The Scoundrel’s Daughter: an interview with Anne Gracie

Mary Jo here. Today I'm delighted to interview my sister Word Wench, Anne Gracie  about her new book, The Scoundrel's Daughter, the first in her new series, The Brides of Bellaire Gardens.

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Reviews so far have been very positive. On Book Page it was called "an excellent new romance" and concludes "Within these two love stories, Gracie paints a beautiful portrait of two women becoming fuller, happier versions of themselves." The blog Flippin' Pages gave it 5 stars and said: "This delightfully romantic and entertaining book has it ALL!  Wonderful characters, wit, laugh-worthy humor, a despicable, shrewish harpy who definitely gets her comeuppance, TWO swoon-worthy romances, three adorable little girls, and it is all set a very realistic and well-described Regency London." 

MJP: Anne, your cover is one of the most beautiful I've ever seen and it reflects the setting of the book.  Romance series most often are built around family members or groups of friends, yet you've chosen a physical setting, Bellaire Gardens, a place so charming that we Word Wenches chose it for the setting of this year's Anniversary Blog, part 1 and part 2.

Anne: Thanks, Mary Jo — I feel very blessed to get that beautiful cover. The Berkley Art Dept. has done a wonderful job. I sent them the photo below of a wisteria arch and they clearly liked it.

As for the setting, I wanted something a little bit different to connect the various characters and, since I've always loved gardens, I chose a large private garden, surrounded by houses and only accessible through each house's back gate. Each of the women in the series live on Bellaire Gardens, and of course, they each will become brides.

Wisteria
MJP: 
Often in romance, words like scoundrel, rogue, or rake are used to describe charming but basically honorable heroes.  Not in this book!  Please tell us about Octavius Bamber, who is genuinely despicable.

Anne: Bamber is the catalyst to the whole plot — and yes, he's not a nice man. My heroine, Alice, has just finished her obligatory one year of mourning after the death of her unpleasant husband, and after paying off the debts he left, is preparing to live a quiet, peaceful life — pleasing herself for a change, instead of other people. 

Then Bamber turns up, brandishing letters that she could not bear to be made public, but instead of money (which she doesn't have) he wants her to bring his daughter out in society and get her married to a lord. But the daughter, with whom he's had very little contact for most of her life, wants nothing to do with society or lords. Does he care? Not a bit. He wants the lordly connection to enhance his own status. (You can read a bit of the scene where Alice first meets the scoundrel here.)

LadbrokeEstate

(The photo here and below are of the Ladbroke Estate, which was one of my many sources of inspiration.)

MJP:  The Scoundrel's Daughter has many heartwarming relationships, including two different romances and an unexpected and transformative friendship between two women.  How much of this is planned in advance? For example, the two romances are pretty much opposite in how they evolve. Did these relationships just manifest as you were writing?

Anne: Thank you. Mostly characters and their relationships develop as I'm writing, rather than being the result of pre-plotting. I might try to plan things ahead, but characters will often surprise me in what they say or do and while that can derail the plot I had in mind, it almost always makes the story better. For instance I wasn't expecting Lucy (the scoundrel's daughter) to act up the way she did at first, which resulted in her and Alice taking an initial dislike to each other — and that developed into the "unexpected and transformative friendship between two women" that you mentioned — and thank you for those very kind words.

As for the two contrasting romances — one is all sparks and banter and a good dose of mischief, and the other is slower and more emotional and intense — Alice, remember is a disillusioned widow. But her hero is a man who understands love and refuses to give up on her. So I really enjoyed exploring the two different love stories. 

MJP:  Could you give us an enticing sample of your story?

Anne: In this scene Alice's nephew, Gerald meets Lucy (the scoundrel's daughter) at a party in his honor. He doesn't realize that he's met her before, and she has no intention of enlightening —or encouraging— him. . .

“Have you been in London long, Miss Bamber?” Gerald asked.
“Not long.” Lucy plied her fan and gazed across the room, apparently uninterested.
“Have you seen many of the city sights yet?”
“Not yet.”
“Perhaps I could show you some of them—with Aunt Alice, of course, or some suitable companion.” Alice was surprised by his offer. Gerald never squired young ladies around. He couldn’t possibly be interested in Lucy, could he?
“Perhaps,” Lucy said vaguely. Her gaze wandered over the crowd.
“Are you interested in art? I’m told the Elgin Marbles are very popular.” Then, when Lucy didn’t respond, he added, “Or perhaps you prefer flowers. Kew Gardens has some remarkable specimens from all over the world.
“Mmm? Flowers? My godmother has flowers in her garden,” she said in a seen-one-flower-seen-them-all kind of voice.
Alice didn’t know whether to laugh or weep. On the one hand, she was relieved that Lucy was showing no interest in Gerald. But oh, she was being so naughty.
Gerald persisted. “Perhaps Astley’s Amphitheatre would be more to your taste. They put on some quite spectacular shows.”
Lucy gazed at something over to the right and didn’t answer.
“Miss Bamber? Did you hear me?” Gerald sounded annoyed. He was not used to young ladies ignoring him. Quite the contrary. “I asked you about Astley’s Amphitheatre.”
For a moment Lucy didn’t respond at all, then she said in an awed voice, “That woman over there is wearing the largest turban I’ve ever seen in my life. I wonder how she makes it stay on.”

Ladbroke3

 

MJP: What comes next in The Brides of Bellaire Gardens? 

Anne: The next story is called The Rake's Daughter, and it's about two young women — half sisters — whose neglectful rakish father is now dead. They come to London to enter society, but the guardian their father appointed (by mistake) insists that only one of them can enter society, and that people would be scandalized by the presence of the illegitimate sister at their exclusive ton events. The sisters set out to prove him wrong. It will be published next year.

MJP: Will there be a giveaway?

Anne: Yes indeed. I'll give a copy of The Scoundrel's Daughter to someone who leaves a comment or answers this question: The Scoundrel's Daughter is set in a beautiful garden at the beginning of spring. What's your favorite spring flower?

 

 

310 thoughts on “The Scoundrel’s Daughter: an interview with Anne Gracie”

  1. I’m looking forward to reading this book, and of course all the ones to follow. My favorite spring flower is the iris, not the big bearded iris, rather the more delicate, small version, and in that intense purple color. Thanks to you, and Mary Jo, for all your lovely books and the hours of pleasure they give me in the reading and rereading and re-re-reading!

    Reply
  2. I’m looking forward to reading this book, and of course all the ones to follow. My favorite spring flower is the iris, not the big bearded iris, rather the more delicate, small version, and in that intense purple color. Thanks to you, and Mary Jo, for all your lovely books and the hours of pleasure they give me in the reading and rereading and re-re-reading!

    Reply
  3. I’m looking forward to reading this book, and of course all the ones to follow. My favorite spring flower is the iris, not the big bearded iris, rather the more delicate, small version, and in that intense purple color. Thanks to you, and Mary Jo, for all your lovely books and the hours of pleasure they give me in the reading and rereading and re-re-reading!

    Reply
  4. I’m looking forward to reading this book, and of course all the ones to follow. My favorite spring flower is the iris, not the big bearded iris, rather the more delicate, small version, and in that intense purple color. Thanks to you, and Mary Jo, for all your lovely books and the hours of pleasure they give me in the reading and rereading and re-re-reading!

    Reply
  5. I’m looking forward to reading this book, and of course all the ones to follow. My favorite spring flower is the iris, not the big bearded iris, rather the more delicate, small version, and in that intense purple color. Thanks to you, and Mary Jo, for all your lovely books and the hours of pleasure they give me in the reading and rereading and re-re-reading!

    Reply
  6. I love all flowers, but I will choose daffodils because they are the first promise of Spring for me. I have a patch of them in my backyard, and in February, when the ground is still frozen I can see them fighting their way up through the snow. Gives me hope.
    No need to put me in the drawing – I ordered this book already. BTW, I like books with dual love stories. Good luck with it.

    Reply
  7. I love all flowers, but I will choose daffodils because they are the first promise of Spring for me. I have a patch of them in my backyard, and in February, when the ground is still frozen I can see them fighting their way up through the snow. Gives me hope.
    No need to put me in the drawing – I ordered this book already. BTW, I like books with dual love stories. Good luck with it.

    Reply
  8. I love all flowers, but I will choose daffodils because they are the first promise of Spring for me. I have a patch of them in my backyard, and in February, when the ground is still frozen I can see them fighting their way up through the snow. Gives me hope.
    No need to put me in the drawing – I ordered this book already. BTW, I like books with dual love stories. Good luck with it.

    Reply
  9. I love all flowers, but I will choose daffodils because they are the first promise of Spring for me. I have a patch of them in my backyard, and in February, when the ground is still frozen I can see them fighting their way up through the snow. Gives me hope.
    No need to put me in the drawing – I ordered this book already. BTW, I like books with dual love stories. Good luck with it.

    Reply
  10. I love all flowers, but I will choose daffodils because they are the first promise of Spring for me. I have a patch of them in my backyard, and in February, when the ground is still frozen I can see them fighting their way up through the snow. Gives me hope.
    No need to put me in the drawing – I ordered this book already. BTW, I like books with dual love stories. Good luck with it.

    Reply
  11. My favourite spring flower is the wild primrose, when that blooms spring is reliably arrived.
    I too already own the book and look forward to the weekend, when I can finally read it, so no need for a giveaway.

