon in Australia and other countries make their selection from these books. Harlequin is a global company, so keeping in mind what has worldwide appeal is an important part of the acquisition process.  

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There have been a number of big changes during my working life.  When I joined the company John and Alan Boon (sons of the one of the founders) were very much in evidence as Chairman and Editorial Director.  The staff were all crammed into small premises in London’s Foley Street and the Post Office Tower was perfectly placed just around the corner for author lunches.  The company was growing apace even then and, now, we reside in leafy Richmond, on the edge of London, close to a beautiful stretch of the river Thames.  We’re part of Harlequin Enterprises which is the world’s leading publisher of romantic fiction.  One of the biggest editorial changes I’ve seen is the way the hero has evolved over time.  When stories were seen almost exclusively from the heroine’s perspective the hero, of necessity, was often aloof and enigmatic.  Over time he has come to reveal more of his own thoughts which has had the effect of creating a much more three-dimensional character, although I have to confess there’s a lot to be said for the occasional hero who doesn’t give much away!

The romance market is always developing and changing.  What are you looking for now in historicals?  And what are your own particular preferences?

What remain ever-popular are historicals set in Regency times.  The love of authors such as Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer never fades so this successfully keeps feeding reader appetite for this time period.  In North America Westerns are key performers while in our Overseas markets, such as Japan and Italy, Medievals are highly popular.  MastersBed
 We’re happy to consider a wide variety of time periods from Ancient Civilisations – such as Greece, Rome and Egypt – up to and including the Second World War.  In a nutshell, what we’re looking for are well paced, well characterised, well researched, emotionally intense stories where the main focus is on the developing relationship between the hero and heroine.  I do have a soft spot for sexy Viking heroes, myself, and embittered, battle-scarred loners be they warriors or outcasts from the Regency ton.  

M&B historicals have a reputation for being flexible and wide-ranging in the time settings accepted — a boon (no pun intended) for the reader looking for something different.  In fact at the recent RWA conference in Washington, I heard a Golden Heart winner tell people that she'd been warned she'd never sell that setting, but that  Mills & Boon bought it. And Mills & Boon were the first to take a chance on Diane Gaston's controversial book with a courtesan heroine — and now everyone's doing it. So what settings do you accept?

As already mentioned, we are open to strong storylines well told.  We will seriously consider stories which break boundaries as long as the writing convinces us that the journey into, for example, the Regency underworld or into less familiar Asian cultures will be an exciting and emotionally rewarding one. 

Who are some rising stars in HH?  The exciting new voices people should look for.  We already know about Nicola Cornick. 

CinderellaBride

 

All of our authors are stars!  I would like to highlight some outstanding authors who are published this month in North America.  Carole Mortimer – celebrating publication of her 150th Presents book this year – is now also contributing to the historical line.  THE DUKE’S CINDERELLA BRIDE is the first in a Regency quartet about The Notorious St Claires.  We’re very pleased to welcome Carole to the line and know you’ll find her Regency Rake heroes sinfully delicious. 
Ravenhurst Louise Allen’s THE PIRATICAL MISS RAVENHURST is the final tale in her six-book family miniseries.  Warm wit and sensuality combine to make this a special book.  Blythe Gifford’s Medieval  IN THE MASTER’S BED features a heroine who dresses as a young man to attain the independence she so desires.  She doesn’t foresee her attraction to Duncan, who stirs unknown but delightful sensations in her highly receptive, very feminine body!
Texaswedding  Kathryn Albright writes a wonderfully emotional story with a Western setting.  TEXAS WEDDING FOR THEIR BABY’S SAKE features a war-shattered hero (a Linda favourite!) who feels he no longer fits into society – until his fiancée tracks him down and proves that he has all to live for… 

I hope I’ve whetted your appetite to sample these and other Harlequin Mills & Boon novels. These can be found on www.eHarlequin.com and www.millsandboon.co.uk    as print and also eBooks.  We are constantly adding to our ebook backlist so you can now go and download books you might have missed out on.  

I'm drooling at the delicious covers. And I'm so pleased about the backlist coming out in e-books — it might be the nudge I need to get me to buy an e-reader. 
As well as readers, we have a number of aspiring writers who visit this blog regularly. What are some of the problems you see in manuscripts that come to you?

LindaFildew2 Lack of research is a key one.  Historical readers love to pick up a book, enter into the story and really feel as if they are there.  Authors need to do enough research so that the background feels authentic without the story seeming like a historical text book.  It’s a fine line to walk.  I always think the hardest part for an author must be to decide what gets to stay in the story and what must be cut out to help pacing and bring the focus back to the all-vital developing relationship between the hero and heroine.  

Some stories can feel claustrophobic set within one Regency family home, or one Norman castle’s walls because the author hasn’t the confidence to go beyond them.  You don’t have to know all the politics of the day, but some social context is necessary because readers love to feel they’ve learnt something about the period along with enjoying the romance. 

To turn this round, what I want to see is a storyline where you can tell the author is in love with her characters. There's a depth to their personalities which shows that the writer has got to know them intimately and understands what motivates and drives them. It's how the hero and heroine interact that is key to a good historical romance. The authentic background is important, but it's the developing relationship between your main protagonists that is key. Take the reader into their world and hold them there with good pacing, natural dialogue, intense emotion, and a strong storyline.

What new developments are happening in HH?  I’ve heard about the Undone series of short e-books.  Would you care to explain more?

Undone is an exciting new venture for Harlequin Historical! Launched November 1, 2008, these short, sexy, scandalous stories appear in ebook format. Available from eharlequin and other ebook distributors. The length is between 10 and 15,000 words, and we encourage submissions for any time period. We've widened our horizons and are also encouraging paranormal and time travel stories. We are looking for a high level of sensuality that flows naturally out of the plotline. There should be a strong emotional basis to the heightened attraction–it's vital the reader can believe in the intense emotion driving the characters as their relationship develops. These stories should be hot, sexy, and subtly explicit without the lovemaking being vulgar or gratuitous. Full guidelines are on eHarlequin's and millsandboon’s websites. Warriorsvirg
 We launched with 4 Undones and continue with 1 a month. In our anniversary month (1 year old in November 09!) we are featuring 2 stories and will publish 1 – 2 stories each month as we move into 2010.   In November we’re delighted to introduce some newly acquired authors.  3 talented new authors  have been signed up so far from unsolicited submissions for Undone.  

 For any aspiring writers who have been daunted by the idea of writing an historical of over 70,000 words, the shorter Undones might now give you the opportunity you've been looking for. Look out this month for Michelle Willingham’s THE WARRIOR’S FORBIDDEN VIRGIN. 

It sounds like a very vibrant and exciting program, Linda. Thank you so much for answering my questions and visiting here at the Word Wenches. I know you're extremely busy, so I appreciate your generosity.

It was my pleasure, Anne. Now, if any of your readers have any questions to ask me, I'll do my best to answer them.

Linda will be giving away a book to several readers who leave comments or ask questions.

215 thoughts on “Interview with Linda Fildew, Senior Editor Harlequin Historical.”

  1. Hi Linda, from another Linda.
    Question–I’ve been told that the story should focus more on the heroine than the hero. Is this true?
    I confess, I have a Regency story that is more hero than heroine.
    As a comment, I know that in all Harlequin Historical books I will find a lot of history, and I want the history. Other publishers vary.

    Reply
  2. Hi Linda, from another Linda.
    Question–I’ve been told that the story should focus more on the heroine than the hero. Is this true?
    I confess, I have a Regency story that is more hero than heroine.
    As a comment, I know that in all Harlequin Historical books I will find a lot of history, and I want the history. Other publishers vary.

    Reply
  3. Hi Linda, from another Linda.
    Question–I’ve been told that the story should focus more on the heroine than the hero. Is this true?
    I confess, I have a Regency story that is more hero than heroine.
    As a comment, I know that in all Harlequin Historical books I will find a lot of history, and I want the history. Other publishers vary.

