Interview with Beth Miller, Writers House

Young_Woman_Writing2
Pat Rice here:

Today, I’d like to introduce Beth Miller, assistant to Robin Rue at Writers House, a literary agency.  She’s gone from a B.S. in biology to an M.A. in literature and has been working with WH since February 2007. 

From Beth's bio: “I have a long-standing fascination with the sea, and went to college with the intention of studying marine biology. About halfway through, I switched to general biology, and graduated with a B.S. in Biology from Southampton College of Long Island University. Not knowing what to do after I graduated, I entered a teaching certification program, where I quickly discovered that I had absolutely no desire to teach. I gave that up and worked in a bookstore for awhile before landing a job at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory as a DNA Sequencing Technician. That position lasted for 7 years, during which time I went back to school, earning my M.A. in Literature from Queens Beth bio pic
College, CUNY, in December 2006. I began working as an assistant at a literary agency in February 2007. I absolutely love it here, so much so that the 7 years at the lab are barely even a memory
.”

Now, on to our interview:

Even though editorial and agent assistants are paid so little, I'm amazed at the high caliber of people who take these jobs.  Publishing is one of the only industries where the apprenticeship system is still in force.  Agents and editors virtually always come up through the ranks, starting as minions who learn on the job.  What drew you to abandon a solid technical job for the whacky world of publishing?  What are the good and bad points of your current job? (window photo from www.WritersHouse.com)

Writershouse
After a number of years at the lab, I had begun to realize that there wasn’t much room for advancement there.  It was a comfortable place to be, and I liked my coworkers very much, but there was nowhere to go.  My folks were urging me to go back to school, and I decided to go for an M.A. in Literature, because I had always loved reading and writing, and the thought of going for a Ph.D. in science made me ill.  <G> I wasn’t sure what I’d do with the degree once I had it, as teaching had never been something I was particularly enamored of either—at least on the high school level.  I started scoping out publishing jobs after an editor came to my writing group’s monthly meeting, and within about a week I was interviewing with Robin.  And within a few days after that, I was giving notice at the lab.  It was one of those “meant-to-be” kinds of things.

My favorite part of the job is the interaction with the authors. Putney

One of the things that drew me to 
Robin (and vice versa) was that when I went for my interview, I gazed open-mouthed at the book covers on her wall, and when I got my voice back, I said, “I’ve read that…and that… and I love that… and oh my God, you work with…!”  So I have been a fan of Robin’s authors for years and years, and when I get to talk to them on the phone, or email them, or even meet them, I’m like a giddy fangirl.

(Pat note: Mary Jo and I are two of Robin's many authors, so Beth is one of our favorite people!)

The thing I like the least is when we have trouble selling manuscripts we love.  There is nothing I hate more than telling a client that we received a turn-down.  You’d think that once Mysticrider
you’ve landed an agent, it’s in the bag, but sometimes it isn’t.  But I’m determined that come hell or high water, we’ll find homes for these manuscripts!

How do you sort through the slush pile? By date? Color of paper? <G> Topic?

As the slush comes in, I open it and glance at it to make sure it’s not a referral or some other form of VIP.  Then I put it aside until I have time to really look at it.  I try not to let it build up too much, and I would say that usually, I reply within 2 weeks to a month.  

How often have you found a manuscript worth taking on?

Since I started here in February, 2007, we’ve taken on 3 unpublished authors whose manuscripts we both adored.  All Young Adult, by the way.  There have been maybe 6-10 more manuscripts I have shown to Robin that unfortunately weren’t for her.  But out of those, I know some of them have found agents and even have publishing dates (I lurk on various writers’ forums—amazing what you learn from them!), so it makes me happy to know that these authors are finding homes, and that my own sense of what’s good is on track. 

You work at the grass roots level of publishing.  What materials are you seeing most (pubbed or unpubbed)—paranormal, suspense, anything new or interesting?   Are historical settings broadening yet?  

We get a lot of YA—and I have to say, that YA has been the genre in which I’ve found the most manuscripts that I’ve liked and shown to Robin.  I think that the genre is so wonderful—there’s great fantasy and edgy contemporaries, and I love to read it.  In fact, when I go to bookstores now, I usually find myself spending the most time (and money-sigh) on YAs.  There’s also a LOT of paranormal romance.  We get a lot of fantasy and thrillers, too.  I’m not really sure about historicals. 

What have you heard about the industry in general? Are the publishers trying new things in this dismal market?

This is so hard to answer.  I think for unpublished authors it’s very difficult now.  But if the author has a great voice and a story that stands out from the others, they have a good chance of finding a home with a publisher.

What’s hot and what’s not?

Not sure about this one… I think paranormal romance is hot, and paranormal YA as well.  Beyond that, not sure.