    Reply
  12. My favourite spring flower is the wild primrose, when that blooms spring is reliably arrived.
    I too already own the book and look forward to the weekend, when I can finally read it, so no need for a giveaway.

    Reply
  13. My favourite spring flower is the wild primrose, when that blooms spring is reliably arrived.
    I too already own the book and look forward to the weekend, when I can finally read it, so no need for a giveaway.

    Reply
  14. My favourite spring flower is the wild primrose, when that blooms spring is reliably arrived.
    I too already own the book and look forward to the weekend, when I can finally read it, so no need for a giveaway.

    Reply
  15. My favourite spring flower is the wild primrose, when that blooms spring is reliably arrived.
    I too already own the book and look forward to the weekend, when I can finally read it, so no need for a giveaway.

    Reply
  16. I already have a copy of the book but I just wanted to chime in and say how absolutely gorgeous this cover art is – also, how very much I enjoyed the novel. I adored Debo and her cat fixation – so much to love about this story!
    I’m wondering if you can share who will be the heroine/hero in the next Bellaire Gardens installment?

    Reply
  17. I already have a copy of the book but I just wanted to chime in and say how absolutely gorgeous this cover art is – also, how very much I enjoyed the novel. I adored Debo and her cat fixation – so much to love about this story!
    I’m wondering if you can share who will be the heroine/hero in the next Bellaire Gardens installment?

    Reply
  18. I already have a copy of the book but I just wanted to chime in and say how absolutely gorgeous this cover art is – also, how very much I enjoyed the novel. I adored Debo and her cat fixation – so much to love about this story!
    I’m wondering if you can share who will be the heroine/hero in the next Bellaire Gardens installment?

    Reply
  19. I already have a copy of the book but I just wanted to chime in and say how absolutely gorgeous this cover art is – also, how very much I enjoyed the novel. I adored Debo and her cat fixation – so much to love about this story!
    I’m wondering if you can share who will be the heroine/hero in the next Bellaire Gardens installment?

    Reply
  20. I already have a copy of the book but I just wanted to chime in and say how absolutely gorgeous this cover art is – also, how very much I enjoyed the novel. I adored Debo and her cat fixation – so much to love about this story!
    I’m wondering if you can share who will be the heroine/hero in the next Bellaire Gardens installment?

    Reply
  21. I love Japanese witch hazel as the flower is a cheerful yellow but also has a wonderful scent. This sounds like a very promising start to a new series. Thank you

    Reply
  22. I love Japanese witch hazel as the flower is a cheerful yellow but also has a wonderful scent. This sounds like a very promising start to a new series. Thank you

    Reply
  23. I love Japanese witch hazel as the flower is a cheerful yellow but also has a wonderful scent. This sounds like a very promising start to a new series. Thank you

    Reply
  24. I love Japanese witch hazel as the flower is a cheerful yellow but also has a wonderful scent. This sounds like a very promising start to a new series. Thank you

    Reply
  25. I love Japanese witch hazel as the flower is a cheerful yellow but also has a wonderful scent. This sounds like a very promising start to a new series. Thank you

    Reply
  26. Thanks for a wonderful interview, Ladies, and for that fun excerpt. Best wishes for the success of The Scoundrel’s Daughter, Anne!
    I’m happy to see any and all flowers in the spring. Daffodils are particularly bright and cheerful.

    Reply
  27. Thanks for a wonderful interview, Ladies, and for that fun excerpt. Best wishes for the success of The Scoundrel’s Daughter, Anne!
    I’m happy to see any and all flowers in the spring. Daffodils are particularly bright and cheerful.

    Reply
  28. Thanks for a wonderful interview, Ladies, and for that fun excerpt. Best wishes for the success of The Scoundrel’s Daughter, Anne!
    I’m happy to see any and all flowers in the spring. Daffodils are particularly bright and cheerful.

    Reply
  29. Thanks for a wonderful interview, Ladies, and for that fun excerpt. Best wishes for the success of The Scoundrel’s Daughter, Anne!
    I’m happy to see any and all flowers in the spring. Daffodils are particularly bright and cheerful.

    Reply
  30. Thanks for a wonderful interview, Ladies, and for that fun excerpt. Best wishes for the success of The Scoundrel’s Daughter, Anne!
    I’m happy to see any and all flowers in the spring. Daffodils are particularly bright and cheerful.

    Reply
  31. I always look out for the snowdrops as winter draws to a close. I have several clumps in my own garden and there are larger gardens nearby, available to visit, and with spectacular displays, eg the Rococo Garden at Painswick. When the snowdrops appear I know that the daffs will follow soon and the whole garden is about to regenerate.
    Anne, I think a garden is the perfect setting for romance to blossom! I do hope audio versions are planned.

    Reply
  32. I always look out for the snowdrops as winter draws to a close. I have several clumps in my own garden and there are larger gardens nearby, available to visit, and with spectacular displays, eg the Rococo Garden at Painswick. When the snowdrops appear I know that the daffs will follow soon and the whole garden is about to regenerate.
    Anne, I think a garden is the perfect setting for romance to blossom! I do hope audio versions are planned.

    Reply
  33. I always look out for the snowdrops as winter draws to a close. I have several clumps in my own garden and there are larger gardens nearby, available to visit, and with spectacular displays, eg the Rococo Garden at Painswick. When the snowdrops appear I know that the daffs will follow soon and the whole garden is about to regenerate.
    Anne, I think a garden is the perfect setting for romance to blossom! I do hope audio versions are planned.

    Reply
  34. I always look out for the snowdrops as winter draws to a close. I have several clumps in my own garden and there are larger gardens nearby, available to visit, and with spectacular displays, eg the Rococo Garden at Painswick. When the snowdrops appear I know that the daffs will follow soon and the whole garden is about to regenerate.
    Anne, I think a garden is the perfect setting for romance to blossom! I do hope audio versions are planned.

    Reply
  35. I always look out for the snowdrops as winter draws to a close. I have several clumps in my own garden and there are larger gardens nearby, available to visit, and with spectacular displays, eg the Rococo Garden at Painswick. When the snowdrops appear I know that the daffs will follow soon and the whole garden is about to regenerate.
    Anne, I think a garden is the perfect setting for romance to blossom! I do hope audio versions are planned.

    Reply
  36. I like forsythia – it comes really early and lets you know the season is on it’s way! I don’t need a copy – I already won one but I would like to say how much I love the cover. I think it is gorgeous. Always like purple on a cover and the wisteria arch is stunning!

    Reply
  37. I like forsythia – it comes really early and lets you know the season is on it’s way! I don’t need a copy – I already won one but I would like to say how much I love the cover. I think it is gorgeous. Always like purple on a cover and the wisteria arch is stunning!

    Reply
  38. I like forsythia – it comes really early and lets you know the season is on it’s way! I don’t need a copy – I already won one but I would like to say how much I love the cover. I think it is gorgeous. Always like purple on a cover and the wisteria arch is stunning!

    Reply
  39. I like forsythia – it comes really early and lets you know the season is on it’s way! I don’t need a copy – I already won one but I would like to say how much I love the cover. I think it is gorgeous. Always like purple on a cover and the wisteria arch is stunning!

    Reply
  40. I like forsythia – it comes really early and lets you know the season is on it’s way! I don’t need a copy – I already won one but I would like to say how much I love the cover. I think it is gorgeous. Always like purple on a cover and the wisteria arch is stunning!

    Reply
  41. Thanks, Jeanette, for those very kind words. I love irises, too, and will often buy a bunch of blue and a bunch of yellow ones at the florists’s. My dad had a spectacular range of irises in his garden. I transplanted some to my garden but sadly only a few took.

    Reply
  42. Thanks, Jeanette, for those very kind words. I love irises, too, and will often buy a bunch of blue and a bunch of yellow ones at the florists’s. My dad had a spectacular range of irises in his garden. I transplanted some to my garden but sadly only a few took.

    Reply
  43. Thanks, Jeanette, for those very kind words. I love irises, too, and will often buy a bunch of blue and a bunch of yellow ones at the florists’s. My dad had a spectacular range of irises in his garden. I transplanted some to my garden but sadly only a few took.

    Reply
  44. Thanks, Jeanette, for those very kind words. I love irises, too, and will often buy a bunch of blue and a bunch of yellow ones at the florists’s. My dad had a spectacular range of irises in his garden. I transplanted some to my garden but sadly only a few took.

    Reply
  45. Thanks, Jeanette, for those very kind words. I love irises, too, and will often buy a bunch of blue and a bunch of yellow ones at the florists’s. My dad had a spectacular range of irises in his garden. I transplanted some to my garden but sadly only a few took.

    Reply
  46. Thanks so much for buying the book, Mary. I hope you enjoy it. Daffies aren’t the first flowers out here, but I remember the year we lived in Scotland when I was a kid, it was a particularly severe winter and the garden was packed deep with frozen snow for months and I could not imagine anything staying alive under all that. But come spring the snow melted away and all kinds of flowers — including daffies — popped up. To this small Australian child it was a “secret garden” kind of miracle.

    Reply
  47. Thanks so much for buying the book, Mary. I hope you enjoy it. Daffies aren’t the first flowers out here, but I remember the year we lived in Scotland when I was a kid, it was a particularly severe winter and the garden was packed deep with frozen snow for months and I could not imagine anything staying alive under all that. But come spring the snow melted away and all kinds of flowers — including daffies — popped up. To this small Australian child it was a “secret garden” kind of miracle.

