Covers ‘Round the World

Kingsfavorite
By Susan Holloway Scott

They say that love makes the world go around, and there’s no one who believes that with more certainly than Harlequin Books.  Whether under the guise of Harlequin, Silhouette, or Mills & Boon, the Toronto-based publisher remains the romance world’s answer to Micky D’s, with zillions of romance novels sold in just about every place on earth where there’s a woman waiting to buy.  Unlike most American books that require a new contract negotiated with a separate publisher for each foreign edition, Harlequin has its own publishing branches based in more than twenty different countries, all publishing foreign editions at a furious rate.

This can come as an exciting revelation for a Harlequin writer.   The editors based in New York don't tend to play up the international editions, nor do they have any input into them, anyway. Not all books are published everywhere, and there doesn’t seem to be any sort of timetable for publication, either.  Some are released overseas a month or two after North American publication, while others suddenly pop up a decade later.  Thus, when you least expect it, five copies of your book in a new language and format will suddenly appear in your mailbox (and, with luck, on your royalty statement, too.)

But while misguided cover art for a new book can offer exquisite torment to even the most jaded writerInsanepassion.jpg008
–– 
not to mention hysterical calls between editors, agents, production heads, marketing, and legal, all with the result that Nothing Really Gets Changed –– the foreign covers are just, well, a surprise.  There’s no input with writers at all regarding the art, or even the new titles (foreign editions almost never have the same title as the North American edition.)  I've heard that the actual art isn't painted specifically for a cover, but more a case of "what's around the office that we haven't used for a while."  My foreign covers may have already graced other books.  As for the inside, and what is lost or found in translation –– ah, the wise author will never, ever go there, not if she wishes to keep her sanity.

Thus for the sake of education, amusement, or horror, I’m posting the covers of several of my books for Harlequin Historicals, written under the name Miranda Jarrett.

One of my earliest books for Harlequin, originally published in 1992 as Columbine.  Set in the New England wilderness around 1700, it fit right in with then-popular movie The Last of the Mohicans, and was full of colonial history, adventure, and an idyllic romance.  When it was published in Brazil (above right), the cover art didn’t change, but the title became Insane Passion, and I swear every sentence 
inside ends in an exclamation point.

Clearly covers are pitched in different ways to appeal to different markets.  My British covers tend to be realistic and low-key, showing the couple happily together but usually not embracing.  (They're also often the painting printed in black-and-white on the inside cover of the North American editions: the junior varsity cover, I guess.) The heat-factor rises dramatically with my German and French covers, which favor lurid clinches with plenty of heaving bosoms, bulging muscles, and flying hair.  Japanese covers have artwork that's more like colored drawings than paintings, and often forgo people altogether in favor of pastel landscapes.

The original cover for Sparhawk’s Angel (1996) was almost sweet, a lace-trimmed confection.  A year later, the German edition seems to promise something altogether different.  This past year, the book was released in Japan, with a cover that doesn’t look even vaguely historical.  All I know is that my name’s on the copyright page.

Amsparhawksang.jpg004       
Italiansparhawksang.jpg003      Japansparhawksang.jpg005

Of course, marketing shenanigans take place everywhere.  The holiday anthology Christmas Wedding Belles: A Regency Christmas on the High Seas was released last year, both here and in Great Britain by Harlequin.  This year, Mills & Boon is releasing it again in Great Britain.  Same book, same authors, but the sailors have vanished.  Now it’s Regency Christmas Weddings: Three Glittering Regency Love Stories, and features artwork that belongs on a Victorian candy-box.  (I have to admit that I prefer the candy-box cover with the plump, rosy-cheeked heroine in her bonnet.)

SailorXmas.jpg002       
  RegencyXmas.jpg001

  
  

Another Christmas anthology earned a more traditional Christmas cover in Poland (and isn't it fascinating that the English word "Bestsellers" must have the same appeal regardless of the language?)  On the version sold in the Czech, a seasonal wreath has been looped around the lovers.  My favorite part of that one is that I’ve become Miranda Jarrettova, and there’s new Wench Anne Gracieova, too.

PolishXmas.jpg006               CzechXmas.jpg007

      

And in my opinion, some of the foreign covers are a definite improvement over the North American originals.  I hated the cover for The Duke’s Gamble (2006): a bilious yellow cityscape with a priggish couple and a horseless carriage.  The English cover for Mills & Boon is an improvement, and especially interesting since it must have been a rejected version of the North American one — note that same blue dress with the poufy sleeves!  Still, I think the Swedish version with the sly, card-holding heroine is the real winner.

AmDG.jpg009            

EngDG.jpg010       


SwedDG.jpg011
The American cover for The Rake’s Wager (2007) fell short, too, with its curiously faceless heroine and the hero reduced to a mere cane and top hat (top hat??) But the couple on the Italian cover captured the relationship of the hero and heroine in a much better way, and the cover of the Mills & Boon edition –– ah, who says a smiling hero is a turn-off?

AmRW.jpg012          ItalRW.jpg014   

     EngRW.jpg013








What do you think?  Do you prefer the North American covers, or those on the foreign editions? And if you’re one of our international readers, what do you think of the romance covers in your country?