    Reply
  4. Hi Linda, from another Linda.
    Question–I’ve been told that the story should focus more on the heroine than the hero. Is this true?
    I confess, I have a Regency story that is more hero than heroine.
    As a comment, I know that in all Harlequin Historical books I will find a lot of history, and I want the history. Other publishers vary.

    Reply
  5. Hi Linda, from another Linda.
    Question–I’ve been told that the story should focus more on the heroine than the hero. Is this true?
    I confess, I have a Regency story that is more hero than heroine.
    As a comment, I know that in all Harlequin Historical books I will find a lot of history, and I want the history. Other publishers vary.

    Reply
  6. Hi Linda,
    Thanks for giving us a behind-the-scenes. My question is a followup to the Undone series, which sounds like Harlequin is seriously thinking about adopting the e-market. What do you think about the e-market and how it’ll affect the publishing industry? Romance accounts for a large share of the paperbacks sold but with ebooks being cheaper production-wise, would this means more titles and more authors? How is Harlequin planning to handle this? Any hints?

    Reply
  7. Hi Linda,
    Thanks for giving us a behind-the-scenes. My question is a followup to the Undone series, which sounds like Harlequin is seriously thinking about adopting the e-market. What do you think about the e-market and how it’ll affect the publishing industry? Romance accounts for a large share of the paperbacks sold but with ebooks being cheaper production-wise, would this means more titles and more authors? How is Harlequin planning to handle this? Any hints?

    Reply
  8. Hi Linda,
    Thanks for giving us a behind-the-scenes. My question is a followup to the Undone series, which sounds like Harlequin is seriously thinking about adopting the e-market. What do you think about the e-market and how it’ll affect the publishing industry? Romance accounts for a large share of the paperbacks sold but with ebooks being cheaper production-wise, would this means more titles and more authors? How is Harlequin planning to handle this? Any hints?

    Reply
  9. Hi Linda,
    Thanks for giving us a behind-the-scenes. My question is a followup to the Undone series, which sounds like Harlequin is seriously thinking about adopting the e-market. What do you think about the e-market and how it’ll affect the publishing industry? Romance accounts for a large share of the paperbacks sold but with ebooks being cheaper production-wise, would this means more titles and more authors? How is Harlequin planning to handle this? Any hints?

    Reply
  10. Hi Linda,
    Thanks for giving us a behind-the-scenes. My question is a followup to the Undone series, which sounds like Harlequin is seriously thinking about adopting the e-market. What do you think about the e-market and how it’ll affect the publishing industry? Romance accounts for a large share of the paperbacks sold but with ebooks being cheaper production-wise, would this means more titles and more authors? How is Harlequin planning to handle this? Any hints?

    Reply
  11. Linda, I just thought of another question.
    How much sex do you want in your books?
    I don’t write all that much sex, but I have lots of sexual tension. Nowadays everyone tells me books have to be drenched in sex before they will sell.
    Thanks.

    Reply
  12. Linda, I just thought of another question.
    How much sex do you want in your books?
    I don’t write all that much sex, but I have lots of sexual tension. Nowadays everyone tells me books have to be drenched in sex before they will sell.
    Thanks.

    Reply
  13. Linda, I just thought of another question.
    How much sex do you want in your books?
    I don’t write all that much sex, but I have lots of sexual tension. Nowadays everyone tells me books have to be drenched in sex before they will sell.
    Thanks.

    Reply
  14. Linda, I just thought of another question.
    How much sex do you want in your books?
    I don’t write all that much sex, but I have lots of sexual tension. Nowadays everyone tells me books have to be drenched in sex before they will sell.
    Thanks.

    Reply
  15. Linda, I just thought of another question.
    How much sex do you want in your books?
    I don’t write all that much sex, but I have lots of sexual tension. Nowadays everyone tells me books have to be drenched in sex before they will sell.
    Thanks.

    Reply
  16. Thanks for the great interview, Linda. You do SUCH a wonderful range of books (and have such wonderful people working with you! Joanne and Kim were a real hit with everyone at RWA.)
    The Undone line is a great innovation. It’s fun to have shorter reads to complement full books, and I find it’s a great way to discover new or unfamiliar authors.
    It was fascinating to hear that Italy and Japan love medievals. I’d love to hear what genres are popular in other countries. And where are the biggest markets for Harlequin (aside from the US and Britain)? Do you have a big presence in India yet?
    Again, thanks for visiting!

    Reply
  17. Thanks for the great interview, Linda. You do SUCH a wonderful range of books (and have such wonderful people working with you! Joanne and Kim were a real hit with everyone at RWA.)
    The Undone line is a great innovation. It’s fun to have shorter reads to complement full books, and I find it’s a great way to discover new or unfamiliar authors.
    It was fascinating to hear that Italy and Japan love medievals. I’d love to hear what genres are popular in other countries. And where are the biggest markets for Harlequin (aside from the US and Britain)? Do you have a big presence in India yet?
    Again, thanks for visiting!

    Reply
  18. Thanks for the great interview, Linda. You do SUCH a wonderful range of books (and have such wonderful people working with you! Joanne and Kim were a real hit with everyone at RWA.)
    The Undone line is a great innovation. It’s fun to have shorter reads to complement full books, and I find it’s a great way to discover new or unfamiliar authors.
    It was fascinating to hear that Italy and Japan love medievals. I’d love to hear what genres are popular in other countries. And where are the biggest markets for Harlequin (aside from the US and Britain)? Do you have a big presence in India yet?
    Again, thanks for visiting!

    Reply
  19. Thanks for the great interview, Linda. You do SUCH a wonderful range of books (and have such wonderful people working with you! Joanne and Kim were a real hit with everyone at RWA.)
    The Undone line is a great innovation. It’s fun to have shorter reads to complement full books, and I find it’s a great way to discover new or unfamiliar authors.
    It was fascinating to hear that Italy and Japan love medievals. I’d love to hear what genres are popular in other countries. And where are the biggest markets for Harlequin (aside from the US and Britain)? Do you have a big presence in India yet?
    Again, thanks for visiting!

    Reply
  20. Thanks for the great interview, Linda. You do SUCH a wonderful range of books (and have such wonderful people working with you! Joanne and Kim were a real hit with everyone at RWA.)
    The Undone line is a great innovation. It’s fun to have shorter reads to complement full books, and I find it’s a great way to discover new or unfamiliar authors.
    It was fascinating to hear that Italy and Japan love medievals. I’d love to hear what genres are popular in other countries. And where are the biggest markets for Harlequin (aside from the US and Britain)? Do you have a big presence in India yet?
    Again, thanks for visiting!

    Reply
  21. Lovely to see you here at the Word Wenches, Linda. One of the many things that I like about Harlequin Historicals is the range of backgrounds and settings that you encourage people to try. It’s wonderful to have that scope!

    Reply
  22. Lovely to see you here at the Word Wenches, Linda. One of the many things that I like about Harlequin Historicals is the range of backgrounds and settings that you encourage people to try. It’s wonderful to have that scope!

    Reply
  23. Lovely to see you here at the Word Wenches, Linda. One of the many things that I like about Harlequin Historicals is the range of backgrounds and settings that you encourage people to try. It’s wonderful to have that scope!

    Reply
  24. Lovely to see you here at the Word Wenches, Linda. One of the many things that I like about Harlequin Historicals is the range of backgrounds and settings that you encourage people to try. It’s wonderful to have that scope!

    Reply
  25. Lovely to see you here at the Word Wenches, Linda. One of the many things that I like about Harlequin Historicals is the range of backgrounds and settings that you encourage people to try. It’s wonderful to have that scope!

