Inspirational Rooms

Hi, Jo here.

I recently went on a little trip north, mainly to celebrate a wedding anniversary with friends, but it also let me visit a place I had in the back of my mind when I envisioned Perriam Manor in Seduction in Silk —Astley Hall. The outside isn't right, but years ago, I had been impressed by the amount of dark panelling and the heavily ornate plaster ceilings. Ornate plaster ceilings aren't that unusual in grand houses, but these are in rooms of quite modest proportions as you can see at the right. They do feel rather oppressive, and of such substance that they might fall on one's head! 

In the book I describe them as swirls of plaster, but that's my memory failing me.
M4618 - m4619ew pan2I found they are detailed and this was apparently achieved by carving the designs out of wood and then plastering on top. Cheating, I suppose, but impressive. No one knows who created them.The next picture shows some detail. Sort of ghoulish, isn't it? Like a skeleton. I wish I'd remembered that detail! M4615w

 

 

 

On to the rooms. Here's a typical one. 
M4649wThe ceiling is quite modest, but the panelling is very dark. Imagine the windows overhung by ivy, as in the novel!

Finally, one of the bedrooms, which is almost exactly like the one I saw when writing the opening scene, when Perry arrives at Perriam Manor to find his cousin Giles dying, a curse on his mind.

If you've read Seduction in Silk, do these pictures fit the image in your mind?

M4703ew

We also went to Chirk Castle on the Welsh border, which I was surpised to find had relevance to Crag Wyvern, the faux medieval keep in The Dragon's Bride, which therefore also plays a part in A Shocking Delight, which follows on with the story of the new Earl of Wyvern and his search for a bride.

I'll share more about Chirk another time.

Have you ever visited a house that seemed ideal as a setting for a historical romance? Which one, and why?

This all reminds me of the magical Thorne miniature rooms in the Chicago Institute of Arts. They are recreations of rooms from all periods and by detail and use of light they feel as if you could just walk into the them.

There are examples on line. Here's one. Can't you just imagine some of my Mallorens strolling in there?

Lastly, my publisher recently did a cover reveal for A Shocking Delight, out next April. We're all so pleased with this one we felt it needed a fanfare. Isn't it gorgeous?
Andel Lucy looks as young and pretty as she is. She doesn't always find it works to her advantage, especially when trying to be taken seriously.

Anyone note a slight implausibility in the picture, though? If so, I'll tell you how it relates to Chirk.If not, you'll have to wait.*G*

Cheers,

Jo

 

 

90 thoughts on “Inspirational Rooms”

  1. The implausibility is that a ship with the draught of that one could be close enough inshore to be seen through the window of a house, like that! But it’s beautiful and evocative, so one must allow the artistic licence!

    Reply
  2. The implausibility is that a ship with the draught of that one could be close enough inshore to be seen through the window of a house, like that! But it’s beautiful and evocative, so one must allow the artistic licence!

    Reply
  3. The implausibility is that a ship with the draught of that one could be close enough inshore to be seen through the window of a house, like that! But it’s beautiful and evocative, so one must allow the artistic licence!

    Reply
  4. The implausibility is that a ship with the draught of that one could be close enough inshore to be seen through the window of a house, like that! But it’s beautiful and evocative, so one must allow the artistic licence!

    Reply
  5. The implausibility is that a ship with the draught of that one could be close enough inshore to be seen through the window of a house, like that! But it’s beautiful and evocative, so one must allow the artistic licence!

    Reply
  6. The first thing that springs to mind, looking at the cover, is that if it’s set at Crag Wyvern, there shouldn’t be big windows looking out over the sea… but I suppose an arrow slit wouldn’t give the right impression on the cover. 😀 Lovely cover, can’t wait to read it!

    Reply
  7. The first thing that springs to mind, looking at the cover, is that if it’s set at Crag Wyvern, there shouldn’t be big windows looking out over the sea… but I suppose an arrow slit wouldn’t give the right impression on the cover. 😀 Lovely cover, can’t wait to read it!

    Reply
  8. The first thing that springs to mind, looking at the cover, is that if it’s set at Crag Wyvern, there shouldn’t be big windows looking out over the sea… but I suppose an arrow slit wouldn’t give the right impression on the cover. 😀 Lovely cover, can’t wait to read it!

    Reply
  9. The first thing that springs to mind, looking at the cover, is that if it’s set at Crag Wyvern, there shouldn’t be big windows looking out over the sea… but I suppose an arrow slit wouldn’t give the right impression on the cover. 😀 Lovely cover, can’t wait to read it!