120 thoughts on “Covers ‘Round the World”

  1. Hellu! In Norway the covers tend do be Gawdawful. Last time I looked there seemed to still be a majority of windy hair, heaving bosoms and ripped bodices. Although the Harlequin Historicals have cleaned up, the rest of the Lines/publishers seems to be stuck in the seventies. And do not get me started on the titles. I have read some books in Norwegian and in English, and I prefer the original. Specially in books where the author uses a lot of endearments. When translated they sound so silly..

    Reply
  2. Hellu! In Norway the covers tend do be Gawdawful. Last time I looked there seemed to still be a majority of windy hair, heaving bosoms and ripped bodices. Although the Harlequin Historicals have cleaned up, the rest of the Lines/publishers seems to be stuck in the seventies. And do not get me started on the titles. I have read some books in Norwegian and in English, and I prefer the original. Specially in books where the author uses a lot of endearments. When translated they sound so silly..

    Reply
  3. Hellu! In Norway the covers tend do be Gawdawful. Last time I looked there seemed to still be a majority of windy hair, heaving bosoms and ripped bodices. Although the Harlequin Historicals have cleaned up, the rest of the Lines/publishers seems to be stuck in the seventies. And do not get me started on the titles. I have read some books in Norwegian and in English, and I prefer the original. Specially in books where the author uses a lot of endearments. When translated they sound so silly..

    Reply
  4. Hellu! In Norway the covers tend do be Gawdawful. Last time I looked there seemed to still be a majority of windy hair, heaving bosoms and ripped bodices. Although the Harlequin Historicals have cleaned up, the rest of the Lines/publishers seems to be stuck in the seventies. And do not get me started on the titles. I have read some books in Norwegian and in English, and I prefer the original. Specially in books where the author uses a lot of endearments. When translated they sound so silly..

    Reply
  5. Hellu! In Norway the covers tend do be Gawdawful. Last time I looked there seemed to still be a majority of windy hair, heaving bosoms and ripped bodices. Although the Harlequin Historicals have cleaned up, the rest of the Lines/publishers seems to be stuck in the seventies. And do not get me started on the titles. I have read some books in Norwegian and in English, and I prefer the original. Specially in books where the author uses a lot of endearments. When translated they sound so silly..

    Reply
  6. Susan, this is GREAT! Seldom have I had a chance to see the same book as channeled through several different nationalities by Harlequin. (And there was the proof that Anne Gracienova was destined to be a Wench. :))
    My single title historicals have been publishing in a lot of countries (I’m particularly popular in Spain), but the covers are pretty random.
    American publishers will buy North American rights to illustrations and the artists, like authors, are then free to sell the rights abroad. So I’ve had covers that I recognized as having been originally done for books by Laura Kinsale or Johanna Lindsey.
    If I’m lucky, the historical era will be more or less right. If I’m REALLY lucky, the hair colorings will more or less match the characters. But it’s best not to count on that. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  7. Susan, this is GREAT! Seldom have I had a chance to see the same book as channeled through several different nationalities by Harlequin. (And there was the proof that Anne Gracienova was destined to be a Wench. :))
    My single title historicals have been publishing in a lot of countries (I’m particularly popular in Spain), but the covers are pretty random.
    American publishers will buy North American rights to illustrations and the artists, like authors, are then free to sell the rights abroad. So I’ve had covers that I recognized as having been originally done for books by Laura Kinsale or Johanna Lindsey.
    If I’m lucky, the historical era will be more or less right. If I’m REALLY lucky, the hair colorings will more or less match the characters. But it’s best not to count on that. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  8. Susan, this is GREAT! Seldom have I had a chance to see the same book as channeled through several different nationalities by Harlequin. (And there was the proof that Anne Gracienova was destined to be a Wench. :))
    My single title historicals have been publishing in a lot of countries (I’m particularly popular in Spain), but the covers are pretty random.
    American publishers will buy North American rights to illustrations and the artists, like authors, are then free to sell the rights abroad. So I’ve had covers that I recognized as having been originally done for books by Laura Kinsale or Johanna Lindsey.
    If I’m lucky, the historical era will be more or less right. If I’m REALLY lucky, the hair colorings will more or less match the characters. But it’s best not to count on that. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  9. Susan, this is GREAT! Seldom have I had a chance to see the same book as channeled through several different nationalities by Harlequin. (And there was the proof that Anne Gracienova was destined to be a Wench. :))
    My single title historicals have been publishing in a lot of countries (I’m particularly popular in Spain), but the covers are pretty random.
    American publishers will buy North American rights to illustrations and the artists, like authors, are then free to sell the rights abroad. So I’ve had covers that I recognized as having been originally done for books by Laura Kinsale or Johanna Lindsey.
    If I’m lucky, the historical era will be more or less right. If I’m REALLY lucky, the hair colorings will more or less match the characters. But it’s best not to count on that. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  10. Susan, this is GREAT! Seldom have I had a chance to see the same book as channeled through several different nationalities by Harlequin. (And there was the proof that Anne Gracienova was destined to be a Wench. :))
    My single title historicals have been publishing in a lot of countries (I’m particularly popular in Spain), but the covers are pretty random.
    American publishers will buy North American rights to illustrations and the artists, like authors, are then free to sell the rights abroad. So I’ve had covers that I recognized as having been originally done for books by Laura Kinsale or Johanna Lindsey.
    If I’m lucky, the historical era will be more or less right. If I’m REALLY lucky, the hair colorings will more or less match the characters. But it’s best not to count on that. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  11. Susan here:
    Hvitveis, the link came through indeed! Many thanks for sharing. And I agree, the Harlequin Norwegian covers haven’t been the best — and it’s interesting (though depressing*g*) to hear that the translations aren’t so hot either.
    I hadn’t considered how endearments wouldn’t translate literally, but you’re right. One country’s charming “delicious little cabbage” might leave other readers scratching their heads.