 Are you accepting clients of your own?  Or is publishing like making sausage–something that one doesn't want to know too much about?  <G> Would you like to become an agent?  If so, what kinds of books would you like to handle?

Ok, the sausage analogy just made me a little queasy.  <G> I am not yet accepting clients of my own.  Although I had never before considered being a literary agent prior to getting this job, I think it’s a fascinating career.  I love listening to Robin on the phone—no matter whether she is talking to an editor or an author, she always seems to know the right thing to say.  I am trying to learn all I can, so that when I do reach the point at which I am ready to take on clients, I will hopefully have something of a clue as to what to do.

I would love to work with the kinds of books I love to read, which would be romance, YA, fantasy, and thrillers.

Favorite non-client books/authors:

Annebishop
Anne Bishop’s The Black Jewels series, Juliet Marillier’s Sevenwaters series, Sherrilyn Kenyon’s DarkHunters series, P.C. & Kristin Cast’s House of Night series, Lynn Kurland, Suzanne Brockmann, Harry Potter series, The Lord of the Rings, Nora Roberts (especially her trilogies), Vince Flynn.

Query pet peeves:

People who don’t take the time to do some research before querying.  For example, why are you sending your self-help proposal to someone who represents commercial fiction?  It’s a waste of time on both sides.

Email submissions that are blasted out to every agent on the planet, especially ones directing me to check their website for more info.  Similarly, don’t query every agent in the same company.  We often help sort the mail, and we can see when the same person is querying every agent.  If you get a turn-down from one, then you may feel free to try another.  WHlibrary

Queries that come without a SASE or an email address for a reply (and please don’t use those tiny 3×5 envelopes!)

Queries that don’t include the title of the work being queried, or have it buried somewhere so that we can’t easily find it.

When authors who queried once before don’t mention that they’ve done so in their query.  We have databases (and very good memories!)—tell us you queried before and have a new project!

For those of you who would like to know more about Beth’s daily job activities or the agency’s submission policies, check out her blog on the Romance Vagabonds. http://www.romancevagabonds.com/?p=1405   It’s wonderfully insightful and fun to read.  Beth will be here today dropping in to answer questions–so have fun!

125 thoughts on “Interview with Beth Miller, Writers House”

  1. Hi Linda,
    WH accepts mostly anything– I’m not sure why the website doesn’t include romance. I will mention that to people here. But yes, we certainly do accept romance submissions.

    Reply
  2. Hi Linda,
    WH accepts mostly anything– I’m not sure why the website doesn’t include romance. I will mention that to people here. But yes, we certainly do accept romance submissions.

    Reply
  3. Hi Linda,
    WH accepts mostly anything– I’m not sure why the website doesn’t include romance. I will mention that to people here. But yes, we certainly do accept romance submissions.

    Reply
  4. Hi Linda,
    WH accepts mostly anything– I’m not sure why the website doesn’t include romance. I will mention that to people here. But yes, we certainly do accept romance submissions.

    Reply
  5. Hi Linda,
    WH accepts mostly anything– I’m not sure why the website doesn’t include romance. I will mention that to people here. But yes, we certainly do accept romance submissions.

    Reply
  6. Good morning, Beth 🙂
    I wonder (I think your submissions page needs an update) which you prefer, email submissions or snail mail. The submissions page at WH says snail mail first, email queries may not be looked at.
    Also, if you receive a story that’s intriguing but not quite as solid as it could be, do you only send it back and ask to revise and resubmit, or do you spend a bit of time with that possible client, working with them to tighten up and strengthen the story? I know you sort of touched on this, but I’m curious to know how much time you’ll actually invest in a not-yet-but-could-be client.
    Thanks!

    Reply
  7. Good morning, Beth 🙂
    I wonder (I think your submissions page needs an update) which you prefer, email submissions or snail mail. The submissions page at WH says snail mail first, email queries may not be looked at.
    Also, if you receive a story that’s intriguing but not quite as solid as it could be, do you only send it back and ask to revise and resubmit, or do you spend a bit of time with that possible client, working with them to tighten up and strengthen the story? I know you sort of touched on this, but I’m curious to know how much time you’ll actually invest in a not-yet-but-could-be client.
    Thanks!

    Reply
  8. Good morning, Beth 🙂
    I wonder (I think your submissions page needs an update) which you prefer, email submissions or snail mail. The submissions page at WH says snail mail first, email queries may not be looked at.
    Also, if you receive a story that’s intriguing but not quite as solid as it could be, do you only send it back and ask to revise and resubmit, or do you spend a bit of time with that possible client, working with them to tighten up and strengthen the story? I know you sort of touched on this, but I’m curious to know how much time you’ll actually invest in a not-yet-but-could-be client.
    Thanks!