    Reply
  48. Thanks so much for buying the book, Mary. I hope you enjoy it. Daffies aren’t the first flowers out here, but I remember the year we lived in Scotland when I was a kid, it was a particularly severe winter and the garden was packed deep with frozen snow for months and I could not imagine anything staying alive under all that. But come spring the snow melted away and all kinds of flowers — including daffies — popped up. To this small Australian child it was a “secret garden” kind of miracle.

    Reply
  49. Thanks so much for buying the book, Mary. I hope you enjoy it. Daffies aren’t the first flowers out here, but I remember the year we lived in Scotland when I was a kid, it was a particularly severe winter and the garden was packed deep with frozen snow for months and I could not imagine anything staying alive under all that. But come spring the snow melted away and all kinds of flowers — including daffies — popped up. To this small Australian child it was a “secret garden” kind of miracle.

    Reply
  50. Thanks so much for buying the book, Mary. I hope you enjoy it. Daffies aren’t the first flowers out here, but I remember the year we lived in Scotland when I was a kid, it was a particularly severe winter and the garden was packed deep with frozen snow for months and I could not imagine anything staying alive under all that. But come spring the snow melted away and all kinds of flowers — including daffies — popped up. To this small Australian child it was a “secret garden” kind of miracle.

    Reply
  51. Thanks, Katja, the children in the books of my childhood often picked wild primroses, and one day I’d love to see them growing. Thanks for buying the book. I hope you enjoy it.

    Reply
  52. Thanks, Katja, the children in the books of my childhood often picked wild primroses, and one day I’d love to see them growing. Thanks for buying the book. I hope you enjoy it.

    Reply
  53. Thanks, Katja, the children in the books of my childhood often picked wild primroses, and one day I’d love to see them growing. Thanks for buying the book. I hope you enjoy it.

    Reply
  54. Thanks, Katja, the children in the books of my childhood often picked wild primroses, and one day I’d love to see them growing. Thanks for buying the book. I hope you enjoy it.

    Reply
  55. Thanks, Katja, the children in the books of my childhood often picked wild primroses, and one day I’d love to see them growing. Thanks for buying the book. I hope you enjoy it.

    Reply
  56. Thank you so much, Lois — it’s lovely of you to say so. It’s a fraught time for authors when a book comes out, and your comment has cheered me immensely — especially after reading a very bad one star review on amazon.
    You haven’t yet met the hero and heroine of the Rake’s Daughter, though one of my savvy friend spotted the mention of a young earl who’d inherited a house on Bellaire Gardens from his father and queried me about him. He is going to become the hero in the next book.

    Reply
  57. Thank you so much, Lois — it’s lovely of you to say so. It’s a fraught time for authors when a book comes out, and your comment has cheered me immensely — especially after reading a very bad one star review on amazon.
    You haven’t yet met the hero and heroine of the Rake’s Daughter, though one of my savvy friend spotted the mention of a young earl who’d inherited a house on Bellaire Gardens from his father and queried me about him. He is going to become the hero in the next book.

    Reply
  58. Thank you so much, Lois — it’s lovely of you to say so. It’s a fraught time for authors when a book comes out, and your comment has cheered me immensely — especially after reading a very bad one star review on amazon.
    You haven’t yet met the hero and heroine of the Rake’s Daughter, though one of my savvy friend spotted the mention of a young earl who’d inherited a house on Bellaire Gardens from his father and queried me about him. He is going to become the hero in the next book.

    Reply
  59. Thank you so much, Lois — it’s lovely of you to say so. It’s a fraught time for authors when a book comes out, and your comment has cheered me immensely — especially after reading a very bad one star review on amazon.
    You haven’t yet met the hero and heroine of the Rake’s Daughter, though one of my savvy friend spotted the mention of a young earl who’d inherited a house on Bellaire Gardens from his father and queried me about him. He is going to become the hero in the next book.

    Reply
  60. Thank you so much, Lois — it’s lovely of you to say so. It’s a fraught time for authors when a book comes out, and your comment has cheered me immensely — especially after reading a very bad one star review on amazon.
    You haven’t yet met the hero and heroine of the Rake’s Daughter, though one of my savvy friend spotted the mention of a young earl who’d inherited a house on Bellaire Gardens from his father and queried me about him. He is going to become the hero in the next book.

    Reply
  61. I just looked up Japanese witch hazel, Alice, as I love scented flowers. To my delight, they grow well in my corner of the world, so when I redo my garden I’m going to look for Japanese witch hazel. Thank you.

    Reply
  62. I just looked up Japanese witch hazel, Alice, as I love scented flowers. To my delight, they grow well in my corner of the world, so when I redo my garden I’m going to look for Japanese witch hazel. Thank you.

    Reply
  63. I just looked up Japanese witch hazel, Alice, as I love scented flowers. To my delight, they grow well in my corner of the world, so when I redo my garden I’m going to look for Japanese witch hazel. Thank you.

    Reply
  64. I just looked up Japanese witch hazel, Alice, as I love scented flowers. To my delight, they grow well in my corner of the world, so when I redo my garden I’m going to look for Japanese witch hazel. Thank you.

    Reply
  65. I just looked up Japanese witch hazel, Alice, as I love scented flowers. To my delight, they grow well in my corner of the world, so when I redo my garden I’m going to look for Japanese witch hazel. Thank you.

    Reply
  66. Thank you Kareni — and yes, all flowers are welcome, aren’t they? I watched a program on a daffodil growing family recently and the variety of daffodils amazed me. But I think I still prefer the old fashioned yellow ones.

    Reply
  67. Thank you Kareni — and yes, all flowers are welcome, aren’t they? I watched a program on a daffodil growing family recently and the variety of daffodils amazed me. But I think I still prefer the old fashioned yellow ones.

    Reply
  68. Thank you Kareni — and yes, all flowers are welcome, aren’t they? I watched a program on a daffodil growing family recently and the variety of daffodils amazed me. But I think I still prefer the old fashioned yellow ones.

    Reply
  69. Thank you Kareni — and yes, all flowers are welcome, aren’t they? I watched a program on a daffodil growing family recently and the variety of daffodils amazed me. But I think I still prefer the old fashioned yellow ones.

    Reply
  70. Thank you Kareni — and yes, all flowers are welcome, aren’t they? I watched a program on a daffodil growing family recently and the variety of daffodils amazed me. But I think I still prefer the old fashioned yellow ones.

    Reply
  71. Thanks, Katie, bleeding hearts are indeed gorgeous, and I love how so many flowers are associated with memories. I’ve tried to grow them a couple of times without success. Maybe third time lucky.

    Reply
  72. Thanks, Katie, bleeding hearts are indeed gorgeous, and I love how so many flowers are associated with memories. I’ve tried to grow them a couple of times without success. Maybe third time lucky.

    Reply
  73. Thanks, Katie, bleeding hearts are indeed gorgeous, and I love how so many flowers are associated with memories. I’ve tried to grow them a couple of times without success. Maybe third time lucky.

    Reply
  74. Thanks, Katie, bleeding hearts are indeed gorgeous, and I love how so many flowers are associated with memories. I’ve tried to grow them a couple of times without success. Maybe third time lucky.

    Reply
  75. Thanks, Katie, bleeding hearts are indeed gorgeous, and I love how so many flowers are associated with memories. I’ve tried to grow them a couple of times without success. Maybe third time lucky.

    Reply
  76. Quantum I have several clumps of snowdrops in flower right now. I brought them from my dad’s lovely garden, which sadly got bulldozed after we sold the house. Criminal! I’m looking forward to our current Lockdown (#6) when I can go and visit gardens again. (We can’t go more than 5 km from out homes)
    And the audio version of The Scoundrel’s Daughter is also out — this time they planned for simultaneous release, which pleased me greatly.

    Reply
  77. Quantum I have several clumps of snowdrops in flower right now. I brought them from my dad’s lovely garden, which sadly got bulldozed after we sold the house. Criminal! I’m looking forward to our current Lockdown (#6) when I can go and visit gardens again. (We can’t go more than 5 km from out homes)
    And the audio version of The Scoundrel’s Daughter is also out — this time they planned for simultaneous release, which pleased me greatly.

    Reply
  78. Quantum I have several clumps of snowdrops in flower right now. I brought them from my dad’s lovely garden, which sadly got bulldozed after we sold the house. Criminal! I’m looking forward to our current Lockdown (#6) when I can go and visit gardens again. (We can’t go more than 5 km from out homes)
    And the audio version of The Scoundrel’s Daughter is also out — this time they planned for simultaneous release, which pleased me greatly.

    Reply
  79. Quantum I have several clumps of snowdrops in flower right now. I brought them from my dad’s lovely garden, which sadly got bulldozed after we sold the house. Criminal! I’m looking forward to our current Lockdown (#6) when I can go and visit gardens again. (We can’t go more than 5 km from out homes)
    And the audio version of The Scoundrel’s Daughter is also out — this time they planned for simultaneous release, which pleased me greatly.

    Reply
  80. Quantum I have several clumps of snowdrops in flower right now. I brought them from my dad’s lovely garden, which sadly got bulldozed after we sold the house. Criminal! I’m looking forward to our current Lockdown (#6) when I can go and visit gardens again. (We can’t go more than 5 km from out homes)
    And the audio version of The Scoundrel’s Daughter is also out — this time they planned for simultaneous release, which pleased me greatly.