    Reply
  12. Susan here:
    Hvitveis, the link came through indeed! Many thanks for sharing. And I agree, the Harlequin Norwegian covers haven’t been the best — and it’s interesting (though depressing*g*) to hear that the translations aren’t so hot either.
    I hadn’t considered how endearments wouldn’t translate literally, but you’re right. One country’s charming “delicious little cabbage” might leave other readers scratching their heads.

    Reply
  13. Susan here:
    Hvitveis, the link came through indeed! Many thanks for sharing. And I agree, the Harlequin Norwegian covers haven’t been the best — and it’s interesting (though depressing*g*) to hear that the translations aren’t so hot either.
    I hadn’t considered how endearments wouldn’t translate literally, but you’re right. One country’s charming “delicious little cabbage” might leave other readers scratching their heads.

    Reply
  14. Susan here:
    Hvitveis, the link came through indeed! Many thanks for sharing. And I agree, the Harlequin Norwegian covers haven’t been the best — and it’s interesting (though depressing*g*) to hear that the translations aren’t so hot either.
    I hadn’t considered how endearments wouldn’t translate literally, but you’re right. One country’s charming “delicious little cabbage” might leave other readers scratching their heads.

    Reply
  15. Susan here:
    Hvitveis, the link came through indeed! Many thanks for sharing. And I agree, the Harlequin Norwegian covers haven’t been the best — and it’s interesting (though depressing*g*) to hear that the translations aren’t so hot either.
    I hadn’t considered how endearments wouldn’t translate literally, but you’re right. One country’s charming “delicious little cabbage” might leave other readers scratching their heads.

    Reply
  16. Fascinating! I didn’t realize books could change so much overseas. I’d be interested in seeing covers from other Wenches, too, if they’d be willing to please share them.

    Reply
  17. Fascinating! I didn’t realize books could change so much overseas. I’d be interested in seeing covers from other Wenches, too, if they’d be willing to please share them.

    Reply
  18. Fascinating! I didn’t realize books could change so much overseas. I’d be interested in seeing covers from other Wenches, too, if they’d be willing to please share them.

    Reply
  19. Fascinating! I didn’t realize books could change so much overseas. I’d be interested in seeing covers from other Wenches, too, if they’d be willing to please share them.

    Reply
  20. Fascinating! I didn’t realize books could change so much overseas. I’d be interested in seeing covers from other Wenches, too, if they’d be willing to please share them.

    Reply
  21. I have always thought Harlequin’s historical covers were among the better ones out there. They appear to make an effort to make the pictures resemble the hero and heroine and show a real scene from the story. They don’t put on one more sleazy naked body that could be any book. But I have to agree that the English covers are better than the American ones!

    Reply
  22. I have always thought Harlequin’s historical covers were among the better ones out there. They appear to make an effort to make the pictures resemble the hero and heroine and show a real scene from the story. They don’t put on one more sleazy naked body that could be any book. But I have to agree that the English covers are better than the American ones!

    Reply
  23. I have always thought Harlequin’s historical covers were among the better ones out there. They appear to make an effort to make the pictures resemble the hero and heroine and show a real scene from the story. They don’t put on one more sleazy naked body that could be any book. But I have to agree that the English covers are better than the American ones!

    Reply
  24. I have always thought Harlequin’s historical covers were among the better ones out there. They appear to make an effort to make the pictures resemble the hero and heroine and show a real scene from the story. They don’t put on one more sleazy naked body that could be any book. But I have to agree that the English covers are better than the American ones!

    Reply
  25. I have always thought Harlequin’s historical covers were among the better ones out there. They appear to make an effort to make the pictures resemble the hero and heroine and show a real scene from the story. They don’t put on one more sleazy naked body that could be any book. But I have to agree that the English covers are better than the American ones!

    Reply
  26. The French cover made me giggle. I’d think he’d soon run the ship aground, tangled as he is in his shirt, distracted by her decolletage, and trying to steer one handed. If we ever needed evidence that one can’t judge a book by its cover, we need look no further.

    Reply
  27. The French cover made me giggle. I’d think he’d soon run the ship aground, tangled as he is in his shirt, distracted by her decolletage, and trying to steer one handed. If we ever needed evidence that one can’t judge a book by its cover, we need look no further.

    Reply
  28. The French cover made me giggle. I’d think he’d soon run the ship aground, tangled as he is in his shirt, distracted by her decolletage, and trying to steer one handed. If we ever needed evidence that one can’t judge a book by its cover, we need look no further.

    Reply
  29. The French cover made me giggle. I’d think he’d soon run the ship aground, tangled as he is in his shirt, distracted by her decolletage, and trying to steer one handed. If we ever needed evidence that one can’t judge a book by its cover, we need look no further.

    Reply
  30. The French cover made me giggle. I’d think he’d soon run the ship aground, tangled as he is in his shirt, distracted by her decolletage, and trying to steer one handed. If we ever needed evidence that one can’t judge a book by its cover, we need look no further.

