Jo Beverley: Interview!

TvnawnewsmAndrea/Cara here, and today I have the distinct delight of interviewing Jo about her new book, The Viscount Needs A Wife, which releases on April 5th. Now before I begin, I have a confession to make—normally we Wenches behave with the utmost ladylike decorum among ourselves. But when Jo asked who wanted to read an ARC and interview her, I threw a few elbows to get my hand in the air first. (Sorry, everyone—the bruises will fade quickly.) Am I ashamed of myself? Nope. (evil chuckle.) When you read the book, you will understand why. And now, without further ado, let’s hear from Jo!

Jo-head shotYou seem endlessly intrigued by the marriage of convenience trope, and always succeed in putting a fresh spin on it. The Viscount Needs A Wife is no exception—tell us a little about the process of creating such a match.

I do love a MOC, but that's because it forces strangers together in a believable way and that's what I like to write about. I like to observe their discoveries.

Both your hero and heroine have very interesting backstories, and you use them to turn the usual “heir to a title” aspirations—as well as city-country life— a very unexpected twist. What attracted you to the idea of doing something a little different?

TdfalmThe difference came from Braydon in the previous book, Too Dangerous for a Lady, when he began to express this powerful pleasure at living in London and his dislike of spending any significant period of time in the countryside. I've always taken it for granted that my characters enjoyed country life with occasional city jaunts, because that was true of the English upper class in the past, and is arguably an English constant. It seems to be that even now, when most people live in towns and cities, the dream is to retire to a country village or a small place on the coast. Possibly the appeal of TV programs like Midsomer Murders and Downton Abbey is the rural life.

In theory at least, it's the outsiders who are drawn to London, Manchester, Leeds, and Liverpool and rave about their vibrancy. This isn't a social commentary, but about  subconscious dreams. I'm not sure what the American "idyllic location" is, but I don't think it's life in a small rural town.

Perhaps some blog readers will have suggestions.

Back to the point, having Braydon happy with his London-based life made his inheriting a title a problem — and we author are always looking for ways to torment our characters. It took me a while to realize that Kitty shared his feelings, in part because she didn't realize it herself. Her London life hadn't been idyllic, but she had lived there for ten years, and she'd been born and brought up in towns. The countryside is alien territory and that frightens her. I expected them both to come to love their rural life, but they didn't. They found unexpected harmony in dislike of the rural and love of London.

Princess_Charlotte_Augusta_of_Wales_and_LeopoldYou talk a lot about how you love to read primary sources in order to weave the real mood of the era into your stories. Can you talk about the some of the actual history that influenced your story?

I do like to read the newspapers of the time to see what was important, but the crucial true event in this book is the death of Princess Charlotte in November 1817. As my Regency historical novels follow a timeline I knew this was coming and I've been wondering for years how I'd deal with it.

Charlotte 2Charlotte was the Regent's only child, and thus heir after him to the throne.  Due to a number of factors, she was the only legitimate grandchild of King George III, and thus the hope of the nation. She had dutifully married a suitable German prince and was apparently happy. Prince Leopold seemed devoted to her, and her child would be the security of the future. All was perfect!

Her death in childbirth, along with her baby son, devastated the whole nation. That's no exaggeration. It was like the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, magnified by political implications of true significance.

We often get the impression that women frequently died in childbirth back then, but it's not true. The death rate was much higher than now, but it still wasn't common. The queen had many pregnancies and in 1817 had many living children. Thus, when the news spread that Charlotte was in labor, no one expected this disaster and it truly shocked as well as grieved. It was easy to imagine the news powerfully affecting people's lives, as it does here, awakening Kitty to the chancy nature of life, and that she shouldn't waste it.

FuneralAs well as shock and grief, the nation was plunged into a succession crisis. If mad, elderly King George died, and that was expected at any moment, the Regent would become king. He, however, wasn't a fit and healthy man, and as I said above, there were no other legitimate grandchildren. If one of the Regent's brothers didn't produce legitimate children, Britain could be looking at a foreign ruler, with all the problems that might bring, when the nation had only recently emerged from decades of the Napoleonic Wars.

That crisis provides the external plot to the novel, when an attempt to blow up three princes takes Braydon and Kitty to London.

How about sharing a short excerpt?

Here&#3
9;s the scene where Kitty finally officially meets the man who's proposed a marriage of convenience. Unfortunately, they have met the day before, when Kitty was a muddy mess after rescuing her dog from a cow field. Kitty is sure Lord Dauntry will want to back out of the arrangement.

I should also note that Kitty isn't nobly born. Her family were quite ordinary and it was only chance that led to her marrying Marcus Cateril, the son of a noble family, and becoming the Honorable Kathryn Cateril.

      He should have seemed less formidable than he had on horseback, but she found him more so. He wasn't as broad a man as Marcus, but his elegant clothing didn't disguise the same sense of muscular power that her husband had retained even in his ruined state. Dauntry was perhaps taller.
   
     Then she wondered why she'd thought "elegant clothing." He was wearing a brown jacket, buff riding breeches and top boots, as most men did in the country But in some way his garments warranted the tag "beau." With his clean-cut features, fashionably dressed blond hair and cool expression, the word that came to mind was sleek.
    
     Somewhere in the distance, Ruth was making introductions, but Sillikin disregarded formalities to trot forward and stare. That wasn't a good sign.
    
     "Sillikin, heel," Kitty commanded, and thank heaven, her dog obligingly trotted back to her side. Kitty dipped a curtsy. "Good morning, Lord Dauntry."
    
     He bowed. "A pleasure to meet you, ma'am."
    
     Kitty heard a silent "again."
    
     Pride afflicted her with an urge to break the arrangement first, but that would be foolish indeed. Innards churning with nerves, she sat, waving him to a nearby seat. Ruth mentioned last minute arrangements and left, but Kitty only saw her from the corner of her eye. She couldn't stop looking at Lord Dauntry, rather as one might watch a predator that seemed likely to attack. His eyes were a light and rather icy blue.
    
     He sat on a facing chair and crossed his legs. "Well, Mrs. Cateril?"
    
     "Very well, sir."
    
     "I wasn't asking how you are, ma'am. What questions do you have for me?"
    
     Questions? Her mind went blank. "Mrs. Lulworth told me the essentials, sir."
    
     "Are you not curious about the inessentials?"
    
     The wretched man was toying with her! "I assume she didn't conceal that you are stark, staring mad?"
    
     No reaction apart from a raised brow. "I might have concealed it from her, but indeed, I'm not. Are you?"
    
     "No."
    
     "Excellent. I also have all my teeth."
    
     "So do I."
    
     "Yet more harmony."
    
     Oh, you wretch. Now she understood his abrasive manner. He'd come here to end the arrangement, but was going to avoid any hint of jilting her by making her do it. Well, he could work for his prize. She'd play his game, returning every shot, forcing him to produce the coup de grace.
    
     Now he was using silence. She saw the small piano in the corner of the room. "Is there a pianoforte in  the Abbey, my lord?" 
    
     "There is," he said, "though I've heard no one play it."
    "
     Has the house in general been neglected, my lord?"
    
     "Not as far as I can tell, but I know little of such matters. I was in the army, and since leaving, my home has been rooms in London."
    
     For a moment she envisioned rooms similar to the ones in Moor Street that she'd lived in with Marcus, but she dismissed the notion. No one had such deep polish and surety without luxury and privilege from the day they were born.
    "I have no living family," she said. "Is that the case with you, too, my lord?"
    
     "My parents and three of four grandparents are dead. I have two much older sisters, both married. We're not close. Some distant female cousins dangle on the family tree, but I don't know 'em."
    
     Solitary, but careless of it. Like a cat. A fine blooded cat, sure of its position in the world and that all should do it reverence. The cat was playing with a mouse, but this mouse wouldn't be trapped. She let silence settle.
    
     "Of course I have my new family," he said. "At the Abbey."
    
     The reason for all this. "The previous viscount's mother and daughter, I understand. The situation must be difficult for them."
    
     "And for me. Your husband was the son of a baron?"
    
     "My father was a shopkeeper." There's your exit, sir. Take it.
     "A bookseller, I understand, and a scholar of some repute."
    
    
Damn it. Of course, Ruth would have told him that.
    

     He continued. "Your husband was an officer gallantly injured at Roleia."
    
     "He was, my lord. You, too, were a soldier. You escaped without injury?"
    
     She didn't mean it to be as insulting as it sounded. She would have apologized, but he seemed unmoved. "Superficial wounds only. I'm sound in wind and limb. Are you?"
    
     She deserved that riposte. "Yes." She recognized an opening. "You will have noted that I have no children, my lord. That must be a concern to you." Another escape. Take it.
    
     "Must it? If the viscountcy dies with me I won't turn a hair."
    
     "Of course not, being dead," she said tartly, "but when living you will want to provide for the continuance of the title. Any man would."
    
     "Ma'am, until a few weeks ago I'd never given a thought to the viscountcy of Dauntry, so its future is unlikely to disturb me now or in the hereafter."
    