    Reply
  10. The first thing that springs to mind, looking at the cover, is that if it’s set at Crag Wyvern, there shouldn’t be big windows looking out over the sea… but I suppose an arrow slit wouldn’t give the right impression on the cover. 😀 Lovely cover, can’t wait to read it!

    Reply
  11. That is a beautiful cover.
    A note about woodwork–the “bones” of the plaster ceiling is hand carved. A craftsman had to take a chisel and get the wood just right before plaster could be applied. Whoever did that was a master craftsman. So was the plaster guy that was able to get it all stuck on there evenly. So beautiful! Also, the paneling is dark because wood darkens over time (generally–walnut is an exception and gets lighter along with a couple of others I can’t think of right now). The UV in the natural light is what does it. So, when that room was new it would have been much lighter. That said, they are perfect settings!

    Reply
  12. That is a beautiful cover.
    A note about woodwork–the “bones” of the plaster ceiling is hand carved. A craftsman had to take a chisel and get the wood just right before plaster could be applied. Whoever did that was a master craftsman. So was the plaster guy that was able to get it all stuck on there evenly. So beautiful! Also, the paneling is dark because wood darkens over time (generally–walnut is an exception and gets lighter along with a couple of others I can’t think of right now). The UV in the natural light is what does it. So, when that room was new it would have been much lighter. That said, they are perfect settings!

    Reply
  13. That is a beautiful cover.
    A note about woodwork–the “bones” of the plaster ceiling is hand carved. A craftsman had to take a chisel and get the wood just right before plaster could be applied. Whoever did that was a master craftsman. So was the plaster guy that was able to get it all stuck on there evenly. So beautiful! Also, the paneling is dark because wood darkens over time (generally–walnut is an exception and gets lighter along with a couple of others I can’t think of right now). The UV in the natural light is what does it. So, when that room was new it would have been much lighter. That said, they are perfect settings!

    Reply
  14. That is a beautiful cover.
    A note about woodwork–the “bones” of the plaster ceiling is hand carved. A craftsman had to take a chisel and get the wood just right before plaster could be applied. Whoever did that was a master craftsman. So was the plaster guy that was able to get it all stuck on there evenly. So beautiful! Also, the paneling is dark because wood darkens over time (generally–walnut is an exception and gets lighter along with a couple of others I can’t think of right now). The UV in the natural light is what does it. So, when that room was new it would have been much lighter. That said, they are perfect settings!

    Reply
  15. That is a beautiful cover.
    A note about woodwork–the “bones” of the plaster ceiling is hand carved. A craftsman had to take a chisel and get the wood just right before plaster could be applied. Whoever did that was a master craftsman. So was the plaster guy that was able to get it all stuck on there evenly. So beautiful! Also, the paneling is dark because wood darkens over time (generally–walnut is an exception and gets lighter along with a couple of others I can’t think of right now). The UV in the natural light is what does it. So, when that room was new it would have been much lighter. That said, they are perfect settings!

    Reply
  16. Good spot, Julie! However, talking this over with my husband, and having just visited Chirk, I realized there could be a window or two. After all, David’s having to live there, so it’s believable that he’s knocked out the wall to put in a window in his private parlour, isn’t it? Even though he’s broke?
    Did you notice I learned how to have an avatar work? Yay!
    Jo

    Reply
  17. Good spot, Julie! However, talking this over with my husband, and having just visited Chirk, I realized there could be a window or two. After all, David’s having to live there, so it’s believable that he’s knocked out the wall to put in a window in his private parlour, isn’t it? Even though he’s broke?
    Did you notice I learned how to have an avatar work? Yay!
    Jo

    Reply
  18. Good spot, Julie! However, talking this over with my husband, and having just visited Chirk, I realized there could be a window or two. After all, David’s having to live there, so it’s believable that he’s knocked out the wall to put in a window in his private parlour, isn’t it? Even though he’s broke?
    Did you notice I learned how to have an avatar work? Yay!
    Jo

    Reply
  19. Good spot, Julie! However, talking this over with my husband, and having just visited Chirk, I realized there could be a window or two. After all, David’s having to live there, so it’s believable that he’s knocked out the wall to put in a window in his private parlour, isn’t it? Even though he’s broke?
    Did you notice I learned how to have an avatar work? Yay!
    Jo

