Ink, vellum . . . and Murder


Old_book_bindingsAndrea here
, My new Wrexford & Sloane mystery, MURDER AT THE MERTON LIBRARY, has just been put up all all major retailers for pre-order, and as the setting for the dastardly crime that sets off the investigation into old betrayals and new skullduggery takes place in a very beautiful and historic library, I thought I would give a little backstory on it.

 
MatML-.lo res-smallFounded in 1264 by Walter de Merton, Merton College is one of the oldest and most prestigious of the self-governing colleges that make up Oxford University, I’ve talked about about the history of the college itself in an earlier Word Wenches blog post, as it appeared as a “secondary character” in my current mystery, MURDER AT THE SERPENTINE BRIDGE. But it's such an atmospheric place that I couldn’t resist giving it a marquee role in my upcoming book. (I'm absolutely delighted that my publisher was able to use a real picture of the Library on the cover!)


 
Merton_College_library_hallThe Merton College Library is the world’s oldest academic library that has been in continuous daily use, and is also one of the oldest libraries in England. Its treasures include a priceless collection of early printed books and over 300 medieval manuscripts.
 
In 1276, a decree was made that all Fellows of the college (it was founded with 20 Fellows) were required to leave their books, or an equivalent sum in money, to the library upon their death. These books—books were VERY valuable in those days—were kept locked in heavy chests secured with three locks, and a Fellow had to pay a security to borrow one. Several years later, as the collection grew, books were then chained to reading table so scholars had easier access.
The-Upper-Library_refPP232488_Library-and-Archives_header
Upper-Library-Ceiling-Boss_refTOMphotos_DVD1_04_Library-and-Archives_History_headerCatalogues still exist from early times—the first one shows the library possessed 85 philosophical volumes. By the late 1300’s, it was deemed necessary to build  new library. The new building formed a side of what is now known as Mob Quadrangle and connected with the adjacent building. Stained glass windows with subtle designs in shades of yellow were created to let in maximum light. (Some of the original glass still exists.) Details included ceiling bosses featuring red and white Tudor roses in honor of King Henry VII and the Merton crest.
 
I Merton 1n the 1550s, stalls were constructed, with built-in seating and desks below the bookshelves, along with other alterations to the space. Maps, globes, and astronomical instruments were also housed in the library. In the mid-1600s, a Merton Fellow named Griffin Higgs left a bequest establishing the position of Librarian for the library. (I hope he will forgive me for murdering my fictional head librarian of Merton College within the library’s hallowed walls.) The 1600s also saw the donations of some magnificent bibliographic treasures, including a first edition of The Canterbury Tales printed by William Caxton, and a collection dried plant specimens given by Charles Willoughby. And in the 1790s, the books were finally unchained, along with the momentous change of allowing books to circulate.
 
It wasn’t until 1822 that undergraduates were permitted to use the library—for one hour a week! (No wonder Regency scholars were known to spend a good amount of their time drinking, gambling and wenching!) By 1899, the college was a tad more generous and allowed three hours per day.
 
Merton 3Today the library’s collection continues to offer scholars and booklovers a wonderful assortment of bibliographic treasures, including 27 first editions of classical authors donated by Sir Basil Blackwell and over 500 items by or about T. S. Eliot. (J.R.R. Tolkien was a professor at Merton, so I like to think there may be a few hobbits and elves residing in the ancient nooks and crannies!)
 
I have had the good fortune to spend time within the walls of Merton College exploring the courtyards and magnificent chapel. However, the library is only occasionally open to the public and the timing didn’t work for me to see the interior. I have a lovely lavishly illustrated book showing many of the details, so I feel that I have some sense of its beauty and the aura of history that permeates the centuries-old wood and stone. But I can’t wait to go back and visit in person.
 
What about you? Do you have a favorite historic library that takes your breath away when you pass through the doors because of its ambience and resident treasures? Please share!

115 thoughts on “Ink, vellum . . . and Murder”

  1. The closest I’ve ever been to a historical library is pictures on Instagram. 😉 I do love libraries though. And I LOVE the cover on your new book.

    Reply
  2. The closest I’ve ever been to a historical library is pictures on Instagram. 😉 I do love libraries though. And I LOVE the cover on your new book.

    Reply
  3. The closest I’ve ever been to a historical library is pictures on Instagram. 😉 I do love libraries though. And I LOVE the cover on your new book.

    Reply
  4. The closest I’ve ever been to a historical library is pictures on Instagram. 😉 I do love libraries though. And I LOVE the cover on your new book.

    Reply
  5. The closest I’ve ever been to a historical library is pictures on Instagram. 😉 I do love libraries though. And I LOVE the cover on your new book.

    Reply
  6. The New York Public Library and the Library of Trinity College in Dublin, are both pretty impressive. But, the library I was most taken with is Marsh’s Library in Dublin.
    It opened in 1707 and was the first public library in Ireland, and it is basically unchanged. One gallery houses 10,000 books that belonged to one prominent English clergyman. There are 3 alcoves where scholars were locked in while studying here.
    It is also home to a bindery, that repairs and restores old books.
    If you are ever in Dublin, do check it out. I don’t think you will be disappointed.

    Reply
  7. The New York Public Library and the Library of Trinity College in Dublin, are both pretty impressive. But, the library I was most taken with is Marsh’s Library in Dublin.
    It opened in 1707 and was the first public library in Ireland, and it is basically unchanged. One gallery houses 10,000 books that belonged to one prominent English clergyman. There are 3 alcoves where scholars were locked in while studying here.
    It is also home to a bindery, that repairs and restores old books.
    If you are ever in Dublin, do check it out. I don’t think you will be disappointed.