    Reply
  26. Thanks for the interesting interview, Linda. I am so impressed with Harlequin’s historical line. You provide a wider variety of locales and time periods than I have seen anywhere else.
    I love the latest covers. I am wondering, though, when you market a book overseas do you usually change the cover to reflect that counntry’s culture and ethnicity?

    Reply
  27. Thanks for the interesting interview, Linda. I am so impressed with Harlequin’s historical line. You provide a wider variety of locales and time periods than I have seen anywhere else.
    I love the latest covers. I am wondering, though, when you market a book overseas do you usually change the cover to reflect that counntry’s culture and ethnicity?

    Reply
  28. Thanks for the interesting interview, Linda. I am so impressed with Harlequin’s historical line. You provide a wider variety of locales and time periods than I have seen anywhere else.
    I love the latest covers. I am wondering, though, when you market a book overseas do you usually change the cover to reflect that counntry’s culture and ethnicity?

    Reply
  29. Thanks for the interesting interview, Linda. I am so impressed with Harlequin’s historical line. You provide a wider variety of locales and time periods than I have seen anywhere else.
    I love the latest covers. I am wondering, though, when you market a book overseas do you usually change the cover to reflect that counntry’s culture and ethnicity?

    Reply
  30. Thanks for the interesting interview, Linda. I am so impressed with Harlequin’s historical line. You provide a wider variety of locales and time periods than I have seen anywhere else.
    I love the latest covers. I am wondering, though, when you market a book overseas do you usually change the cover to reflect that counntry’s culture and ethnicity?

    Reply
  31. Hello to all of you. Sorry not to have got back on board sooner.
    To answer your various queries in order.
    Linda – you have flexibility over the story focus. You could see the whole story from either the hero or heroine’s perspective or from both. In historicals you can also bring in a little of the secondary characters point of view, but beware of taking the focus too much away from the main protagonists.

    Reply
  32. Hello to all of you. Sorry not to have got back on board sooner.
    To answer your various queries in order.
    Linda – you have flexibility over the story focus. You could see the whole story from either the hero or heroine’s perspective or from both. In historicals you can also bring in a little of the secondary characters point of view, but beware of taking the focus too much away from the main protagonists.

    Reply
  33. Hello to all of you. Sorry not to have got back on board sooner.
    To answer your various queries in order.
    Linda – you have flexibility over the story focus. You could see the whole story from either the hero or heroine’s perspective or from both. In historicals you can also bring in a little of the secondary characters point of view, but beware of taking the focus too much away from the main protagonists.

    Reply
  34. Hello to all of you. Sorry not to have got back on board sooner.
    To answer your various queries in order.
    Linda – you have flexibility over the story focus. You could see the whole story from either the hero or heroine’s perspective or from both. In historicals you can also bring in a little of the secondary characters point of view, but beware of taking the focus too much away from the main protagonists.

    Reply
  35. Hello to all of you. Sorry not to have got back on board sooner.
    To answer your various queries in order.
    Linda – you have flexibility over the story focus. You could see the whole story from either the hero or heroine’s perspective or from both. In historicals you can also bring in a little of the secondary characters point of view, but beware of taking the focus too much away from the main protagonists.

    Reply
  36. Shirley – we are taking the ebook market very seriously at Harlequin. Not only are there Undone, Spice Briefs and Nocturne Bites as short eBooks, but all of our current print list is also available as ebook editions with a growing backlist as well.Readers know to come to Harlequin for excellent stories from skilled writers so I do believe we will continue to hold a big share of the romance market be it in print or ebook formats.

    Reply
  37. Shirley – we are taking the ebook market very seriously at Harlequin. Not only are there Undone, Spice Briefs and Nocturne Bites as short eBooks, but all of our current print list is also available as ebook editions with a growing backlist as well.Readers know to come to Harlequin for excellent stories from skilled writers so I do believe we will continue to hold a big share of the romance market be it in print or ebook formats.

    Reply
  38. Shirley – we are taking the ebook market very seriously at Harlequin. Not only are there Undone, Spice Briefs and Nocturne Bites as short eBooks, but all of our current print list is also available as ebook editions with a growing backlist as well.Readers know to come to Harlequin for excellent stories from skilled writers so I do believe we will continue to hold a big share of the romance market be it in print or ebook formats.

    Reply
  39. Shirley – we are taking the ebook market very seriously at Harlequin. Not only are there Undone, Spice Briefs and Nocturne Bites as short eBooks, but all of our current print list is also available as ebook editions with a growing backlist as well.Readers know to come to Harlequin for excellent stories from skilled writers so I do believe we will continue to hold a big share of the romance market be it in print or ebook formats.

    Reply
  40. Shirley – we are taking the ebook market very seriously at Harlequin. Not only are there Undone, Spice Briefs and Nocturne Bites as short eBooks, but all of our current print list is also available as ebook editions with a growing backlist as well.Readers know to come to Harlequin for excellent stories from skilled writers so I do believe we will continue to hold a big share of the romance market be it in print or ebook formats.

    Reply
  41. Linda – sexual tension is what will draw your reader through the story and keep them glued to finding out about your characters. As you appear to be doing, you should focus on building strong emotional intensity between your hero and heroine and if you are not comfortable with sex scenes then it’s better that you leave them out.

    Reply
  42. Linda – sexual tension is what will draw your reader through the story and keep them glued to finding out about your characters. As you appear to be doing, you should focus on building strong emotional intensity between your hero and heroine and if you are not comfortable with sex scenes then it’s better that you leave them out.

    Reply
  43. Linda – sexual tension is what will draw your reader through the story and keep them glued to finding out about your characters. As you appear to be doing, you should focus on building strong emotional intensity between your hero and heroine and if you are not comfortable with sex scenes then it’s better that you leave them out.

    Reply
  44. Linda – sexual tension is what will draw your reader through the story and keep them glued to finding out about your characters. As you appear to be doing, you should focus on building strong emotional intensity between your hero and heroine and if you are not comfortable with sex scenes then it’s better that you leave them out.

    Reply
  45. Linda – sexual tension is what will draw your reader through the story and keep them glued to finding out about your characters. As you appear to be doing, you should focus on building strong emotional intensity between your hero and heroine and if you are not comfortable with sex scenes then it’s better that you leave them out.

    Reply
  46. Liz – Thank you for your praise for the range of books we publish in Harlequin Historical and for your nice words about Joanne and Kim. I will pass this on to them. Having variety in the line is important because I’m acquiring for the global market and work hard to get the right balance between the different time periods. Historicals are very popular in our Overseas markets – universally the Regencies are loved which is why approx 36 of our 72 original titles a year are Regency (I include under this umbrella late Georgian and early Victorian). We have now established a presence in India and certain lines have launched there. We had a successful writers’ competition in India some months back which garnered a lot of interest. Harlequin is always looking for opportunities to expand the readership – India and also our new venture in Undone are obvious signs of this.

    Reply
  47. Liz – Thank you for your praise for the range of books we publish in Harlequin Historical and for your nice words about Joanne and Kim. I will pass this on to them. Having variety in the line is important because I’m acquiring for the global market and work hard to get the right balance between the different time periods. Historicals are very popular in our Overseas markets – universally the Regencies are loved which is why approx 36 of our 72 original titles a year are Regency (I include under this umbrella late Georgian and early Victorian). We have now established a presence in India and certain lines have launched there. We had a successful writers’ competition in India some months back which garnered a lot of interest. Harlequin is always looking for opportunities to expand the readership – India and also our new venture in Undone are obvious signs of this.