    Reply
  20. Good spot, Julie! However, talking this over with my husband, and having just visited Chirk, I realized there could be a window or two. After all, David’s having to live there, so it’s believable that he’s knocked out the wall to put in a window in his private parlour, isn’t it? Even though he’s broke?
    Did you notice I learned how to have an avatar work? Yay!
    Jo

    Reply
  21. Good points, Amanda. Wood does darken, but this is a particularly dense dark. I didn’t check, but it could be oak which darkens almost to black. At Perriam Manor I had it oak.
    Jo

    Reply
  22. Good points, Amanda. Wood does darken, but this is a particularly dense dark. I didn’t check, but it could be oak which darkens almost to black. At Perriam Manor I had it oak.
    Jo

    Reply
  23. Good points, Amanda. Wood does darken, but this is a particularly dense dark. I didn’t check, but it could be oak which darkens almost to black. At Perriam Manor I had it oak.
    Jo

    Reply
  24. Good points, Amanda. Wood does darken, but this is a particularly dense dark. I didn’t check, but it could be oak which darkens almost to black. At Perriam Manor I had it oak.
    Jo

    Reply
  25. Good points, Amanda. Wood does darken, but this is a particularly dense dark. I didn’t check, but it could be oak which darkens almost to black. At Perriam Manor I had it oak.
    Jo

    Reply
  26. I’m completely in love with those miniature rooms, and I’d never seen them before. Thanks for linking!
    Also, that ceiling looks like maybe an underwater seascape? With anemone things, and corals and what have you? Otherwise, it just sort of creeps me out. 😀

    Reply
  27. I’m completely in love with those miniature rooms, and I’d never seen them before. Thanks for linking!
    Also, that ceiling looks like maybe an underwater seascape? With anemone things, and corals and what have you? Otherwise, it just sort of creeps me out. 😀

    Reply
  28. I’m completely in love with those miniature rooms, and I’d never seen them before. Thanks for linking!
    Also, that ceiling looks like maybe an underwater seascape? With anemone things, and corals and what have you? Otherwise, it just sort of creeps me out. 😀

    Reply
  29. I’m completely in love with those miniature rooms, and I’d never seen them before. Thanks for linking!
    Also, that ceiling looks like maybe an underwater seascape? With anemone things, and corals and what have you? Otherwise, it just sort of creeps me out. 😀

    Reply
  30. I’m completely in love with those miniature rooms, and I’d never seen them before. Thanks for linking!
    Also, that ceiling looks like maybe an underwater seascape? With anemone things, and corals and what have you? Otherwise, it just sort of creeps me out. 😀

    Reply
  31. Yes, that does look like my mental image of Perriam Manor, but eeeew about the skeletons in the ceiling! Indeed excellent craftsmanship, but not to my taste. And while the dark walls are very impressive, they’d probably also be depressive. *G*

    Reply
  32. Yes, that does look like my mental image of Perriam Manor, but eeeew about the skeletons in the ceiling! Indeed excellent craftsmanship, but not to my taste. And while the dark walls are very impressive, they’d probably also be depressive. *G*

    Reply
  33. Yes, that does look like my mental image of Perriam Manor, but eeeew about the skeletons in the ceiling! Indeed excellent craftsmanship, but not to my taste. And while the dark walls are very impressive, they’d probably also be depressive. *G*

    Reply
  34. Yes, that does look like my mental image of Perriam Manor, but eeeew about the skeletons in the ceiling! Indeed excellent craftsmanship, but not to my taste. And while the dark walls are very impressive, they’d probably also be depressive. *G*

    Reply
  35. Yes, that does look like my mental image of Perriam Manor, but eeeew about the skeletons in the ceiling! Indeed excellent craftsmanship, but not to my taste. And while the dark walls are very impressive, they’d probably also be depressive. *G*

    Reply
  36. I once stayed in a hotel in a building that ahd been in business on that spt as a coaching inn for centuries. The place sprawled, There were many short corridors with two or three steps. For some reason I want to put it into a book. However, as I am not got at finishing books, it is still in my mind.
    I read about some houses with hidden corridors and stairs for servants and thought such a place would be great for eavesdropping.
    The detail in the rooms pictured is amazing, especially for those who live in apartments or houses where one doesn’t even have a light fixture to break the plain smooth blank surfaceof the ceiling.
    PS Love the cover, Not too bothered about realism of windows and ship draught.. it isn’t impossible for the place to have a window nor do we know how deep the water is at that point. The smugglers are active there and ships have to come fairly close to shore for quick unloading.