    Reply
  31. Susan again:
    Hah, I’d forgotten that French cover! And I can’t blame Harlequin for it, either. That one was originally published by Pocket Books, with the title “Starlight.” French title: “The Seductive Pirate”(Un seduisant corsaire.) I wonder how long that artwork has been floating around, too, since it’s by the famous (or infamous?) cover artist Pino, so popular about ten years ago. You just never know….
    But thank you, Delphine, for adding it to the collection.

    Reply
  32. Susan again:
    Hah, I’d forgotten that French cover! And I can’t blame Harlequin for it, either. That one was originally published by Pocket Books, with the title “Starlight.” French title: “The Seductive Pirate”(Un seduisant corsaire.) I wonder how long that artwork has been floating around, too, since it’s by the famous (or infamous?) cover artist Pino, so popular about ten years ago. You just never know….
    But thank you, Delphine, for adding it to the collection.

    Reply
  33. Susan again:
    Hah, I’d forgotten that French cover! And I can’t blame Harlequin for it, either. That one was originally published by Pocket Books, with the title “Starlight.” French title: “The Seductive Pirate”(Un seduisant corsaire.) I wonder how long that artwork has been floating around, too, since it’s by the famous (or infamous?) cover artist Pino, so popular about ten years ago. You just never know….
    But thank you, Delphine, for adding it to the collection.

    Reply
  34. Susan again:
    Hah, I’d forgotten that French cover! And I can’t blame Harlequin for it, either. That one was originally published by Pocket Books, with the title “Starlight.” French title: “The Seductive Pirate”(Un seduisant corsaire.) I wonder how long that artwork has been floating around, too, since it’s by the famous (or infamous?) cover artist Pino, so popular about ten years ago. You just never know….
    But thank you, Delphine, for adding it to the collection.

    Reply
  35. Susan again:
    Hah, I’d forgotten that French cover! And I can’t blame Harlequin for it, either. That one was originally published by Pocket Books, with the title “Starlight.” French title: “The Seductive Pirate”(Un seduisant corsaire.) I wonder how long that artwork has been floating around, too, since it’s by the famous (or infamous?) cover artist Pino, so popular about ten years ago. You just never know….
    But thank you, Delphine, for adding it to the collection.

    Reply
  36. I’d love to see more of these international covers… it’s fascinating. I remember being amused by the romance covers I saw when I was in France.
    Harlequin Mills & Boon most definitely recycle cover-art, even just within the US or the UK. This page http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/thumbnail_sets.htm isn’t bang up to date, but it does show zillions of cover duplicates (just US and UK editions). For example, the (very nice) picture on your Italian book has also been used in the UK (Margaret McPhee – The Captain’s Lady) and the US (Paula Marshall – Major Chancellor’s Mission).
    [My best example to date has one piece of art being used for three completely different M&B historicals in the UK alone, plus a fourth in the US.]

    Reply
  37. I’d love to see more of these international covers… it’s fascinating. I remember being amused by the romance covers I saw when I was in France.
    Harlequin Mills & Boon most definitely recycle cover-art, even just within the US or the UK. This page http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/thumbnail_sets.htm isn’t bang up to date, but it does show zillions of cover duplicates (just US and UK editions). For example, the (very nice) picture on your Italian book has also been used in the UK (Margaret McPhee – The Captain’s Lady) and the US (Paula Marshall – Major Chancellor’s Mission).
    [My best example to date has one piece of art being used for three completely different M&B historicals in the UK alone, plus a fourth in the US.]

    Reply
  38. I’d love to see more of these international covers… it’s fascinating. I remember being amused by the romance covers I saw when I was in France.
    Harlequin Mills & Boon most definitely recycle cover-art, even just within the US or the UK. This page http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/thumbnail_sets.htm isn’t bang up to date, but it does show zillions of cover duplicates (just US and UK editions). For example, the (very nice) picture on your Italian book has also been used in the UK (Margaret McPhee – The Captain’s Lady) and the US (Paula Marshall – Major Chancellor’s Mission).
    [My best example to date has one piece of art being used for three completely different M&B historicals in the UK alone, plus a fourth in the US.]

    Reply
  39. I’d love to see more of these international covers… it’s fascinating. I remember being amused by the romance covers I saw when I was in France.
    Harlequin Mills & Boon most definitely recycle cover-art, even just within the US or the UK. This page http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/thumbnail_sets.htm isn’t bang up to date, but it does show zillions of cover duplicates (just US and UK editions). For example, the (very nice) picture on your Italian book has also been used in the UK (Margaret McPhee – The Captain’s Lady) and the US (Paula Marshall – Major Chancellor’s Mission).
    [My best example to date has one piece of art being used for three completely different M&B historicals in the UK alone, plus a fourth in the US.]

    Reply
  40. I’d love to see more of these international covers… it’s fascinating. I remember being amused by the romance covers I saw when I was in France.
    Harlequin Mills & Boon most definitely recycle cover-art, even just within the US or the UK. This page http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/thumbnail_sets.htm isn’t bang up to date, but it does show zillions of cover duplicates (just US and UK editions). For example, the (very nice) picture on your Italian book has also been used in the UK (Margaret McPhee – The Captain’s Lady) and the US (Paula Marshall – Major Chancellor’s Mission).
    [My best example to date has one piece of art being used for three completely different M&B historicals in the UK alone, plus a fourth in the US.]