    Reply
  81. Thanks, Janet — I hope you enjoy the book, and that it arrives in good time. Postage is not as reliable as it used to me. I posted out a bunch of others when I posted yours and the person who lives closest to me — who I can’t visit because of Lockdown — still hasn’t received her copy, though people in much more far flung corners of Australia have theirs. Weird!
    I was very blessed with that cover, I think. We authors depend a LOT on the art department. I don’t think I know forsythia — when I’ve seen it in photos I’ve always thought it was another name for what we in Australia call wattle — of which there are many varieties — but I just looked it up, and though it looks similar, I think ot’s a different plant. Will have to investigate further.

    Reply
  82. Thanks, Janet — I hope you enjoy the book, and that it arrives in good time. Postage is not as reliable as it used to me. I posted out a bunch of others when I posted yours and the person who lives closest to me — who I can’t visit because of Lockdown — still hasn’t received her copy, though people in much more far flung corners of Australia have theirs. Weird!
    I was very blessed with that cover, I think. We authors depend a LOT on the art department. I don’t think I know forsythia — when I’ve seen it in photos I’ve always thought it was another name for what we in Australia call wattle — of which there are many varieties — but I just looked it up, and though it looks similar, I think ot’s a different plant. Will have to investigate further.

    Reply
  83. Thanks, Janet — I hope you enjoy the book, and that it arrives in good time. Postage is not as reliable as it used to me. I posted out a bunch of others when I posted yours and the person who lives closest to me — who I can’t visit because of Lockdown — still hasn’t received her copy, though people in much more far flung corners of Australia have theirs. Weird!
    I was very blessed with that cover, I think. We authors depend a LOT on the art department. I don’t think I know forsythia — when I’ve seen it in photos I’ve always thought it was another name for what we in Australia call wattle — of which there are many varieties — but I just looked it up, and though it looks similar, I think ot’s a different plant. Will have to investigate further.

    Reply
  84. Thanks, Janet — I hope you enjoy the book, and that it arrives in good time. Postage is not as reliable as it used to me. I posted out a bunch of others when I posted yours and the person who lives closest to me — who I can’t visit because of Lockdown — still hasn’t received her copy, though people in much more far flung corners of Australia have theirs. Weird!
    I was very blessed with that cover, I think. We authors depend a LOT on the art department. I don’t think I know forsythia — when I’ve seen it in photos I’ve always thought it was another name for what we in Australia call wattle — of which there are many varieties — but I just looked it up, and though it looks similar, I think ot’s a different plant. Will have to investigate further.

    Reply
  85. Thanks, Janet — I hope you enjoy the book, and that it arrives in good time. Postage is not as reliable as it used to me. I posted out a bunch of others when I posted yours and the person who lives closest to me — who I can’t visit because of Lockdown — still hasn’t received her copy, though people in much more far flung corners of Australia have theirs. Weird!
    I was very blessed with that cover, I think. We authors depend a LOT on the art department. I don’t think I know forsythia — when I’ve seen it in photos I’ve always thought it was another name for what we in Australia call wattle — of which there are many varieties — but I just looked it up, and though it looks similar, I think ot’s a different plant. Will have to investigate further.

    Reply
  86. Well, I planned to read in on the weekend. But I started yesterday and now it is already finished. So yes, I would say I did enjoy it. Finally a scoundrel who is a real villain. And I did love both heroes and heroines. Another winner!

    Reply
  87. Well, I planned to read in on the weekend. But I started yesterday and now it is already finished. So yes, I would say I did enjoy it. Finally a scoundrel who is a real villain. And I did love both heroes and heroines. Another winner!

    Reply
  88. Well, I planned to read in on the weekend. But I started yesterday and now it is already finished. So yes, I would say I did enjoy it. Finally a scoundrel who is a real villain. And I did love both heroes and heroines. Another winner!

    Reply
  89. Well, I planned to read in on the weekend. But I started yesterday and now it is already finished. So yes, I would say I did enjoy it. Finally a scoundrel who is a real villain. And I did love both heroes and heroines. Another winner!

    Reply
  90. Well, I planned to read in on the weekend. But I started yesterday and now it is already finished. So yes, I would say I did enjoy it. Finally a scoundrel who is a real villain. And I did love both heroes and heroines. Another winner!

    Reply
  91. Anne, just dropping by to say hi and congrats! Can’t wait to read a new Anne Gracie creation. How anyone could rate one of your books 1* is beyond my comprehension, guess it just goes with the authorial territory. As to spring flowers, here in the Valley of the Sun (aka Phoenix), we have some short, brilliantly orange/yellow wildflowers that carpet desert yards and roadside verges around March-April, then disappear in a few weeks. They’re everywhere, but I have never heard anyone name them.

    Reply
  92. Anne, just dropping by to say hi and congrats! Can’t wait to read a new Anne Gracie creation. How anyone could rate one of your books 1* is beyond my comprehension, guess it just goes with the authorial territory. As to spring flowers, here in the Valley of the Sun (aka Phoenix), we have some short, brilliantly orange/yellow wildflowers that carpet desert yards and roadside verges around March-April, then disappear in a few weeks. They’re everywhere, but I have never heard anyone name them.

    Reply
  93. Anne, just dropping by to say hi and congrats! Can’t wait to read a new Anne Gracie creation. How anyone could rate one of your books 1* is beyond my comprehension, guess it just goes with the authorial territory. As to spring flowers, here in the Valley of the Sun (aka Phoenix), we have some short, brilliantly orange/yellow wildflowers that carpet desert yards and roadside verges around March-April, then disappear in a few weeks. They’re everywhere, but I have never heard anyone name them.

    Reply
  94. Anne, just dropping by to say hi and congrats! Can’t wait to read a new Anne Gracie creation. How anyone could rate one of your books 1* is beyond my comprehension, guess it just goes with the authorial territory. As to spring flowers, here in the Valley of the Sun (aka Phoenix), we have some short, brilliantly orange/yellow wildflowers that carpet desert yards and roadside verges around March-April, then disappear in a few weeks. They’re everywhere, but I have never heard anyone name them.

    Reply
  95. Anne, just dropping by to say hi and congrats! Can’t wait to read a new Anne Gracie creation. How anyone could rate one of your books 1* is beyond my comprehension, guess it just goes with the authorial territory. As to spring flowers, here in the Valley of the Sun (aka Phoenix), we have some short, brilliantly orange/yellow wildflowers that carpet desert yards and roadside verges around March-April, then disappear in a few weeks. They’re everywhere, but I have never heard anyone name them.

    Reply
  96. Thanks, Mary — getting one star reviews is part of an author’s territory — it’s impossible to please everyone and we need to develop thick skins. I’d love to see your brilliantly colored wildflowers. I love Californian poppies, which are very bright too.

    Reply
  97. Thanks, Mary — getting one star reviews is part of an author’s territory — it’s impossible to please everyone and we need to develop thick skins. I’d love to see your brilliantly colored wildflowers. I love Californian poppies, which are very bright too.

    Reply
  98. Thanks, Mary — getting one star reviews is part of an author’s territory — it’s impossible to please everyone and we need to develop thick skins. I’d love to see your brilliantly colored wildflowers. I love Californian poppies, which are very bright too.

    Reply
  99. Thanks, Mary — getting one star reviews is part of an author’s territory — it’s impossible to please everyone and we need to develop thick skins. I’d love to see your brilliantly colored wildflowers. I love Californian poppies, which are very bright too.

    Reply
  100. Thanks, Mary — getting one star reviews is part of an author’s territory — it’s impossible to please everyone and we need to develop thick skins. I’d love to see your brilliantly colored wildflowers. I love Californian poppies, which are very bright too.

    Reply
  101. I really love pansies, but all flowers are gorgeous. The wattles are out at the moment and making a beautiful display.
    The gardens on the cover are so beautiful and I would love to explore what lays beyond that path.

    Reply
  102. I really love pansies, but all flowers are gorgeous. The wattles are out at the moment and making a beautiful display.
    The gardens on the cover are so beautiful and I would love to explore what lays beyond that path.

    Reply
  103. I really love pansies, but all flowers are gorgeous. The wattles are out at the moment and making a beautiful display.
    The gardens on the cover are so beautiful and I would love to explore what lays beyond that path.

    Reply
  104. I really love pansies, but all flowers are gorgeous. The wattles are out at the moment and making a beautiful display.
    The gardens on the cover are so beautiful and I would love to explore what lays beyond that path.

    Reply
  105. I really love pansies, but all flowers are gorgeous. The wattles are out at the moment and making a beautiful display.
    The gardens on the cover are so beautiful and I would love to explore what lays beyond that path.

    Reply
  106. Traditional daisies with yellow centers, white petals, an green stems and leaves. Best displayed in mason jars all over the house.

    Reply
  107. Traditional daisies with yellow centers, white petals, an green stems and leaves. Best displayed in mason jars all over the house.

    Reply
  108. Traditional daisies with yellow centers, white petals, an green stems and leaves. Best displayed in mason jars all over the house.

    Reply
  109. Traditional daisies with yellow centers, white petals, an green stems and leaves. Best displayed in mason jars all over the house.

    Reply
  110. Traditional daisies with yellow centers, white petals, an green stems and leaves. Best displayed in mason jars all over the house.

    Reply
  111. Thanks for telling us about The Scoundrel’s Daughter, it sounds great and I know I’ll love it. For a favorite spring flower, it’s a tossup between lilacs and peonies. And about the wisteria on the cover, I wonder if the Berkley Art Dept. also had the Bridgerton Netflix series in mind. The Bridgerton mansion in the series was always shown with a wisteria vine in full bloom. I’ve seen people joking online that it continued to bloom regardless of the season!