    Reply
  37. I once stayed in a hotel in a building that ahd been in business on that spt as a coaching inn for centuries. The place sprawled, There were many short corridors with two or three steps. For some reason I want to put it into a book. However, as I am not got at finishing books, it is still in my mind.
    I read about some houses with hidden corridors and stairs for servants and thought such a place would be great for eavesdropping.
    The detail in the rooms pictured is amazing, especially for those who live in apartments or houses where one doesn’t even have a light fixture to break the plain smooth blank surfaceof the ceiling.
    PS Love the cover, Not too bothered about realism of windows and ship draught.. it isn’t impossible for the place to have a window nor do we know how deep the water is at that point. The smugglers are active there and ships have to come fairly close to shore for quick unloading.

    Reply
  38. I once stayed in a hotel in a building that ahd been in business on that spt as a coaching inn for centuries. The place sprawled, There were many short corridors with two or three steps. For some reason I want to put it into a book. However, as I am not got at finishing books, it is still in my mind.
    I read about some houses with hidden corridors and stairs for servants and thought such a place would be great for eavesdropping.
    The detail in the rooms pictured is amazing, especially for those who live in apartments or houses where one doesn’t even have a light fixture to break the plain smooth blank surfaceof the ceiling.
    PS Love the cover, Not too bothered about realism of windows and ship draught.. it isn’t impossible for the place to have a window nor do we know how deep the water is at that point. The smugglers are active there and ships have to come fairly close to shore for quick unloading.

    Reply
  39. I once stayed in a hotel in a building that ahd been in business on that spt as a coaching inn for centuries. The place sprawled, There were many short corridors with two or three steps. For some reason I want to put it into a book. However, as I am not got at finishing books, it is still in my mind.
    I read about some houses with hidden corridors and stairs for servants and thought such a place would be great for eavesdropping.
    The detail in the rooms pictured is amazing, especially for those who live in apartments or houses where one doesn’t even have a light fixture to break the plain smooth blank surfaceof the ceiling.
    PS Love the cover, Not too bothered about realism of windows and ship draught.. it isn’t impossible for the place to have a window nor do we know how deep the water is at that point. The smugglers are active there and ships have to come fairly close to shore for quick unloading.

    Reply
  40. I once stayed in a hotel in a building that ahd been in business on that spt as a coaching inn for centuries. The place sprawled, There were many short corridors with two or three steps. For some reason I want to put it into a book. However, as I am not got at finishing books, it is still in my mind.
    I read about some houses with hidden corridors and stairs for servants and thought such a place would be great for eavesdropping.
    The detail in the rooms pictured is amazing, especially for those who live in apartments or houses where one doesn’t even have a light fixture to break the plain smooth blank surfaceof the ceiling.
    PS Love the cover, Not too bothered about realism of windows and ship draught.. it isn’t impossible for the place to have a window nor do we know how deep the water is at that point. The smugglers are active there and ships have to come fairly close to shore for quick unloading.

    Reply
  41. The cover deserves fanfare.
    As for places that would make good settings, three come to mind–there’s a Norman chapel at Dover Castle that’s small and intimate, there’s a room in the Hearst mansion that has a ceiling that was turquoise blue and gold that was stunning (it had been removed from some home in Europe and reassembled in California), and there’s a staircase in the Vanderbilt mansion in North Carolina that was lovely. I always envison myself floating gracefully down the stairs in a stunning evening gown when visiting manor houses or castles.

    Reply
  42. The cover deserves fanfare.
    As for places that would make good settings, three come to mind–there’s a Norman chapel at Dover Castle that’s small and intimate, there’s a room in the Hearst mansion that has a ceiling that was turquoise blue and gold that was stunning (it had been removed from some home in Europe and reassembled in California), and there’s a staircase in the Vanderbilt mansion in North Carolina that was lovely. I always envison myself floating gracefully down the stairs in a stunning evening gown when visiting manor houses or castles.

    Reply
  43. The cover deserves fanfare.
    As for places that would make good settings, three come to mind–there’s a Norman chapel at Dover Castle that’s small and intimate, there’s a room in the Hearst mansion that has a ceiling that was turquoise blue and gold that was stunning (it had been removed from some home in Europe and reassembled in California), and there’s a staircase in the Vanderbilt mansion in North Carolina that was lovely. I always envison myself floating gracefully down the stairs in a stunning evening gown when visiting manor houses or castles.