    Reply
  41. Oh, Gemma, that’s a fantastic link! I can’t imagine all the time it took for the owner of that page to compile it. That’s YEARS of books. I don’t believe they’ve done the “Legacy of Love” imprint for quite a while. I know there are more examples out there — the lady with the playing cards on “Duke’s Gamble” has been on at least one more cover, and I think the headless “Lady of Fortune” has, too.
    And I love the caption linking Steve Sandalis to Zoolander…..*g*

    Reply
  42. Oh, Gemma, that’s a fantastic link! I can’t imagine all the time it took for the owner of that page to compile it. That’s YEARS of books. I don’t believe they’ve done the “Legacy of Love” imprint for quite a while. I know there are more examples out there — the lady with the playing cards on “Duke’s Gamble” has been on at least one more cover, and I think the headless “Lady of Fortune” has, too.
    And I love the caption linking Steve Sandalis to Zoolander…..*g*

    Reply
  43. Oh, Gemma, that’s a fantastic link! I can’t imagine all the time it took for the owner of that page to compile it. That’s YEARS of books. I don’t believe they’ve done the “Legacy of Love” imprint for quite a while. I know there are more examples out there — the lady with the playing cards on “Duke’s Gamble” has been on at least one more cover, and I think the headless “Lady of Fortune” has, too.
    And I love the caption linking Steve Sandalis to Zoolander…..*g*

    Reply
  44. Oh, Gemma, that’s a fantastic link! I can’t imagine all the time it took for the owner of that page to compile it. That’s YEARS of books. I don’t believe they’ve done the “Legacy of Love” imprint for quite a while. I know there are more examples out there — the lady with the playing cards on “Duke’s Gamble” has been on at least one more cover, and I think the headless “Lady of Fortune” has, too.
    And I love the caption linking Steve Sandalis to Zoolander…..*g*

    Reply
  45. Oh, Gemma, that’s a fantastic link! I can’t imagine all the time it took for the owner of that page to compile it. That’s YEARS of books. I don’t believe they’ve done the “Legacy of Love” imprint for quite a while. I know there are more examples out there — the lady with the playing cards on “Duke’s Gamble” has been on at least one more cover, and I think the headless “Lady of Fortune” has, too.
    And I love the caption linking Steve Sandalis to Zoolander…..*g*

    Reply
  46. Let the Amazing Coincidences continue!
    Here are two different German anthologies of Christmas stories (Anne Gracie, here we are again) yet they have the same poor single horse drawing a coach struggling through the snow:
    http://www.amazon.de/Christmas-Rogues/dp/0373832974/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books-intl-de&qid=1226088210&sr=8-1
    http://www.amazon.de/Gifts-Season-Harlequin-Historical/dp/0373292317/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books-intl-de&qid=1226088691&sr=8-3

    Reply
  47. Let the Amazing Coincidences continue!
    Here are two different German anthologies of Christmas stories (Anne Gracie, here we are again) yet they have the same poor single horse drawing a coach struggling through the snow:
    http://www.amazon.de/Christmas-Rogues/dp/0373832974/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books-intl-de&qid=1226088210&sr=8-1
    http://www.amazon.de/Gifts-Season-Harlequin-Historical/dp/0373292317/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books-intl-de&qid=1226088691&sr=8-3

    Reply
  48. Let the Amazing Coincidences continue!
    Here are two different German anthologies of Christmas stories (Anne Gracie, here we are again) yet they have the same poor single horse drawing a coach struggling through the snow:
    http://www.amazon.de/Christmas-Rogues/dp/0373832974/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books-intl-de&qid=1226088210&sr=8-1
    http://www.amazon.de/Gifts-Season-Harlequin-Historical/dp/0373292317/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books-intl-de&qid=1226088691&sr=8-3

    Reply
  49. Let the Amazing Coincidences continue!
    Here are two different German anthologies of Christmas stories (Anne Gracie, here we are again) yet they have the same poor single horse drawing a coach struggling through the snow:
    http://www.amazon.de/Christmas-Rogues/dp/0373832974/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books-intl-de&qid=1226088210&sr=8-1
    http://www.amazon.de/Gifts-Season-Harlequin-Historical/dp/0373292317/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books-intl-de&qid=1226088691&sr=8-3

    Reply
  50. Let the Amazing Coincidences continue!
    Here are two different German anthologies of Christmas stories (Anne Gracie, here we are again) yet they have the same poor single horse drawing a coach struggling through the snow:
    http://www.amazon.de/Christmas-Rogues/dp/0373832974/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books-intl-de&qid=1226088210&sr=8-1
    http://www.amazon.de/Gifts-Season-Harlequin-Historical/dp/0373292317/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books-intl-de&qid=1226088691&sr=8-3

    Reply
  51. Susan, thanks. That’s my website I linked to. 😀
    For more cover joy, you can also look at the trends in the cover designs of HHs and M&B Historicals.
    http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/hhcovers.htm
    http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/mbcovers.htm
    The main part of the site is a complete list of all HHs and M&BHs ever published. I managed to pin down all the main series books, but I am probably missing tons of special releases.
    (Geeking out on romance books is fun!)