     "Are you ever disturbed?" Oh dear. That shouldn't have escaped.
    
     He stared, as well he might. "It rarely serves any purpose."
    
     "Yet you don't seem idle."
    
     "Activity is generally most effective when taken calmly. Do you have any other questions?"

You can read more of this excerpt here. And an earlier one here. A list of all my books is here, with each title linking to more information.

Charlotte 1You’ve created amazing worlds for your readers with your Malloren and Company of Rogues series. How does “Viscount” fit in, and can you give us a sneak peek at what’s coming up next?

I like the idea of "worlds" because my characters exist there, no matter what, but with The Viscount Needs a Wife, I'm making a departure. There are no Rogues left to provide heroes, and no close connections, either. Rogue fans will meet a few familiar people in this book, but it isn't exactly a Rogues book. Nor is the next one, which I'm writing now. Merely a Marriage also springs out of the death of Princess Charlotte, when Lady Ariana Boxstall realizes that only one life stands between her family and disaster — that of her young and foolhardy brother. She tries to force him to marry and produce heirs, which leads to a story. Again, Rogues fans will encounter some familiar characters, but I can't accurately claim that it's a Company of Rogues book.

The Viscount Needs a Wife will be published on April 5th, but it can be pre-ordered now.

Two commenters on this blog will receive a pre-publication Advanced Reading Copy, so have your say.

285 thoughts on “Jo Beverley: Interview!”

  1. “It seems to be that even now, when most people live in towns and cities, the dream is to retire to a country village or a small place on the coast.”
    In Australia, there’re about a thousand episodes of (British show) Escape to the Country on every week. It’s silly and formulaic, but I find it addictive! All those gorgeous houses and little villages and towns…
    The accounts I’ve read of Charlotte’s death are very sad. It seems like the couple really did care for each other.
    I read an article that stated 20% of women in the late Georgian era died in childbirth, but I don’t know how accurate that is (also, many died having their tenth or eleventh child, so it wasn’t like everyone was dying having just one baby).
    Two of Jane Austen’s sisters in law died that way. I think I would have gone down Jane’s route and not married back then! Even if you didn’t die, the number of children that was average… I’m not much of a baby person!

    Reply
  2. “It seems to be that even now, when most people live in towns and cities, the dream is to retire to a country village or a small place on the coast.”
    In Australia, there’re about a thousand episodes of (British show) Escape to the Country on every week. It’s silly and formulaic, but I find it addictive! All those gorgeous houses and little villages and towns…
    The accounts I’ve read of Charlotte’s death are very sad. It seems like the couple really did care for each other.
    I read an article that stated 20% of women in the late Georgian era died in childbirth, but I don’t know how accurate that is (also, many died having their tenth or eleventh child, so it wasn’t like everyone was dying having just one baby).
    Two of Jane Austen’s sisters in law died that way. I think I would have gone down Jane’s route and not married back then! Even if you didn’t die, the number of children that was average… I’m not much of a baby person!

    Reply
  3. “It seems to be that even now, when most people live in towns and cities, the dream is to retire to a country village or a small place on the coast.”
    In Australia, there’re about a thousand episodes of (British show) Escape to the Country on every week. It’s silly and formulaic, but I find it addictive! All those gorgeous houses and little villages and towns…
    The accounts I’ve read of Charlotte’s death are very sad. It seems like the couple really did care for each other.
    I read an article that stated 20% of women in the late Georgian era died in childbirth, but I don’t know how accurate that is (also, many died having their tenth or eleventh child, so it wasn’t like everyone was dying having just one baby).
    Two of Jane Austen’s sisters in law died that way. I think I would have gone down Jane’s route and not married back then! Even if you didn’t die, the number of children that was average… I’m not much of a baby person!

    Reply
  4. “It seems to be that even now, when most people live in towns and cities, the dream is to retire to a country village or a small place on the coast.”
    In Australia, there’re about a thousand episodes of (British show) Escape to the Country on every week. It’s silly and formulaic, but I find it addictive! All those gorgeous houses and little villages and towns…
    The accounts I’ve read of Charlotte’s death are very sad. It seems like the couple really did care for each other.
    I read an article that stated 20% of women in the late Georgian era died in childbirth, but I don’t know how accurate that is (also, many died having their tenth or eleventh child, so it wasn’t like everyone was dying having just one baby).
    Two of Jane Austen’s sisters in law died that way. I think I would have gone down Jane’s route and not married back then! Even if you didn’t die, the number of children that was average… I’m not much of a baby person!

    Reply
  5. “It seems to be that even now, when most people live in towns and cities, the dream is to retire to a country village or a small place on the coast.”
    In Australia, there’re about a thousand episodes of (British show) Escape to the Country on every week. It’s silly and formulaic, but I find it addictive! All those gorgeous houses and little villages and towns…
    The accounts I’ve read of Charlotte’s death are very sad. It seems like the couple really did care for each other.
    I read an article that stated 20% of women in the late Georgian era died in childbirth, but I don’t know how accurate that is (also, many died having their tenth or eleventh child, so it wasn’t like everyone was dying having just one baby).
    Two of Jane Austen’s sisters in law died that way. I think I would have gone down Jane’s route and not married back then! Even if you didn’t die, the number of children that was average… I’m not much of a baby person!

    Reply
  6. “I read an article that stated 20% of women in the late Georgian era died in childbirth, but I don’t know how accurate that is (also, many died having their tenth or eleventh child, so it wasn’t like everyone was dying having just one baby)”
    As you say, the risk per birth and the lifetime risk are two different things. We also need to consider birth risk v others. Stats suggest that women were more likely to die of other causes. But stats are always tricky!

    Reply
  7. “I read an article that stated 20% of women in the late Georgian era died in childbirth, but I don’t know how accurate that is (also, many died having their tenth or eleventh child, so it wasn’t like everyone was dying having just one baby)”
    As you say, the risk per birth and the lifetime risk are two different things. We also need to consider birth risk v others. Stats suggest that women were more likely to die of other causes. But stats are always tricky!

    Reply
  8. “I read an article that stated 20% of women in the late Georgian era died in childbirth, but I don’t know how accurate that is (also, many died having their tenth or eleventh child, so it wasn’t like everyone was dying having just one baby)”
    As you say, the risk per birth and the lifetime risk are two different things. We also need to consider birth risk v others. Stats suggest that women were more likely to die of other causes. But stats are always tricky!

    Reply
  9. “I read an article that stated 20% of women in the late Georgian era died in childbirth, but I don’t know how accurate that is (also, many died having their tenth or eleventh child, so it wasn’t like everyone was dying having just one baby)”
    As you say, the risk per birth and the lifetime risk are two different things. We also need to consider birth risk v others. Stats suggest that women were more likely to die of other causes. But stats are always tricky!

    Reply
  10. “I read an article that stated 20% of women in the late Georgian era died in childbirth, but I don’t know how accurate that is (also, many died having their tenth or eleventh child, so it wasn’t like everyone was dying having just one baby)”
    As you say, the risk per birth and the lifetime risk are two different things. We also need to consider birth risk v others. Stats suggest that women were more likely to die of other causes. But stats are always tricky!

    Reply
  11. I lived in the country for 17 yrs and then moved to London last year. I totally feel Kitty and Braydon. 🙂 Btw, Sonya, they show those shows here, too. Several a day as a matter of fact.

    Reply
  12. I lived in the country for 17 yrs and then moved to London last year. I totally feel Kitty and Braydon. 🙂 Btw, Sonya, they show those shows here, too. Several a day as a matter of fact.

    Reply
  13. I lived in the country for 17 yrs and then moved to London last year. I totally feel Kitty and Braydon. 🙂 Btw, Sonya, they show those shows here, too. Several a day as a matter of fact.

    Reply
  14. I lived in the country for 17 yrs and then moved to London last year. I totally feel Kitty and Braydon. 🙂 Btw, Sonya, they show those shows here, too. Several a day as a matter of fact.

    Reply
  15. I lived in the country for 17 yrs and then moved to London last year. I totally feel Kitty and Braydon. 🙂 Btw, Sonya, they show those shows here, too. Several a day as a matter of fact.

    Reply
  16. I like my suburban patch of green, but do love pretending to be a city dweller on vacation. Eagerly looking forward to this book, as you’ve been a favorite author since being on the RRA listserv in my college days.

    Reply
  17. I like my suburban patch of green, but do love pretending to be a city dweller on vacation. Eagerly looking forward to this book, as you’ve been a favorite author since being on the RRA listserv in my college days.

    Reply
  18. I like my suburban patch of green, but do love pretending to be a city dweller on vacation. Eagerly looking forward to this book, as you’ve been a favorite author since being on the RRA listserv in my college days.

    Reply
  19. I like my suburban patch of green, but do love pretending to be a city dweller on vacation. Eagerly looking forward to this book, as you’ve been a favorite author since being on the RRA listserv in my college days.

    Reply
  20. I like my suburban patch of green, but do love pretending to be a city dweller on vacation. Eagerly looking forward to this book, as you’ve been a favorite author since being on the RRA listserv in my college days.

