Interview: Jo Beverley on A Shocking Delight

AndelSusan here, very pleased today to be interviewing Jo Beverley about her latest release, A Shocking Delight, new this week in stores and online–and already getting much-deserved praise, including a Top Pick from RT Book Reviews

"Beverley, with her masterful writing and keen knowledge of the Regency, sets the tone for a new novel in the Rogues series. With her ability to build sexual tension and emotional intensity into a lively story, she combines dynamic characters with a secret, smugglers, and a cast of secondary characters, including a few of those wickedly handsome rogues from previous novels to round out the plot. Simply savor this read."

The man she shouldn’t want. The woman he shouldn’t marry…

David Kerslake, smuggling master from The Dragon's Bride, is now Earl of Wyvern and must survive the ton as well as the Preventive Officers. Lucy Potter, daughter of a wealthy merchant, is more interested in trade than in the men after her dowry . . . but in London, when she meets the notorious Earl of Wyvern, her resolve weakens—even though she senses danger . . . . The Earl of Wyvern has a dark secret—but must win a rich bride. Lucinda Potter seems ideal—especially because at first glance, she seems unlikely to realize the truth . . . but soon, marrying Lucy would mean living a lie with the woman he has come to love. . . .

Susan:  Jo, please tell us something about A Shocking Delight

Jo: The title comes straight out of the book, because both Lucy and David are avoiding love. Lucy doesn't want to fall in love because marriage would hinder her ambitions, and David needs to make a cool-headed marriage to a rich but feather-witted woman. Love gets them anyway, and the delight is both a shock and irresistible. 

It came directly from Lucy, from this passage. David has realized that such a sharp-witted bride would be a disastrous, but she's begun to accept his attractions. Being a lady who goes after what she wants, she teases him into pretending to woo her for a little while to deter her irritating suitors. Tangled in her expert negotiating skills, he demands a kiss a day as payment.

She’d won the means to spend time with him, to learn him better, to find the way. She had to suppress a smile at how he’d seen the daily kiss as a bargaining point when the prospect filled her with a shocking delight.

Susan: She is very clever, even though she's trying to hide it in order to fit in with the ton.

Jo: Lucy is the only child of a very wealthy London merchant, and he's involved her in his world. She's always assumed she was his heir and successor, but her mother has died and he plans to remarry with the clear desire to have a son to follow in his footsteps. He even encourages her to take part in the ton season and find a titled husband. He doesn't understand her at all.

She's devastated, but she goes to Mayfair as an escape while she decides what to do. She can't possibly marry at this point, as it will make it even more challenging to be accepted in the man's world of business and trade, but she's looking forward to the entertainments. However her fortune means she's pestered by fortune hunters. 

Susan: David should have been one of them, shouldn't he?

DragonJo: Definitely. He's in London to find as rich a bride as possible. At the end of my novel The Dragon's Bride, David, the heroine's brother, reluctantly agrees to claim legitimacy which means he'll be Earl of Wyvern. He does it for his sister, and it is a sacrifice. He hasn't been raised to fill such a position, he's the local smuggling master, and the earldom's coffers are empty. If he's to look after all his responsibilities he must marry money. He targets Lucy, but soon realizes she's too clever not to realize that her husband has a secret life as a smuggler. To make it worse, at their first meeting he discovers she's firmly opposed to the Free Trade.

David says, “I wouldn’t have thought the Freetrade of interest to anyone in the City.”

“There, sir, you are wrong. Those wretches bring in foreign goods to compete with British-made ones, and they avoid taxes that honest traders must pay. In addition, I understand their practices are vile.”

He resolves to seek another bride, but where she's concerned his will is weak. 

One of the themes of the book is love at first sight. Both David and Lucy's parents made scandalous matches because of rampant love; matches that could have been even more damaging than they were. Both David as Lucy are sure they can be more resolutely sensible. 

And Cupid laughs.  Vintage valentine - Copy

Question for the blog: Do you believe in love at first sight? Please comment below!

 

Susan:A Shocking Delight is a captivating story that not only develops a strong new romantic relationship, but is also a richly detailed historical tale of smuggling along the English coast as well as a story of the differences in English society during the Regency era. What did you find most interesting as a writer—the smuggling or the chance to explore layers of Regency society, or all of the above?

Jo: Oh, all of it. I enjoy anything I find when I peel back a page. The smuggling part was familiar to me, however, because I'd researched that for The Dragon's Bride. (Image: Dragon's Bride, UK cover)

DragbrismThe contrast between society in the City of London and the West End was fun to unfold through Lucy and her family and friends. The City (think Wall Street) and the West End (the ton areas of St. James and Mayfair) are still distinct areas today, but in Regency times the distinctions were much clearer. They way of life was different, as was the pattern of the days. The City kept hours similar to our working days today, but also similar to the working days elsewhere in the country. When in Town, the ton woke at noon and danced until dawn. 

By the way, the City of London leads to a trick question. If you're ever asked about the smallest cities in England, include the City of London, for it is still within those ancient boundaries. The rest is the huge Metropolitan area of London. All the same, I was surprised to find that the population of "greater London" was a million back in the Regency. 

Susan: David is both a titled lord and a free trader. What qualities did you give him to create such an irresistible hero — not only an aristocratic gentleman, but a clever free trader and a complex and fascinating man? Why do smugglers make such interesting romantic heroes?

Jo:  I'm glad you found him irresistible. I like him a lot, and readers have been asking for his story ever since The Dragon's Bride came out. However, I don't think he's complex so much as having complexity forced upon him. He's intelligent, competent, honorable and kind, so he would have done something with his life, but without interference he'd have chosen a local sweetheart, a simple home in Devon, and a family similar to the one in which he was raised. 

One of the things I realized as I wrote the book is that there's a lot of anger inside him about the choices forced upon him. It does burst out at times, but most of the time he accepts the consequences of the choices he's made. I like that in a person. Readers might be interested in the scene where he agrees to claim the earldom. I rewrote and expanded it from The Dragon's Bride, intending to use it as a prologue for A Shocking Delight, but then changed my mind.  I've put it up on line here.  

Funny that you say smugglers make interesting heroes, because I don't find criminals admirable. After all, there's nearly always a victim. I don't think I've written any other such hero. The debates Lucy and David have over the rights and wrongs of smuggling reflect my own conflicted views. Extremely high excise taxes are foolish because they foster smuggling, but smuggling is wicked because it undercuts legitimate, hard-working businesses. I think we find it a little bit acceptable because we think of the victim as the government, but that really means the community, the taxpayer, and ordinary people. In particular, as Lucy points out, the law-abiding traders.

Question for the blog: Anyone have an opinion about criminal heroes or heroines?

896125.thbSusan: I’ll answer that, if I may, having brought up the question of smuggling heroes, and it's a great discussion point to toss around in the comments section too. I've written smuggling heroes in Scottish historical romance, stories set in an era when a good number of Scottish smugglers were rebelling against the English government rather than breaking laws for personal gain. So smuggling, especially of Highland whiskey, was another expression of the longstanding contention with England. Certainly there were criminally minded smugglers everywhere, with some very nasty characters in both England and Scotland (particularly the Lowlands). But Scots–especially Highlanders–did not agree that making and transporting their whiskey was a crime. They considered it a right. The Scots resisted being told how they could use the barley in their fields and the water in their streams. So it's quite plausible to have a heroic whiskey smuggler in Scotland. In part it's a fundamental difference separated by a border.