    Reply
  44. The cover deserves fanfare.
    As for places that would make good settings, three come to mind–there’s a Norman chapel at Dover Castle that’s small and intimate, there’s a room in the Hearst mansion that has a ceiling that was turquoise blue and gold that was stunning (it had been removed from some home in Europe and reassembled in California), and there’s a staircase in the Vanderbilt mansion in North Carolina that was lovely. I always envison myself floating gracefully down the stairs in a stunning evening gown when visiting manor houses or castles.

    Reply
  45. The cover deserves fanfare.
    As for places that would make good settings, three come to mind–there’s a Norman chapel at Dover Castle that’s small and intimate, there’s a room in the Hearst mansion that has a ceiling that was turquoise blue and gold that was stunning (it had been removed from some home in Europe and reassembled in California), and there’s a staircase in the Vanderbilt mansion in North Carolina that was lovely. I always envison myself floating gracefully down the stairs in a stunning evening gown when visiting manor houses or castles.

    Reply
  46. Lucy, the Thorne rooms are fabulous.
    Interesting thought about underwater!
    Yes, Nancy, a lot of these old buildings ramble. Often they were built in bits and pieces and added onto in days before planning permission. A lot of the time rooms were small, because large rooms are hard to keep warm in winter.
    Jo

    Reply
  47. Lucy, the Thorne rooms are fabulous.
    Interesting thought about underwater!
    Yes, Nancy, a lot of these old buildings ramble. Often they were built in bits and pieces and added onto in days before planning permission. A lot of the time rooms were small, because large rooms are hard to keep warm in winter.
    Jo

    Reply
  48. Lucy, the Thorne rooms are fabulous.
    Interesting thought about underwater!
    Yes, Nancy, a lot of these old buildings ramble. Often they were built in bits and pieces and added onto in days before planning permission. A lot of the time rooms were small, because large rooms are hard to keep warm in winter.
    Jo

    Reply
  49. Lucy, the Thorne rooms are fabulous.
    Interesting thought about underwater!
    Yes, Nancy, a lot of these old buildings ramble. Often they were built in bits and pieces and added onto in days before planning permission. A lot of the time rooms were small, because large rooms are hard to keep warm in winter.
    Jo

    Reply
  50. Lucy, the Thorne rooms are fabulous.
    Interesting thought about underwater!
    Yes, Nancy, a lot of these old buildings ramble. Often they were built in bits and pieces and added onto in days before planning permission. A lot of the time rooms were small, because large rooms are hard to keep warm in winter.
    Jo

    Reply
  51. Interesting suggestions, Shannon.
    There’s a double staircase in a French Chateau — Chantillon? — where the two coil around each other like the DNA double helix, so you could be on one and see a person on the other, and even talk to them, but not get to them.
    That could be fabulous, but a writer would first have to set it up in the reader’s mind.
    Jo

    Reply
  52. Interesting suggestions, Shannon.
    There’s a double staircase in a French Chateau — Chantillon? — where the two coil around each other like the DNA double helix, so you could be on one and see a person on the other, and even talk to them, but not get to them.
    That could be fabulous, but a writer would first have to set it up in the reader’s mind.
    Jo

    Reply
  53. Interesting suggestions, Shannon.
    There’s a double staircase in a French Chateau — Chantillon? — where the two coil around each other like the DNA double helix, so you could be on one and see a person on the other, and even talk to them, but not get to them.
    That could be fabulous, but a writer would first have to set it up in the reader’s mind.
    Jo

    Reply
  54. Interesting suggestions, Shannon.
    There’s a double staircase in a French Chateau — Chantillon? — where the two coil around each other like the DNA double helix, so you could be on one and see a person on the other, and even talk to them, but not get to them.
    That could be fabulous, but a writer would first have to set it up in the reader’s mind.
    Jo

    Reply
  55. Interesting suggestions, Shannon.
    There’s a double staircase in a French Chateau — Chantillon? — where the two coil around each other like the DNA double helix, so you could be on one and see a person on the other, and even talk to them, but not get to them.
    That could be fabulous, but a writer would first have to set it up in the reader’s mind.
    Jo

    Reply
  56. Fortunately your books are sold at the grocery store, so I am happily reading about Perriam Manor. That ceiling looks like it is going to attack whoever sits in the room. I see underwater creatures, but my first thought was aliens. So strange that all that exacting work to us looks horrible, yet it must have been an absolute show stopper when it was made.
    I look forward to the next book showing up at the grocery store.

    Reply
  57. Fortunately your books are sold at the grocery store, so I am happily reading about Perriam Manor. That ceiling looks like it is going to attack whoever sits in the room. I see underwater creatures, but my first thought was aliens. So strange that all that exacting work to us looks horrible, yet it must have been an absolute show stopper when it was made.
    I look forward to the next book showing up at the grocery store.