    Reply
  21. I like my suburban patch of green, but love pretending to be a city dweller on my vacations. Looking forward to this book, as you’ve been a favorite author since being on the RRA listserv in my college days.

    Reply
  22. I like my suburban patch of green, but love pretending to be a city dweller on my vacations. Looking forward to this book, as you’ve been a favorite author since being on the RRA listserv in my college days.

    Reply
  23. I like my suburban patch of green, but love pretending to be a city dweller on my vacations. Looking forward to this book, as you’ve been a favorite author since being on the RRA listserv in my college days.

    Reply
  24. I like my suburban patch of green, but love pretending to be a city dweller on my vacations. Looking forward to this book, as you’ve been a favorite author since being on the RRA listserv in my college days.

    Reply
  25. I like my suburban patch of green, but love pretending to be a city dweller on my vacations. Looking forward to this book, as you’ve been a favorite author since being on the RRA listserv in my college days.

    Reply
  26. I love the MOC trope, and one of the things I like about it is the challenge of finding ways to make it happen without infuriating either the hero or the heroine. (Although overcoming that fury can make for an interesting plot.)
    One of its advantages is that it provides a plausible way to get the hero and heroine into bed before the wedding in the final chapter.

    Reply
  27. I love the MOC trope, and one of the things I like about it is the challenge of finding ways to make it happen without infuriating either the hero or the heroine. (Although overcoming that fury can make for an interesting plot.)
    One of its advantages is that it provides a plausible way to get the hero and heroine into bed before the wedding in the final chapter.

    Reply
  28. I love the MOC trope, and one of the things I like about it is the challenge of finding ways to make it happen without infuriating either the hero or the heroine. (Although overcoming that fury can make for an interesting plot.)
    One of its advantages is that it provides a plausible way to get the hero and heroine into bed before the wedding in the final chapter.

    Reply
  29. I love the MOC trope, and one of the things I like about it is the challenge of finding ways to make it happen without infuriating either the hero or the heroine. (Although overcoming that fury can make for an interesting plot.)
    One of its advantages is that it provides a plausible way to get the hero and heroine into bed before the wedding in the final chapter.

    Reply
  30. I love the MOC trope, and one of the things I like about it is the challenge of finding ways to make it happen without infuriating either the hero or the heroine. (Although overcoming that fury can make for an interesting plot.)
    One of its advantages is that it provides a plausible way to get the hero and heroine into bed before the wedding in the final chapter.

    Reply
  31. MOC is my favourite trope. I like the courtship narrative too, that leads to the HEA, but I really love the HEA inherent in the MOC. Because the stakes are higher and more compelling. If things don’t work out, then the protagonists, at least in histrom, are condemned to a life of misery at worst, benign and boring tolerance at best.

    Reply
  32. MOC is my favourite trope. I like the courtship narrative too, that leads to the HEA, but I really love the HEA inherent in the MOC. Because the stakes are higher and more compelling. If things don’t work out, then the protagonists, at least in histrom, are condemned to a life of misery at worst, benign and boring tolerance at best.

    Reply
  33. MOC is my favourite trope. I like the courtship narrative too, that leads to the HEA, but I really love the HEA inherent in the MOC. Because the stakes are higher and more compelling. If things don’t work out, then the protagonists, at least in histrom, are condemned to a life of misery at worst, benign and boring tolerance at best.

    Reply
  34. MOC is my favourite trope. I like the courtship narrative too, that leads to the HEA, but I really love the HEA inherent in the MOC. Because the stakes are higher and more compelling. If things don’t work out, then the protagonists, at least in histrom, are condemned to a life of misery at worst, benign and boring tolerance at best.

    Reply
  35. MOC is my favourite trope. I like the courtship narrative too, that leads to the HEA, but I really love the HEA inherent in the MOC. Because the stakes are higher and more compelling. If things don’t work out, then the protagonists, at least in histrom, are condemned to a life of misery at worst, benign and boring tolerance at best.

    Reply
  36. should have fought Andrea harder for the privilege! This looks delicious. As you say, MOCs provide such interesting possibilities. I do believe I’m writing one now. *G*
    I don’t think American dreams of places to live are so clearly defined. A lot of dreams might want two residences, like a city/suburban home and a seaside or mountain or ranch home. Personally, having been raised on a farm, I like the much-despised suburbs: trees and relaxed living with near to culture and great shopping. *G* A lot of people must agree, or we wouldn’t have so many suburbs.

    Reply
  37. should have fought Andrea harder for the privilege! This looks delicious. As you say, MOCs provide such interesting possibilities. I do believe I’m writing one now. *G*
    I don’t think American dreams of places to live are so clearly defined. A lot of dreams might want two residences, like a city/suburban home and a seaside or mountain or ranch home. Personally, having been raised on a farm, I like the much-despised suburbs: trees and relaxed living with near to culture and great shopping. *G* A lot of people must agree, or we wouldn’t have so many suburbs.

    Reply
  38. should have fought Andrea harder for the privilege! This looks delicious. As you say, MOCs provide such interesting possibilities. I do believe I’m writing one now. *G*
    I don’t think American dreams of places to live are so clearly defined. A lot of dreams might want two residences, like a city/suburban home and a seaside or mountain or ranch home. Personally, having been raised on a farm, I like the much-despised suburbs: trees and relaxed living with near to culture and great shopping. *G* A lot of people must agree, or we wouldn’t have so many suburbs.

    Reply
  39. should have fought Andrea harder for the privilege! This looks delicious. As you say, MOCs provide such interesting possibilities. I do believe I’m writing one now. *G*
    I don’t think American dreams of places to live are so clearly defined. A lot of dreams might want two residences, like a city/suburban home and a seaside or mountain or ranch home. Personally, having been raised on a farm, I like the much-despised suburbs: trees and relaxed living with near to culture and great shopping. *G* A lot of people must agree, or we wouldn’t have so many suburbs.

    Reply
  40. should have fought Andrea harder for the privilege! This looks delicious. As you say, MOCs provide such interesting possibilities. I do believe I’m writing one now. *G*
    I don’t think American dreams of places to live are so clearly defined. A lot of dreams might want two residences, like a city/suburban home and a seaside or mountain or ranch home. Personally, having been raised on a farm, I like the much-despised suburbs: trees and relaxed living with near to culture and great shopping. *G* A lot of people must agree, or we wouldn’t have so many suburbs.

    Reply
  41. Sigh. Could you folks just go on a big vacation together somewhere? You know, take a break. My TBR pile is turning into piles and they’re tippy. 🙂 Looking forward to it.

    Reply
  42. Sigh. Could you folks just go on a big vacation together somewhere? You know, take a break. My TBR pile is turning into piles and they’re tippy. 🙂 Looking forward to it.

    Reply
  43. Sigh. Could you folks just go on a big vacation together somewhere? You know, take a break. My TBR pile is turning into piles and they’re tippy. 🙂 Looking forward to it.

    Reply
  44. Sigh. Could you folks just go on a big vacation together somewhere? You know, take a break. My TBR pile is turning into piles and they’re tippy. 🙂 Looking forward to it.

    Reply
  45. Sigh. Could you folks just go on a big vacation together somewhere? You know, take a break. My TBR pile is turning into piles and they’re tippy. 🙂 Looking forward to it.

    Reply
  46. I find the discussions of urban, suburban, or rural interesting. I grew less than 5 miles north of a fairly large city; lived there, back in the ‘burbs, and now in the country. I cannot imagine moving back to where I can see my neighbor’s windows. Even the small town I live near is larger than I want to live in.
    Really looking forward to this next story; need my Jo Beverley fix!

    Reply
  47. I find the discussions of urban, suburban, or rural interesting. I grew less than 5 miles north of a fairly large city; lived there, back in the ‘burbs, and now in the country. I cannot imagine moving back to where I can see my neighbor’s windows. Even the small town I live near is larger than I want to live in.
    Really looking forward to this next story; need my Jo Beverley fix!

    Reply
  48. I find the discussions of urban, suburban, or rural interesting. I grew less than 5 miles north of a fairly large city; lived there, back in the ‘burbs, and now in the country. I cannot imagine moving back to where I can see my neighbor’s windows. Even the small town I live near is larger than I want to live in.
    Really looking forward to this next story; need my Jo Beverley fix!

    Reply
  49. I find the discussions of urban, suburban, or rural interesting. I grew less than 5 miles north of a fairly large city; lived there, back in the ‘burbs, and now in the country. I cannot imagine moving back to where I can see my neighbor’s windows. Even the small town I live near is larger than I want to live in.
    Really looking forward to this next story; need my Jo Beverley fix!

    Reply
  50. I find the discussions of urban, suburban, or rural interesting. I grew less than 5 miles north of a fairly large city; lived there, back in the ‘burbs, and now in the country. I cannot imagine moving back to where I can see my neighbor’s windows. Even the small town I live near is larger than I want to live in.
    Really looking forward to this next story; need my Jo Beverley fix!