    Reply
  9. Good morning, Beth 🙂
    I wonder (I think your submissions page needs an update) which you prefer, email submissions or snail mail. The submissions page at WH says snail mail first, email queries may not be looked at.
    Also, if you receive a story that’s intriguing but not quite as solid as it could be, do you only send it back and ask to revise and resubmit, or do you spend a bit of time with that possible client, working with them to tighten up and strengthen the story? I know you sort of touched on this, but I’m curious to know how much time you’ll actually invest in a not-yet-but-could-be client.
    Thanks!

    Reply
  10. Good morning, Beth 🙂
    I wonder (I think your submissions page needs an update) which you prefer, email submissions or snail mail. The submissions page at WH says snail mail first, email queries may not be looked at.
    Also, if you receive a story that’s intriguing but not quite as solid as it could be, do you only send it back and ask to revise and resubmit, or do you spend a bit of time with that possible client, working with them to tighten up and strengthen the story? I know you sort of touched on this, but I’m curious to know how much time you’ll actually invest in a not-yet-but-could-be client.
    Thanks!

    Reply
  11. Beth, I just read your post at Romance Vagabonds. In it, you wonder if you should give feedback when you reject. Oh please, do give feedback! You’re closer to the publishing world than a newbie writer is. Any help gratefully accepted.

    Reply
  12. Beth, I just read your post at Romance Vagabonds. In it, you wonder if you should give feedback when you reject. Oh please, do give feedback! You’re closer to the publishing world than a newbie writer is. Any help gratefully accepted.

    Reply
  13. Beth, I just read your post at Romance Vagabonds. In it, you wonder if you should give feedback when you reject. Oh please, do give feedback! You’re closer to the publishing world than a newbie writer is. Any help gratefully accepted.

    Reply
  14. Beth, I just read your post at Romance Vagabonds. In it, you wonder if you should give feedback when you reject. Oh please, do give feedback! You’re closer to the publishing world than a newbie writer is. Any help gratefully accepted.

    Reply
  15. Beth, I just read your post at Romance Vagabonds. In it, you wonder if you should give feedback when you reject. Oh please, do give feedback! You’re closer to the publishing world than a newbie writer is. Any help gratefully accepted.

    Reply
  16. Hi Theo,
    As a whole, WH prefers snail-mail submissions, though individual agents have different preferences. As long as your e-query is directed to Robin (not “Writers House Agent,” or some such), it gets treated the same as a snail query. We generally prefer snail queries, but we read them all.
    As to your second question, I guess it depends. If I really love it, and am able to compose an editorial letter, I will, and if I do so, I invite a resubmission, but it’s always with the caveat that I can’t promise anything. I always suggest the author get some other reads before they make major changes. Just last week, one of the interns and I read a ms we both liked, but had extensive questions and issues with it. We composed a lengthy letter, and I guess we’ll see if the author decides to work on it and resubmit. I always feel kind of weird about sending a lot of editorial comments when I can’t promise anything. Hopefully, the author will find them helpful, even if it doesn’t work out with WH.

    Reply
  17. Hi Theo,
    As a whole, WH prefers snail-mail submissions, though individual agents have different preferences. As long as your e-query is directed to Robin (not “Writers House Agent,” or some such), it gets treated the same as a snail query. We generally prefer snail queries, but we read them all.
    As to your second question, I guess it depends. If I really love it, and am able to compose an editorial letter, I will, and if I do so, I invite a resubmission, but it’s always with the caveat that I can’t promise anything. I always suggest the author get some other reads before they make major changes. Just last week, one of the interns and I read a ms we both liked, but had extensive questions and issues with it. We composed a lengthy letter, and I guess we’ll see if the author decides to work on it and resubmit. I always feel kind of weird about sending a lot of editorial comments when I can’t promise anything. Hopefully, the author will find them helpful, even if it doesn’t work out with WH.

    Reply
  18. Hi Theo,
    As a whole, WH prefers snail-mail submissions, though individual agents have different preferences. As long as your e-query is directed to Robin (not “Writers House Agent,” or some such), it gets treated the same as a snail query. We generally prefer snail queries, but we read them all.
    As to your second question, I guess it depends. If I really love it, and am able to compose an editorial letter, I will, and if I do so, I invite a resubmission, but it’s always with the caveat that I can’t promise anything. I always suggest the author get some other reads before they make major changes. Just last week, one of the interns and I read a ms we both liked, but had extensive questions and issues with it. We composed a lengthy letter, and I guess we’ll see if the author decides to work on it and resubmit. I always feel kind of weird about sending a lot of editorial comments when I can’t promise anything. Hopefully, the author will find them helpful, even if it doesn’t work out with WH.