    Reply
  112. Thanks for telling us about The Scoundrel’s Daughter, it sounds great and I know I’ll love it. For a favorite spring flower, it’s a tossup between lilacs and peonies. And about the wisteria on the cover, I wonder if the Berkley Art Dept. also had the Bridgerton Netflix series in mind. The Bridgerton mansion in the series was always shown with a wisteria vine in full bloom. I’ve seen people joking online that it continued to bloom regardless of the season!

    Reply
  113. Thanks for telling us about The Scoundrel’s Daughter, it sounds great and I know I’ll love it. For a favorite spring flower, it’s a tossup between lilacs and peonies. And about the wisteria on the cover, I wonder if the Berkley Art Dept. also had the Bridgerton Netflix series in mind. The Bridgerton mansion in the series was always shown with a wisteria vine in full bloom. I’ve seen people joking online that it continued to bloom regardless of the season!

    Reply
  114. Thanks for telling us about The Scoundrel’s Daughter, it sounds great and I know I’ll love it. For a favorite spring flower, it’s a tossup between lilacs and peonies. And about the wisteria on the cover, I wonder if the Berkley Art Dept. also had the Bridgerton Netflix series in mind. The Bridgerton mansion in the series was always shown with a wisteria vine in full bloom. I’ve seen people joking online that it continued to bloom regardless of the season!

    Reply
  115. Thanks for telling us about The Scoundrel’s Daughter, it sounds great and I know I’ll love it. For a favorite spring flower, it’s a tossup between lilacs and peonies. And about the wisteria on the cover, I wonder if the Berkley Art Dept. also had the Bridgerton Netflix series in mind. The Bridgerton mansion in the series was always shown with a wisteria vine in full bloom. I’ve seen people joking online that it continued to bloom regardless of the season!

    Reply
  116. Anne, I cannot wait to read your new book! And I’m so happy that it’s the start of another series. I am always overjoyed to see the first brave crocuses poking out from the winter muck. The ones near me are the most beautiful shade of lavender, and they bring hope for better days to come.

    Reply
  117. Anne, I cannot wait to read your new book! And I’m so happy that it’s the start of another series. I am always overjoyed to see the first brave crocuses poking out from the winter muck. The ones near me are the most beautiful shade of lavender, and they bring hope for better days to come.

    Reply
  118. Anne, I cannot wait to read your new book! And I’m so happy that it’s the start of another series. I am always overjoyed to see the first brave crocuses poking out from the winter muck. The ones near me are the most beautiful shade of lavender, and they bring hope for better days to come.

    Reply
  119. Anne, I cannot wait to read your new book! And I’m so happy that it’s the start of another series. I am always overjoyed to see the first brave crocuses poking out from the winter muck. The ones near me are the most beautiful shade of lavender, and they bring hope for better days to come.

    Reply
  120. Anne, I cannot wait to read your new book! And I’m so happy that it’s the start of another series. I am always overjoyed to see the first brave crocuses poking out from the winter muck. The ones near me are the most beautiful shade of lavender, and they bring hope for better days to come.

    Reply
  121. Your book sounds fun and so full of potential for its characters! My favorite spring flowers are the wild flowers that grow here in Texas. Fields of bluebonnets, Indian paintbrush, and winecups are just a few flowers I love. They start popping up in March and are such a welcome sight.

    Reply
  122. Your book sounds fun and so full of potential for its characters! My favorite spring flowers are the wild flowers that grow here in Texas. Fields of bluebonnets, Indian paintbrush, and winecups are just a few flowers I love. They start popping up in March and are such a welcome sight.

    Reply
  123. Your book sounds fun and so full of potential for its characters! My favorite spring flowers are the wild flowers that grow here in Texas. Fields of bluebonnets, Indian paintbrush, and winecups are just a few flowers I love. They start popping up in March and are such a welcome sight.

    Reply
  124. Your book sounds fun and so full of potential for its characters! My favorite spring flowers are the wild flowers that grow here in Texas. Fields of bluebonnets, Indian paintbrush, and winecups are just a few flowers I love. They start popping up in March and are such a welcome sight.

    Reply
  125. Your book sounds fun and so full of potential for its characters! My favorite spring flowers are the wild flowers that grow here in Texas. Fields of bluebonnets, Indian paintbrush, and winecups are just a few flowers I love. They start popping up in March and are such a welcome sight.

    Reply
  126. Thank you to both of you for the lovely interview. I have ordered this book. The cover is eye catching.
    In another life, I had a huge garden with daffodils and bearded iris. It gave me a great deal of pleasure.
    Hope everyone is safe and well and happy.

    Reply
  127. Thank you to both of you for the lovely interview. I have ordered this book. The cover is eye catching.
    In another life, I had a huge garden with daffodils and bearded iris. It gave me a great deal of pleasure.
    Hope everyone is safe and well and happy.

    Reply
  128. Thank you to both of you for the lovely interview. I have ordered this book. The cover is eye catching.
    In another life, I had a huge garden with daffodils and bearded iris. It gave me a great deal of pleasure.
    Hope everyone is safe and well and happy.

    Reply
  129. Thank you to both of you for the lovely interview. I have ordered this book. The cover is eye catching.
    In another life, I had a huge garden with daffodils and bearded iris. It gave me a great deal of pleasure.
    Hope everyone is safe and well and happy.

    Reply
  130. Thank you to both of you for the lovely interview. I have ordered this book. The cover is eye catching.
    In another life, I had a huge garden with daffodils and bearded iris. It gave me a great deal of pleasure.
    Hope everyone is safe and well and happy.

    Reply
  131. Snow drops are the first I see as Spring arrives, then the crocus, and soon the forsythia -but my favorite are the hyacinth, especially the purple ones.

    Reply
  132. Snow drops are the first I see as Spring arrives, then the crocus, and soon the forsythia -but my favorite are the hyacinth, especially the purple ones.

    Reply
  133. Snow drops are the first I see as Spring arrives, then the crocus, and soon the forsythia -but my favorite are the hyacinth, especially the purple ones.

    Reply
  134. Snow drops are the first I see as Spring arrives, then the crocus, and soon the forsythia -but my favorite are the hyacinth, especially the purple ones.

    Reply
  135. Snow drops are the first I see as Spring arrives, then the crocus, and soon the forsythia -but my favorite are the hyacinth, especially the purple ones.

    Reply
  136. do I have to choose just one? I love pussywillows, they come out early; another early bloomer around her is skunk cabbage — not the prettiest or best smelling flower, but another harbinger of spring.

    Reply
  137. do I have to choose just one? I love pussywillows, they come out early; another early bloomer around her is skunk cabbage — not the prettiest or best smelling flower, but another harbinger of spring.

    Reply
  138. do I have to choose just one? I love pussywillows, they come out early; another early bloomer around her is skunk cabbage — not the prettiest or best smelling flower, but another harbinger of spring.

    Reply
  139. do I have to choose just one? I love pussywillows, they come out early; another early bloomer around her is skunk cabbage — not the prettiest or best smelling flower, but another harbinger of spring.

    Reply
  140. do I have to choose just one? I love pussywillows, they come out early; another early bloomer around her is skunk cabbage — not the prettiest or best smelling flower, but another harbinger of spring.

    Reply
  141. While I was determined to wait for the copy I already won, I couldn’t resist and read late into last night to finish this absolutely wonderful story, Anne! But since it will clearly join the re-read list, the paper version will become dog-eared, I am sure. From the goose with the delightful name to the HEAs, this was such a lovely read – you deserve every kudo you’ve received so far and many more! And I am one of the daffodil lovers, all varieties!

    Reply
  142. While I was determined to wait for the copy I already won, I couldn’t resist and read late into last night to finish this absolutely wonderful story, Anne! But since it will clearly join the re-read list, the paper version will become dog-eared, I am sure. From the goose with the delightful name to the HEAs, this was such a lovely read – you deserve every kudo you’ve received so far and many more! And I am one of the daffodil lovers, all varieties!

    Reply
  143. While I was determined to wait for the copy I already won, I couldn’t resist and read late into last night to finish this absolutely wonderful story, Anne! But since it will clearly join the re-read list, the paper version will become dog-eared, I am sure. From the goose with the delightful name to the HEAs, this was such a lovely read – you deserve every kudo you’ve received so far and many more! And I am one of the daffodil lovers, all varieties!

    Reply
  144. While I was determined to wait for the copy I already won, I couldn’t resist and read late into last night to finish this absolutely wonderful story, Anne! But since it will clearly join the re-read list, the paper version will become dog-eared, I am sure. From the goose with the delightful name to the HEAs, this was such a lovely read – you deserve every kudo you’ve received so far and many more! And I am one of the daffodil lovers, all varieties!

    Reply
  145. While I was determined to wait for the copy I already won, I couldn’t resist and read late into last night to finish this absolutely wonderful story, Anne! But since it will clearly join the re-read list, the paper version will become dog-eared, I am sure. From the goose with the delightful name to the HEAs, this was such a lovely read – you deserve every kudo you’ve received so far and many more! And I am one of the daffodil lovers, all varieties!

    Reply
  146. What an absolutely beautiful cover! Thanks for the tantalizing excerpt. I love the color & smell of lilacs. I had some in my yard in Pennsylvania but don’t have any here in California. I do have a gardener here though and he plants purple & yellow flowers of all kinds for me since he knows I love those colors.