    Reply
  51. I grew up in what was then the 10th largest city, but my paternal grandmother lived in a small rural support town. After ending my professional life on Manhattan and living for seven years in Greater New York City, we retired to a small college town in central Missouri. This was definitely a bid to get away from the big city! But it is now the 5th largest city in the state. I guess the small town and/or the country isn’t for me! (We like it here, and 5th largest is still small compared to Greater New York.)

    Reply
  52. I grew up in what was then the 10th largest city, but my paternal grandmother lived in a small rural support town. After ending my professional life on Manhattan and living for seven years in Greater New York City, we retired to a small college town in central Missouri. This was definitely a bid to get away from the big city! But it is now the 5th largest city in the state. I guess the small town and/or the country isn’t for me! (We like it here, and 5th largest is still small compared to Greater New York.)

    Reply
  53. I grew up in what was then the 10th largest city, but my paternal grandmother lived in a small rural support town. After ending my professional life on Manhattan and living for seven years in Greater New York City, we retired to a small college town in central Missouri. This was definitely a bid to get away from the big city! But it is now the 5th largest city in the state. I guess the small town and/or the country isn’t for me! (We like it here, and 5th largest is still small compared to Greater New York.)

    Reply
  54. I grew up in what was then the 10th largest city, but my paternal grandmother lived in a small rural support town. After ending my professional life on Manhattan and living for seven years in Greater New York City, we retired to a small college town in central Missouri. This was definitely a bid to get away from the big city! But it is now the 5th largest city in the state. I guess the small town and/or the country isn’t for me! (We like it here, and 5th largest is still small compared to Greater New York.)

    Reply
  55. I grew up in what was then the 10th largest city, but my paternal grandmother lived in a small rural support town. After ending my professional life on Manhattan and living for seven years in Greater New York City, we retired to a small college town in central Missouri. This was definitely a bid to get away from the big city! But it is now the 5th largest city in the state. I guess the small town and/or the country isn’t for me! (We like it here, and 5th largest is still small compared to Greater New York.)

    Reply
  56. It used to be the thing to move to the suburbs (from the big city) once people got married and started to have kids. But it isn’t as popular these days (and the city is bursting at the seams). Now I think people sometimes move because they can’t afford to live here, not just to have the American dream of more space and a back yard. But there are a lot of drawbacks to the suburbs. One, I think, is that (older) kids can’t go anywhere without being driven, whereas, in the city, they can get around on public transportation.
    Also, cities are nicer as one ages. I really don’t understand people moving from a big city with lots of public transportation so they can finally start driving around Florida after retirement. Eventually, they can’t drive, so they are reliant on much more limited transportation. (Okay, I can see the appeal of warmer weather in the winter.)
    Sometimes I get the appeal of moving out of the city, but I really don’t want to have to rely on a car for transportation.

    Reply
  57. It used to be the thing to move to the suburbs (from the big city) once people got married and started to have kids. But it isn’t as popular these days (and the city is bursting at the seams). Now I think people sometimes move because they can’t afford to live here, not just to have the American dream of more space and a back yard. But there are a lot of drawbacks to the suburbs. One, I think, is that (older) kids can’t go anywhere without being driven, whereas, in the city, they can get around on public transportation.
    Also, cities are nicer as one ages. I really don’t understand people moving from a big city with lots of public transportation so they can finally start driving around Florida after retirement. Eventually, they can’t drive, so they are reliant on much more limited transportation. (Okay, I can see the appeal of warmer weather in the winter.)
    Sometimes I get the appeal of moving out of the city, but I really don’t want to have to rely on a car for transportation.

    Reply
  58. It used to be the thing to move to the suburbs (from the big city) once people got married and started to have kids. But it isn’t as popular these days (and the city is bursting at the seams). Now I think people sometimes move because they can’t afford to live here, not just to have the American dream of more space and a back yard. But there are a lot of drawbacks to the suburbs. One, I think, is that (older) kids can’t go anywhere without being driven, whereas, in the city, they can get around on public transportation.
    Also, cities are nicer as one ages. I really don’t understand people moving from a big city with lots of public transportation so they can finally start driving around Florida after retirement. Eventually, they can’t drive, so they are reliant on much more limited transportation. (Okay, I can see the appeal of warmer weather in the winter.)
    Sometimes I get the appeal of moving out of the city, but I really don’t want to have to rely on a car for transportation.

    Reply
  59. It used to be the thing to move to the suburbs (from the big city) once people got married and started to have kids. But it isn’t as popular these days (and the city is bursting at the seams). Now I think people sometimes move because they can’t afford to live here, not just to have the American dream of more space and a back yard. But there are a lot of drawbacks to the suburbs. One, I think, is that (older) kids can’t go anywhere without being driven, whereas, in the city, they can get around on public transportation.
    Also, cities are nicer as one ages. I really don’t understand people moving from a big city with lots of public transportation so they can finally start driving around Florida after retirement. Eventually, they can’t drive, so they are reliant on much more limited transportation. (Okay, I can see the appeal of warmer weather in the winter.)
    Sometimes I get the appeal of moving out of the city, but I really don’t want to have to rely on a car for transportation.

    Reply
  60. It used to be the thing to move to the suburbs (from the big city) once people got married and started to have kids. But it isn’t as popular these days (and the city is bursting at the seams). Now I think people sometimes move because they can’t afford to live here, not just to have the American dream of more space and a back yard. But there are a lot of drawbacks to the suburbs. One, I think, is that (older) kids can’t go anywhere without being driven, whereas, in the city, they can get around on public transportation.
    Also, cities are nicer as one ages. I really don’t understand people moving from a big city with lots of public transportation so they can finally start driving around Florida after retirement. Eventually, they can’t drive, so they are reliant on much more limited transportation. (Okay, I can see the appeal of warmer weather in the winter.)
    Sometimes I get the appeal of moving out of the city, but I really don’t want to have to rely on a car for transportation.

    Reply
  61. It’s always fascinating to me to read these little bits of history. I’ve read books about the Napoleonic Wars, Regency times, and of course regency but I don’t think I’ve read anything that happened during the transition of power between one royal to another. I’m sure this will be one interesting read!
    By the way, I grew up in a huge city and now live in a much in the suburbs and I don’t think I could ever go go back to all the hubbub of the big city, and I’m not even married 😉

    Reply
  62. It’s always fascinating to me to read these little bits of history. I’ve read books about the Napoleonic Wars, Regency times, and of course regency but I don’t think I’ve read anything that happened during the transition of power between one royal to another. I’m sure this will be one interesting read!
    By the way, I grew up in a huge city and now live in a much in the suburbs and I don’t think I could ever go go back to all the hubbub of the big city, and I’m not even married 😉

    Reply
  63. It’s always fascinating to me to read these little bits of history. I’ve read books about the Napoleonic Wars, Regency times, and of course regency but I don’t think I’ve read anything that happened during the transition of power between one royal to another. I’m sure this will be one interesting read!
    By the way, I grew up in a huge city and now live in a much in the suburbs and I don’t think I could ever go go back to all the hubbub of the big city, and I’m not even married 😉

    Reply
  64. It’s always fascinating to me to read these little bits of history. I’ve read books about the Napoleonic Wars, Regency times, and of course regency but I don’t think I’ve read anything that happened during the transition of power between one royal to another. I’m sure this will be one interesting read!
    By the way, I grew up in a huge city and now live in a much in the suburbs and I don’t think I could ever go go back to all the hubbub of the big city, and I’m not even married 😉

    Reply
  65. It’s always fascinating to me to read these little bits of history. I’ve read books about the Napoleonic Wars, Regency times, and of course regency but I don’t think I’ve read anything that happened during the transition of power between one royal to another. I’m sure this will be one interesting read!
    By the way, I grew up in a huge city and now live in a much in the suburbs and I don’t think I could ever go go back to all the hubbub of the big city, and I’m not even married 😉

    Reply
  66. I can’t wait! I’m sitting at work sneaking looks at my email and was just totally caught up in the excerpt – so much so that when one of my charges spoke to me, it took me a second to come back to the “real” world!

    Reply
  67. I can’t wait! I’m sitting at work sneaking looks at my email and was just totally caught up in the excerpt – so much so that when one of my charges spoke to me, it took me a second to come back to the “real” world!

    Reply
  68. I can’t wait! I’m sitting at work sneaking looks at my email and was just totally caught up in the excerpt – so much so that when one of my charges spoke to me, it took me a second to come back to the “real” world!

    Reply
  69. I can’t wait! I’m sitting at work sneaking looks at my email and was just totally caught up in the excerpt – so much so that when one of my charges spoke to me, it took me a second to come back to the “real” world!

    Reply
  70. I can’t wait! I’m sitting at work sneaking looks at my email and was just totally caught up in the excerpt – so much so that when one of my charges spoke to me, it took me a second to come back to the “real” world!

    Reply
  71. MOC is a great plot. Interesting how to get two characters who make that decision to marry for convenience fall for each other in the course of adjusting to the marriage. Lots of latitude. Can’t wait for its release.