True, it's a trickier situation in England, where the perspective was different. They too resisted unfair laws, but weren't motivated by an old cultural urge for freedom. While sticking to their rights can lend Scottish smugglers a heroic angle, English smugglers like the Earl of Wyvern have a slightly different perspective. Sometimes a hero has a good reason to commit a crime — if he believes it's not crime but a dispute of human rights. I love smuggling books for the added adventure, the danger and the characters' willingness to take risks for powerful reasons. The Earl of Wyvern is one of those heroes. But the truly criminal smugglers? They're the Baddies!  

Susan: Lucy perhaps faces even more challenges than David in A Shocking Delight, because the life she thought she had falls away. How much of that was planned?

Jo: I don't plan my books, because I can't work that way, so I experienced those challenges through Lucy, and some surprised me. Of course I opened with the huge change of her mother's death having happened the year before, but then we have her father's news, which pulls the rug out from under her feet.

She bounces back, but going into the ton and meeting new people and situations keeps the changes coming. She enjoys many aspects of the beau monde, but that changes her, which she finds uncomfortable. Change always includes a loss of some things that were normal before, and all this is stressful. In addition, she's dealing with her irrational, potentially ruinous attraction to the mysterious Earl of Wyvern. Some of his appeal is because he, too, is an outsider and she senses similar tension within him. Histbeer

And then she's challenged to leave not only the City of London, but the metropolis itself and go to the wilderness — ie the remote Devon coast. Of course she meets every challenge. I find her as delightful as David does, and I hope readers do, too. (Illustration, Beer Harbor, Coast of Devon)

Susan: Your books are often extensions of series.  A Shocking Delight is a spin-off within the Company of Rogues series, and a sequel to Dragon’s Bride. You’ve also extended your Georgian Malloren series. Somehow you always keep things balanced and fresh, with new characters and stories in the forefront, while earlier characters never overtake the scenery. How do you keep track of it all?

Jo: Keeping track is very tricky. There are 15 books in the Rogues World now, written over 25 years, if we don't count that I wrote the first draft of An Arranged Marriage 37 years ago. I started with file cards, moved to ring binders, and now have a wiki and other data management systems, but it's still very difficult. I'm resigned to only being able to do my best. Anyone can look at my Rogues wiki here. You can read what's there, and if you see an error, please let me know. If you find names you don't recognize, you probably haven't missed a book. There are people and places that were cut, and bits from stories I've dabbled with and put aside. 

As for characters from previous books, I try to only bring on stage ones who are needed — ie I would have needed that sort of character anyway. It was useful to realize that Maria Vandeimen, from The Demon's Mistress, would have a lot in common with Lucy's mother because they were both aristocratic ladies who'd married merchants. Therefore, they could well have known each other and even been friends. Lucy needed friends and allies.

This business of controlling the appearances of other characters was particularly tricky in A Shocking Delight as it takes place at the same time as two earlier books, To Rescue a Rogue and Lady Beware. All the Rogues gathered in London in To Rescue a Rogue to support Dare Debenham's return to society, and they lingered to help the hero of Lady Beware. So they were all around.

Sparky reads JoBevASDAt one point I did have some scenes of massed Rogues and wives because they would have happened, but those scenes would have been too much for new readers so I kept most of the Rogues in the background. I hope fans of the Rogues will enjoy some casual mentions and that new readers will think the references are simply to random members of the beau monde, as in the Duchess of St. Raven's ball.

Susan: The cover is stunning. How does it reflect the story and the character of the heroine?

Jo: Very well! Due to a tight writing schedule my publisher was working on the cover as I was finishing the book. They gave me some input into Lucy and the model is perfect — young, pretty, and meeting the reader's eyes. When I saw the setting, I had to include that gorgeous rich paneling, which meant there had to be some renovations to the earl's house, Crag Wyvern. As it happened that gave insights into David's character for both me and Lucy. And then, of course, there's the ship, which also plays a part.

Thank you, Jo, and best of luck with A Shocking Delight! 

Jo will be giving away a copy of ASD to a reader chosen at random from those who comment on this blog.  Ask Jo a question, or answer one of hers:

Do you find smugglers romantic?

Do you believe in love at first sight?

If you were a Regency lady with 30,000 pounds of your own, would you marry, or would you set up your own household and live to suit yourself? 

135 thoughts on “Interview: Jo Beverley on A Shocking Delight”

  1. I’m reading Madeline Hunter’s newest series at the moment and it features English and French smugglers in 1798. I’m finding it fascinating, and the issue not as black and white as you might want it to be.
    I’m glad you mentioned the distinction between The City and the West End. It’s something I’ve seen some authors mix up and it drives me a little crazy.
    When I first moved to London I lived on Fleet Street (The City) and it was a totally different world to how people imagine London to be (the City of Westminster). Apart from anything else, the only place open at night was Mc Donald’s! You could walk to St Paul’s at midnight and be the only person for miles. Cool, but very creepy!
    There’s so much exciting history – away from the ballrooms – buried in the era. I get excited by books that explore them.

    Reply
  2. I’m reading Madeline Hunter’s newest series at the moment and it features English and French smugglers in 1798. I’m finding it fascinating, and the issue not as black and white as you might want it to be.
    I’m glad you mentioned the distinction between The City and the West End. It’s something I’ve seen some authors mix up and it drives me a little crazy.
    When I first moved to London I lived on Fleet Street (The City) and it was a totally different world to how people imagine London to be (the City of Westminster). Apart from anything else, the only place open at night was Mc Donald’s! You could walk to St Paul’s at midnight and be the only person for miles. Cool, but very creepy!
    There’s so much exciting history – away from the ballrooms – buried in the era. I get excited by books that explore them.

    Reply
  3. I’m reading Madeline Hunter’s newest series at the moment and it features English and French smugglers in 1798. I’m finding it fascinating, and the issue not as black and white as you might want it to be.
    I’m glad you mentioned the distinction between The City and the West End. It’s something I’ve seen some authors mix up and it drives me a little crazy.
    When I first moved to London I lived on Fleet Street (The City) and it was a totally different world to how people imagine London to be (the City of Westminster). Apart from anything else, the only place open at night was Mc Donald’s! You could walk to St Paul’s at midnight and be the only person for miles. Cool, but very creepy!
    There’s so much exciting history – away from the ballrooms – buried in the era. I get excited by books that explore them.

    Reply
  4. I’m reading Madeline Hunter’s newest series at the moment and it features English and French smugglers in 1798. I’m finding it fascinating, and the issue not as black and white as you might want it to be.
    I’m glad you mentioned the distinction between The City and the West End. It’s something I’ve seen some authors mix up and it drives me a little crazy.
    When I first moved to London I lived on Fleet Street (The City) and it was a totally different world to how people imagine London to be (the City of Westminster). Apart from anything else, the only place open at night was Mc Donald’s! You could walk to St Paul’s at midnight and be the only person for miles. Cool, but very creepy!
    There’s so much exciting history – away from the ballrooms – buried in the era. I get excited by books that explore them.

    Reply
  5. I’m reading Madeline Hunter’s newest series at the moment and it features English and French smugglers in 1798. I’m finding it fascinating, and the issue not as black and white as you might want it to be.
    I’m glad you mentioned the distinction between The City and the West End. It’s something I’ve seen some authors mix up and it drives me a little crazy.
    When I first moved to London I lived on Fleet Street (The City) and it was a totally different world to how people imagine London to be (the City of Westminster). Apart from anything else, the only place open at night was Mc Donald’s! You could walk to St Paul’s at midnight and be the only person for miles. Cool, but very creepy!
    There’s so much exciting history – away from the ballrooms – buried in the era. I get excited by books that explore them.

    Reply
  6. I do believe in love at first sight. My grandmother and grandfather met and married in two weeks. My greats were terribly opposed, saying it was too soon and my grandmother would give up her chance to go to college, something they wanted for her even in that date. They were incredibly happy most together even though their lives were touched by the depression and tragedy. I know they celebrated their 50th, maybe their 60th. I know my Dad fell in love with Mom at first sight. Mom was not so sure until their first kiss.