    Reply
  19. Hi Theo,
    As a whole, WH prefers snail-mail submissions, though individual agents have different preferences. As long as your e-query is directed to Robin (not “Writers House Agent,” or some such), it gets treated the same as a snail query. We generally prefer snail queries, but we read them all.
    As to your second question, I guess it depends. If I really love it, and am able to compose an editorial letter, I will, and if I do so, I invite a resubmission, but it’s always with the caveat that I can’t promise anything. I always suggest the author get some other reads before they make major changes. Just last week, one of the interns and I read a ms we both liked, but had extensive questions and issues with it. We composed a lengthy letter, and I guess we’ll see if the author decides to work on it and resubmit. I always feel kind of weird about sending a lot of editorial comments when I can’t promise anything. Hopefully, the author will find them helpful, even if it doesn’t work out with WH.

    Reply
  20. Hi Theo,
    As a whole, WH prefers snail-mail submissions, though individual agents have different preferences. As long as your e-query is directed to Robin (not “Writers House Agent,” or some such), it gets treated the same as a snail query. We generally prefer snail queries, but we read them all.
    As to your second question, I guess it depends. If I really love it, and am able to compose an editorial letter, I will, and if I do so, I invite a resubmission, but it’s always with the caveat that I can’t promise anything. I always suggest the author get some other reads before they make major changes. Just last week, one of the interns and I read a ms we both liked, but had extensive questions and issues with it. We composed a lengthy letter, and I guess we’ll see if the author decides to work on it and resubmit. I always feel kind of weird about sending a lot of editorial comments when I can’t promise anything. Hopefully, the author will find them helpful, even if it doesn’t work out with WH.

    Reply
  21. Hey Linda,
    Thanks for that– and I usually do try and give feedback if at all possible. Sometimes, it just isn’t right for us, and there’s nothing more to say, you know?

    Reply
  22. Hey Linda,
    Thanks for that– and I usually do try and give feedback if at all possible. Sometimes, it just isn’t right for us, and there’s nothing more to say, you know?

    Reply
  23. Hey Linda,
    Thanks for that– and I usually do try and give feedback if at all possible. Sometimes, it just isn’t right for us, and there’s nothing more to say, you know?

    Reply
  24. Hey Linda,
    Thanks for that– and I usually do try and give feedback if at all possible. Sometimes, it just isn’t right for us, and there’s nothing more to say, you know?

    Reply
  25. Hey Linda,
    Thanks for that– and I usually do try and give feedback if at all possible. Sometimes, it just isn’t right for us, and there’s nothing more to say, you know?

    Reply
  26. Welcome to Word Wenches, Beth! The best thing about publishing is that just about everyone involved loves books, so clearly you’ve found your home in this world. 🙂
    Editorial and agent assistants must be sharp, well-organized, analytical, and able to keep at least a dozen balls in the air at once. Publishing would fall apart without them!
    Thanks for visiting, Beth. Even though it adds a thirteenth ball to your juggling. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  27. Welcome to Word Wenches, Beth! The best thing about publishing is that just about everyone involved loves books, so clearly you’ve found your home in this world. 🙂
    Editorial and agent assistants must be sharp, well-organized, analytical, and able to keep at least a dozen balls in the air at once. Publishing would fall apart without them!
    Thanks for visiting, Beth. Even though it adds a thirteenth ball to your juggling. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  28. Welcome to Word Wenches, Beth! The best thing about publishing is that just about everyone involved loves books, so clearly you’ve found your home in this world. 🙂
    Editorial and agent assistants must be sharp, well-organized, analytical, and able to keep at least a dozen balls in the air at once. Publishing would fall apart without them!
    Thanks for visiting, Beth. Even though it adds a thirteenth ball to your juggling. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  29. Welcome to Word Wenches, Beth! The best thing about publishing is that just about everyone involved loves books, so clearly you’ve found your home in this world. 🙂
    Editorial and agent assistants must be sharp, well-organized, analytical, and able to keep at least a dozen balls in the air at once. Publishing would fall apart without them!
    Thanks for visiting, Beth. Even though it adds a thirteenth ball to your juggling. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  30. Welcome to Word Wenches, Beth! The best thing about publishing is that just about everyone involved loves books, so clearly you’ve found your home in this world. 🙂
    Editorial and agent assistants must be sharp, well-organized, analytical, and able to keep at least a dozen balls in the air at once. Publishing would fall apart without them!
    Thanks for visiting, Beth. Even though it adds a thirteenth ball to your juggling. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  31. I just reread the WH submissions page, and also the list of agents.
    The Submissions page says to submit to “Submissions”. Will you throw a query out if it’s addressed to a specific agent? Or do you prefer a query sent to a specific agent? Thanks.