    Reply
  72. MOC is a great plot. Interesting how to get two characters who make that decision to marry for convenience fall for each other in the course of adjusting to the marriage. Lots of latitude. Can’t wait for its release.

    Reply
  73. MOC is a great plot. Interesting how to get two characters who make that decision to marry for convenience fall for each other in the course of adjusting to the marriage. Lots of latitude. Can’t wait for its release.

    Reply
  74. MOC is a great plot. Interesting how to get two characters who make that decision to marry for convenience fall for each other in the course of adjusting to the marriage. Lots of latitude. Can’t wait for its release.

    Reply
  75. MOC is a great plot. Interesting how to get two characters who make that decision to marry for convenience fall for each other in the course of adjusting to the marriage. Lots of latitude. Can’t wait for its release.

    Reply
  76. Oh, missed the countryside/town conflict in addition to a MOC. For myself a visit to a city is good for a couple of days, then get back to countryside or in my case, the beach of South Carolina. Nice twist indeed. Can’t wait even more for April 5.

    Reply
  77. Oh, missed the countryside/town conflict in addition to a MOC. For myself a visit to a city is good for a couple of days, then get back to countryside or in my case, the beach of South Carolina. Nice twist indeed. Can’t wait even more for April 5.

    Reply
  78. Oh, missed the countryside/town conflict in addition to a MOC. For myself a visit to a city is good for a couple of days, then get back to countryside or in my case, the beach of South Carolina. Nice twist indeed. Can’t wait even more for April 5.

    Reply
  79. Oh, missed the countryside/town conflict in addition to a MOC. For myself a visit to a city is good for a couple of days, then get back to countryside or in my case, the beach of South Carolina. Nice twist indeed. Can’t wait even more for April 5.

    Reply
  80. Oh, missed the countryside/town conflict in addition to a MOC. For myself a visit to a city is good for a couple of days, then get back to countryside or in my case, the beach of South Carolina. Nice twist indeed. Can’t wait even more for April 5.

    Reply
  81. Good point about suburbs, Mary Jo.
    The idea of two homes is more rooted in North America than in Britain. The “cottage” for the summer. There’s more of it here now. “second homes”.

    Reply
  82. Good point about suburbs, Mary Jo.
    The idea of two homes is more rooted in North America than in Britain. The “cottage” for the summer. There’s more of it here now. “second homes”.

    Reply
  83. Good point about suburbs, Mary Jo.
    The idea of two homes is more rooted in North America than in Britain. The “cottage” for the summer. There’s more of it here now. “second homes”.

    Reply
  84. Good point about suburbs, Mary Jo.
    The idea of two homes is more rooted in North America than in Britain. The “cottage” for the summer. There’s more of it here now. “second homes”.

    Reply
  85. Good point about suburbs, Mary Jo.
    The idea of two homes is more rooted in North America than in Britain. The “cottage” for the summer. There’s more of it here now. “second homes”.

    Reply
  86. I’m always intrigued by a marriage of convenience, since I always wonder whether it has as good a chance to succeed as a love match. It seems so iffy!
    It will be fun to read about protagonists who enjoy living in town, since I’m a city girl myself and find that small towns aren’t always friendly to diversity or to outsiders.
    Looking forward to April 5!

    Reply
  87. I’m always intrigued by a marriage of convenience, since I always wonder whether it has as good a chance to succeed as a love match. It seems so iffy!
    It will be fun to read about protagonists who enjoy living in town, since I’m a city girl myself and find that small towns aren’t always friendly to diversity or to outsiders.
    Looking forward to April 5!

    Reply
  88. I’m always intrigued by a marriage of convenience, since I always wonder whether it has as good a chance to succeed as a love match. It seems so iffy!
    It will be fun to read about protagonists who enjoy living in town, since I’m a city girl myself and find that small towns aren’t always friendly to diversity or to outsiders.
    Looking forward to April 5!

    Reply
  89. I’m always intrigued by a marriage of convenience, since I always wonder whether it has as good a chance to succeed as a love match. It seems so iffy!
    It will be fun to read about protagonists who enjoy living in town, since I’m a city girl myself and find that small towns aren’t always friendly to diversity or to outsiders.
    Looking forward to April 5!

    Reply
  90. I’m always intrigued by a marriage of convenience, since I always wonder whether it has as good a chance to succeed as a love match. It seems so iffy!
    It will be fun to read about protagonists who enjoy living in town, since I’m a city girl myself and find that small towns aren’t always friendly to diversity or to outsiders.
    Looking forward to April 5!

    Reply
  91. I’ve never really thought about it before but I like the MOC as well – I must do considering the amount of them I’ve collected and how much I enjoy them! I definitely want to finish reading the book now! I had to click on the longer excerpt! 🙂
    I’ve lived in small cities (smallish compared to some of the places mentioned!) and also in small villages. For 3 years I lived in Northern BC 10 miles out of Village (you couldn’t say out of town as it was only a village!) and I had to adjust to both the harsh winters I’d never experienced before being an “Island Girl” from Vancouver Island, and also the isolation of living 10 miles out of a village that had one mall and one hotel, etc.
    I was happy to get back to my Island but the older I get, the more I cherish living surrounded by trees, the ocean. I’ve gone back to Victoria and through Vancouver and felt smothered by them. But I don’t think I could live completely off-grid as my cousin is doing now. It’s a compelling discussion.

    Reply
  92. I’ve never really thought about it before but I like the MOC as well – I must do considering the amount of them I’ve collected and how much I enjoy them! I definitely want to finish reading the book now! I had to click on the longer excerpt! 🙂
    I’ve lived in small cities (smallish compared to some of the places mentioned!) and also in small villages. For 3 years I lived in Northern BC 10 miles out of Village (you couldn’t say out of town as it was only a village!) and I had to adjust to both the harsh winters I’d never experienced before being an “Island Girl” from Vancouver Island, and also the isolation of living 10 miles out of a village that had one mall and one hotel, etc.
    I was happy to get back to my Island but the older I get, the more I cherish living surrounded by trees, the ocean. I’ve gone back to Victoria and through Vancouver and felt smothered by them. But I don’t think I could live completely off-grid as my cousin is doing now. It’s a compelling discussion.

    Reply
  93. I’ve never really thought about it before but I like the MOC as well – I must do considering the amount of them I’ve collected and how much I enjoy them! I definitely want to finish reading the book now! I had to click on the longer excerpt! 🙂
    I’ve lived in small cities (smallish compared to some of the places mentioned!) and also in small villages. For 3 years I lived in Northern BC 10 miles out of Village (you couldn’t say out of town as it was only a village!) and I had to adjust to both the harsh winters I’d never experienced before being an “Island Girl” from Vancouver Island, and also the isolation of living 10 miles out of a village that had one mall and one hotel, etc.
    I was happy to get back to my Island but the older I get, the more I cherish living surrounded by trees, the ocean. I’ve gone back to Victoria and through Vancouver and felt smothered by them. But I don’t think I could live completely off-grid as my cousin is doing now. It’s a compelling discussion.

    Reply
  94. I’ve never really thought about it before but I like the MOC as well – I must do considering the amount of them I’ve collected and how much I enjoy them! I definitely want to finish reading the book now! I had to click on the longer excerpt! 🙂
    I’ve lived in small cities (smallish compared to some of the places mentioned!) and also in small villages. For 3 years I lived in Northern BC 10 miles out of Village (you couldn’t say out of town as it was only a village!) and I had to adjust to both the harsh winters I’d never experienced before being an “Island Girl” from Vancouver Island, and also the isolation of living 10 miles out of a village that had one mall and one hotel, etc.
    I was happy to get back to my Island but the older I get, the more I cherish living surrounded by trees, the ocean. I’ve gone back to Victoria and through Vancouver and felt smothered by them. But I don’t think I could live completely off-grid as my cousin is doing now. It’s a compelling discussion.

    Reply
  95. I’ve never really thought about it before but I like the MOC as well – I must do considering the amount of them I’ve collected and how much I enjoy them! I definitely want to finish reading the book now! I had to click on the longer excerpt! 🙂
    I’ve lived in small cities (smallish compared to some of the places mentioned!) and also in small villages. For 3 years I lived in Northern BC 10 miles out of Village (you couldn’t say out of town as it was only a village!) and I had to adjust to both the harsh winters I’d never experienced before being an “Island Girl” from Vancouver Island, and also the isolation of living 10 miles out of a village that had one mall and one hotel, etc.
    I was happy to get back to my Island but the older I get, the more I cherish living surrounded by trees, the ocean. I’ve gone back to Victoria and through Vancouver and felt smothered by them. But I don’t think I could live completely off-grid as my cousin is doing now. It’s a compelling discussion.