    Reply
  48. Liz – Thank you for your praise for the range of books we publish in Harlequin Historical and for your nice words about Joanne and Kim. I will pass this on to them. Having variety in the line is important because I’m acquiring for the global market and work hard to get the right balance between the different time periods. Historicals are very popular in our Overseas markets – universally the Regencies are loved which is why approx 36 of our 72 original titles a year are Regency (I include under this umbrella late Georgian and early Victorian). We have now established a presence in India and certain lines have launched there. We had a successful writers’ competition in India some months back which garnered a lot of interest. Harlequin is always looking for opportunities to expand the readership – India and also our new venture in Undone are obvious signs of this.

    Reply
  49. Liz – Thank you for your praise for the range of books we publish in Harlequin Historical and for your nice words about Joanne and Kim. I will pass this on to them. Having variety in the line is important because I’m acquiring for the global market and work hard to get the right balance between the different time periods. Historicals are very popular in our Overseas markets – universally the Regencies are loved which is why approx 36 of our 72 original titles a year are Regency (I include under this umbrella late Georgian and early Victorian). We have now established a presence in India and certain lines have launched there. We had a successful writers’ competition in India some months back which garnered a lot of interest. Harlequin is always looking for opportunities to expand the readership – India and also our new venture in Undone are obvious signs of this.

    Reply
  50. Liz – Thank you for your praise for the range of books we publish in Harlequin Historical and for your nice words about Joanne and Kim. I will pass this on to them. Having variety in the line is important because I’m acquiring for the global market and work hard to get the right balance between the different time periods. Historicals are very popular in our Overseas markets – universally the Regencies are loved which is why approx 36 of our 72 original titles a year are Regency (I include under this umbrella late Georgian and early Victorian). We have now established a presence in India and certain lines have launched there. We had a successful writers’ competition in India some months back which garnered a lot of interest. Harlequin is always looking for opportunities to expand the readership – India and also our new venture in Undone are obvious signs of this.

    Reply
  51. Andrea – Thank you for also saying that you like the scope we have in Harlequin Historical. It does allow authors to explore different avenues and, if the emotional engagement is there, then readers are happy to go with them.

    Reply
  52. Andrea – Thank you for also saying that you like the scope we have in Harlequin Historical. It does allow authors to explore different avenues and, if the emotional engagement is there, then readers are happy to go with them.

    Reply
  53. Andrea – Thank you for also saying that you like the scope we have in Harlequin Historical. It does allow authors to explore different avenues and, if the emotional engagement is there, then readers are happy to go with them.

    Reply
  54. Andrea – Thank you for also saying that you like the scope we have in Harlequin Historical. It does allow authors to explore different avenues and, if the emotional engagement is there, then readers are happy to go with them.

    Reply
  55. Andrea – Thank you for also saying that you like the scope we have in Harlequin Historical. It does allow authors to explore different avenues and, if the emotional engagement is there, then readers are happy to go with them.

    Reply
  56. Nicola – lovely to see your comment. You have certainly helped broaden our scope in HH – most particularly with your first person novel – KIDNAPPED: HIS INNOCENT MISTRESS. One of the many reasons I so love my job is that it’s never the same from one day to the next. The reading is so varied – one day Regency London, the next Medieval Ireland. With regard to the covers. The Overseas companies devise packaging which is appropriate for their individual markets. Some will pick up the art that we commissioned for it, others will use their own art sources to create the right image and feel for their readership.I’m always fascinated to see the Overseas books come through – or spot them on their websites – because they each have their own different spin. How on earth do you manage to hold all the various editions on your shelves?

    Reply
  57. Nicola – lovely to see your comment. You have certainly helped broaden our scope in HH – most particularly with your first person novel – KIDNAPPED: HIS INNOCENT MISTRESS. One of the many reasons I so love my job is that it’s never the same from one day to the next. The reading is so varied – one day Regency London, the next Medieval Ireland. With regard to the covers. The Overseas companies devise packaging which is appropriate for their individual markets. Some will pick up the art that we commissioned for it, others will use their own art sources to create the right image and feel for their readership.I’m always fascinated to see the Overseas books come through – or spot them on their websites – because they each have their own different spin. How on earth do you manage to hold all the various editions on your shelves?

    Reply
  58. Nicola – lovely to see your comment. You have certainly helped broaden our scope in HH – most particularly with your first person novel – KIDNAPPED: HIS INNOCENT MISTRESS. One of the many reasons I so love my job is that it’s never the same from one day to the next. The reading is so varied – one day Regency London, the next Medieval Ireland. With regard to the covers. The Overseas companies devise packaging which is appropriate for their individual markets. Some will pick up the art that we commissioned for it, others will use their own art sources to create the right image and feel for their readership.I’m always fascinated to see the Overseas books come through – or spot them on their websites – because they each have their own different spin. How on earth do you manage to hold all the various editions on your shelves?

    Reply
  59. Nicola – lovely to see your comment. You have certainly helped broaden our scope in HH – most particularly with your first person novel – KIDNAPPED: HIS INNOCENT MISTRESS. One of the many reasons I so love my job is that it’s never the same from one day to the next. The reading is so varied – one day Regency London, the next Medieval Ireland. With regard to the covers. The Overseas companies devise packaging which is appropriate for their individual markets. Some will pick up the art that we commissioned for it, others will use their own art sources to create the right image and feel for their readership.I’m always fascinated to see the Overseas books come through – or spot them on their websites – because they each have their own different spin. How on earth do you manage to hold all the various editions on your shelves?

    Reply
  60. Nicola – lovely to see your comment. You have certainly helped broaden our scope in HH – most particularly with your first person novel – KIDNAPPED: HIS INNOCENT MISTRESS. One of the many reasons I so love my job is that it’s never the same from one day to the next. The reading is so varied – one day Regency London, the next Medieval Ireland. With regard to the covers. The Overseas companies devise packaging which is appropriate for their individual markets. Some will pick up the art that we commissioned for it, others will use their own art sources to create the right image and feel for their readership.I’m always fascinated to see the Overseas books come through – or spot them on their websites – because they each have their own different spin. How on earth do you manage to hold all the various editions on your shelves?

    Reply
  61. Accept my apologies – I think, in moving back and forth between the questions I have confused some of the names and who wrote what. Blame the lateness of the day here in Richmond. Am signing off now for the weekend but will check back on Monday to see if any more questions have come in. Have a good weekend.

    Reply
  62. Accept my apologies – I think, in moving back and forth between the questions I have confused some of the names and who wrote what. Blame the lateness of the day here in Richmond. Am signing off now for the weekend but will check back on Monday to see if any more questions have come in. Have a good weekend.

    Reply
  63. Accept my apologies – I think, in moving back and forth between the questions I have confused some of the names and who wrote what. Blame the lateness of the day here in Richmond. Am signing off now for the weekend but will check back on Monday to see if any more questions have come in. Have a good weekend.

    Reply
  64. Accept my apologies – I think, in moving back and forth between the questions I have confused some of the names and who wrote what. Blame the lateness of the day here in Richmond. Am signing off now for the weekend but will check back on Monday to see if any more questions have come in. Have a good weekend.

    Reply
  65. Accept my apologies – I think, in moving back and forth between the questions I have confused some of the names and who wrote what. Blame the lateness of the day here in Richmond. Am signing off now for the weekend but will check back on Monday to see if any more questions have come in. Have a good weekend.