    Reply
  147. What an absolutely beautiful cover! Thanks for the tantalizing excerpt. I love the color & smell of lilacs. I had some in my yard in Pennsylvania but don’t have any here in California. I do have a gardener here though and he plants purple & yellow flowers of all kinds for me since he knows I love those colors.

    Reply
  148. What an absolutely beautiful cover! Thanks for the tantalizing excerpt. I love the color & smell of lilacs. I had some in my yard in Pennsylvania but don’t have any here in California. I do have a gardener here though and he plants purple & yellow flowers of all kinds for me since he knows I love those colors.

    Reply
  149. What an absolutely beautiful cover! Thanks for the tantalizing excerpt. I love the color & smell of lilacs. I had some in my yard in Pennsylvania but don’t have any here in California. I do have a gardener here though and he plants purple & yellow flowers of all kinds for me since he knows I love those colors.

    Reply
  150. What an absolutely beautiful cover! Thanks for the tantalizing excerpt. I love the color & smell of lilacs. I had some in my yard in Pennsylvania but don’t have any here in California. I do have a gardener here though and he plants purple & yellow flowers of all kinds for me since he knows I love those colors.

    Reply
  151. I LOVE the cover of this book and purple is my favourite colour. Dual romances are lovely. Always enjoy them.
    My favourite Spring flower is the snowdrop. It looks so delicate but is so sturdy and survives in the real cold of our Springs.
    The best of luck with the book Anne.
    Please don’t enter me in the draw. I’m already half way through my copy and enjoying it! I do like the Colonel!

    Reply
  152. I LOVE the cover of this book and purple is my favourite colour. Dual romances are lovely. Always enjoy them.
    My favourite Spring flower is the snowdrop. It looks so delicate but is so sturdy and survives in the real cold of our Springs.
    The best of luck with the book Anne.
    Please don’t enter me in the draw. I’m already half way through my copy and enjoying it! I do like the Colonel!

    Reply
  153. I LOVE the cover of this book and purple is my favourite colour. Dual romances are lovely. Always enjoy them.
    My favourite Spring flower is the snowdrop. It looks so delicate but is so sturdy and survives in the real cold of our Springs.
    The best of luck with the book Anne.
    Please don’t enter me in the draw. I’m already half way through my copy and enjoying it! I do like the Colonel!

    Reply
  154. I LOVE the cover of this book and purple is my favourite colour. Dual romances are lovely. Always enjoy them.
    My favourite Spring flower is the snowdrop. It looks so delicate but is so sturdy and survives in the real cold of our Springs.
    The best of luck with the book Anne.
    Please don’t enter me in the draw. I’m already half way through my copy and enjoying it! I do like the Colonel!

    Reply
  155. I LOVE the cover of this book and purple is my favourite colour. Dual romances are lovely. Always enjoy them.
    My favourite Spring flower is the snowdrop. It looks so delicate but is so sturdy and survives in the real cold of our Springs.
    The best of luck with the book Anne.
    Please don’t enter me in the draw. I’m already half way through my copy and enjoying it! I do like the Colonel!

    Reply
  156. Thank you, Jenny. I too love pansies — when I was little I thought they had such sweet faces. And the flowering of the various wattles in the bush is such a lovely splash of colour in a grey time of year.

    Reply
  157. Thank you, Jenny. I too love pansies — when I was little I thought they had such sweet faces. And the flowering of the various wattles in the bush is such a lovely splash of colour in a grey time of year.

    Reply
  158. Thank you, Jenny. I too love pansies — when I was little I thought they had such sweet faces. And the flowering of the various wattles in the bush is such a lovely splash of colour in a grey time of year.

    Reply
  159. Thank you, Jenny. I too love pansies — when I was little I thought they had such sweet faces. And the flowering of the various wattles in the bush is such a lovely splash of colour in a grey time of year.

    Reply
  160. Thank you, Jenny. I too love pansies — when I was little I thought they had such sweet faces. And the flowering of the various wattles in the bush is such a lovely splash of colour in a grey time of year.

    Reply
  161. Thank you Karin — lilacs and peonies are faves of mine too. I have an old faithful lilac tree that flowers so beautifully every year. And when I moved here I tried to transplant a gorgeous peonie, but sadly, it didn’t take.
    As for the netflix Bridgerton inspiration for the cover, I don’t think so. The cover design was finalized well before Bridgerton came onto our screens — before I’d even finished the book — that’s how long in advance book preparation works in traditional publishing. I think wisteria is such a spectacularly lovely flower it’s a natural for anything set in spring.
    And sometimes it’s just something in the air. NZ writer India Holton’s debut book is called The Wisteria Society of Lady Scoundrels, and I’m pretty sure that was in the pipeline before the Bridgerton netflix came out too. https://www.amazon.com/Wisteria-Society-Lady-Scoundrels-ebook/dp/B08JKM9V1Y/wordwench-20

    Reply
  162. Thank you Karin — lilacs and peonies are faves of mine too. I have an old faithful lilac tree that flowers so beautifully every year. And when I moved here I tried to transplant a gorgeous peonie, but sadly, it didn’t take.
    As for the netflix Bridgerton inspiration for the cover, I don’t think so. The cover design was finalized well before Bridgerton came onto our screens — before I’d even finished the book — that’s how long in advance book preparation works in traditional publishing. I think wisteria is such a spectacularly lovely flower it’s a natural for anything set in spring.
    And sometimes it’s just something in the air. NZ writer India Holton’s debut book is called The Wisteria Society of Lady Scoundrels, and I’m pretty sure that was in the pipeline before the Bridgerton netflix came out too. https://www.amazon.com/Wisteria-Society-Lady-Scoundrels-ebook/dp/B08JKM9V1Y/wordwench-20

    Reply
  163. Thank you Karin — lilacs and peonies are faves of mine too. I have an old faithful lilac tree that flowers so beautifully every year. And when I moved here I tried to transplant a gorgeous peonie, but sadly, it didn’t take.
    As for the netflix Bridgerton inspiration for the cover, I don’t think so. The cover design was finalized well before Bridgerton came onto our screens — before I’d even finished the book — that’s how long in advance book preparation works in traditional publishing. I think wisteria is such a spectacularly lovely flower it’s a natural for anything set in spring.
    And sometimes it’s just something in the air. NZ writer India Holton’s debut book is called The Wisteria Society of Lady Scoundrels, and I’m pretty sure that was in the pipeline before the Bridgerton netflix came out too. https://www.amazon.com/Wisteria-Society-Lady-Scoundrels-ebook/dp/B08JKM9V1Y/wordwench-20

    Reply
  164. Thank you Karin — lilacs and peonies are faves of mine too. I have an old faithful lilac tree that flowers so beautifully every year. And when I moved here I tried to transplant a gorgeous peonie, but sadly, it didn’t take.
    As for the netflix Bridgerton inspiration for the cover, I don’t think so. The cover design was finalized well before Bridgerton came onto our screens — before I’d even finished the book — that’s how long in advance book preparation works in traditional publishing. I think wisteria is such a spectacularly lovely flower it’s a natural for anything set in spring.
    And sometimes it’s just something in the air. NZ writer India Holton’s debut book is called The Wisteria Society of Lady Scoundrels, and I’m pretty sure that was in the pipeline before the Bridgerton netflix came out too. https://www.amazon.com/Wisteria-Society-Lady-Scoundrels-ebook/dp/B08JKM9V1Y/wordwench-20

    Reply
  165. Thank you Karin — lilacs and peonies are faves of mine too. I have an old faithful lilac tree that flowers so beautifully every year. And when I moved here I tried to transplant a gorgeous peonie, but sadly, it didn’t take.
    As for the netflix Bridgerton inspiration for the cover, I don’t think so. The cover design was finalized well before Bridgerton came onto our screens — before I’d even finished the book — that’s how long in advance book preparation works in traditional publishing. I think wisteria is such a spectacularly lovely flower it’s a natural for anything set in spring.
    And sometimes it’s just something in the air. NZ writer India Holton’s debut book is called The Wisteria Society of Lady Scoundrels, and I’m pretty sure that was in the pipeline before the Bridgerton netflix came out too. https://www.amazon.com/Wisteria-Society-Lady-Scoundrels-ebook/dp/B08JKM9V1Y/wordwench-20

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  166. Thank you Margaret. The idea of delicate flowers poking up out of snow and mud always amazes me, and I can easily see why such sights bring the hope of better times to come. One day I hope to see crocuses flowering for myself.

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  167. Thank you Margaret. The idea of delicate flowers poking up out of snow and mud always amazes me, and I can easily see why such sights bring the hope of better times to come. One day I hope to see crocuses flowering for myself.

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  168. Thank you Margaret. The idea of delicate flowers poking up out of snow and mud always amazes me, and I can easily see why such sights bring the hope of better times to come. One day I hope to see crocuses flowering for myself.

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  169. Thank you Margaret. The idea of delicate flowers poking up out of snow and mud always amazes me, and I can easily see why such sights bring the hope of better times to come. One day I hope to see crocuses flowering for myself.

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  170. Thank you Margaret. The idea of delicate flowers poking up out of snow and mud always amazes me, and I can easily see why such sights bring the hope of better times to come. One day I hope to see crocuses flowering for myself.

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  171. Thank you, Annette — your garden sounds lovely. It’s always a bit sad when we leave a garden behind. I still occasionally drive past my previous garden and see all the bulbs I planted flowering, and I look at the gorgeous dark red rose with the incredible perfume and wish I’d brought it with me. But it was completely the wrong time. One day I’ll remember what variety it was and get another one. Thanks for your good wishes. Stay safe and well.