    Reply
  96. Andrea had better be glad I wasn’t in on the scramble. I think I could have taken her down for a chance at a new JB book!!
    I love a MOC story because there are so many ways it can go bad and getting to good is always a wonderful adventure.
    I currently live deep in the country in rural Alabama. I live 8 miles from the nearest small town, 22 miles from the nearest moderate city, and 80 miles from the largest metropolitan city.
    I have, in my 50 plus odd years, lived in major cities all over the world. And I loved every minute of it. But my country life has its advantages and I love it as well.
    I would gladly live in London full-time and would not mind returning to Salzburg to live.

    Reply
  97. Andrea had better be glad I wasn’t in on the scramble. I think I could have taken her down for a chance at a new JB book!!
    I love a MOC story because there are so many ways it can go bad and getting to good is always a wonderful adventure.
    I currently live deep in the country in rural Alabama. I live 8 miles from the nearest small town, 22 miles from the nearest moderate city, and 80 miles from the largest metropolitan city.
    I have, in my 50 plus odd years, lived in major cities all over the world. And I loved every minute of it. But my country life has its advantages and I love it as well.
    I would gladly live in London full-time and would not mind returning to Salzburg to live.

    Reply
  98. Andrea had better be glad I wasn’t in on the scramble. I think I could have taken her down for a chance at a new JB book!!
    I love a MOC story because there are so many ways it can go bad and getting to good is always a wonderful adventure.
    I currently live deep in the country in rural Alabama. I live 8 miles from the nearest small town, 22 miles from the nearest moderate city, and 80 miles from the largest metropolitan city.
    I have, in my 50 plus odd years, lived in major cities all over the world. And I loved every minute of it. But my country life has its advantages and I love it as well.
    I would gladly live in London full-time and would not mind returning to Salzburg to live.

    Reply
  99. Andrea had better be glad I wasn’t in on the scramble. I think I could have taken her down for a chance at a new JB book!!
    I love a MOC story because there are so many ways it can go bad and getting to good is always a wonderful adventure.
    I currently live deep in the country in rural Alabama. I live 8 miles from the nearest small town, 22 miles from the nearest moderate city, and 80 miles from the largest metropolitan city.
    I have, in my 50 plus odd years, lived in major cities all over the world. And I loved every minute of it. But my country life has its advantages and I love it as well.
    I would gladly live in London full-time and would not mind returning to Salzburg to live.

    Reply
  100. Andrea had better be glad I wasn’t in on the scramble. I think I could have taken her down for a chance at a new JB book!!
    I love a MOC story because there are so many ways it can go bad and getting to good is always a wonderful adventure.
    I currently live deep in the country in rural Alabama. I live 8 miles from the nearest small town, 22 miles from the nearest moderate city, and 80 miles from the largest metropolitan city.
    I have, in my 50 plus odd years, lived in major cities all over the world. And I loved every minute of it. But my country life has its advantages and I love it as well.
    I would gladly live in London full-time and would not mind returning to Salzburg to live.

    Reply
  101. I seem to be fitting the stereo-type here of a city dweller (NYC) longing to live in the country. I love the idea of living in a quaint house with a beautiful forest/lake/beach nearby. Something more scenic than tall buildings and lots of concrete. But, I do love the liveliness of the city and all there is to do, which is why I still live in the city. 😉
    I must say, I envy Cara’s sneak peek at The Viscount Needs a Wife. You’ve totally hooked me with the little excerpt and I can’t wait to add this to reading stack.
    I also shared on my FB page, as I’m not one to keep a good read to myself. 😉

    Reply
  102. I seem to be fitting the stereo-type here of a city dweller (NYC) longing to live in the country. I love the idea of living in a quaint house with a beautiful forest/lake/beach nearby. Something more scenic than tall buildings and lots of concrete. But, I do love the liveliness of the city and all there is to do, which is why I still live in the city. 😉
    I must say, I envy Cara’s sneak peek at The Viscount Needs a Wife. You’ve totally hooked me with the little excerpt and I can’t wait to add this to reading stack.
    I also shared on my FB page, as I’m not one to keep a good read to myself. 😉

    Reply
  103. I seem to be fitting the stereo-type here of a city dweller (NYC) longing to live in the country. I love the idea of living in a quaint house with a beautiful forest/lake/beach nearby. Something more scenic than tall buildings and lots of concrete. But, I do love the liveliness of the city and all there is to do, which is why I still live in the city. 😉
    I must say, I envy Cara’s sneak peek at The Viscount Needs a Wife. You’ve totally hooked me with the little excerpt and I can’t wait to add this to reading stack.
    I also shared on my FB page, as I’m not one to keep a good read to myself. 😉

    Reply
  104. I seem to be fitting the stereo-type here of a city dweller (NYC) longing to live in the country. I love the idea of living in a quaint house with a beautiful forest/lake/beach nearby. Something more scenic than tall buildings and lots of concrete. But, I do love the liveliness of the city and all there is to do, which is why I still live in the city. 😉
    I must say, I envy Cara’s sneak peek at The Viscount Needs a Wife. You’ve totally hooked me with the little excerpt and I can’t wait to add this to reading stack.
    I also shared on my FB page, as I’m not one to keep a good read to myself. 😉

    Reply
  105. I seem to be fitting the stereo-type here of a city dweller (NYC) longing to live in the country. I love the idea of living in a quaint house with a beautiful forest/lake/beach nearby. Something more scenic than tall buildings and lots of concrete. But, I do love the liveliness of the city and all there is to do, which is why I still live in the city. 😉
    I must say, I envy Cara’s sneak peek at The Viscount Needs a Wife. You’ve totally hooked me with the little excerpt and I can’t wait to add this to reading stack.
    I also shared on my FB page, as I’m not one to keep a good read to myself. 😉

    Reply
  106. I just watched Lucy Worsley’s documentary about Charlotte’s death and what happened after it: the race to get married and produce legimate heirs. Queen Victoria might have actually never even been born if Charlotte hadn’t died!

    Reply
  107. I just watched Lucy Worsley’s documentary about Charlotte’s death and what happened after it: the race to get married and produce legimate heirs. Queen Victoria might have actually never even been born if Charlotte hadn’t died!

    Reply
  108. I just watched Lucy Worsley’s documentary about Charlotte’s death and what happened after it: the race to get married and produce legimate heirs. Queen Victoria might have actually never even been born if Charlotte hadn’t died!

    Reply
  109. I just watched Lucy Worsley’s documentary about Charlotte’s death and what happened after it: the race to get married and produce legimate heirs. Queen Victoria might have actually never even been born if Charlotte hadn’t died!

    Reply
  110. I just watched Lucy Worsley’s documentary about Charlotte’s death and what happened after it: the race to get married and produce legimate heirs. Queen Victoria might have actually never even been born if Charlotte hadn’t died!

    Reply
  111. A mix of both city and country life is, to my mind, ideal. Both offer wonderful pleasures, but too much of a good thing can often leave you less appreciative of them. I’m not sure I would have been as eager as Kitty and Braydon to give up the manor. But then, Ididn’t have the headaches of running an estate!

    Reply
  112. A mix of both city and country life is, to my mind, ideal. Both offer wonderful pleasures, but too much of a good thing can often leave you less appreciative of them. I’m not sure I would have been as eager as Kitty and Braydon to give up the manor. But then, Ididn’t have the headaches of running an estate!

    Reply
  113. A mix of both city and country life is, to my mind, ideal. Both offer wonderful pleasures, but too much of a good thing can often leave you less appreciative of them. I’m not sure I would have been as eager as Kitty and Braydon to give up the manor. But then, Ididn’t have the headaches of running an estate!

    Reply
  114. A mix of both city and country life is, to my mind, ideal. Both offer wonderful pleasures, but too much of a good thing can often leave you less appreciative of them. I’m not sure I would have been as eager as Kitty and Braydon to give up the manor. But then, Ididn’t have the headaches of running an estate!

    Reply
  115. A mix of both city and country life is, to my mind, ideal. Both offer wonderful pleasures, but too much of a good thing can often leave you less appreciative of them. I’m not sure I would have been as eager as Kitty and Braydon to give up the manor. But then, Ididn’t have the headaches of running an estate!

    Reply
  116. Sue, a college town can often be perfect—offering less bustle and congestin than a big city, but also lots of engaging cultural activities. I love the country, but I’d go a little stir crazy if I wasn’t neara place that offered museums, theater, msuic, interesting restaurants, etc. I like the best of both worlds!

    Reply
  117. Sue, a college town can often be perfect—offering less bustle and congestin than a big city, but also lots of engaging cultural activities. I love the country, but I’d go a little stir crazy if I wasn’t neara place that offered museums, theater, msuic, interesting restaurants, etc. I like the best of both worlds!

    Reply
  118. Sue, a college town can often be perfect—offering less bustle and congestin than a big city, but also lots of engaging cultural activities. I love the country, but I’d go a little stir crazy if I wasn’t neara place that offered museums, theater, msuic, interesting restaurants, etc. I like the best of both worlds!

    Reply
  119. Sue, a college town can often be perfect—offering less bustle and congestin than a big city, but also lots of engaging cultural activities. I love the country, but I’d go a little stir crazy if I wasn’t neara place that offered museums, theater, msuic, interesting restaurants, etc. I like the best of both worlds!