    Reply
  66. Hi Linda,
    What are your thoughts about a story set partially in Victorian India? Many aristocrats fled there, living in exile for various reasons, yet still maintained their lavish lifestyles.
    Thanks

    Reply
  67. Hi Linda,
    What are your thoughts about a story set partially in Victorian India? Many aristocrats fled there, living in exile for various reasons, yet still maintained their lavish lifestyles.
    Thanks

    Reply
  68. Hi Linda,
    What are your thoughts about a story set partially in Victorian India? Many aristocrats fled there, living in exile for various reasons, yet still maintained their lavish lifestyles.
    Thanks

    Reply
  69. Hi Linda,
    What are your thoughts about a story set partially in Victorian India? Many aristocrats fled there, living in exile for various reasons, yet still maintained their lavish lifestyles.
    Thanks

    Reply
  70. Hi Linda,
    What are your thoughts about a story set partially in Victorian India? Many aristocrats fled there, living in exile for various reasons, yet still maintained their lavish lifestyles.
    Thanks

    Reply
  71. Linda, what a great interview. It’s so nice to read what Harlequin M&B is looking for. The other Linda asked the same question I was going to – about the sexual tension / sex scenes. So I’m glad that’s been answered.
    Thanks!
    ~Phyllis~

    Reply
  72. Linda, what a great interview. It’s so nice to read what Harlequin M&B is looking for. The other Linda asked the same question I was going to – about the sexual tension / sex scenes. So I’m glad that’s been answered.
    Thanks!
    ~Phyllis~

    Reply
  73. Linda, what a great interview. It’s so nice to read what Harlequin M&B is looking for. The other Linda asked the same question I was going to – about the sexual tension / sex scenes. So I’m glad that’s been answered.
    Thanks!
    ~Phyllis~

    Reply
  74. Linda, what a great interview. It’s so nice to read what Harlequin M&B is looking for. The other Linda asked the same question I was going to – about the sexual tension / sex scenes. So I’m glad that’s been answered.
    Thanks!
    ~Phyllis~

    Reply
  75. Linda, what a great interview. It’s so nice to read what Harlequin M&B is looking for. The other Linda asked the same question I was going to – about the sexual tension / sex scenes. So I’m glad that’s been answered.
    Thanks!
    ~Phyllis~

    Reply
  76. Hi Linda,
    I am really impressed with the diversity of the stories in Harlequin Historicals. I hope that this is something that you continue.

    Reply
  77. Hi Linda,
    I am really impressed with the diversity of the stories in Harlequin Historicals. I hope that this is something that you continue.

    Reply
  78. Hi Linda,
    I am really impressed with the diversity of the stories in Harlequin Historicals. I hope that this is something that you continue.

    Reply
  79. Hi Linda,
    I am really impressed with the diversity of the stories in Harlequin Historicals. I hope that this is something that you continue.

    Reply
  80. Hi Linda,
    I am really impressed with the diversity of the stories in Harlequin Historicals. I hope that this is something that you continue.

    Reply
  81. Linda, thanks so much for such an informative interview. I was interested to see someone mention India as a market. I read a paper recently on the once-upon-a-time market for raj romances in Britain, which faded in the 50s after the dissolution. Those would have of course been contemporaries in their time, but has anyone considered looking at the raj as a historical possibility now?
    Also, thank you from the bottom of my heart for publishing Carla Kelly. She’s a goddess in what she does in capturing the more commonplace in the Regency, and I thank heaven HQ has been there to bring her to us!
    ml

    Reply
  82. Linda, thanks so much for such an informative interview. I was interested to see someone mention India as a market. I read a paper recently on the once-upon-a-time market for raj romances in Britain, which faded in the 50s after the dissolution. Those would have of course been contemporaries in their time, but has anyone considered looking at the raj as a historical possibility now?
    Also, thank you from the bottom of my heart for publishing Carla Kelly. She’s a goddess in what she does in capturing the more commonplace in the Regency, and I thank heaven HQ has been there to bring her to us!
    ml

    Reply
  83. Linda, thanks so much for such an informative interview. I was interested to see someone mention India as a market. I read a paper recently on the once-upon-a-time market for raj romances in Britain, which faded in the 50s after the dissolution. Those would have of course been contemporaries in their time, but has anyone considered looking at the raj as a historical possibility now?
    Also, thank you from the bottom of my heart for publishing Carla Kelly. She’s a goddess in what she does in capturing the more commonplace in the Regency, and I thank heaven HQ has been there to bring her to us!
    ml

    Reply
  84. Linda, thanks so much for such an informative interview. I was interested to see someone mention India as a market. I read a paper recently on the once-upon-a-time market for raj romances in Britain, which faded in the 50s after the dissolution. Those would have of course been contemporaries in their time, but has anyone considered looking at the raj as a historical possibility now?
    Also, thank you from the bottom of my heart for publishing Carla Kelly. She’s a goddess in what she does in capturing the more commonplace in the Regency, and I thank heaven HQ has been there to bring her to us!
    ml

    Reply
  85. Linda, thanks so much for such an informative interview. I was interested to see someone mention India as a market. I read a paper recently on the once-upon-a-time market for raj romances in Britain, which faded in the 50s after the dissolution. Those would have of course been contemporaries in their time, but has anyone considered looking at the raj as a historical possibility now?
    Also, thank you from the bottom of my heart for publishing Carla Kelly. She’s a goddess in what she does in capturing the more commonplace in the Regency, and I thank heaven HQ has been there to bring her to us!
    ml

    Reply
  86. Really great interview! And thanks for the book recs, I’m always looking for new reads (even though my TBR pile is rather large LOL. What can I say, you can never have to many books;)

    Reply
  87. Really great interview! And thanks for the book recs, I’m always looking for new reads (even though my TBR pile is rather large LOL. What can I say, you can never have to many books;)

    Reply
  88. Really great interview! And thanks for the book recs, I’m always looking for new reads (even though my TBR pile is rather large LOL. What can I say, you can never have to many books;)

    Reply
  89. Really great interview! And thanks for the book recs, I’m always looking for new reads (even though my TBR pile is rather large LOL. What can I say, you can never have to many books;)

    Reply
  90. Really great interview! And thanks for the book recs, I’m always looking for new reads (even though my TBR pile is rather large LOL. What can I say, you can never have to many books;)

    Reply
  91. Linda, I’m traveling today so I’m checking in late, but thank you soooo much for visiting the wenches! Our readers are dying to know about new-to-them authors as well as how the publishing world works. I think you’ve nicely satisfied both cravings.
    And one of these days, an e-book reader is gonna be mine, too!

    Reply
  92. Linda, I’m traveling today so I’m checking in late, but thank you soooo much for visiting the wenches! Our readers are dying to know about new-to-them authors as well as how the publishing world works. I think you’ve nicely satisfied both cravings.
    And one of these days, an e-book reader is gonna be mine, too!

    Reply
  93. Linda, I’m traveling today so I’m checking in late, but thank you soooo much for visiting the wenches! Our readers are dying to know about new-to-them authors as well as how the publishing world works. I think you’ve nicely satisfied both cravings.
    And one of these days, an e-book reader is gonna be mine, too!

    Reply
  94. Linda, I’m traveling today so I’m checking in late, but thank you soooo much for visiting the wenches! Our readers are dying to know about new-to-them authors as well as how the publishing world works. I think you’ve nicely satisfied both cravings.
    And one of these days, an e-book reader is gonna be mine, too!

    Reply
  95. Linda, I’m traveling today so I’m checking in late, but thank you soooo much for visiting the wenches! Our readers are dying to know about new-to-them authors as well as how the publishing world works. I think you’ve nicely satisfied both cravings.
    And one of these days, an e-book reader is gonna be mine, too!

    Reply
  96. I wish we could get Undones in print form. I have often wished for short historicals, because they I love them, but they can take such an investment of time and attention that I don’t always have when I’m in a historicals mood.
    (Gotta say though, I really hate the trend of historical titles that sound just like Harlequin Presents titles. It robs the books of so much of their unique personality.)

    Reply
  97. I wish we could get Undones in print form. I have often wished for short historicals, because they I love them, but they can take such an investment of time and attention that I don’t always have when I’m in a historicals mood.
    (Gotta say though, I really hate the trend of historical titles that sound just like Harlequin Presents titles. It robs the books of so much of their unique personality.)

    Reply
  98. I wish we could get Undones in print form. I have often wished for short historicals, because they I love them, but they can take such an investment of time and attention that I don’t always have when I’m in a historicals mood.
    (Gotta say though, I really hate the trend of historical titles that sound just like Harlequin Presents titles. It robs the books of so much of their unique personality.)