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  172. Thank you, Annette — your garden sounds lovely. It’s always a bit sad when we leave a garden behind. I still occasionally drive past my previous garden and see all the bulbs I planted flowering, and I look at the gorgeous dark red rose with the incredible perfume and wish I’d brought it with me. But it was completely the wrong time. One day I’ll remember what variety it was and get another one. Thanks for your good wishes. Stay safe and well.

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  173. Thank you, Annette — your garden sounds lovely. It’s always a bit sad when we leave a garden behind. I still occasionally drive past my previous garden and see all the bulbs I planted flowering, and I look at the gorgeous dark red rose with the incredible perfume and wish I’d brought it with me. But it was completely the wrong time. One day I’ll remember what variety it was and get another one. Thanks for your good wishes. Stay safe and well.

    Reply
  174. Thank you, Annette — your garden sounds lovely. It’s always a bit sad when we leave a garden behind. I still occasionally drive past my previous garden and see all the bulbs I planted flowering, and I look at the gorgeous dark red rose with the incredible perfume and wish I’d brought it with me. But it was completely the wrong time. One day I’ll remember what variety it was and get another one. Thanks for your good wishes. Stay safe and well.

    Reply
  175. Thank you, Annette — your garden sounds lovely. It’s always a bit sad when we leave a garden behind. I still occasionally drive past my previous garden and see all the bulbs I planted flowering, and I look at the gorgeous dark red rose with the incredible perfume and wish I’d brought it with me. But it was completely the wrong time. One day I’ll remember what variety it was and get another one. Thanks for your good wishes. Stay safe and well.

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  176. Diane, yes, I do love a purple hyacinth — the perfume is wonderful. I only have limited success growing them — the first year is fabulous, after that, not much. Thanks for commenting.

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  177. Diane, yes, I do love a purple hyacinth — the perfume is wonderful. I only have limited success growing them — the first year is fabulous, after that, not much. Thanks for commenting.

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  178. Diane, yes, I do love a purple hyacinth — the perfume is wonderful. I only have limited success growing them — the first year is fabulous, after that, not much. Thanks for commenting.

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  179. Diane, yes, I do love a purple hyacinth — the perfume is wonderful. I only have limited success growing them — the first year is fabulous, after that, not much. Thanks for commenting.

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  180. Diane, yes, I do love a purple hyacinth — the perfume is wonderful. I only have limited success growing them — the first year is fabulous, after that, not much. Thanks for commenting.

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  181. LOL ML — I never thought of deer eating daffodils, but of course they would. I have a friend who was so bothered by possums eating all her flowers she eventually designed a whole new garden around Things Possums Don’t Eat.

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  182. LOL ML — I never thought of deer eating daffodils, but of course they would. I have a friend who was so bothered by possums eating all her flowers she eventually designed a whole new garden around Things Possums Don’t Eat.

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  183. LOL ML — I never thought of deer eating daffodils, but of course they would. I have a friend who was so bothered by possums eating all her flowers she eventually designed a whole new garden around Things Possums Don’t Eat.

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  184. LOL ML — I never thought of deer eating daffodils, but of course they would. I have a friend who was so bothered by possums eating all her flowers she eventually designed a whole new garden around Things Possums Don’t Eat.

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  185. LOL ML — I never thought of deer eating daffodils, but of course they would. I have a friend who was so bothered by possums eating all her flowers she eventually designed a whole new garden around Things Possums Don’t Eat.

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  186. Thank you Jeanne — glad you enjoyed the excerpt. Lilacs brighten my life every spring and their scent fills my house when I pick it and bring it inside. How lovely that your gardener plants in colors you like. And purple and yellow is a lovely combo — I like blue and yellow too.

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  187. Thank you Jeanne — glad you enjoyed the excerpt. Lilacs brighten my life every spring and their scent fills my house when I pick it and bring it inside. How lovely that your gardener plants in colors you like. And purple and yellow is a lovely combo — I like blue and yellow too.

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  188. Thank you Jeanne — glad you enjoyed the excerpt. Lilacs brighten my life every spring and their scent fills my house when I pick it and bring it inside. How lovely that your gardener plants in colors you like. And purple and yellow is a lovely combo — I like blue and yellow too.

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  189. Thank you Jeanne — glad you enjoyed the excerpt. Lilacs brighten my life every spring and their scent fills my house when I pick it and bring it inside. How lovely that your gardener plants in colors you like. And purple and yellow is a lovely combo — I like blue and yellow too.

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  190. Thank you Jeanne — glad you enjoyed the excerpt. Lilacs brighten my life every spring and their scent fills my house when I pick it and bring it inside. How lovely that your gardener plants in colors you like. And purple and yellow is a lovely combo — I like blue and yellow too.

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  191. Thanks so much, Teresa. I’m so glad you’re enjoying my book. I fell in love with James myself. And snowdrops have been mentioned here more than all the other spring flowers, which is lovely. And well deserved.
    Thanks for your good wishes. Stay safe and well.

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  192. Thanks so much, Teresa. I’m so glad you’re enjoying my book. I fell in love with James myself. And snowdrops have been mentioned here more than all the other spring flowers, which is lovely. And well deserved.
    Thanks for your good wishes. Stay safe and well.

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  193. Thanks so much, Teresa. I’m so glad you’re enjoying my book. I fell in love with James myself. And snowdrops have been mentioned here more than all the other spring flowers, which is lovely. And well deserved.
    Thanks for your good wishes. Stay safe and well.

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  194. Thanks so much, Teresa. I’m so glad you’re enjoying my book. I fell in love with James myself. And snowdrops have been mentioned here more than all the other spring flowers, which is lovely. And well deserved.
    Thanks for your good wishes. Stay safe and well.

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  195. Thanks so much, Teresa. I’m so glad you’re enjoying my book. I fell in love with James myself. And snowdrops have been mentioned here more than all the other spring flowers, which is lovely. And well deserved.
    Thanks for your good wishes. Stay safe and well.

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  196. Not to worry, Anne – mail in the US is ridiculously slow these days! Who knows? The Rake’s Daughter may be out before the current Daughter gets here! I hope you are taking some time to rest on your laurels – or your daffodils!

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  197. Not to worry, Anne – mail in the US is ridiculously slow these days! Who knows? The Rake’s Daughter may be out before the current Daughter gets here! I hope you are taking some time to rest on your laurels – or your daffodils!

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  198. Not to worry, Anne – mail in the US is ridiculously slow these days! Who knows? The Rake’s Daughter may be out before the current Daughter gets here! I hope you are taking some time to rest on your laurels – or your daffodils!

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  199. Not to worry, Anne – mail in the US is ridiculously slow these days! Who knows? The Rake’s Daughter may be out before the current Daughter gets here! I hope you are taking some time to rest on your laurels – or your daffodils!

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  200. Not to worry, Anne – mail in the US is ridiculously slow these days! Who knows? The Rake’s Daughter may be out before the current Daughter gets here! I hope you are taking some time to rest on your laurels – or your daffodils!

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  201. I look forward to listening to your new novel on audio. My favorite spring flower are lilies. You know winter has passed when lilies are in abundance. Book 🤗!!

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  202. I look forward to listening to your new novel on audio. My favorite spring flower are lilies. You know winter has passed when lilies are in abundance. Book 🤗!!

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  203. I look forward to listening to your new novel on audio. My favorite spring flower are lilies. You know winter has passed when lilies are in abundance. Book 🤗!!

    Reply
  204. I look forward to listening to your new novel on audio. My favorite spring flower are lilies. You know winter has passed when lilies are in abundance. Book 🤗!!

    Reply
  205. I look forward to listening to your new novel on audio. My favorite spring flower are lilies. You know winter has passed when lilies are in abundance. Book 🤗!!

    Reply
  206. Anne-My favorite spring flower is coleus, especially when the flowers are a deep burgundy. And speaking of flowers – I think the wisteria garden on the cover and Bellaire Gardens in the book itself are simply enchanting. I pre-ordered your book, as I always do. I got my hands on it today. I’m on page 76. I have the feeling that I won’t be able to out it down. Who needs sleep, anyhow. Thanks for a lovely interview with Anne, Mary Jo.