    Reply
  120. Sue, a college town can often be perfect—offering less bustle and congestin than a big city, but also lots of engaging cultural activities. I love the country, but I’d go a little stir crazy if I wasn’t neara place that offered museums, theater, msuic, interesting restaurants, etc. I like the best of both worlds!

    Reply
  121. I’m excited to hear that your books in a sort of ‘new direction’ outside of the Malloren and Rogues lines. I think my favorite book of yours is Emily and the Dark Angel – mmm, Randal Ashby. 😀 Anyway, this sounds good.
    I grew up moving around the northeast and midwest as my Dad was transferred for his job. Part of the problem with identifying the American ideal place to live, is the ‘grass is always greener’ problem. City people want to retire to the country. Many small town/country people are intrigued by the city. Suburban people are more often moving to the cities these days when they retire. The Chicago Tribune recently had a big story about it. Personally, I like the idea of a low maintenance home in a medium size city or near public transportation to one. I live in a suburb of Chicago within easy walking distance to our active downtown and public transportation into Chicago. My husband and I have discussed selling our house and buying a condo in the same area as we get closer to retirement. But, who knows, our plans may change.

    Reply
  122. I’m excited to hear that your books in a sort of ‘new direction’ outside of the Malloren and Rogues lines. I think my favorite book of yours is Emily and the Dark Angel – mmm, Randal Ashby. 😀 Anyway, this sounds good.
    I grew up moving around the northeast and midwest as my Dad was transferred for his job. Part of the problem with identifying the American ideal place to live, is the ‘grass is always greener’ problem. City people want to retire to the country. Many small town/country people are intrigued by the city. Suburban people are more often moving to the cities these days when they retire. The Chicago Tribune recently had a big story about it. Personally, I like the idea of a low maintenance home in a medium size city or near public transportation to one. I live in a suburb of Chicago within easy walking distance to our active downtown and public transportation into Chicago. My husband and I have discussed selling our house and buying a condo in the same area as we get closer to retirement. But, who knows, our plans may change.

    Reply
  123. I’m excited to hear that your books in a sort of ‘new direction’ outside of the Malloren and Rogues lines. I think my favorite book of yours is Emily and the Dark Angel – mmm, Randal Ashby. 😀 Anyway, this sounds good.
    I grew up moving around the northeast and midwest as my Dad was transferred for his job. Part of the problem with identifying the American ideal place to live, is the ‘grass is always greener’ problem. City people want to retire to the country. Many small town/country people are intrigued by the city. Suburban people are more often moving to the cities these days when they retire. The Chicago Tribune recently had a big story about it. Personally, I like the idea of a low maintenance home in a medium size city or near public transportation to one. I live in a suburb of Chicago within easy walking distance to our active downtown and public transportation into Chicago. My husband and I have discussed selling our house and buying a condo in the same area as we get closer to retirement. But, who knows, our plans may change.

    Reply
  124. I’m excited to hear that your books in a sort of ‘new direction’ outside of the Malloren and Rogues lines. I think my favorite book of yours is Emily and the Dark Angel – mmm, Randal Ashby. 😀 Anyway, this sounds good.
    I grew up moving around the northeast and midwest as my Dad was transferred for his job. Part of the problem with identifying the American ideal place to live, is the ‘grass is always greener’ problem. City people want to retire to the country. Many small town/country people are intrigued by the city. Suburban people are more often moving to the cities these days when they retire. The Chicago Tribune recently had a big story about it. Personally, I like the idea of a low maintenance home in a medium size city or near public transportation to one. I live in a suburb of Chicago within easy walking distance to our active downtown and public transportation into Chicago. My husband and I have discussed selling our house and buying a condo in the same area as we get closer to retirement. But, who knows, our plans may change.

    Reply
  125. I’m excited to hear that your books in a sort of ‘new direction’ outside of the Malloren and Rogues lines. I think my favorite book of yours is Emily and the Dark Angel – mmm, Randal Ashby. 😀 Anyway, this sounds good.
    I grew up moving around the northeast and midwest as my Dad was transferred for his job. Part of the problem with identifying the American ideal place to live, is the ‘grass is always greener’ problem. City people want to retire to the country. Many small town/country people are intrigued by the city. Suburban people are more often moving to the cities these days when they retire. The Chicago Tribune recently had a big story about it. Personally, I like the idea of a low maintenance home in a medium size city or near public transportation to one. I live in a suburb of Chicago within easy walking distance to our active downtown and public transportation into Chicago. My husband and I have discussed selling our house and buying a condo in the same area as we get closer to retirement. But, who knows, our plans may change.

    Reply
  126. I need public transportation so need to live in an urban area. Where I live , here are plenty of gardens and trees at present. Might not last, Had during pollen season but lovely.
    I would love a copy of the book.
    One commentator on the Regency period said the Whigs generally preferred town life and didn’t spend much time in the country. Some of the new style politicians like Liverpool and Bathurst also spent most of their time in town. Those who father’s were ennobled for being judges or other government service quite often lacked inherited country property and weren’t acquainted with sheep or wheat. Haven’t delved into that much.

    Reply
  127. I need public transportation so need to live in an urban area. Where I live , here are plenty of gardens and trees at present. Might not last, Had during pollen season but lovely.
    I would love a copy of the book.
    One commentator on the Regency period said the Whigs generally preferred town life and didn’t spend much time in the country. Some of the new style politicians like Liverpool and Bathurst also spent most of their time in town. Those who father’s were ennobled for being judges or other government service quite often lacked inherited country property and weren’t acquainted with sheep or wheat. Haven’t delved into that much.

    Reply
  128. I need public transportation so need to live in an urban area. Where I live , here are plenty of gardens and trees at present. Might not last, Had during pollen season but lovely.
    I would love a copy of the book.
    One commentator on the Regency period said the Whigs generally preferred town life and didn’t spend much time in the country. Some of the new style politicians like Liverpool and Bathurst also spent most of their time in town. Those who father’s were ennobled for being judges or other government service quite often lacked inherited country property and weren’t acquainted with sheep or wheat. Haven’t delved into that much.

    Reply
  129. I need public transportation so need to live in an urban area. Where I live , here are plenty of gardens and trees at present. Might not last, Had during pollen season but lovely.
    I would love a copy of the book.
    One commentator on the Regency period said the Whigs generally preferred town life and didn’t spend much time in the country. Some of the new style politicians like Liverpool and Bathurst also spent most of their time in town. Those who father’s were ennobled for being judges or other government service quite often lacked inherited country property and weren’t acquainted with sheep or wheat. Haven’t delved into that much.

    Reply
  130. I need public transportation so need to live in an urban area. Where I live , here are plenty of gardens and trees at present. Might not last, Had during pollen season but lovely.
    I would love a copy of the book.
    One commentator on the Regency period said the Whigs generally preferred town life and didn’t spend much time in the country. Some of the new style politicians like Liverpool and Bathurst also spent most of their time in town. Those who father’s were ennobled for being judges or other government service quite often lacked inherited country property and weren’t acquainted with sheep or wheat. Haven’t delved into that much.

    Reply
  131. That scene from the book is so marvelously tempting! I think one of the sadder aspects of the Georgian/Regency periods was the fate of the daughters of George III. Talk about stifled lives…. And one result from that was the succession crisis. One wonders what might have come had they been able to marry easily and then bear children.

    Reply
  132. That scene from the book is so marvelously tempting! I think one of the sadder aspects of the Georgian/Regency periods was the fate of the daughters of George III. Talk about stifled lives…. And one result from that was the succession crisis. One wonders what might have come had they been able to marry easily and then bear children.

    Reply
  133. That scene from the book is so marvelously tempting! I think one of the sadder aspects of the Georgian/Regency periods was the fate of the daughters of George III. Talk about stifled lives…. And one result from that was the succession crisis. One wonders what might have come had they been able to marry easily and then bear children.

    Reply
  134. That scene from the book is so marvelously tempting! I think one of the sadder aspects of the Georgian/Regency periods was the fate of the daughters of George III. Talk about stifled lives…. And one result from that was the succession crisis. One wonders what might have come had they been able to marry easily and then bear children.

    Reply
  135. That scene from the book is so marvelously tempting! I think one of the sadder aspects of the Georgian/Regency periods was the fate of the daughters of George III. Talk about stifled lives…. And one result from that was the succession crisis. One wonders what might have come had they been able to marry easily and then bear children.

    Reply
  136. I’m really looking forward to this book. I love MOC stories. I live in the countryside and have done all my life. It’s beautiful in the Summer but where we live is desolate in the Winter. Now that I’m getting older I would like to live in a small town. Public transport would be great and I love museums and galleries. It’s a huge effort for me to arrange to go anywhere decent so most of the time I don’t bother. Best of luck with the new book Jo.