    Reply
  58. Fortunately your books are sold at the grocery store, so I am happily reading about Perriam Manor. That ceiling looks like it is going to attack whoever sits in the room. I see underwater creatures, but my first thought was aliens. So strange that all that exacting work to us looks horrible, yet it must have been an absolute show stopper when it was made.
    I look forward to the next book showing up at the grocery store.

    Reply
  59. Fortunately your books are sold at the grocery store, so I am happily reading about Perriam Manor. That ceiling looks like it is going to attack whoever sits in the room. I see underwater creatures, but my first thought was aliens. So strange that all that exacting work to us looks horrible, yet it must have been an absolute show stopper when it was made.
    I look forward to the next book showing up at the grocery store.

    Reply
  60. Fortunately your books are sold at the grocery store, so I am happily reading about Perriam Manor. That ceiling looks like it is going to attack whoever sits in the room. I see underwater creatures, but my first thought was aliens. So strange that all that exacting work to us looks horrible, yet it must have been an absolute show stopper when it was made.
    I look forward to the next book showing up at the grocery store.

    Reply
  61. That ceiling gives me the horrors. So opressive it seems to be closing in.
    All those comments about secret stairways, corridors, rooms etc., make me enviuous. Living in Australia where everything is still quite new, I would love to live in or near one of those old houses that could be explored and discovered.
    Looking forward to reading David’s story. I love reading about that part of England and always envision Polperro for some reason.

    Reply
  62. That ceiling gives me the horrors. So opressive it seems to be closing in.
    All those comments about secret stairways, corridors, rooms etc., make me enviuous. Living in Australia where everything is still quite new, I would love to live in or near one of those old houses that could be explored and discovered.
    Looking forward to reading David’s story. I love reading about that part of England and always envision Polperro for some reason.

    Reply
  63. That ceiling gives me the horrors. So opressive it seems to be closing in.
    All those comments about secret stairways, corridors, rooms etc., make me enviuous. Living in Australia where everything is still quite new, I would love to live in or near one of those old houses that could be explored and discovered.
    Looking forward to reading David’s story. I love reading about that part of England and always envision Polperro for some reason.

    Reply
  64. That ceiling gives me the horrors. So opressive it seems to be closing in.
    All those comments about secret stairways, corridors, rooms etc., make me enviuous. Living in Australia where everything is still quite new, I would love to live in or near one of those old houses that could be explored and discovered.
    Looking forward to reading David’s story. I love reading about that part of England and always envision Polperro for some reason.

    Reply
  65. That ceiling gives me the horrors. So opressive it seems to be closing in.
    All those comments about secret stairways, corridors, rooms etc., make me enviuous. Living in Australia where everything is still quite new, I would love to live in or near one of those old houses that could be explored and discovered.
    Looking forward to reading David’s story. I love reading about that part of England and always envision Polperro for some reason.

    Reply
  66. When we lived in England one of my father’s squadron buddies rented an old medieval manor house outside of Ipswich. I cannot remember the name of it. (It’s been forty years!)
    What I do remember is the sloped wooden floors upstairs. And the huge fireplaces. And the little hidden rooms. And how cold it always was because the house was so big.

    Reply
  67. When we lived in England one of my father’s squadron buddies rented an old medieval manor house outside of Ipswich. I cannot remember the name of it. (It’s been forty years!)
    What I do remember is the sloped wooden floors upstairs. And the huge fireplaces. And the little hidden rooms. And how cold it always was because the house was so big.

    Reply
  68. When we lived in England one of my father’s squadron buddies rented an old medieval manor house outside of Ipswich. I cannot remember the name of it. (It’s been forty years!)
    What I do remember is the sloped wooden floors upstairs. And the huge fireplaces. And the little hidden rooms. And how cold it always was because the house was so big.

    Reply
  69. When we lived in England one of my father’s squadron buddies rented an old medieval manor house outside of Ipswich. I cannot remember the name of it. (It’s been forty years!)
    What I do remember is the sloped wooden floors upstairs. And the huge fireplaces. And the little hidden rooms. And how cold it always was because the house was so big.

    Reply
  70. When we lived in England one of my father’s squadron buddies rented an old medieval manor house outside of Ipswich. I cannot remember the name of it. (It’s been forty years!)
    What I do remember is the sloped wooden floors upstairs. And the huge fireplaces. And the little hidden rooms. And how cold it always was because the house was so big.

    Reply

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