    Reply
  7. I do believe in love at first sight. My grandmother and grandfather met and married in two weeks. My greats were terribly opposed, saying it was too soon and my grandmother would give up her chance to go to college, something they wanted for her even in that date. They were incredibly happy most together even though their lives were touched by the depression and tragedy. I know they celebrated their 50th, maybe their 60th. I know my Dad fell in love with Mom at first sight. Mom was not so sure until their first kiss.

    Reply
  8. I do believe in love at first sight. My grandmother and grandfather met and married in two weeks. My greats were terribly opposed, saying it was too soon and my grandmother would give up her chance to go to college, something they wanted for her even in that date. They were incredibly happy most together even though their lives were touched by the depression and tragedy. I know they celebrated their 50th, maybe their 60th. I know my Dad fell in love with Mom at first sight. Mom was not so sure until their first kiss.

    Reply
  9. I do believe in love at first sight. My grandmother and grandfather met and married in two weeks. My greats were terribly opposed, saying it was too soon and my grandmother would give up her chance to go to college, something they wanted for her even in that date. They were incredibly happy most together even though their lives were touched by the depression and tragedy. I know they celebrated their 50th, maybe their 60th. I know my Dad fell in love with Mom at first sight. Mom was not so sure until their first kiss.

    Reply
  10. I do believe in love at first sight. My grandmother and grandfather met and married in two weeks. My greats were terribly opposed, saying it was too soon and my grandmother would give up her chance to go to college, something they wanted for her even in that date. They were incredibly happy most together even though their lives were touched by the depression and tragedy. I know they celebrated their 50th, maybe their 60th. I know my Dad fell in love with Mom at first sight. Mom was not so sure until their first kiss.

    Reply
  11. I believe in attraction at first sight but feel people should get to know the other person better before they marry. It is often a painful experience now to discover that one’s spouse isn’t the person you though she/he was, it was disasterous in the past when women were locked into a marriage forever.
    I think david is quite capable of being a good earl and managing things. Con wouldn’t have turned it all over to him if he thought david too light weight to measure up. Any man who can be Captain Drake without being killed by someone, can manage being an earl.
    He has been managing the estate so that is no mystery. He’ll be no more a stranger to the House of Lords than the heirs who spent their time as heirs in wasting time, money, and their health .
    Bound to be a great story.

    Reply
  12. I believe in attraction at first sight but feel people should get to know the other person better before they marry. It is often a painful experience now to discover that one’s spouse isn’t the person you though she/he was, it was disasterous in the past when women were locked into a marriage forever.
    I think david is quite capable of being a good earl and managing things. Con wouldn’t have turned it all over to him if he thought david too light weight to measure up. Any man who can be Captain Drake without being killed by someone, can manage being an earl.
    He has been managing the estate so that is no mystery. He’ll be no more a stranger to the House of Lords than the heirs who spent their time as heirs in wasting time, money, and their health .
    Bound to be a great story.

    Reply
  13. I believe in attraction at first sight but feel people should get to know the other person better before they marry. It is often a painful experience now to discover that one’s spouse isn’t the person you though she/he was, it was disasterous in the past when women were locked into a marriage forever.
    I think david is quite capable of being a good earl and managing things. Con wouldn’t have turned it all over to him if he thought david too light weight to measure up. Any man who can be Captain Drake without being killed by someone, can manage being an earl.
    He has been managing the estate so that is no mystery. He’ll be no more a stranger to the House of Lords than the heirs who spent their time as heirs in wasting time, money, and their health .
    Bound to be a great story.

    Reply
  14. I believe in attraction at first sight but feel people should get to know the other person better before they marry. It is often a painful experience now to discover that one’s spouse isn’t the person you though she/he was, it was disasterous in the past when women were locked into a marriage forever.
    I think david is quite capable of being a good earl and managing things. Con wouldn’t have turned it all over to him if he thought david too light weight to measure up. Any man who can be Captain Drake without being killed by someone, can manage being an earl.
    He has been managing the estate so that is no mystery. He’ll be no more a stranger to the House of Lords than the heirs who spent their time as heirs in wasting time, money, and their health .
    Bound to be a great story.

    Reply
  15. I believe in attraction at first sight but feel people should get to know the other person better before they marry. It is often a painful experience now to discover that one’s spouse isn’t the person you though she/he was, it was disasterous in the past when women were locked into a marriage forever.
    I think david is quite capable of being a good earl and managing things. Con wouldn’t have turned it all over to him if he thought david too light weight to measure up. Any man who can be Captain Drake without being killed by someone, can manage being an earl.
    He has been managing the estate so that is no mystery. He’ll be no more a stranger to the House of Lords than the heirs who spent their time as heirs in wasting time, money, and their health .
    Bound to be a great story.

    Reply
  16. meant to add, I really don’t ahve much sympathy for smugglers as most were criminals and not in any way trying to help peopl. However, Jo has made a case for Captain Drake’s band. Still, I hope he can find a different source of income for the people. Smuggling can lead to disregarding laws in general which can’t be good.
    Marriage was risky so one would ahve to be very careful in one’s choice of husband.

    Reply
  17. meant to add, I really don’t ahve much sympathy for smugglers as most were criminals and not in any way trying to help peopl. However, Jo has made a case for Captain Drake’s band. Still, I hope he can find a different source of income for the people. Smuggling can lead to disregarding laws in general which can’t be good.
    Marriage was risky so one would ahve to be very careful in one’s choice of husband.

    Reply
  18. meant to add, I really don’t ahve much sympathy for smugglers as most were criminals and not in any way trying to help peopl. However, Jo has made a case for Captain Drake’s band. Still, I hope he can find a different source of income for the people. Smuggling can lead to disregarding laws in general which can’t be good.
    Marriage was risky so one would ahve to be very careful in one’s choice of husband.

    Reply
  19. meant to add, I really don’t ahve much sympathy for smugglers as most were criminals and not in any way trying to help peopl. However, Jo has made a case for Captain Drake’s band. Still, I hope he can find a different source of income for the people. Smuggling can lead to disregarding laws in general which can’t be good.
    Marriage was risky so one would ahve to be very careful in one’s choice of husband.

    Reply
  20. meant to add, I really don’t ahve much sympathy for smugglers as most were criminals and not in any way trying to help peopl. However, Jo has made a case for Captain Drake’s band. Still, I hope he can find a different source of income for the people. Smuggling can lead to disregarding laws in general which can’t be good.
    Marriage was risky so one would ahve to be very careful in one’s choice of husband.

    Reply
  21. ***Both David as Lucy are sure they can be more resolutely sensible.
    And Cupid laughs. ***
    LOL! So true. I certainly believe at attraction at first sight, and sometimes that does turn into deep and lasting love. Sometimes…not.

    Reply
  22. ***Both David as Lucy are sure they can be more resolutely sensible.
    And Cupid laughs. ***
    LOL! So true. I certainly believe at attraction at first sight, and sometimes that does turn into deep and lasting love. Sometimes…not.

    Reply
  23. ***Both David as Lucy are sure they can be more resolutely sensible.
    And Cupid laughs. ***
    LOL! So true. I certainly believe at attraction at first sight, and sometimes that does turn into deep and lasting love. Sometimes…not.

    Reply
  24. ***Both David as Lucy are sure they can be more resolutely sensible.
    And Cupid laughs. ***
    LOL! So true. I certainly believe at attraction at first sight, and sometimes that does turn into deep and lasting love. Sometimes…not.