    Reply
  99. I wish we could get Undones in print form. I have often wished for short historicals, because they I love them, but they can take such an investment of time and attention that I don’t always have when I’m in a historicals mood.
    (Gotta say though, I really hate the trend of historical titles that sound just like Harlequin Presents titles. It robs the books of so much of their unique personality.)

    Reply
  100. I wish we could get Undones in print form. I have often wished for short historicals, because they I love them, but they can take such an investment of time and attention that I don’t always have when I’m in a historicals mood.
    (Gotta say though, I really hate the trend of historical titles that sound just like Harlequin Presents titles. It robs the books of so much of their unique personality.)

    Reply
  101. I’m glad to see more medievals, and to hear more backlist available in eformat. Would even like to see an ebook club for buying like they do for prints for the HH line.

    Reply
  102. I’m glad to see more medievals, and to hear more backlist available in eformat. Would even like to see an ebook club for buying like they do for prints for the HH line.

    Reply
  103. I’m glad to see more medievals, and to hear more backlist available in eformat. Would even like to see an ebook club for buying like they do for prints for the HH line.

    Reply
  104. I’m glad to see more medievals, and to hear more backlist available in eformat. Would even like to see an ebook club for buying like they do for prints for the HH line.

    Reply
  105. I’m glad to see more medievals, and to hear more backlist available in eformat. Would even like to see an ebook club for buying like they do for prints for the HH line.

    Reply
  106. Very interesting interview. It is interesting how romances have changed over the years. My grandmother gave me a box of Harlequins published in the early 60’s. Very different from the Harlequins that are out there today. You comment about the change in the depiction of the heroes is so right. They were sort of just there: strong, handsome, enigmatic, usually understanding, often a mystery, but pretty much one dimensional. It is nice to see the fuller characterizations that are in the books today.
    Glad you have been at a job you like.

    Reply
  107. Very interesting interview. It is interesting how romances have changed over the years. My grandmother gave me a box of Harlequins published in the early 60’s. Very different from the Harlequins that are out there today. You comment about the change in the depiction of the heroes is so right. They were sort of just there: strong, handsome, enigmatic, usually understanding, often a mystery, but pretty much one dimensional. It is nice to see the fuller characterizations that are in the books today.
    Glad you have been at a job you like.

    Reply
  108. Very interesting interview. It is interesting how romances have changed over the years. My grandmother gave me a box of Harlequins published in the early 60’s. Very different from the Harlequins that are out there today. You comment about the change in the depiction of the heroes is so right. They were sort of just there: strong, handsome, enigmatic, usually understanding, often a mystery, but pretty much one dimensional. It is nice to see the fuller characterizations that are in the books today.
    Glad you have been at a job you like.

    Reply
  109. Very interesting interview. It is interesting how romances have changed over the years. My grandmother gave me a box of Harlequins published in the early 60’s. Very different from the Harlequins that are out there today. You comment about the change in the depiction of the heroes is so right. They were sort of just there: strong, handsome, enigmatic, usually understanding, often a mystery, but pretty much one dimensional. It is nice to see the fuller characterizations that are in the books today.
    Glad you have been at a job you like.

    Reply
  110. Very interesting interview. It is interesting how romances have changed over the years. My grandmother gave me a box of Harlequins published in the early 60’s. Very different from the Harlequins that are out there today. You comment about the change in the depiction of the heroes is so right. They were sort of just there: strong, handsome, enigmatic, usually understanding, often a mystery, but pretty much one dimensional. It is nice to see the fuller characterizations that are in the books today.
    Glad you have been at a job you like.

    Reply
  111. I was thinking the same thing as Willa, that these titles in the “The (Male Noun)’s (Adjective) (Female Noun)” pattern aren’t to my liking; to my mind, they trivialize and stereotype series books, and the whole genre, actually. Are they mandatory now?
    I would also add my thanks for publishing Carla Kelly, who’s a genius, as well as Diane Gaston and Nicola Cornick.

    Reply
  112. I was thinking the same thing as Willa, that these titles in the “The (Male Noun)’s (Adjective) (Female Noun)” pattern aren’t to my liking; to my mind, they trivialize and stereotype series books, and the whole genre, actually. Are they mandatory now?
    I would also add my thanks for publishing Carla Kelly, who’s a genius, as well as Diane Gaston and Nicola Cornick.

    Reply
  113. I was thinking the same thing as Willa, that these titles in the “The (Male Noun)’s (Adjective) (Female Noun)” pattern aren’t to my liking; to my mind, they trivialize and stereotype series books, and the whole genre, actually. Are they mandatory now?
    I would also add my thanks for publishing Carla Kelly, who’s a genius, as well as Diane Gaston and Nicola Cornick.

    Reply
  114. I was thinking the same thing as Willa, that these titles in the “The (Male Noun)’s (Adjective) (Female Noun)” pattern aren’t to my liking; to my mind, they trivialize and stereotype series books, and the whole genre, actually. Are they mandatory now?
    I would also add my thanks for publishing Carla Kelly, who’s a genius, as well as Diane Gaston and Nicola Cornick.

    Reply
  115. I was thinking the same thing as Willa, that these titles in the “The (Male Noun)’s (Adjective) (Female Noun)” pattern aren’t to my liking; to my mind, they trivialize and stereotype series books, and the whole genre, actually. Are they mandatory now?
    I would also add my thanks for publishing Carla Kelly, who’s a genius, as well as Diane Gaston and Nicola Cornick.

    Reply
  116. Hello Linda’
    This was a great interview. Thank you so much. Historicals are my favorite, and I also like the idea of stories set in British-held India. I read one years ago entitled “Olivia and Jai” and I have never forgotten it, partly because of the setting.

    Reply
  117. Hello Linda’
    This was a great interview. Thank you so much. Historicals are my favorite, and I also like the idea of stories set in British-held India. I read one years ago entitled “Olivia and Jai” and I have never forgotten it, partly because of the setting.

    Reply
  118. Hello Linda’
    This was a great interview. Thank you so much. Historicals are my favorite, and I also like the idea of stories set in British-held India. I read one years ago entitled “Olivia and Jai” and I have never forgotten it, partly because of the setting.

    Reply
  119. Hello Linda’
    This was a great interview. Thank you so much. Historicals are my favorite, and I also like the idea of stories set in British-held India. I read one years ago entitled “Olivia and Jai” and I have never forgotten it, partly because of the setting.

    Reply
  120. Hello Linda’
    This was a great interview. Thank you so much. Historicals are my favorite, and I also like the idea of stories set in British-held India. I read one years ago entitled “Olivia and Jai” and I have never forgotten it, partly because of the setting.

    Reply
  121. What an interesting post ! I think it’s the first time I read an interview of an editor… what a great job you have 😉
    My question was aready answeredn thank you.

    Reply
  122. What an interesting post ! I think it’s the first time I read an interview of an editor… what a great job you have 😉
    My question was aready answeredn thank you.

    Reply
  123. What an interesting post ! I think it’s the first time I read an interview of an editor… what a great job you have 😉
    My question was aready answeredn thank you.

    Reply
  124. What an interesting post ! I think it’s the first time I read an interview of an editor… what a great job you have 😉
    My question was aready answeredn thank you.

    Reply
  125. What an interesting post ! I think it’s the first time I read an interview of an editor… what a great job you have 😉
    My question was aready answeredn thank you.

    Reply
  126. I absolutely love the new Undone series of short historicals. They are the perfect choice for a short but very satisfying sensual read. I like them because I enjoy erotic romance, emphasis on the romance. I must have my HEA! And I absolutely love historicals, they will never go out of style in my opinion.
    I have learned about new authors I was curious about through the Undone series and eagerly await next month’s installment.