    Reply
  52. Susan, thanks. That’s my website I linked to. 😀
    For more cover joy, you can also look at the trends in the cover designs of HHs and M&B Historicals.
    http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/hhcovers.htm
    http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/mbcovers.htm
    The main part of the site is a complete list of all HHs and M&BHs ever published. I managed to pin down all the main series books, but I am probably missing tons of special releases.
    (Geeking out on romance books is fun!)

    Reply
  53. Susan, thanks. That’s my website I linked to. 😀
    For more cover joy, you can also look at the trends in the cover designs of HHs and M&B Historicals.
    http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/hhcovers.htm
    http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/mbcovers.htm
    The main part of the site is a complete list of all HHs and M&BHs ever published. I managed to pin down all the main series books, but I am probably missing tons of special releases.
    (Geeking out on romance books is fun!)

    Reply
  54. Susan, thanks. That’s my website I linked to. 😀
    For more cover joy, you can also look at the trends in the cover designs of HHs and M&B Historicals.
    http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/hhcovers.htm
    http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/mbcovers.htm
    The main part of the site is a complete list of all HHs and M&BHs ever published. I managed to pin down all the main series books, but I am probably missing tons of special releases.
    (Geeking out on romance books is fun!)

    Reply
  55. Susan, thanks. That’s my website I linked to. 😀
    For more cover joy, you can also look at the trends in the cover designs of HHs and M&B Historicals.
    http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/hhcovers.htm
    http://www.historicalromance.myzen.co.uk/mbcovers.htm
    The main part of the site is a complete list of all HHs and M&BHs ever published. I managed to pin down all the main series books, but I am probably missing tons of special releases.
    (Geeking out on romance books is fun!)

    Reply
  56. Do you know if this has been done for any of the other publishers? I’d like to see Avon covers over the years, complete with the old Fabio ones.

    Reply
  57. Do you know if this has been done for any of the other publishers? I’d like to see Avon covers over the years, complete with the old Fabio ones.

    Reply
  58. Do you know if this has been done for any of the other publishers? I’d like to see Avon covers over the years, complete with the old Fabio ones.

    Reply
  59. Do you know if this has been done for any of the other publishers? I’d like to see Avon covers over the years, complete with the old Fabio ones.

    Reply
  60. Do you know if this has been done for any of the other publishers? I’d like to see Avon covers over the years, complete with the old Fabio ones.

    Reply
  61. These covers are great. I buy every Regency Harlequin publishes, and in general, I like their covers. I prefer covers where the people have all their clothes on because the Regency clothes are gorgeous. And those gorgeous models look wonderful in those clothes.
    I notice that for some of the newer authors, who apparently write hotter than the more established authors, there are more open shirts and falling-off dresses.

    Reply
  62. These covers are great. I buy every Regency Harlequin publishes, and in general, I like their covers. I prefer covers where the people have all their clothes on because the Regency clothes are gorgeous. And those gorgeous models look wonderful in those clothes.
    I notice that for some of the newer authors, who apparently write hotter than the more established authors, there are more open shirts and falling-off dresses.

    Reply
  63. These covers are great. I buy every Regency Harlequin publishes, and in general, I like their covers. I prefer covers where the people have all their clothes on because the Regency clothes are gorgeous. And those gorgeous models look wonderful in those clothes.
    I notice that for some of the newer authors, who apparently write hotter than the more established authors, there are more open shirts and falling-off dresses.

    Reply
  64. These covers are great. I buy every Regency Harlequin publishes, and in general, I like their covers. I prefer covers where the people have all their clothes on because the Regency clothes are gorgeous. And those gorgeous models look wonderful in those clothes.
    I notice that for some of the newer authors, who apparently write hotter than the more established authors, there are more open shirts and falling-off dresses.

    Reply
  65. These covers are great. I buy every Regency Harlequin publishes, and in general, I like their covers. I prefer covers where the people have all their clothes on because the Regency clothes are gorgeous. And those gorgeous models look wonderful in those clothes.
    I notice that for some of the newer authors, who apparently write hotter than the more established authors, there are more open shirts and falling-off dresses.

    Reply
  66. Interesting to see how these covers morph into different versions, and to see how the various out-takes are used in one country over another. I think the NA cover with the turned away faces is the same models as the UK cover you like better, too. Do the variations come from the artists playing around with images on their computers? Do the artists get paid again each time a cover is recycled?

    Reply
  67. Interesting to see how these covers morph into different versions, and to see how the various out-takes are used in one country over another. I think the NA cover with the turned away faces is the same models as the UK cover you like better, too. Do the variations come from the artists playing around with images on their computers? Do the artists get paid again each time a cover is recycled?

    Reply
  68. Interesting to see how these covers morph into different versions, and to see how the various out-takes are used in one country over another. I think the NA cover with the turned away faces is the same models as the UK cover you like better, too. Do the variations come from the artists playing around with images on their computers? Do the artists get paid again each time a cover is recycled?

    Reply
  69. Interesting to see how these covers morph into different versions, and to see how the various out-takes are used in one country over another. I think the NA cover with the turned away faces is the same models as the UK cover you like better, too. Do the variations come from the artists playing around with images on their computers? Do the artists get paid again each time a cover is recycled?

    Reply
  70. Interesting to see how these covers morph into different versions, and to see how the various out-takes are used in one country over another. I think the NA cover with the turned away faces is the same models as the UK cover you like better, too. Do the variations come from the artists playing around with images on their computers? Do the artists get paid again each time a cover is recycled?