    Reply
  25. ***Both David as Lucy are sure they can be more resolutely sensible.
    And Cupid laughs. ***
    LOL! So true. I certainly believe at attraction at first sight, and sometimes that does turn into deep and lasting love. Sometimes…not.

    Reply
  26. You’re right about David’s abilities, Nancy, but it isn’t just a matter of talent, is it? The wastrel heirs were mostly trained for their future. A remarkable number of the upper class managed to be competent in some areas and wastrels in others!
    But yes, David will cope, and the Rogues will support him.

    Reply
  27. You’re right about David’s abilities, Nancy, but it isn’t just a matter of talent, is it? The wastrel heirs were mostly trained for their future. A remarkable number of the upper class managed to be competent in some areas and wastrels in others!
    But yes, David will cope, and the Rogues will support him.

    Reply
  28. You’re right about David’s abilities, Nancy, but it isn’t just a matter of talent, is it? The wastrel heirs were mostly trained for their future. A remarkable number of the upper class managed to be competent in some areas and wastrels in others!
    But yes, David will cope, and the Rogues will support him.

    Reply
  29. You’re right about David’s abilities, Nancy, but it isn’t just a matter of talent, is it? The wastrel heirs were mostly trained for their future. A remarkable number of the upper class managed to be competent in some areas and wastrels in others!
    But yes, David will cope, and the Rogues will support him.

    Reply
  30. You’re right about David’s abilities, Nancy, but it isn’t just a matter of talent, is it? The wastrel heirs were mostly trained for their future. A remarkable number of the upper class managed to be competent in some areas and wastrels in others!
    But yes, David will cope, and the Rogues will support him.

    Reply
  31. Right, Mary Jo, those instant attractions can go horrible wrong. Then we call them infatuation, but IMO that’s love at first sight that didn’t work out.

    Reply
  32. Right, Mary Jo, those instant attractions can go horrible wrong. Then we call them infatuation, but IMO that’s love at first sight that didn’t work out.

    Reply
  33. Right, Mary Jo, those instant attractions can go horrible wrong. Then we call them infatuation, but IMO that’s love at first sight that didn’t work out.

    Reply
  34. Right, Mary Jo, those instant attractions can go horrible wrong. Then we call them infatuation, but IMO that’s love at first sight that didn’t work out.

    Reply
  35. Right, Mary Jo, those instant attractions can go horrible wrong. Then we call them infatuation, but IMO that’s love at first sight that didn’t work out.

    Reply
  36. A most excellent interview, Susan and Jo!
    I do believe in love at first sight (as well as lust at first sight!). I’ve known many couples who have been married for decades, and a surprising number of older women/younger men who were happily married. The most interesting couple was a 17-yr-old high school student who fell in love at first sight with his best friend’s single mother. The aghast mother steadfastly refused to have anything to do with him, but determined persistence eventually wore her down. Not until the teen had graduated high school and started college did she give in. They have been married for over 40 years now and they’re still going strong. It was love at first sight for him, but not for her. She said it was his flattering persistence in courting her that finally won her over. *g*

    Reply
  37. A most excellent interview, Susan and Jo!
    I do believe in love at first sight (as well as lust at first sight!). I’ve known many couples who have been married for decades, and a surprising number of older women/younger men who were happily married. The most interesting couple was a 17-yr-old high school student who fell in love at first sight with his best friend’s single mother. The aghast mother steadfastly refused to have anything to do with him, but determined persistence eventually wore her down. Not until the teen had graduated high school and started college did she give in. They have been married for over 40 years now and they’re still going strong. It was love at first sight for him, but not for her. She said it was his flattering persistence in courting her that finally won her over. *g*

    Reply
  38. A most excellent interview, Susan and Jo!
    I do believe in love at first sight (as well as lust at first sight!). I’ve known many couples who have been married for decades, and a surprising number of older women/younger men who were happily married. The most interesting couple was a 17-yr-old high school student who fell in love at first sight with his best friend’s single mother. The aghast mother steadfastly refused to have anything to do with him, but determined persistence eventually wore her down. Not until the teen had graduated high school and started college did she give in. They have been married for over 40 years now and they’re still going strong. It was love at first sight for him, but not for her. She said it was his flattering persistence in courting her that finally won her over. *g*

    Reply
  39. A most excellent interview, Susan and Jo!
    I do believe in love at first sight (as well as lust at first sight!). I’ve known many couples who have been married for decades, and a surprising number of older women/younger men who were happily married. The most interesting couple was a 17-yr-old high school student who fell in love at first sight with his best friend’s single mother. The aghast mother steadfastly refused to have anything to do with him, but determined persistence eventually wore her down. Not until the teen had graduated high school and started college did she give in. They have been married for over 40 years now and they’re still going strong. It was love at first sight for him, but not for her. She said it was his flattering persistence in courting her that finally won her over. *g*

    Reply
  40. A most excellent interview, Susan and Jo!
    I do believe in love at first sight (as well as lust at first sight!). I’ve known many couples who have been married for decades, and a surprising number of older women/younger men who were happily married. The most interesting couple was a 17-yr-old high school student who fell in love at first sight with his best friend’s single mother. The aghast mother steadfastly refused to have anything to do with him, but determined persistence eventually wore her down. Not until the teen had graduated high school and started college did she give in. They have been married for over 40 years now and they’re still going strong. It was love at first sight for him, but not for her. She said it was his flattering persistence in courting her that finally won her over. *g*

    Reply
  41. Congrats on the release of A Shocking Delight Jo! I think smugglers are romantic if they’re smuggling for altruistic reasons, and not just for profit.
    I don’t believe in love at first sight, how can you instantly love someone when you don’t know them and are just going on looks alone?
    If I had a fortune of my own in the Regency, I’d probably want to be independent, so I’d set up my own household. Of course, if I found someone to love, I wouldn’t count out marriage, if I could find a way to keep some of my independence.

    Reply
  42. Congrats on the release of A Shocking Delight Jo! I think smugglers are romantic if they’re smuggling for altruistic reasons, and not just for profit.
    I don’t believe in love at first sight, how can you instantly love someone when you don’t know them and are just going on looks alone?
    If I had a fortune of my own in the Regency, I’d probably want to be independent, so I’d set up my own household. Of course, if I found someone to love, I wouldn’t count out marriage, if I could find a way to keep some of my independence.

    Reply
  43. Congrats on the release of A Shocking Delight Jo! I think smugglers are romantic if they’re smuggling for altruistic reasons, and not just for profit.
    I don’t believe in love at first sight, how can you instantly love someone when you don’t know them and are just going on looks alone?
    If I had a fortune of my own in the Regency, I’d probably want to be independent, so I’d set up my own household. Of course, if I found someone to love, I wouldn’t count out marriage, if I could find a way to keep some of my independence.

    Reply
  44. Congrats on the release of A Shocking Delight Jo! I think smugglers are romantic if they’re smuggling for altruistic reasons, and not just for profit.
    I don’t believe in love at first sight, how can you instantly love someone when you don’t know them and are just going on looks alone?
    If I had a fortune of my own in the Regency, I’d probably want to be independent, so I’d set up my own household. Of course, if I found someone to love, I wouldn’t count out marriage, if I could find a way to keep some of my independence.

    Reply
  45. Congrats on the release of A Shocking Delight Jo! I think smugglers are romantic if they’re smuggling for altruistic reasons, and not just for profit.
    I don’t believe in love at first sight, how can you instantly love someone when you don’t know them and are just going on looks alone?
    If I had a fortune of my own in the Regency, I’d probably want to be independent, so I’d set up my own household. Of course, if I found someone to love, I wouldn’t count out marriage, if I could find a way to keep some of my independence.