    Reply
  127. I absolutely love the new Undone series of short historicals. They are the perfect choice for a short but very satisfying sensual read. I like them because I enjoy erotic romance, emphasis on the romance. I must have my HEA! And I absolutely love historicals, they will never go out of style in my opinion.
    I have learned about new authors I was curious about through the Undone series and eagerly await next month’s installment.

    Reply
  128. I absolutely love the new Undone series of short historicals. They are the perfect choice for a short but very satisfying sensual read. I like them because I enjoy erotic romance, emphasis on the romance. I must have my HEA! And I absolutely love historicals, they will never go out of style in my opinion.
    I have learned about new authors I was curious about through the Undone series and eagerly await next month’s installment.

    Reply
  129. I absolutely love the new Undone series of short historicals. They are the perfect choice for a short but very satisfying sensual read. I like them because I enjoy erotic romance, emphasis on the romance. I must have my HEA! And I absolutely love historicals, they will never go out of style in my opinion.
    I have learned about new authors I was curious about through the Undone series and eagerly await next month’s installment.

    Reply
  130. I absolutely love the new Undone series of short historicals. They are the perfect choice for a short but very satisfying sensual read. I like them because I enjoy erotic romance, emphasis on the romance. I must have my HEA! And I absolutely love historicals, they will never go out of style in my opinion.
    I have learned about new authors I was curious about through the Undone series and eagerly await next month’s installment.

    Reply
  131. Linda, thanks so much for the insight. You’ve left the field open for lots of creativity in times and places. However, are there some that would be better to avoid, that if not politically correct, are at least politically risky? One that springs to mind is India under the Raj (lots of scope for really good stories), but are there others?
    DO

    Reply
  132. Linda, thanks so much for the insight. You’ve left the field open for lots of creativity in times and places. However, are there some that would be better to avoid, that if not politically correct, are at least politically risky? One that springs to mind is India under the Raj (lots of scope for really good stories), but are there others?
    DO

    Reply
  133. Linda, thanks so much for the insight. You’ve left the field open for lots of creativity in times and places. However, are there some that would be better to avoid, that if not politically correct, are at least politically risky? One that springs to mind is India under the Raj (lots of scope for really good stories), but are there others?
    DO

    Reply
  134. Linda, thanks so much for the insight. You’ve left the field open for lots of creativity in times and places. However, are there some that would be better to avoid, that if not politically correct, are at least politically risky? One that springs to mind is India under the Raj (lots of scope for really good stories), but are there others?
    DO

    Reply
  135. Linda, thanks so much for the insight. You’ve left the field open for lots of creativity in times and places. However, are there some that would be better to avoid, that if not politically correct, are at least politically risky? One that springs to mind is India under the Raj (lots of scope for really good stories), but are there others?
    DO

    Reply
  136. I can see that over the weekend a good number of comments have come in and that’s wonderful. Thank you all for taking the time to post. I do feel I’m very lucky to have a job that brings me so much satisfaction – having tremendous authors to work with and their special manuscripts to read is both a privilege and a delight.
    To briefly answer your various questions:
    Yes, we’d be happy to consider stories with Indian settings. No time period or setting is impossible. The story’s acceptability will all be down to the execution. You might think Vikings heroes or Sultans in the Ottoman Empire would be a challenge to make sympathetic, but Harlequin Historical authors have most brilliantly achieved this. So do feel you can let your imagination run free.
    We will be keeping diversity in the line, never fear, always bearing in mind global market tastes.
    I’m so pleased to learn of your delight in what we publish in HH and Undone. It’s very encouraging for both authors and editors alike to receive this kind of feedback.

    Reply
  137. I can see that over the weekend a good number of comments have come in and that’s wonderful. Thank you all for taking the time to post. I do feel I’m very lucky to have a job that brings me so much satisfaction – having tremendous authors to work with and their special manuscripts to read is both a privilege and a delight.
    To briefly answer your various questions:
    Yes, we’d be happy to consider stories with Indian settings. No time period or setting is impossible. The story’s acceptability will all be down to the execution. You might think Vikings heroes or Sultans in the Ottoman Empire would be a challenge to make sympathetic, but Harlequin Historical authors have most brilliantly achieved this. So do feel you can let your imagination run free.
    We will be keeping diversity in the line, never fear, always bearing in mind global market tastes.
    I’m so pleased to learn of your delight in what we publish in HH and Undone. It’s very encouraging for both authors and editors alike to receive this kind of feedback.

    Reply
  138. I can see that over the weekend a good number of comments have come in and that’s wonderful. Thank you all for taking the time to post. I do feel I’m very lucky to have a job that brings me so much satisfaction – having tremendous authors to work with and their special manuscripts to read is both a privilege and a delight.
    To briefly answer your various questions:
    Yes, we’d be happy to consider stories with Indian settings. No time period or setting is impossible. The story’s acceptability will all be down to the execution. You might think Vikings heroes or Sultans in the Ottoman Empire would be a challenge to make sympathetic, but Harlequin Historical authors have most brilliantly achieved this. So do feel you can let your imagination run free.
    We will be keeping diversity in the line, never fear, always bearing in mind global market tastes.
    I’m so pleased to learn of your delight in what we publish in HH and Undone. It’s very encouraging for both authors and editors alike to receive this kind of feedback.

    Reply
  139. I can see that over the weekend a good number of comments have come in and that’s wonderful. Thank you all for taking the time to post. I do feel I’m very lucky to have a job that brings me so much satisfaction – having tremendous authors to work with and their special manuscripts to read is both a privilege and a delight.
    To briefly answer your various questions:
    Yes, we’d be happy to consider stories with Indian settings. No time period or setting is impossible. The story’s acceptability will all be down to the execution. You might think Vikings heroes or Sultans in the Ottoman Empire would be a challenge to make sympathetic, but Harlequin Historical authors have most brilliantly achieved this. So do feel you can let your imagination run free.
    We will be keeping diversity in the line, never fear, always bearing in mind global market tastes.
    I’m so pleased to learn of your delight in what we publish in HH and Undone. It’s very encouraging for both authors and editors alike to receive this kind of feedback.

    Reply
  140. I can see that over the weekend a good number of comments have come in and that’s wonderful. Thank you all for taking the time to post. I do feel I’m very lucky to have a job that brings me so much satisfaction – having tremendous authors to work with and their special manuscripts to read is both a privilege and a delight.
    To briefly answer your various questions:
    Yes, we’d be happy to consider stories with Indian settings. No time period or setting is impossible. The story’s acceptability will all be down to the execution. You might think Vikings heroes or Sultans in the Ottoman Empire would be a challenge to make sympathetic, but Harlequin Historical authors have most brilliantly achieved this. So do feel you can let your imagination run free.
    We will be keeping diversity in the line, never fear, always bearing in mind global market tastes.
    I’m so pleased to learn of your delight in what we publish in HH and Undone. It’s very encouraging for both authors and editors alike to receive this kind of feedback.

    Reply
  141. Finding the right title has to be the hardest part of the publishing process – apart from writing the story, of course! Knowing we have to grab the reader’s attention in a matter of seconds, having a buy-me title is a vital part of the overall package. We’re always looking to evolve our strategy re titles and we encourage authors to be innovative in their suggestions to us rather than relying on generic titles which could go on any number of books. We strive hard to make each and every title as saleable as possible ensuring title, blurb and cover art all work together to create the best possible result.

    Reply
  142. Finding the right title has to be the hardest part of the publishing process – apart from writing the story, of course! Knowing we have to grab the reader’s attention in a matter of seconds, having a buy-me title is a vital part of the overall package. We’re always looking to evolve our strategy re titles and we encourage authors to be innovative in their suggestions to us rather than relying on generic titles which could go on any number of books. We strive hard to make each and every title as saleable as possible ensuring title, blurb and cover art all work together to create the best possible result.