    Reply
  71. Susan Scott wrote:
    I hadn’t considered how endearments wouldn’t translate literally, but you’re right. One country’s charming “delicious little cabbage” might leave other readers scratching their heads.
    This is always a challenge in translation. In the German original of Kurt Tucholsky’s Kleiner Mann, Was Nun?, the heroine’s nickname was Lämbchen (little lamb). The English translation didn’t make it literal, but used “Bunny,” which does occur and gives the same impression of a soft and rather fuzzy innocent.

    Reply
  72. Susan Scott wrote:
    I hadn’t considered how endearments wouldn’t translate literally, but you’re right. One country’s charming “delicious little cabbage” might leave other readers scratching their heads.
    This is always a challenge in translation. In the German original of Kurt Tucholsky’s Kleiner Mann, Was Nun?, the heroine’s nickname was Lämbchen (little lamb). The English translation didn’t make it literal, but used “Bunny,” which does occur and gives the same impression of a soft and rather fuzzy innocent.

    Reply
  73. Susan Scott wrote:
    I hadn’t considered how endearments wouldn’t translate literally, but you’re right. One country’s charming “delicious little cabbage” might leave other readers scratching their heads.
    This is always a challenge in translation. In the German original of Kurt Tucholsky’s Kleiner Mann, Was Nun?, the heroine’s nickname was Lämbchen (little lamb). The English translation didn’t make it literal, but used “Bunny,” which does occur and gives the same impression of a soft and rather fuzzy innocent.

    Reply
  74. Susan Scott wrote:
    I hadn’t considered how endearments wouldn’t translate literally, but you’re right. One country’s charming “delicious little cabbage” might leave other readers scratching their heads.
    This is always a challenge in translation. In the German original of Kurt Tucholsky’s Kleiner Mann, Was Nun?, the heroine’s nickname was Lämbchen (little lamb). The English translation didn’t make it literal, but used “Bunny,” which does occur and gives the same impression of a soft and rather fuzzy innocent.

    Reply
  75. Susan Scott wrote:
    I hadn’t considered how endearments wouldn’t translate literally, but you’re right. One country’s charming “delicious little cabbage” might leave other readers scratching their heads.
    This is always a challenge in translation. In the German original of Kurt Tucholsky’s Kleiner Mann, Was Nun?, the heroine’s nickname was Lämbchen (little lamb). The English translation didn’t make it literal, but used “Bunny,” which does occur and gives the same impression of a soft and rather fuzzy innocent.

    Reply
  76. Gemma, I hadn’t realized the site with the Harlequin covers was yours! That’s quite a commitment in time (aka, a whole lot of “geeking out”!) for you, but I’m pleased you decided to share it with us. Fascinating to see how the covers have “progressed” over time, too. I think it was my second Harl. Historical (10/92) that got the little lace-trimmed handkerchief on the cover;
    Bonnie, I don’t know how the rights and payment work for the cover artists. I suspect they’re probably only paid once for the use of the art, but it could be something that artists can negotiate when they’re contracted for the work. But that’s just a guess; I honestly don’t know.
    Virginia, I agree, translation must be very difficult. Not only do you have the differences in colloquial language, but also the historical phrases and slong, too.

    Reply
  77. Gemma, I hadn’t realized the site with the Harlequin covers was yours! That’s quite a commitment in time (aka, a whole lot of “geeking out”!) for you, but I’m pleased you decided to share it with us. Fascinating to see how the covers have “progressed” over time, too. I think it was my second Harl. Historical (10/92) that got the little lace-trimmed handkerchief on the cover;
    Bonnie, I don’t know how the rights and payment work for the cover artists. I suspect they’re probably only paid once for the use of the art, but it could be something that artists can negotiate when they’re contracted for the work. But that’s just a guess; I honestly don’t know.
    Virginia, I agree, translation must be very difficult. Not only do you have the differences in colloquial language, but also the historical phrases and slong, too.

    Reply
  78. Gemma, I hadn’t realized the site with the Harlequin covers was yours! That’s quite a commitment in time (aka, a whole lot of “geeking out”!) for you, but I’m pleased you decided to share it with us. Fascinating to see how the covers have “progressed” over time, too. I think it was my second Harl. Historical (10/92) that got the little lace-trimmed handkerchief on the cover;
    Bonnie, I don’t know how the rights and payment work for the cover artists. I suspect they’re probably only paid once for the use of the art, but it could be something that artists can negotiate when they’re contracted for the work. But that’s just a guess; I honestly don’t know.
    Virginia, I agree, translation must be very difficult. Not only do you have the differences in colloquial language, but also the historical phrases and slong, too.

    Reply
  79. Gemma, I hadn’t realized the site with the Harlequin covers was yours! That’s quite a commitment in time (aka, a whole lot of “geeking out”!) for you, but I’m pleased you decided to share it with us. Fascinating to see how the covers have “progressed” over time, too. I think it was my second Harl. Historical (10/92) that got the little lace-trimmed handkerchief on the cover;
    Bonnie, I don’t know how the rights and payment work for the cover artists. I suspect they’re probably only paid once for the use of the art, but it could be something that artists can negotiate when they’re contracted for the work. But that’s just a guess; I honestly don’t know.
    Virginia, I agree, translation must be very difficult. Not only do you have the differences in colloquial language, but also the historical phrases and slong, too.