    Reply
  46. I firmly believe in both lust and love first sight! I’m a victim of both! 😉 My husband and I have been married 22 years now and our love has grown stronger. 🙂
    As for a criminal hero (or heroine), IMO the only ones who can be heros are the ones who break the law for a very, very good reason. The good guy/gal smugglers that I’ve read about always have a good reason. The Earl of Wyvern probably never thought about the other merchant’s POV. He can be my hero any day.
    As for what I’d do if I were a Regency woman with enough money to live on without a husband, I’d definitely NOT y unless I found a wonderful man to love.

    Reply
  47. I firmly believe in both lust and love first sight! I’m a victim of both! 😉 My husband and I have been married 22 years now and our love has grown stronger. 🙂
    As for a criminal hero (or heroine), IMO the only ones who can be heros are the ones who break the law for a very, very good reason. The good guy/gal smugglers that I’ve read about always have a good reason. The Earl of Wyvern probably never thought about the other merchant’s POV. He can be my hero any day.
    As for what I’d do if I were a Regency woman with enough money to live on without a husband, I’d definitely NOT y unless I found a wonderful man to love.

    Reply
  48. I firmly believe in both lust and love first sight! I’m a victim of both! 😉 My husband and I have been married 22 years now and our love has grown stronger. 🙂
    As for a criminal hero (or heroine), IMO the only ones who can be heros are the ones who break the law for a very, very good reason. The good guy/gal smugglers that I’ve read about always have a good reason. The Earl of Wyvern probably never thought about the other merchant’s POV. He can be my hero any day.
    As for what I’d do if I were a Regency woman with enough money to live on without a husband, I’d definitely NOT y unless I found a wonderful man to love.

    Reply
  49. I firmly believe in both lust and love first sight! I’m a victim of both! 😉 My husband and I have been married 22 years now and our love has grown stronger. 🙂
    As for a criminal hero (or heroine), IMO the only ones who can be heros are the ones who break the law for a very, very good reason. The good guy/gal smugglers that I’ve read about always have a good reason. The Earl of Wyvern probably never thought about the other merchant’s POV. He can be my hero any day.
    As for what I’d do if I were a Regency woman with enough money to live on without a husband, I’d definitely NOT y unless I found a wonderful man to love.

    Reply
  50. I firmly believe in both lust and love first sight! I’m a victim of both! 😉 My husband and I have been married 22 years now and our love has grown stronger. 🙂
    As for a criminal hero (or heroine), IMO the only ones who can be heros are the ones who break the law for a very, very good reason. The good guy/gal smugglers that I’ve read about always have a good reason. The Earl of Wyvern probably never thought about the other merchant’s POV. He can be my hero any day.
    As for what I’d do if I were a Regency woman with enough money to live on without a husband, I’d definitely NOT y unless I found a wonderful man to love.

    Reply
  51. Very interesting review, Susan and Jo. I am learning more about London in this than in many books I’ve read.
    As to your questions, first, I don’t believe smugglers are romantic. It takes a certain level of resolve (or in some cases, recklessness) to be a smuggler, and I don’t find that romantic, per se. I think the debate David has with Lucy on smuggling brings up good points, as I am now wondering just why David continues to lead the local smuggling ring. Sure, he inherited the task, but what obligation, moral or otherwise, made him continue it? It must be refreshing for him to love Lucy given their positions.
    I don’t particular believe in love at first sight. Our first impression is nearly always based on one’s physical appearance, and love at first sight is really just lust or attraction at first sight, in my opinion. Love really starts when two people come to know each other, form bonds and emotional connections, and willing to support each other in times of difficulty, among other things. Just my take anyways. 🙂
    I would definitely set up my own house, hire a competent man of affairs or learn some investing skills myself, and steadily grow my fortune so I can spend my time with other pursuits, like amassing a prized collection of books or founding hospitals and orphanages.

    Reply
  52. Very interesting review, Susan and Jo. I am learning more about London in this than in many books I’ve read.
    As to your questions, first, I don’t believe smugglers are romantic. It takes a certain level of resolve (or in some cases, recklessness) to be a smuggler, and I don’t find that romantic, per se. I think the debate David has with Lucy on smuggling brings up good points, as I am now wondering just why David continues to lead the local smuggling ring. Sure, he inherited the task, but what obligation, moral or otherwise, made him continue it? It must be refreshing for him to love Lucy given their positions.
    I don’t particular believe in love at first sight. Our first impression is nearly always based on one’s physical appearance, and love at first sight is really just lust or attraction at first sight, in my opinion. Love really starts when two people come to know each other, form bonds and emotional connections, and willing to support each other in times of difficulty, among other things. Just my take anyways. 🙂
    I would definitely set up my own house, hire a competent man of affairs or learn some investing skills myself, and steadily grow my fortune so I can spend my time with other pursuits, like amassing a prized collection of books or founding hospitals and orphanages.

    Reply
  53. Very interesting review, Susan and Jo. I am learning more about London in this than in many books I’ve read.
    As to your questions, first, I don’t believe smugglers are romantic. It takes a certain level of resolve (or in some cases, recklessness) to be a smuggler, and I don’t find that romantic, per se. I think the debate David has with Lucy on smuggling brings up good points, as I am now wondering just why David continues to lead the local smuggling ring. Sure, he inherited the task, but what obligation, moral or otherwise, made him continue it? It must be refreshing for him to love Lucy given their positions.
    I don’t particular believe in love at first sight. Our first impression is nearly always based on one’s physical appearance, and love at first sight is really just lust or attraction at first sight, in my opinion. Love really starts when two people come to know each other, form bonds and emotional connections, and willing to support each other in times of difficulty, among other things. Just my take anyways. 🙂
    I would definitely set up my own house, hire a competent man of affairs or learn some investing skills myself, and steadily grow my fortune so I can spend my time with other pursuits, like amassing a prized collection of books or founding hospitals and orphanages.

    Reply
  54. Very interesting review, Susan and Jo. I am learning more about London in this than in many books I’ve read.
    As to your questions, first, I don’t believe smugglers are romantic. It takes a certain level of resolve (or in some cases, recklessness) to be a smuggler, and I don’t find that romantic, per se. I think the debate David has with Lucy on smuggling brings up good points, as I am now wondering just why David continues to lead the local smuggling ring. Sure, he inherited the task, but what obligation, moral or otherwise, made him continue it? It must be refreshing for him to love Lucy given their positions.
    I don’t particular believe in love at first sight. Our first impression is nearly always based on one’s physical appearance, and love at first sight is really just lust or attraction at first sight, in my opinion. Love really starts when two people come to know each other, form bonds and emotional connections, and willing to support each other in times of difficulty, among other things. Just my take anyways. 🙂
    I would definitely set up my own house, hire a competent man of affairs or learn some investing skills myself, and steadily grow my fortune so I can spend my time with other pursuits, like amassing a prized collection of books or founding hospitals and orphanages.

    Reply
  55. Very interesting review, Susan and Jo. I am learning more about London in this than in many books I’ve read.
    As to your questions, first, I don’t believe smugglers are romantic. It takes a certain level of resolve (or in some cases, recklessness) to be a smuggler, and I don’t find that romantic, per se. I think the debate David has with Lucy on smuggling brings up good points, as I am now wondering just why David continues to lead the local smuggling ring. Sure, he inherited the task, but what obligation, moral or otherwise, made him continue it? It must be refreshing for him to love Lucy given their positions.
    I don’t particular believe in love at first sight. Our first impression is nearly always based on one’s physical appearance, and love at first sight is really just lust or attraction at first sight, in my opinion. Love really starts when two people come to know each other, form bonds and emotional connections, and willing to support each other in times of difficulty, among other things. Just my take anyways. 🙂
    I would definitely set up my own house, hire a competent man of affairs or learn some investing skills myself, and steadily grow my fortune so I can spend my time with other pursuits, like amassing a prized collection of books or founding hospitals and orphanages.