    Reply
  143. Finding the right title has to be the hardest part of the publishing process – apart from writing the story, of course! Knowing we have to grab the reader’s attention in a matter of seconds, having a buy-me title is a vital part of the overall package. We’re always looking to evolve our strategy re titles and we encourage authors to be innovative in their suggestions to us rather than relying on generic titles which could go on any number of books. We strive hard to make each and every title as saleable as possible ensuring title, blurb and cover art all work together to create the best possible result.

    Reply
  144. Finding the right title has to be the hardest part of the publishing process – apart from writing the story, of course! Knowing we have to grab the reader’s attention in a matter of seconds, having a buy-me title is a vital part of the overall package. We’re always looking to evolve our strategy re titles and we encourage authors to be innovative in their suggestions to us rather than relying on generic titles which could go on any number of books. We strive hard to make each and every title as saleable as possible ensuring title, blurb and cover art all work together to create the best possible result.

    Reply
  145. Finding the right title has to be the hardest part of the publishing process – apart from writing the story, of course! Knowing we have to grab the reader’s attention in a matter of seconds, having a buy-me title is a vital part of the overall package. We’re always looking to evolve our strategy re titles and we encourage authors to be innovative in their suggestions to us rather than relying on generic titles which could go on any number of books. We strive hard to make each and every title as saleable as possible ensuring title, blurb and cover art all work together to create the best possible result.

    Reply
  146. I’m pleased to see that reading Undone is introducing some of you to authors you’ve not read before who also contribute to our Harlequin Historical line. A good way to sample their voice. I hope you all continue to enjoy your Harlequin/Mills & Boon reading and thank you, again, for making me so welcome on your website. Happy Reading!

    Reply
  147. I’m pleased to see that reading Undone is introducing some of you to authors you’ve not read before who also contribute to our Harlequin Historical line. A good way to sample their voice. I hope you all continue to enjoy your Harlequin/Mills & Boon reading and thank you, again, for making me so welcome on your website. Happy Reading!

    Reply
  148. I’m pleased to see that reading Undone is introducing some of you to authors you’ve not read before who also contribute to our Harlequin Historical line. A good way to sample their voice. I hope you all continue to enjoy your Harlequin/Mills & Boon reading and thank you, again, for making me so welcome on your website. Happy Reading!

    Reply
  149. I’m pleased to see that reading Undone is introducing some of you to authors you’ve not read before who also contribute to our Harlequin Historical line. A good way to sample their voice. I hope you all continue to enjoy your Harlequin/Mills & Boon reading and thank you, again, for making me so welcome on your website. Happy Reading!

    Reply
  150. I’m pleased to see that reading Undone is introducing some of you to authors you’ve not read before who also contribute to our Harlequin Historical line. A good way to sample their voice. I hope you all continue to enjoy your Harlequin/Mills & Boon reading and thank you, again, for making me so welcome on your website. Happy Reading!

    Reply
  151. Linda: After listing to your Eharlequin Chat, Last Friday, I am planning to purchase some.
    Could you recommend some excellent
    Undones to read.
    Jane

    Reply
  152. Linda: After listing to your Eharlequin Chat, Last Friday, I am planning to purchase some.
    Could you recommend some excellent
    Undones to read.
    Jane

    Reply
  153. Linda: After listing to your Eharlequin Chat, Last Friday, I am planning to purchase some.
    Could you recommend some excellent
    Undones to read.
    Jane

    Reply
  154. Linda: After listing to your Eharlequin Chat, Last Friday, I am planning to purchase some.
    Could you recommend some excellent
    Undones to read.
    Jane

    Reply
  155. Linda: After listing to your Eharlequin Chat, Last Friday, I am planning to purchase some.
    Could you recommend some excellent
    Undones to read.
    Jane

    Reply
  156. Re: India.
    The Person who commented about India stories, You jocked my brain
    Remember PBS Master Pieces:
    The Jewel Of Inda.
    As I recalled I was glued to the
    TV on those Sunday nights.

    Reply
  157. Re: India.
    The Person who commented about India stories, You jocked my brain
    Remember PBS Master Pieces:
    The Jewel Of Inda.
    As I recalled I was glued to the
    TV on those Sunday nights.

    Reply
  158. Re: India.
    The Person who commented about India stories, You jocked my brain
    Remember PBS Master Pieces:
    The Jewel Of Inda.
    As I recalled I was glued to the
    TV on those Sunday nights.

    Reply
  159. Re: India.
    The Person who commented about India stories, You jocked my brain
    Remember PBS Master Pieces:
    The Jewel Of Inda.
    As I recalled I was glued to the
    TV on those Sunday nights.

    Reply
  160. Re: India.
    The Person who commented about India stories, You jocked my brain
    Remember PBS Master Pieces:
    The Jewel Of Inda.
    As I recalled I was glued to the
    TV on those Sunday nights.

    Reply
  161. Jane
    It depends on the time period you most enjoy. We have Regency, Viking and
    Medieval Undones and they are all highly enjoyable reads. This month’s Undone from Michelle Willingham is pictured (The Warrior’s Forbidden Virgin). This is an emotional, sensual read which should whet your appetite for more of our sexy shorts! I think you’ll find they’re most addictive.

    Reply
  162. Jane
    It depends on the time period you most enjoy. We have Regency, Viking and
    Medieval Undones and they are all highly enjoyable reads. This month’s Undone from Michelle Willingham is pictured (The Warrior’s Forbidden Virgin). This is an emotional, sensual read which should whet your appetite for more of our sexy shorts! I think you’ll find they’re most addictive.

    Reply
  163. Jane
    It depends on the time period you most enjoy. We have Regency, Viking and
    Medieval Undones and they are all highly enjoyable reads. This month’s Undone from Michelle Willingham is pictured (The Warrior’s Forbidden Virgin). This is an emotional, sensual read which should whet your appetite for more of our sexy shorts! I think you’ll find they’re most addictive.

    Reply
  164. Jane
    It depends on the time period you most enjoy. We have Regency, Viking and
    Medieval Undones and they are all highly enjoyable reads. This month’s Undone from Michelle Willingham is pictured (The Warrior’s Forbidden Virgin). This is an emotional, sensual read which should whet your appetite for more of our sexy shorts! I think you’ll find they’re most addictive.

    Reply
  165. Jane
    It depends on the time period you most enjoy. We have Regency, Viking and
    Medieval Undones and they are all highly enjoyable reads. This month’s Undone from Michelle Willingham is pictured (The Warrior’s Forbidden Virgin). This is an emotional, sensual read which should whet your appetite for more of our sexy shorts! I think you’ll find they’re most addictive.

    Reply
  166. Hi linda, I was impressed with your interview and learnt some very good things. I have always enjoyed Vikings and life at sea which should be strange as I am not a lover of water , sailing and can’t even swim but Vikings and their ships always excited me.

    Reply
  167. Hi linda, I was impressed with your interview and learnt some very good things. I have always enjoyed Vikings and life at sea which should be strange as I am not a lover of water , sailing and can’t even swim but Vikings and their ships always excited me.

    Reply
  168. Hi linda, I was impressed with your interview and learnt some very good things. I have always enjoyed Vikings and life at sea which should be strange as I am not a lover of water , sailing and can’t even swim but Vikings and their ships always excited me.

    Reply
  169. Hi linda, I was impressed with your interview and learnt some very good things. I have always enjoyed Vikings and life at sea which should be strange as I am not a lover of water , sailing and can’t even swim but Vikings and their ships always excited me.

    Reply
  170. Hi linda, I was impressed with your interview and learnt some very good things. I have always enjoyed Vikings and life at sea which should be strange as I am not a lover of water , sailing and can’t even swim but Vikings and their ships always excited me.

    Reply

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