    Reply
  137. I’m really looking forward to this book. I love MOC stories. I live in the countryside and have done all my life. It’s beautiful in the Summer but where we live is desolate in the Winter. Now that I’m getting older I would like to live in a small town. Public transport would be great and I love museums and galleries. It’s a huge effort for me to arrange to go anywhere decent so most of the time I don’t bother. Best of luck with the new book Jo.

    Reply
  138. I’m really looking forward to this book. I love MOC stories. I live in the countryside and have done all my life. It’s beautiful in the Summer but where we live is desolate in the Winter. Now that I’m getting older I would like to live in a small town. Public transport would be great and I love museums and galleries. It’s a huge effort for me to arrange to go anywhere decent so most of the time I don’t bother. Best of luck with the new book Jo.

    Reply
  139. I’m really looking forward to this book. I love MOC stories. I live in the countryside and have done all my life. It’s beautiful in the Summer but where we live is desolate in the Winter. Now that I’m getting older I would like to live in a small town. Public transport would be great and I love museums and galleries. It’s a huge effort for me to arrange to go anywhere decent so most of the time I don’t bother. Best of luck with the new book Jo.

    Reply
  140. I’m really looking forward to this book. I love MOC stories. I live in the countryside and have done all my life. It’s beautiful in the Summer but where we live is desolate in the Winter. Now that I’m getting older I would like to live in a small town. Public transport would be great and I love museums and galleries. It’s a huge effort for me to arrange to go anywhere decent so most of the time I don’t bother. Best of luck with the new book Jo.

    Reply
  141. I tell people that I have no inner resources and that as a result I need to live in (or very near) a large city so that I have museums, people, restaurants, films, festivals, etc. at close hand. I’ve also likes that I’ve got options when I want to go from Point A to Point B. Living in a walkable neighborhood as I do contributes to my sense of community, for I rarely run my errands without seeing a neighbor and stopping to chat. Plus, as someone said, as we age driving (especially at night) becomes more difficult, and the ability to walk or take public transit gives me flexibility and comfort that I won’t be trapped as I age and drive less. I love the country, and in an ideal world (ideal for me, at least) I’d have enough money to have both a flat in the city and a cottage in the country. Lacking the funds I have to choose one over the other, so live in the city. Luckily for me, Washington DC is a lovely city with lots of green space and trees, so I do not feel too deprived of natural flora and fauna.
    As for MOC stories, they have always been a favorite, starting with the first Jo Beverley book I read (and adored), “An Unwilling Bride”.

    Reply
  142. I tell people that I have no inner resources and that as a result I need to live in (or very near) a large city so that I have museums, people, restaurants, films, festivals, etc. at close hand. I’ve also likes that I’ve got options when I want to go from Point A to Point B. Living in a walkable neighborhood as I do contributes to my sense of community, for I rarely run my errands without seeing a neighbor and stopping to chat. Plus, as someone said, as we age driving (especially at night) becomes more difficult, and the ability to walk or take public transit gives me flexibility and comfort that I won’t be trapped as I age and drive less. I love the country, and in an ideal world (ideal for me, at least) I’d have enough money to have both a flat in the city and a cottage in the country. Lacking the funds I have to choose one over the other, so live in the city. Luckily for me, Washington DC is a lovely city with lots of green space and trees, so I do not feel too deprived of natural flora and fauna.
    As for MOC stories, they have always been a favorite, starting with the first Jo Beverley book I read (and adored), “An Unwilling Bride”.

    Reply
  143. I tell people that I have no inner resources and that as a result I need to live in (or very near) a large city so that I have museums, people, restaurants, films, festivals, etc. at close hand. I’ve also likes that I’ve got options when I want to go from Point A to Point B. Living in a walkable neighborhood as I do contributes to my sense of community, for I rarely run my errands without seeing a neighbor and stopping to chat. Plus, as someone said, as we age driving (especially at night) becomes more difficult, and the ability to walk or take public transit gives me flexibility and comfort that I won’t be trapped as I age and drive less. I love the country, and in an ideal world (ideal for me, at least) I’d have enough money to have both a flat in the city and a cottage in the country. Lacking the funds I have to choose one over the other, so live in the city. Luckily for me, Washington DC is a lovely city with lots of green space and trees, so I do not feel too deprived of natural flora and fauna.
    As for MOC stories, they have always been a favorite, starting with the first Jo Beverley book I read (and adored), “An Unwilling Bride”.

    Reply
  144. I tell people that I have no inner resources and that as a result I need to live in (or very near) a large city so that I have museums, people, restaurants, films, festivals, etc. at close hand. I’ve also likes that I’ve got options when I want to go from Point A to Point B. Living in a walkable neighborhood as I do contributes to my sense of community, for I rarely run my errands without seeing a neighbor and stopping to chat. Plus, as someone said, as we age driving (especially at night) becomes more difficult, and the ability to walk or take public transit gives me flexibility and comfort that I won’t be trapped as I age and drive less. I love the country, and in an ideal world (ideal for me, at least) I’d have enough money to have both a flat in the city and a cottage in the country. Lacking the funds I have to choose one over the other, so live in the city. Luckily for me, Washington DC is a lovely city with lots of green space and trees, so I do not feel too deprived of natural flora and fauna.
    As for MOC stories, they have always been a favorite, starting with the first Jo Beverley book I read (and adored), “An Unwilling Bride”.

    Reply
  145. I tell people that I have no inner resources and that as a result I need to live in (or very near) a large city so that I have museums, people, restaurants, films, festivals, etc. at close hand. I’ve also likes that I’ve got options when I want to go from Point A to Point B. Living in a walkable neighborhood as I do contributes to my sense of community, for I rarely run my errands without seeing a neighbor and stopping to chat. Plus, as someone said, as we age driving (especially at night) becomes more difficult, and the ability to walk or take public transit gives me flexibility and comfort that I won’t be trapped as I age and drive less. I love the country, and in an ideal world (ideal for me, at least) I’d have enough money to have both a flat in the city and a cottage in the country. Lacking the funds I have to choose one over the other, so live in the city. Luckily for me, Washington DC is a lovely city with lots of green space and trees, so I do not feel too deprived of natural flora and fauna.
    As for MOC stories, they have always been a favorite, starting with the first Jo Beverley book I read (and adored), “An Unwilling Bride”.

    Reply
  146. Jo, so when Kitty married the Honourable Marcus Cateril, that automatically made her an Honourable as well? I do enjoy learning about the minutia of life amongst the nobility. Can’t wait to read this!

    Reply
  147. Jo, so when Kitty married the Honourable Marcus Cateril, that automatically made her an Honourable as well? I do enjoy learning about the minutia of life amongst the nobility. Can’t wait to read this!

    Reply
  148. Jo, so when Kitty married the Honourable Marcus Cateril, that automatically made her an Honourable as well? I do enjoy learning about the minutia of life amongst the nobility. Can’t wait to read this!

    Reply
  149. Jo, so when Kitty married the Honourable Marcus Cateril, that automatically made her an Honourable as well? I do enjoy learning about the minutia of life amongst the nobility. Can’t wait to read this!

    Reply
  150. Jo, so when Kitty married the Honourable Marcus Cateril, that automatically made her an Honourable as well? I do enjoy learning about the minutia of life amongst the nobility. Can’t wait to read this!

    Reply
  151. I wouldn’t go back to Tennessee if you paid me. 🙂 I live in Southeast London. Lots of trees and parks around but access to all the culture I can want. I don’t think I will ever want to live rural again but who knows what the future may bring. 🙂

    Reply
  152. I wouldn’t go back to Tennessee if you paid me. 🙂 I live in Southeast London. Lots of trees and parks around but access to all the culture I can want. I don’t think I will ever want to live rural again but who knows what the future may bring. 🙂

    Reply
  153. I wouldn’t go back to Tennessee if you paid me. 🙂 I live in Southeast London. Lots of trees and parks around but access to all the culture I can want. I don’t think I will ever want to live rural again but who knows what the future may bring. 🙂

    Reply
  154. I wouldn’t go back to Tennessee if you paid me. 🙂 I live in Southeast London. Lots of trees and parks around but access to all the culture I can want. I don’t think I will ever want to live rural again but who knows what the future may bring. 🙂

    Reply
  155. I wouldn’t go back to Tennessee if you paid me. 🙂 I live in Southeast London. Lots of trees and parks around but access to all the culture I can want. I don’t think I will ever want to live rural again but who knows what the future may bring. 🙂

    Reply
  156. Well, if one of the rich, available, already be-heired, eligibles with a country seat wanted to marry me, I might possibly change my mind. 🙂

    Reply
  157. Well, if one of the rich, available, already be-heired, eligibles with a country seat wanted to marry me, I might possibly change my mind. 🙂

    Reply
  158. Well, if one of the rich, available, already be-heired, eligibles with a country seat wanted to marry me, I might possibly change my mind. 🙂

    Reply
  159. Well, if one of the rich, available, already be-heired, eligibles with a country seat wanted to marry me, I might possibly change my mind. 🙂

    Reply
  160. Well, if one of the rich, available, already be-heired, eligibles with a country seat wanted to marry me, I might possibly change my mind. 🙂

    Reply

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