    Reply
  32. I just reread the WH submissions page, and also the list of agents.
    The Submissions page says to submit to “Submissions”. Will you throw a query out if it’s addressed to a specific agent? Or do you prefer a query sent to a specific agent? Thanks.

    Reply
  33. I just reread the WH submissions page, and also the list of agents.
    The Submissions page says to submit to “Submissions”. Will you throw a query out if it’s addressed to a specific agent? Or do you prefer a query sent to a specific agent? Thanks.

    Reply
  34. I just reread the WH submissions page, and also the list of agents.
    The Submissions page says to submit to “Submissions”. Will you throw a query out if it’s addressed to a specific agent? Or do you prefer a query sent to a specific agent? Thanks.

    Reply
  35. I just reread the WH submissions page, and also the list of agents.
    The Submissions page says to submit to “Submissions”. Will you throw a query out if it’s addressed to a specific agent? Or do you prefer a query sent to a specific agent? Thanks.

    Reply
  36. Linda,
    We do have a general submissions department, but if you know of a specific agent, address the query to that person. It’s always better to do some research and try to find the right agent for your material. And since the submissions dept gets sooo many submissions, you’re far better off submitting to a specific agent.

    Reply
  37. Linda,
    We do have a general submissions department, but if you know of a specific agent, address the query to that person. It’s always better to do some research and try to find the right agent for your material. And since the submissions dept gets sooo many submissions, you’re far better off submitting to a specific agent.

    Reply
  38. Linda,
    We do have a general submissions department, but if you know of a specific agent, address the query to that person. It’s always better to do some research and try to find the right agent for your material. And since the submissions dept gets sooo many submissions, you’re far better off submitting to a specific agent.

    Reply
  39. Linda,
    We do have a general submissions department, but if you know of a specific agent, address the query to that person. It’s always better to do some research and try to find the right agent for your material. And since the submissions dept gets sooo many submissions, you’re far better off submitting to a specific agent.

    Reply
  40. Linda,
    We do have a general submissions department, but if you know of a specific agent, address the query to that person. It’s always better to do some research and try to find the right agent for your material. And since the submissions dept gets sooo many submissions, you’re far better off submitting to a specific agent.

    Reply
  41. Hi, Beth–another of Robin’s authors here. In fact, I received something from you in my Saturday snail mail, and was very happy about it!
    What a fascinating background…and so glad you found your way into publishing in general and WH specifically!

    Reply
  42. Hi, Beth–another of Robin’s authors here. In fact, I received something from you in my Saturday snail mail, and was very happy about it!
    What a fascinating background…and so glad you found your way into publishing in general and WH specifically!

    Reply
  43. Hi, Beth–another of Robin’s authors here. In fact, I received something from you in my Saturday snail mail, and was very happy about it!
    What a fascinating background…and so glad you found your way into publishing in general and WH specifically!

    Reply
  44. Hi, Beth–another of Robin’s authors here. In fact, I received something from you in my Saturday snail mail, and was very happy about it!
    What a fascinating background…and so glad you found your way into publishing in general and WH specifically!

    Reply
  45. Hi, Beth–another of Robin’s authors here. In fact, I received something from you in my Saturday snail mail, and was very happy about it!
    What a fascinating background…and so glad you found your way into publishing in general and WH specifically!

    Reply
  46. Wow, it looks like our wenchly readers are already putting you to work this morning, Beth! We have a really knowledgeable group here, so they’ll keep you on your toes.
    And I second Mary Jo, thank you so much for doing this!

    Reply
  47. Wow, it looks like our wenchly readers are already putting you to work this morning, Beth! We have a really knowledgeable group here, so they’ll keep you on your toes.
    And I second Mary Jo, thank you so much for doing this!

    Reply
  48. Wow, it looks like our wenchly readers are already putting you to work this morning, Beth! We have a really knowledgeable group here, so they’ll keep you on your toes.
    And I second Mary Jo, thank you so much for doing this!

    Reply
  49. Wow, it looks like our wenchly readers are already putting you to work this morning, Beth! We have a really knowledgeable group here, so they’ll keep you on your toes.
    And I second Mary Jo, thank you so much for doing this!

    Reply
  50. Wow, it looks like our wenchly readers are already putting you to work this morning, Beth! We have a really knowledgeable group here, so they’ll keep you on your toes.
    And I second Mary Jo, thank you so much for doing this!

    Reply
  51. Thanks, Pat– it’s so nice of you to have invited me here today. And thank you for saying that I’m one of your favorite people. 🙂 Warms me right up on this ridiculously frigid Monday. Brr!