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  207. Anne-My favorite spring flower is coleus, especially when the flowers are a deep burgundy. And speaking of flowers – I think the wisteria garden on the cover and Bellaire Gardens in the book itself are simply enchanting. I pre-ordered your book, as I always do. I got my hands on it today. I’m on page 76. I have the feeling that I won’t be able to out it down. Who needs sleep, anyhow. Thanks for a lovely interview with Anne, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  208. Anne-My favorite spring flower is coleus, especially when the flowers are a deep burgundy. And speaking of flowers – I think the wisteria garden on the cover and Bellaire Gardens in the book itself are simply enchanting. I pre-ordered your book, as I always do. I got my hands on it today. I’m on page 76. I have the feeling that I won’t be able to out it down. Who needs sleep, anyhow. Thanks for a lovely interview with Anne, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  209. Anne-My favorite spring flower is coleus, especially when the flowers are a deep burgundy. And speaking of flowers – I think the wisteria garden on the cover and Bellaire Gardens in the book itself are simply enchanting. I pre-ordered your book, as I always do. I got my hands on it today. I’m on page 76. I have the feeling that I won’t be able to out it down. Who needs sleep, anyhow. Thanks for a lovely interview with Anne, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  210. Anne-My favorite spring flower is coleus, especially when the flowers are a deep burgundy. And speaking of flowers – I think the wisteria garden on the cover and Bellaire Gardens in the book itself are simply enchanting. I pre-ordered your book, as I always do. I got my hands on it today. I’m on page 76. I have the feeling that I won’t be able to out it down. Who needs sleep, anyhow. Thanks for a lovely interview with Anne, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  211. I love the fragrance of champak flowers. Though technically they are not spring flowers, I used to love to wear them on my hair. Their delicate fragrance would keep me company throughout the day!
    Do enter me in the draw as it would be lovely to read your book in paperback format. (I bought your earlier books in electronic format)

    Reply
  212. I love the fragrance of champak flowers. Though technically they are not spring flowers, I used to love to wear them on my hair. Their delicate fragrance would keep me company throughout the day!
    Do enter me in the draw as it would be lovely to read your book in paperback format. (I bought your earlier books in electronic format)

    Reply
  213. I love the fragrance of champak flowers. Though technically they are not spring flowers, I used to love to wear them on my hair. Their delicate fragrance would keep me company throughout the day!
    Do enter me in the draw as it would be lovely to read your book in paperback format. (I bought your earlier books in electronic format)

    Reply
  214. I love the fragrance of champak flowers. Though technically they are not spring flowers, I used to love to wear them on my hair. Their delicate fragrance would keep me company throughout the day!
    Do enter me in the draw as it would be lovely to read your book in paperback format. (I bought your earlier books in electronic format)

    Reply
  215. I love the fragrance of champak flowers. Though technically they are not spring flowers, I used to love to wear them on my hair. Their delicate fragrance would keep me company throughout the day!
    Do enter me in the draw as it would be lovely to read your book in paperback format. (I bought your earlier books in electronic format)

    Reply
  216. Thank you so much, Binnie. I’m fond of coleus as well.
    As for the wisteria, one of the best wisteria displays I’ve seen was many years ago at an old farmhouse in the country that a friend had rented. There was a large concrete patio with a trellis overhead, and growing over the trellis were ancient wisteria vines — one purple and one white. When they were in flower both the perfume and the sight of those masses of flowers hanging down took my breath away.

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  217. Thank you so much, Binnie. I’m fond of coleus as well.
    As for the wisteria, one of the best wisteria displays I’ve seen was many years ago at an old farmhouse in the country that a friend had rented. There was a large concrete patio with a trellis overhead, and growing over the trellis were ancient wisteria vines — one purple and one white. When they were in flower both the perfume and the sight of those masses of flowers hanging down took my breath away.

    Reply
  218. Thank you so much, Binnie. I’m fond of coleus as well.
    As for the wisteria, one of the best wisteria displays I’ve seen was many years ago at an old farmhouse in the country that a friend had rented. There was a large concrete patio with a trellis overhead, and growing over the trellis were ancient wisteria vines — one purple and one white. When they were in flower both the perfume and the sight of those masses of flowers hanging down took my breath away.

    Reply
  219. Thank you so much, Binnie. I’m fond of coleus as well.
    As for the wisteria, one of the best wisteria displays I’ve seen was many years ago at an old farmhouse in the country that a friend had rented. There was a large concrete patio with a trellis overhead, and growing over the trellis were ancient wisteria vines — one purple and one white. When they were in flower both the perfume and the sight of those masses of flowers hanging down took my breath away.

    Reply
  220. Thank you so much, Binnie. I’m fond of coleus as well.
    As for the wisteria, one of the best wisteria displays I’ve seen was many years ago at an old farmhouse in the country that a friend had rented. There was a large concrete patio with a trellis overhead, and growing over the trellis were ancient wisteria vines — one purple and one white. When they were in flower both the perfume and the sight of those masses of flowers hanging down took my breath away.

    Reply
  221. Thank you Shyamala — I’d never heard of champak flowers, so I looked them up on google. And now I’m on a quest to see them growing and flowering. Thanks for joining in with the wench community.

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  222. Thank you Shyamala — I’d never heard of champak flowers, so I looked them up on google. And now I’m on a quest to see them growing and flowering. Thanks for joining in with the wench community.

    Reply
  223. Thank you Shyamala — I’d never heard of champak flowers, so I looked them up on google. And now I’m on a quest to see them growing and flowering. Thanks for joining in with the wench community.

    Reply
  224. Thank you Shyamala — I’d never heard of champak flowers, so I looked them up on google. And now I’m on a quest to see them growing and flowering. Thanks for joining in with the wench community.

    Reply
  225. Thank you Shyamala — I’d never heard of champak flowers, so I looked them up on google. And now I’m on a quest to see them growing and flowering. Thanks for joining in with the wench community.

    Reply
  226. Loved the interview – thank you MaryJo and my book is on its way as I automatically order a copy of each of your books. (no need to add me) I also love the cover and remember a lovely spot in a garden in Maryland where they had a long wisteria arbor. This was our place to go to each spring to enjoy all the flowers.
    You ask what our favorite spring flower is – that is so hard to answer and I think I will not name just one. Crocus are first up in my garden, dandelions and purple violets not far behind, forsythia, daffodils of all kinds, forget me not, grape hyacinth, periwinkle arrives in May. I love most flowers especially wild ones. Sorry I could not choose just one.
    Wishing you much success in getting new readers to your books with this series. I am ready to read them. Thanks for sharing the wonderful stories in your head. I like hearing how attached an author is to the characters and how they change as the story is formed.

    Reply
  227. Loved the interview – thank you MaryJo and my book is on its way as I automatically order a copy of each of your books. (no need to add me) I also love the cover and remember a lovely spot in a garden in Maryland where they had a long wisteria arbor. This was our place to go to each spring to enjoy all the flowers.
    You ask what our favorite spring flower is – that is so hard to answer and I think I will not name just one. Crocus are first up in my garden, dandelions and purple violets not far behind, forsythia, daffodils of all kinds, forget me not, grape hyacinth, periwinkle arrives in May. I love most flowers especially wild ones. Sorry I could not choose just one.
    Wishing you much success in getting new readers to your books with this series. I am ready to read them. Thanks for sharing the wonderful stories in your head. I like hearing how attached an author is to the characters and how they change as the story is formed.

    Reply
  228. Loved the interview – thank you MaryJo and my book is on its way as I automatically order a copy of each of your books. (no need to add me) I also love the cover and remember a lovely spot in a garden in Maryland where they had a long wisteria arbor. This was our place to go to each spring to enjoy all the flowers.
    You ask what our favorite spring flower is – that is so hard to answer and I think I will not name just one. Crocus are first up in my garden, dandelions and purple violets not far behind, forsythia, daffodils of all kinds, forget me not, grape hyacinth, periwinkle arrives in May. I love most flowers especially wild ones. Sorry I could not choose just one.
    Wishing you much success in getting new readers to your books with this series. I am ready to read them. Thanks for sharing the wonderful stories in your head. I like hearing how attached an author is to the characters and how they change as the story is formed.

    Reply
  229. Loved the interview – thank you MaryJo and my book is on its way as I automatically order a copy of each of your books. (no need to add me) I also love the cover and remember a lovely spot in a garden in Maryland where they had a long wisteria arbor. This was our place to go to each spring to enjoy all the flowers.
    You ask what our favorite spring flower is – that is so hard to answer and I think I will not name just one. Crocus are first up in my garden, dandelions and purple violets not far behind, forsythia, daffodils of all kinds, forget me not, grape hyacinth, periwinkle arrives in May. I love most flowers especially wild ones. Sorry I could not choose just one.
    Wishing you much success in getting new readers to your books with this series. I am ready to read them. Thanks for sharing the wonderful stories in your head. I like hearing how attached an author is to the characters and how they change as the story is formed.

    Reply
  230. Loved the interview – thank you MaryJo and my book is on its way as I automatically order a copy of each of your books. (no need to add me) I also love the cover and remember a lovely spot in a garden in Maryland where they had a long wisteria arbor. This was our place to go to each spring to enjoy all the flowers.
    You ask what our favorite spring flower is – that is so hard to answer and I think I will not name just one. Crocus are first up in my garden, dandelions and purple violets not far behind, forsythia, daffodils of all kinds, forget me not, grape hyacinth, periwinkle arrives in May. I love most flowers especially wild ones. Sorry I could not choose just one.
    Wishing you much success in getting new readers to your books with this series. I am ready to read them. Thanks for sharing the wonderful stories in your head. I like hearing how attached an author is to the characters and how they change as the story is formed.

    Reply
  231. Margot thanks for that lovely virtual bouquet of spring flowers. Don’t apologize — I also have trouble narrowing down choices to just one. Thanks too for your good wishes. Much appreciated.

    Reply
  232. Margot thanks for that lovely virtual bouquet of spring flowers. Don’t apologize — I also have trouble narrowing down choices to just one. Thanks too for your good wishes. Much appreciated.

    Reply
  233. Margot thanks for that lovely virtual bouquet of spring flowers. Don’t apologize — I also have trouble narrowing down choices to just one. Thanks too for your good wishes. Much appreciated.

    Reply
  234. Margot thanks for that lovely virtual bouquet of spring flowers. Don’t apologize — I also have trouble narrowing down choices to just one. Thanks too for your good wishes. Much appreciated.

    Reply
  235. Margot thanks for that lovely virtual bouquet of spring flowers. Don’t apologize — I also have trouble narrowing down choices to just one. Thanks too for your good wishes. Much appreciated.

    Reply

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