    Reply
  56. Good points, Barbara. I doubt many smugglers are altruistic, however.
    Alas, it was hard for a woman to keep her independence in marriage in the Regency because in the end the husband had law on his side. Choosing a good one was the best defense, but a strong family and a well-drawn up trust certainly helped!

    Reply
  57. Good points, Barbara. I doubt many smugglers are altruistic, however.
    Alas, it was hard for a woman to keep her independence in marriage in the Regency because in the end the husband had law on his side. Choosing a good one was the best defense, but a strong family and a well-drawn up trust certainly helped!

    Reply
  58. Good points, Barbara. I doubt many smugglers are altruistic, however.
    Alas, it was hard for a woman to keep her independence in marriage in the Regency because in the end the husband had law on his side. Choosing a good one was the best defense, but a strong family and a well-drawn up trust certainly helped!

    Reply
  59. Good points, Barbara. I doubt many smugglers are altruistic, however.
    Alas, it was hard for a woman to keep her independence in marriage in the Regency because in the end the husband had law on his side. Choosing a good one was the best defense, but a strong family and a well-drawn up trust certainly helped!

    Reply
  60. Good points, Barbara. I doubt many smugglers are altruistic, however.
    Alas, it was hard for a woman to keep her independence in marriage in the Regency because in the end the husband had law on his side. Choosing a good one was the best defense, but a strong family and a well-drawn up trust certainly helped!

    Reply
  61. Congratulations on 22 years, Glenda. I agree about finding a wonderful man to marry. The same thing applies today, really, though usually the consequences of marrying a wrong ‘un aren’t so dire.

    Reply
  62. Congratulations on 22 years, Glenda. I agree about finding a wonderful man to marry. The same thing applies today, really, though usually the consequences of marrying a wrong ‘un aren’t so dire.

    Reply
  63. Congratulations on 22 years, Glenda. I agree about finding a wonderful man to marry. The same thing applies today, really, though usually the consequences of marrying a wrong ‘un aren’t so dire.

    Reply
  64. Congratulations on 22 years, Glenda. I agree about finding a wonderful man to marry. The same thing applies today, really, though usually the consequences of marrying a wrong ‘un aren’t so dire.

    Reply
  65. Congratulations on 22 years, Glenda. I agree about finding a wonderful man to marry. The same thing applies today, really, though usually the consequences of marrying a wrong ‘un aren’t so dire.

    Reply
  66. Florence,David continues as Captain Drake out of duty, as you say. Without a strong leader the Dragon’s Horde could fall under the power of bad men and/or many of them could be captured and transported, leaving families in distress. It’s also why he needs to marry money, so he can provide other employment.
    As for love at first sight, I don’t think it’s always on appearances. It’s mysterious, but it doesn’t seem to be a matter of people singling out the most obviously attractive person around. In some cases other people are thinking, “Why him/her?”

    Reply
  67. Florence,David continues as Captain Drake out of duty, as you say. Without a strong leader the Dragon’s Horde could fall under the power of bad men and/or many of them could be captured and transported, leaving families in distress. It’s also why he needs to marry money, so he can provide other employment.
    As for love at first sight, I don’t think it’s always on appearances. It’s mysterious, but it doesn’t seem to be a matter of people singling out the most obviously attractive person around. In some cases other people are thinking, “Why him/her?”

    Reply
  68. Florence,David continues as Captain Drake out of duty, as you say. Without a strong leader the Dragon’s Horde could fall under the power of bad men and/or many of them could be captured and transported, leaving families in distress. It’s also why he needs to marry money, so he can provide other employment.
    As for love at first sight, I don’t think it’s always on appearances. It’s mysterious, but it doesn’t seem to be a matter of people singling out the most obviously attractive person around. In some cases other people are thinking, “Why him/her?”

    Reply
  69. Florence,David continues as Captain Drake out of duty, as you say. Without a strong leader the Dragon’s Horde could fall under the power of bad men and/or many of them could be captured and transported, leaving families in distress. It’s also why he needs to marry money, so he can provide other employment.
    As for love at first sight, I don’t think it’s always on appearances. It’s mysterious, but it doesn’t seem to be a matter of people singling out the most obviously attractive person around. In some cases other people are thinking, “Why him/her?”

    Reply
  70. Florence,David continues as Captain Drake out of duty, as you say. Without a strong leader the Dragon’s Horde could fall under the power of bad men and/or many of them could be captured and transported, leaving families in distress. It’s also why he needs to marry money, so he can provide other employment.
    As for love at first sight, I don’t think it’s always on appearances. It’s mysterious, but it doesn’t seem to be a matter of people singling out the most obviously attractive person around. In some cases other people are thinking, “Why him/her?”

    Reply
  71. I certainly believe in intense attraction at first sight. Love takes more time, although in retrospect people will say they fell in love at first sight.
    In theory, criminals should not be heroes, but I’ve always been a sucker for a well written story where the hero has some kind of justification for breaking the law. Probably I had too many watchings of Errol Flynn playing Robin Hood and Captain Blood on TV as a child.

    Reply
  72. I certainly believe in intense attraction at first sight. Love takes more time, although in retrospect people will say they fell in love at first sight.
    In theory, criminals should not be heroes, but I’ve always been a sucker for a well written story where the hero has some kind of justification for breaking the law. Probably I had too many watchings of Errol Flynn playing Robin Hood and Captain Blood on TV as a child.

    Reply
  73. I certainly believe in intense attraction at first sight. Love takes more time, although in retrospect people will say they fell in love at first sight.
    In theory, criminals should not be heroes, but I’ve always been a sucker for a well written story where the hero has some kind of justification for breaking the law. Probably I had too many watchings of Errol Flynn playing Robin Hood and Captain Blood on TV as a child.

    Reply
  74. I certainly believe in intense attraction at first sight. Love takes more time, although in retrospect people will say they fell in love at first sight.
    In theory, criminals should not be heroes, but I’ve always been a sucker for a well written story where the hero has some kind of justification for breaking the law. Probably I had too many watchings of Errol Flynn playing Robin Hood and Captain Blood on TV as a child.

    Reply
  75. I certainly believe in intense attraction at first sight. Love takes more time, although in retrospect people will say they fell in love at first sight.
    In theory, criminals should not be heroes, but I’ve always been a sucker for a well written story where the hero has some kind of justification for breaking the law. Probably I had too many watchings of Errol Flynn playing Robin Hood and Captain Blood on TV as a child.

    Reply
  76. Many women find outlaws attractive and appealing. It is a shallow but definite compulsion and sometimes the end result is devastating. This novel sounds captivating and special. Love at first sight is based upon chemistry which is strong and not really knowing the individual well. So many are mislead this way but this is typical for eons about relationships. Love can be a coup de foudre.

    Reply
  77. Many women find outlaws attractive and appealing. It is a shallow but definite compulsion and sometimes the end result is devastating. This novel sounds captivating and special. Love at first sight is based upon chemistry which is strong and not really knowing the individual well. So many are mislead this way but this is typical for eons about relationships. Love can be a coup de foudre.

    Reply
  78. Many women find outlaws attractive and appealing. It is a shallow but definite compulsion and sometimes the end result is devastating. This novel sounds captivating and special. Love at first sight is based upon chemistry which is strong and not really knowing the individual well. So many are mislead this way but this is typical for eons about relationships. Love can be a coup de foudre.