    Reply
  80. Gemma, I hadn’t realized the site with the Harlequin covers was yours! That’s quite a commitment in time (aka, a whole lot of “geeking out”!) for you, but I’m pleased you decided to share it with us. Fascinating to see how the covers have “progressed” over time, too. I think it was my second Harl. Historical (10/92) that got the little lace-trimmed handkerchief on the cover;
    Bonnie, I don’t know how the rights and payment work for the cover artists. I suspect they’re probably only paid once for the use of the art, but it could be something that artists can negotiate when they’re contracted for the work. But that’s just a guess; I honestly don’t know.
    Virginia, I agree, translation must be very difficult. Not only do you have the differences in colloquial language, but also the historical phrases and slong, too.

    Reply
  81. Well, it seems that here in Finland we often get the same covers as the Swedes do, since the same publisher takes care of both countries, but not always. Sometimes the covers are totally different. And we get those recycled covers, too. However, if there are people in the cover, they might not look at all the way the characters are described in the book. One would think that those who decide which cover to choose would at least bother to take look at the text to see what the characters actually look like. But no matter what the covers look like, it’s fun to read books in different languages -even though the translations of Harlequin books tend to be about 20 pages shorter than the original text in English.

    Reply
  82. Well, it seems that here in Finland we often get the same covers as the Swedes do, since the same publisher takes care of both countries, but not always. Sometimes the covers are totally different. And we get those recycled covers, too. However, if there are people in the cover, they might not look at all the way the characters are described in the book. One would think that those who decide which cover to choose would at least bother to take look at the text to see what the characters actually look like. But no matter what the covers look like, it’s fun to read books in different languages -even though the translations of Harlequin books tend to be about 20 pages shorter than the original text in English.

    Reply
  83. Well, it seems that here in Finland we often get the same covers as the Swedes do, since the same publisher takes care of both countries, but not always. Sometimes the covers are totally different. And we get those recycled covers, too. However, if there are people in the cover, they might not look at all the way the characters are described in the book. One would think that those who decide which cover to choose would at least bother to take look at the text to see what the characters actually look like. But no matter what the covers look like, it’s fun to read books in different languages -even though the translations of Harlequin books tend to be about 20 pages shorter than the original text in English.

    Reply
  84. Well, it seems that here in Finland we often get the same covers as the Swedes do, since the same publisher takes care of both countries, but not always. Sometimes the covers are totally different. And we get those recycled covers, too. However, if there are people in the cover, they might not look at all the way the characters are described in the book. One would think that those who decide which cover to choose would at least bother to take look at the text to see what the characters actually look like. But no matter what the covers look like, it’s fun to read books in different languages -even though the translations of Harlequin books tend to be about 20 pages shorter than the original text in English.

    Reply
  85. Well, it seems that here in Finland we often get the same covers as the Swedes do, since the same publisher takes care of both countries, but not always. Sometimes the covers are totally different. And we get those recycled covers, too. However, if there are people in the cover, they might not look at all the way the characters are described in the book. One would think that those who decide which cover to choose would at least bother to take look at the text to see what the characters actually look like. But no matter what the covers look like, it’s fun to read books in different languages -even though the translations of Harlequin books tend to be about 20 pages shorter than the original text in English.

    Reply
  86. Diane, I’ve also had the same cover on a couple of other foreign editions as well, and I can only guess where else it’s popped up on yet another author’s book. It even fit the story of my book (an unexpected bonus), which was set in a gentlemen’s gaming club.
    It’s a beautiful cover, and I’m not surprised they’re recylcing it. Whatever you filled out on your cover fact sheet must have been pure genius. *g*

    Reply
  87. Diane, I’ve also had the same cover on a couple of other foreign editions as well, and I can only guess where else it’s popped up on yet another author’s book. It even fit the story of my book (an unexpected bonus), which was set in a gentlemen’s gaming club.
    It’s a beautiful cover, and I’m not surprised they’re recylcing it. Whatever you filled out on your cover fact sheet must have been pure genius. *g*

    Reply
  88. Diane, I’ve also had the same cover on a couple of other foreign editions as well, and I can only guess where else it’s popped up on yet another author’s book. It even fit the story of my book (an unexpected bonus), which was set in a gentlemen’s gaming club.
    It’s a beautiful cover, and I’m not surprised they’re recylcing it. Whatever you filled out on your cover fact sheet must have been pure genius. *g*

    Reply
  89. Diane, I’ve also had the same cover on a couple of other foreign editions as well, and I can only guess where else it’s popped up on yet another author’s book. It even fit the story of my book (an unexpected bonus), which was set in a gentlemen’s gaming club.
    It’s a beautiful cover, and I’m not surprised they’re recylcing it. Whatever you filled out on your cover fact sheet must have been pure genius. *g*

    Reply
  90. Diane, I’ve also had the same cover on a couple of other foreign editions as well, and I can only guess where else it’s popped up on yet another author’s book. It even fit the story of my book (an unexpected bonus), which was set in a gentlemen’s gaming club.
    It’s a beautiful cover, and I’m not surprised they’re recylcing it. Whatever you filled out on your cover fact sheet must have been pure genius. *g*

    Reply

Leave a Comment