    Reply
  52. Thanks, Pat– it’s so nice of you to have invited me here today. And thank you for saying that I’m one of your favorite people. 🙂 Warms me right up on this ridiculously frigid Monday. Brr!

    Reply
  53. Thanks, Pat– it’s so nice of you to have invited me here today. And thank you for saying that I’m one of your favorite people. 🙂 Warms me right up on this ridiculously frigid Monday. Brr!

    Reply
  54. Thanks, Pat– it’s so nice of you to have invited me here today. And thank you for saying that I’m one of your favorite people. 🙂 Warms me right up on this ridiculously frigid Monday. Brr!

    Reply
  55. Thanks, Pat– it’s so nice of you to have invited me here today. And thank you for saying that I’m one of your favorite people. 🙂 Warms me right up on this ridiculously frigid Monday. Brr!

    Reply
  56. I really enjoyed your post here and the post at the Romace Vagabonds. I’m also on my second career- but for me it IS teaching!
    Thanks so much for all your ideas and information. For those of us who write for a hobby and dream of being published, anything that makes that world a little more real is inspiring.

    Reply
  57. I really enjoyed your post here and the post at the Romace Vagabonds. I’m also on my second career- but for me it IS teaching!
    Thanks so much for all your ideas and information. For those of us who write for a hobby and dream of being published, anything that makes that world a little more real is inspiring.

    Reply
  58. I really enjoyed your post here and the post at the Romace Vagabonds. I’m also on my second career- but for me it IS teaching!
    Thanks so much for all your ideas and information. For those of us who write for a hobby and dream of being published, anything that makes that world a little more real is inspiring.

    Reply
  59. I really enjoyed your post here and the post at the Romace Vagabonds. I’m also on my second career- but for me it IS teaching!
    Thanks so much for all your ideas and information. For those of us who write for a hobby and dream of being published, anything that makes that world a little more real is inspiring.

    Reply
  60. I really enjoyed your post here and the post at the Romace Vagabonds. I’m also on my second career- but for me it IS teaching!
    Thanks so much for all your ideas and information. For those of us who write for a hobby and dream of being published, anything that makes that world a little more real is inspiring.

    Reply
  61. Hi LadyDoc–
    I hope you find all the info helpful! And teaching is a wonderful profession, if you have the passion (and the patience) for it. I’ve been doing some online teaching at the college level, and I’ve enjoyed it very much.

    Reply
  62. Hi LadyDoc–
    I hope you find all the info helpful! And teaching is a wonderful profession, if you have the passion (and the patience) for it. I’ve been doing some online teaching at the college level, and I’ve enjoyed it very much.

    Reply
  63. Hi LadyDoc–
    I hope you find all the info helpful! And teaching is a wonderful profession, if you have the passion (and the patience) for it. I’ve been doing some online teaching at the college level, and I’ve enjoyed it very much.

    Reply
  64. Hi LadyDoc–
    I hope you find all the info helpful! And teaching is a wonderful profession, if you have the passion (and the patience) for it. I’ve been doing some online teaching at the college level, and I’ve enjoyed it very much.

    Reply
  65. Hi LadyDoc–
    I hope you find all the info helpful! And teaching is a wonderful profession, if you have the passion (and the patience) for it. I’ve been doing some online teaching at the college level, and I’ve enjoyed it very much.

    Reply
  66. Hi Linda,
    Sure, send a few pages– always (!) from the beginning! You’d be amazed at how many people send sample pages from the middle of the book. That just tells me that the author doesn’t think the beginning of the story is any good.
    If you’re emailing your query, paste the pages into the body of the email, rather than sending unsolicited attachments. That generally goes for any agent, btw.

    Reply
  67. Hi Linda,
    Sure, send a few pages– always (!) from the beginning! You’d be amazed at how many people send sample pages from the middle of the book. That just tells me that the author doesn’t think the beginning of the story is any good.
    If you’re emailing your query, paste the pages into the body of the email, rather than sending unsolicited attachments. That generally goes for any agent, btw.

    Reply
  68. Hi Linda,
    Sure, send a few pages– always (!) from the beginning! You’d be amazed at how many people send sample pages from the middle of the book. That just tells me that the author doesn’t think the beginning of the story is any good.
    If you’re emailing your query, paste the pages into the body of the email, rather than sending unsolicited attachments. That generally goes for any agent, btw.

    Reply
  69. Hi Linda,
    Sure, send a few pages– always (!) from the beginning! You’d be amazed at how many people send sample pages from the middle of the book. That just tells me that the author doesn’t think the beginning of the story is any good.
    If you’re emailing your query, paste the pages into the body of the email, rather than sending unsolicited attachments. That generally goes for any agent, btw.