    Reply
  79. Many women find outlaws attractive and appealing. It is a shallow but definite compulsion and sometimes the end result is devastating. This novel sounds captivating and special. Love at first sight is based upon chemistry which is strong and not really knowing the individual well. So many are mislead this way but this is typical for eons about relationships. Love can be a coup de foudre.

    Reply
  80. Many women find outlaws attractive and appealing. It is a shallow but definite compulsion and sometimes the end result is devastating. This novel sounds captivating and special. Love at first sight is based upon chemistry which is strong and not really knowing the individual well. So many are mislead this way but this is typical for eons about relationships. Love can be a coup de foudre.

    Reply
  81. Smuggling is not of itself romantic – its criminal activity after all but an 18th century smuggler can be romantic.On the south coast of England during that period wages and work were not brilliant and many people took part in smuggling purely to keep body and soul together.There was also the viewpoint that the taxes were unfair and even members of the upper classes turned a blind eye if they got their wine and lace!There were smuggler bands and smuggler bands.The hawkhurst gangs from Sussex were just that a load of thugs .Whilst in Dorset we had Isaac Gulliver who probably today would have given Richard Branson a run for his money as an entrepreneur and in all the tales about him never resorted to violence .So a smuggler can be romantic and a story about smugglers can be as well depending on the circumstances.
    As for love at first sight – possible definitely possible !

    Reply
  82. Smuggling is not of itself romantic – its criminal activity after all but an 18th century smuggler can be romantic.On the south coast of England during that period wages and work were not brilliant and many people took part in smuggling purely to keep body and soul together.There was also the viewpoint that the taxes were unfair and even members of the upper classes turned a blind eye if they got their wine and lace!There were smuggler bands and smuggler bands.The hawkhurst gangs from Sussex were just that a load of thugs .Whilst in Dorset we had Isaac Gulliver who probably today would have given Richard Branson a run for his money as an entrepreneur and in all the tales about him never resorted to violence .So a smuggler can be romantic and a story about smugglers can be as well depending on the circumstances.
    As for love at first sight – possible definitely possible !

    Reply
  83. Smuggling is not of itself romantic – its criminal activity after all but an 18th century smuggler can be romantic.On the south coast of England during that period wages and work were not brilliant and many people took part in smuggling purely to keep body and soul together.There was also the viewpoint that the taxes were unfair and even members of the upper classes turned a blind eye if they got their wine and lace!There were smuggler bands and smuggler bands.The hawkhurst gangs from Sussex were just that a load of thugs .Whilst in Dorset we had Isaac Gulliver who probably today would have given Richard Branson a run for his money as an entrepreneur and in all the tales about him never resorted to violence .So a smuggler can be romantic and a story about smugglers can be as well depending on the circumstances.
    As for love at first sight – possible definitely possible !

    Reply
  84. Smuggling is not of itself romantic – its criminal activity after all but an 18th century smuggler can be romantic.On the south coast of England during that period wages and work were not brilliant and many people took part in smuggling purely to keep body and soul together.There was also the viewpoint that the taxes were unfair and even members of the upper classes turned a blind eye if they got their wine and lace!There were smuggler bands and smuggler bands.The hawkhurst gangs from Sussex were just that a load of thugs .Whilst in Dorset we had Isaac Gulliver who probably today would have given Richard Branson a run for his money as an entrepreneur and in all the tales about him never resorted to violence .So a smuggler can be romantic and a story about smugglers can be as well depending on the circumstances.
    As for love at first sight – possible definitely possible !

    Reply
  85. Smuggling is not of itself romantic – its criminal activity after all but an 18th century smuggler can be romantic.On the south coast of England during that period wages and work were not brilliant and many people took part in smuggling purely to keep body and soul together.There was also the viewpoint that the taxes were unfair and even members of the upper classes turned a blind eye if they got their wine and lace!There were smuggler bands and smuggler bands.The hawkhurst gangs from Sussex were just that a load of thugs .Whilst in Dorset we had Isaac Gulliver who probably today would have given Richard Branson a run for his money as an entrepreneur and in all the tales about him never resorted to violence .So a smuggler can be romantic and a story about smugglers can be as well depending on the circumstances.
    As for love at first sight – possible definitely possible !

    Reply
  86. Smugglers can be romantic (though they probably weren’t in real life). I’ve just finished reading Susanna Kearsley’s The Rose Garden, a time-travel romance, in which the hero is a smuggler, but it doesn’t include a lot of detail about the smuggling lifestyle. Another favorite book is Roberta Gellis’s The Cornish Heiress in which the heroine is a smuggler! So I guess I do enjoy reading about them!

    Reply
  87. Smugglers can be romantic (though they probably weren’t in real life). I’ve just finished reading Susanna Kearsley’s The Rose Garden, a time-travel romance, in which the hero is a smuggler, but it doesn’t include a lot of detail about the smuggling lifestyle. Another favorite book is Roberta Gellis’s The Cornish Heiress in which the heroine is a smuggler! So I guess I do enjoy reading about them!

    Reply
  88. Smugglers can be romantic (though they probably weren’t in real life). I’ve just finished reading Susanna Kearsley’s The Rose Garden, a time-travel romance, in which the hero is a smuggler, but it doesn’t include a lot of detail about the smuggling lifestyle. Another favorite book is Roberta Gellis’s The Cornish Heiress in which the heroine is a smuggler! So I guess I do enjoy reading about them!

    Reply
  89. Smugglers can be romantic (though they probably weren’t in real life). I’ve just finished reading Susanna Kearsley’s The Rose Garden, a time-travel romance, in which the hero is a smuggler, but it doesn’t include a lot of detail about the smuggling lifestyle. Another favorite book is Roberta Gellis’s The Cornish Heiress in which the heroine is a smuggler! So I guess I do enjoy reading about them!

    Reply
  90. Smugglers can be romantic (though they probably weren’t in real life). I’ve just finished reading Susanna Kearsley’s The Rose Garden, a time-travel romance, in which the hero is a smuggler, but it doesn’t include a lot of detail about the smuggling lifestyle. Another favorite book is Roberta Gellis’s The Cornish Heiress in which the heroine is a smuggler! So I guess I do enjoy reading about them!

    Reply
  91. Hello, your description made me download the book via Amazon.de, and I’ve already finished reading it. Very enjoyable, thanks for a good read!

    Reply
  92. Hello, your description made me download the book via Amazon.de, and I’ve already finished reading it. Very enjoyable, thanks for a good read!

    Reply
  93. Hello, your description made me download the book via Amazon.de, and I’ve already finished reading it. Very enjoyable, thanks for a good read!

    Reply
  94. Hello, your description made me download the book via Amazon.de, and I’ve already finished reading it. Very enjoyable, thanks for a good read!

    Reply
  95. Hello, your description made me download the book via Amazon.de, and I’ve already finished reading it. Very enjoyable, thanks for a good read!

    Reply
  96. I believe in attraction at first sight, real love needs a bit more time to develop. If I had 30,000 Regency pounds I would marry the man if he was the right man for me – perhaps a bit of a scholar – I would just have to really trust him since once married he would be in charged based on the law.

    Reply
  97. I believe in attraction at first sight, real love needs a bit more time to develop. If I had 30,000 Regency pounds I would marry the man if he was the right man for me – perhaps a bit of a scholar – I would just have to really trust him since once married he would be in charged based on the law.

    Reply
  98. I believe in attraction at first sight, real love needs a bit more time to develop. If I had 30,000 Regency pounds I would marry the man if he was the right man for me – perhaps a bit of a scholar – I would just have to really trust him since once married he would be in charged based on the law.

    Reply
  99. I believe in attraction at first sight, real love needs a bit more time to develop. If I had 30,000 Regency pounds I would marry the man if he was the right man for me – perhaps a bit of a scholar – I would just have to really trust him since once married he would be in charged based on the law.

    Reply
  100. I believe in attraction at first sight, real love needs a bit more time to develop. If I had 30,000 Regency pounds I would marry the man if he was the right man for me – perhaps a bit of a scholar – I would just have to really trust him since once married he would be in charged based on the law.

    Reply
  101. If I had 30,000 pounds, I would definitely set up my own household. I wouldn’t want my property passing to my husband once married.

    Reply
  102. If I had 30,000 pounds, I would definitely set up my own household. I wouldn’t want my property passing to my husband once married.

    Reply
  103. If I had 30,000 pounds, I would definitely set up my own household. I wouldn’t want my property passing to my husband once married.

    Reply
  104. If I had 30,000 pounds, I would definitely set up my own household. I wouldn’t want my property passing to my husband once married.

    Reply
  105. If I had 30,000 pounds, I would definitely set up my own household. I wouldn’t want my property passing to my husband once married.

    Reply
  106. As I’m not very fond of series (yes I know, how can a romance reader avoid them? I can’t, but that doesn’t mean I like it) my question would be – may I read this book without having read the previous in the series?
    And now, let’s answer your questions
    Do you find smugglers romantic? As a matter of fact, I do, and I shouldn’t. I think that watching British TV series ‘Smuggler’ in the 80s, with a very sexy Oliver Tobias, just ruined me.
    Do you believe in love at first sight?… Nop, sorry. My favourite trope is friends to lovers. But I think that ‘lust-at-first-sight’ is a very good start.
    If you were a Regency lady with 30,000 pounds of your own, would you marry, or would you set up your own household and live to suit yourself? I’d say I wouldn’t marry. I wouldn’t like to be any body’s property, subjected to his orders. And I’d tried to avoid the risks of pregnancy and dying in childbirth. I think it would be very frightening. I don’t know how they did it.

    Reply
  107. As I’m not very fond of series (yes I know, how can a romance reader avoid them? I can’t, but that doesn’t mean I like it) my question would be – may I read this book without having read the previous in the series?
    And now, let’s answer your questions
    Do you find smugglers romantic? As a matter of fact, I do, and I shouldn’t. I think that watching British TV series ‘Smuggler’ in the 80s, with a very sexy Oliver Tobias, just ruined me.
    Do you believe in love at first sight?… Nop, sorry. My favourite trope is friends to lovers. But I think that ‘lust-at-first-sight’ is a very good start.
    If you were a Regency lady with 30,000 pounds of your own, would you marry, or would you set up your own household and live to suit yourself? I’d say I wouldn’t marry. I wouldn’t like to be any body’s property, subjected to his orders. And I’d tried to avoid the risks of pregnancy and dying in childbirth. I think it would be very frightening. I don’t know how they did it.

    Reply
  108. As I’m not very fond of series (yes I know, how can a romance reader avoid them? I can’t, but that doesn’t mean I like it) my question would be – may I read this book without having read the previous in the series?
    And now, let’s answer your questions
    Do you find smugglers romantic? As a matter of fact, I do, and I shouldn’t. I think that watching British TV series ‘Smuggler’ in the 80s, with a very sexy Oliver Tobias, just ruined me.
    Do you believe in love at first sight?… Nop, sorry. My favourite trope is friends to lovers. But I think that ‘lust-at-first-sight’ is a very good start.
    If you were a Regency lady with 30,000 pounds of your own, would you marry, or would you set up your own household and live to suit yourself? I’d say I wouldn’t marry. I wouldn’t like to be any body’s property, subjected to his orders. And I’d tried to avoid the risks of pregnancy and dying in childbirth. I think it would be very frightening. I don’t know how they did it.

    Reply
  109. As I’m not very fond of series (yes I know, how can a romance reader avoid them? I can’t, but that doesn’t mean I like it) my question would be – may I read this book without having read the previous in the series?
    And now, let’s answer your questions
    Do you find smugglers romantic? As a matter of fact, I do, and I shouldn’t. I think that watching British TV series ‘Smuggler’ in the 80s, with a very sexy Oliver Tobias, just ruined me.
    Do you believe in love at first sight?… Nop, sorry. My favourite trope is friends to lovers. But I think that ‘lust-at-first-sight’ is a very good start.
    If you were a Regency lady with 30,000 pounds of your own, would you marry, or would you set up your own household and live to suit yourself? I’d say I wouldn’t marry. I wouldn’t like to be any body’s property, subjected to his orders. And I’d tried to avoid the risks of pregnancy and dying in childbirth. I think it would be very frightening. I don’t know how they did it.

    Reply
  110. As I’m not very fond of series (yes I know, how can a romance reader avoid them? I can’t, but that doesn’t mean I like it) my question would be – may I read this book without having read the previous in the series?
    And now, let’s answer your questions
    Do you find smugglers romantic? As a matter of fact, I do, and I shouldn’t. I think that watching British TV series ‘Smuggler’ in the 80s, with a very sexy Oliver Tobias, just ruined me.
    Do you believe in love at first sight?… Nop, sorry. My favourite trope is friends to lovers. But I think that ‘lust-at-first-sight’ is a very good start.
    If you were a Regency lady with 30,000 pounds of your own, would you marry, or would you set up your own household and live to suit yourself? I’d say I wouldn’t marry. I wouldn’t like to be any body’s property, subjected to his orders. And I’d tried to avoid the risks of pregnancy and dying in childbirth. I think it would be very frightening. I don’t know how they did it.

    Reply
  111. I think smugglers in books are more appealing than they probably were in real life–but I can certainly appreciate their resistance to high taxes!
    As for love at first sight–I think an instant attraction is possible but an instant commitment (i.e., marriage) is foolhardy, especially at a time when women had no rights. She herself, her money and her children were the property of her husband, and she had no recourse.
    If I were an heiress at that time I would seriously consider setting up my own establishment and think long and hard before giving it up. Not very romantic, I know.

    Reply
  112. I think smugglers in books are more appealing than they probably were in real life–but I can certainly appreciate their resistance to high taxes!
    As for love at first sight–I think an instant attraction is possible but an instant commitment (i.e., marriage) is foolhardy, especially at a time when women had no rights. She herself, her money and her children were the property of her husband, and she had no recourse.
    If I were an heiress at that time I would seriously consider setting up my own establishment and think long and hard before giving it up. Not very romantic, I know.

    Reply
  113. I think smugglers in books are more appealing than they probably were in real life–but I can certainly appreciate their resistance to high taxes!
    As for love at first sight–I think an instant attraction is possible but an instant commitment (i.e., marriage) is foolhardy, especially at a time when women had no rights. She herself, her money and her children were the property of her husband, and she had no recourse.
    If I were an heiress at that time I would seriously consider setting up my own establishment and think long and hard before giving it up. Not very romantic, I know.

    Reply
  114. I think smugglers in books are more appealing than they probably were in real life–but I can certainly appreciate their resistance to high taxes!
    As for love at first sight–I think an instant attraction is possible but an instant commitment (i.e., marriage) is foolhardy, especially at a time when women had no rights. She herself, her money and her children were the property of her husband, and she had no recourse.
    If I were an heiress at that time I would seriously consider setting up my own establishment and think long and hard before giving it up. Not very romantic, I know.

    Reply
  115. I think smugglers in books are more appealing than they probably were in real life–but I can certainly appreciate their resistance to high taxes!
    As for love at first sight–I think an instant attraction is possible but an instant commitment (i.e., marriage) is foolhardy, especially at a time when women had no rights. She herself, her money and her children were the property of her husband, and she had no recourse.
    If I were an heiress at that time I would seriously consider setting up my own establishment and think long and hard before giving it up. Not very romantic, I know.

    Reply

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