    Reply
  70. Hi Linda,
    Sure, send a few pages– always (!) from the beginning! You’d be amazed at how many people send sample pages from the middle of the book. That just tells me that the author doesn’t think the beginning of the story is any good.
    If you’re emailing your query, paste the pages into the body of the email, rather than sending unsolicited attachments. That generally goes for any agent, btw.

    Reply
  71. Beth, thanks for your answer 🙂 I for one would value comments like that if I was close and received a lengthy letter recommending those things to change, whether it ultimately was something you’d represent or not. There are no guarantees in life 😉
    But you’re so much closer to those things a writer wishes they knew but don’t. And no matter how many writing classes one takes, unless it’s taught by someone in your position, who can critique a couple paragraphs even, we’re all flying in the dark in the end.
    Thanks so much for your information, and for taking the time today, since you’re not only juggling your job but two blogs too. What was it Mary Jo said? A thirteenth ball? 😉
    You’ve been extremely helpful! 🙂
    (adverb intended 😛 )

    Reply
  72. Beth, thanks for your answer 🙂 I for one would value comments like that if I was close and received a lengthy letter recommending those things to change, whether it ultimately was something you’d represent or not. There are no guarantees in life 😉
    But you’re so much closer to those things a writer wishes they knew but don’t. And no matter how many writing classes one takes, unless it’s taught by someone in your position, who can critique a couple paragraphs even, we’re all flying in the dark in the end.
    Thanks so much for your information, and for taking the time today, since you’re not only juggling your job but two blogs too. What was it Mary Jo said? A thirteenth ball? 😉
    You’ve been extremely helpful! 🙂
    (adverb intended 😛 )

    Reply
  73. Beth, thanks for your answer 🙂 I for one would value comments like that if I was close and received a lengthy letter recommending those things to change, whether it ultimately was something you’d represent or not. There are no guarantees in life 😉
    But you’re so much closer to those things a writer wishes they knew but don’t. And no matter how many writing classes one takes, unless it’s taught by someone in your position, who can critique a couple paragraphs even, we’re all flying in the dark in the end.
    Thanks so much for your information, and for taking the time today, since you’re not only juggling your job but two blogs too. What was it Mary Jo said? A thirteenth ball? 😉
    You’ve been extremely helpful! 🙂
    (adverb intended 😛 )

    Reply
  74. Beth, thanks for your answer 🙂 I for one would value comments like that if I was close and received a lengthy letter recommending those things to change, whether it ultimately was something you’d represent or not. There are no guarantees in life 😉
    But you’re so much closer to those things a writer wishes they knew but don’t. And no matter how many writing classes one takes, unless it’s taught by someone in your position, who can critique a couple paragraphs even, we’re all flying in the dark in the end.
    Thanks so much for your information, and for taking the time today, since you’re not only juggling your job but two blogs too. What was it Mary Jo said? A thirteenth ball? 😉
    You’ve been extremely helpful! 🙂
    (adverb intended 😛 )

    Reply
  75. Beth, thanks for your answer 🙂 I for one would value comments like that if I was close and received a lengthy letter recommending those things to change, whether it ultimately was something you’d represent or not. There are no guarantees in life 😉
    But you’re so much closer to those things a writer wishes they knew but don’t. And no matter how many writing classes one takes, unless it’s taught by someone in your position, who can critique a couple paragraphs even, we’re all flying in the dark in the end.
    Thanks so much for your information, and for taking the time today, since you’re not only juggling your job but two blogs too. What was it Mary Jo said? A thirteenth ball? 😉
    You’ve been extremely helpful! 🙂
    (adverb intended 😛 )

    Reply
  76. Theo, I hear your plea, but let it be known right now that NO ONE knows the answers. Scary, isn’t it? “G”
    Just think of all the rejections some major writers have received before they went on to bestsellerdom. Keep in mind that everyone in the business is clueless. And then understand why we spend much time banging our heads against walls!
    Thank you so much for stopping in today, Beth!

    Reply
  77. Theo, I hear your plea, but let it be known right now that NO ONE knows the answers. Scary, isn’t it? “G”
    Just think of all the rejections some major writers have received before they went on to bestsellerdom. Keep in mind that everyone in the business is clueless. And then understand why we spend much time banging our heads against walls!
    Thank you so much for stopping in today, Beth!

    Reply
  78. Theo, I hear your plea, but let it be known right now that NO ONE knows the answers. Scary, isn’t it? “G”
    Just think of all the rejections some major writers have received before they went on to bestsellerdom. Keep in mind that everyone in the business is clueless. And then understand why we spend much time banging our heads against walls!
    Thank you so much for stopping in today, Beth!

    Reply
  79. Theo, I hear your plea, but let it be known right now that NO ONE knows the answers. Scary, isn’t it? “G”
    Just think of all the rejections some major writers have received before they went on to bestsellerdom. Keep in mind that everyone in the business is clueless. And then understand why we spend much time banging our heads against walls!
    Thank you so much for stopping in today, Beth!

    Reply
  80. Theo, I hear your plea, but let it be known right now that NO ONE knows the answers. Scary, isn’t it? “G”
    Just think of all the rejections some major writers have received before they went on to bestsellerdom. Keep in mind that everyone in the business is clueless. And then understand why we spend much time banging our heads against walls!
    Thank you so much for stopping in today, Beth!

    Reply
  81. Hi Beth, welcome to WordWenches! Thank you for the excellent information. And Prof. Pat, great interview as always.
    Beth… had a look at WH’s submissions page. Maybe I missed this, (if so, please forgive) but to what email address would a un-pub send a e-query? On the topic of comments, I’m with my fellow Wenchlings, anything would be helpful.

    Reply
  82. Hi Beth, welcome to WordWenches! Thank you for the excellent information. And Prof. Pat, great interview as always.
    Beth… had a look at WH’s submissions page. Maybe I missed this, (if so, please forgive) but to what email address would a un-pub send a e-query? On the topic of comments, I’m with my fellow Wenchlings, anything would be helpful.

    Reply
  83. Hi Beth, welcome to WordWenches! Thank you for the excellent information. And Prof. Pat, great interview as always.
    Beth… had a look at WH’s submissions page. Maybe I missed this, (if so, please forgive) but to what email address would a un-pub send a e-query? On the topic of comments, I’m with my fellow Wenchlings, anything would be helpful.

    Reply
  84. Hi Beth, welcome to WordWenches! Thank you for the excellent information. And Prof. Pat, great interview as always.
    Beth… had a look at WH’s submissions page. Maybe I missed this, (if so, please forgive) but to what email address would a un-pub send a e-query? On the topic of comments, I’m with my fellow Wenchlings, anything would be helpful.

    Reply
  85. Hi Beth, welcome to WordWenches! Thank you for the excellent information. And Prof. Pat, great interview as always.
    Beth… had a look at WH’s submissions page. Maybe I missed this, (if so, please forgive) but to what email address would a un-pub send a e-query? On the topic of comments, I’m with my fellow Wenchlings, anything would be helpful.

    Reply
  86. Hi Nina,
    If you’re e-querying, your best bet is to pick a specific agent and email them. If you don’t have a specific agent, then you need to send a snail-mail query to submissions. Hope that helps!

    Reply
  87. Hi Nina,
    If you’re e-querying, your best bet is to pick a specific agent and email them. If you don’t have a specific agent, then you need to send a snail-mail query to submissions. Hope that helps!

    Reply
  88. Hi Nina,
    If you’re e-querying, your best bet is to pick a specific agent and email them. If you don’t have a specific agent, then you need to send a snail-mail query to submissions. Hope that helps!

    Reply
  89. Hi Nina,
    If you’re e-querying, your best bet is to pick a specific agent and email them. If you don’t have a specific agent, then you need to send a snail-mail query to submissions. Hope that helps!

    Reply
  90. Hi Nina,
    If you’re e-querying, your best bet is to pick a specific agent and email them. If you don’t have a specific agent, then you need to send a snail-mail query to submissions. Hope that helps!

    Reply
  91. Hello Beth — Thank you for your timely response. I found contact info for Ms. Rue, but I believe I will snail-mail my query. Somehow, it looks better on paper. 🙂 Hope you have a wonderful Holiday.
    All the best to you,
    Nina

    Reply
  92. Hello Beth — Thank you for your timely response. I found contact info for Ms. Rue, but I believe I will snail-mail my query. Somehow, it looks better on paper. 🙂 Hope you have a wonderful Holiday.
    All the best to you,
    Nina

    Reply
  93. Hello Beth — Thank you for your timely response. I found contact info for Ms. Rue, but I believe I will snail-mail my query. Somehow, it looks better on paper. 🙂 Hope you have a wonderful Holiday.
    All the best to you,
    Nina

    Reply
  94. Hello Beth — Thank you for your timely response. I found contact info for Ms. Rue, but I believe I will snail-mail my query. Somehow, it looks better on paper. 🙂 Hope you have a wonderful Holiday.
    All the best to you,
    Nina

    Reply
  95. Hello Beth — Thank you for your timely response. I found contact info for Ms. Rue, but I believe I will snail-mail my query. Somehow, it looks better on paper. 🙂 Hope you have a wonderful Holiday.
    All the best to you,
    Nina

    Reply

Leave a Comment