    Reply
  8. The New York Public Library and the Library of Trinity College in Dublin, are both pretty impressive. But, the library I was most taken with is Marsh’s Library in Dublin.
    It opened in 1707 and was the first public library in Ireland, and it is basically unchanged. One gallery houses 10,000 books that belonged to one prominent English clergyman. There are 3 alcoves where scholars were locked in while studying here.
    It is also home to a bindery, that repairs and restores old books.
    If you are ever in Dublin, do check it out. I don’t think you will be disappointed.

    Reply
  9. The New York Public Library and the Library of Trinity College in Dublin, are both pretty impressive. But, the library I was most taken with is Marsh’s Library in Dublin.
    It opened in 1707 and was the first public library in Ireland, and it is basically unchanged. One gallery houses 10,000 books that belonged to one prominent English clergyman. There are 3 alcoves where scholars were locked in while studying here.
    It is also home to a bindery, that repairs and restores old books.
    If you are ever in Dublin, do check it out. I don’t think you will be disappointed.

    Reply
  10. The New York Public Library and the Library of Trinity College in Dublin, are both pretty impressive. But, the library I was most taken with is Marsh’s Library in Dublin.
    It opened in 1707 and was the first public library in Ireland, and it is basically unchanged. One gallery houses 10,000 books that belonged to one prominent English clergyman. There are 3 alcoves where scholars were locked in while studying here.
    It is also home to a bindery, that repairs and restores old books.
    If you are ever in Dublin, do check it out. I don’t think you will be disappointed.

    Reply
  11. Thank you for a wonderful post, Andrea. I don’t have a specific library to share, but I am an ardent library user and have been known to visit local libraries while on vacation.
    And, yes, that is a wonderful cover for your new book!

    Reply
  12. Thank you for a wonderful post, Andrea. I don’t have a specific library to share, but I am an ardent library user and have been known to visit local libraries while on vacation.
    And, yes, that is a wonderful cover for your new book!

    Reply
  13. Thank you for a wonderful post, Andrea. I don’t have a specific library to share, but I am an ardent library user and have been known to visit local libraries while on vacation.
    And, yes, that is a wonderful cover for your new book!

    Reply
  14. Thank you for a wonderful post, Andrea. I don’t have a specific library to share, but I am an ardent library user and have been known to visit local libraries while on vacation.
    And, yes, that is a wonderful cover for your new book!

    Reply
  15. Thank you for a wonderful post, Andrea. I don’t have a specific library to share, but I am an ardent library user and have been known to visit local libraries while on vacation.
    And, yes, that is a wonderful cover for your new book!

    Reply
  16. That’s gorgeous, Mary Jo! Thanks for sharing!
    I think you’re right—ALL libraries are beautiful.
    I loved all of Merton College. The ancient stones just thrum with a sense of history!

    Reply
  17. That’s gorgeous, Mary Jo! Thanks for sharing!
    I think you’re right—ALL libraries are beautiful.
    I loved all of Merton College. The ancient stones just thrum with a sense of history!

    Reply
  18. That’s gorgeous, Mary Jo! Thanks for sharing!
    I think you’re right—ALL libraries are beautiful.
    I loved all of Merton College. The ancient stones just thrum with a sense of history!

    Reply
  19. That’s gorgeous, Mary Jo! Thanks for sharing!
    I think you’re right—ALL libraries are beautiful.
    I loved all of Merton College. The ancient stones just thrum with a sense of history!

    Reply
  20. That’s gorgeous, Mary Jo! Thanks for sharing!
    I think you’re right—ALL libraries are beautiful.
    I loved all of Merton College. The ancient stones just thrum with a sense of history!

    Reply
  21. The New York Public Library is amazing! I’ve never had the opportunity to visit Trinity College Library in Dublin, but have seen the spectacular photos. And Marsh’s sounds really wonderful. I love those early libraries that centered around the gift of one benefactor. They are usually very quirky, which makes them even more interesting.

    Reply
  22. The New York Public Library is amazing! I’ve never had the opportunity to visit Trinity College Library in Dublin, but have seen the spectacular photos. And Marsh’s sounds really wonderful. I love those early libraries that centered around the gift of one benefactor. They are usually very quirky, which makes them even more interesting.

    Reply
  23. The New York Public Library is amazing! I’ve never had the opportunity to visit Trinity College Library in Dublin, but have seen the spectacular photos. And Marsh’s sounds really wonderful. I love those early libraries that centered around the gift of one benefactor. They are usually very quirky, which makes them even more interesting.

    Reply
  24. The New York Public Library is amazing! I’ve never had the opportunity to visit Trinity College Library in Dublin, but have seen the spectacular photos. And Marsh’s sounds really wonderful. I love those early libraries that centered around the gift of one benefactor. They are usually very quirky, which makes them even more interesting.

    Reply
  25. The New York Public Library is amazing! I’ve never had the opportunity to visit Trinity College Library in Dublin, but have seen the spectacular photos. And Marsh’s sounds really wonderful. I love those early libraries that centered around the gift of one benefactor. They are usually very quirky, which makes them even more interesting.

    Reply
  26. Andrea – I have to agree with Mary Jo. The Peabody Library can’t help but take your breath away. In addition to being a great library, overflowing with rare books, it also has a 32,000 piece American sheet music collection. It’s also a coveted venue for weddings. But getting back to the Merton College Library – your post was fascinating. I should add that I do a bi-monthly newsletter – A Literary Miscellany – for a group of antiquarian book collectors, booksellers, etc. Upon reading your post, I knew they would find it fascinating, so I’ve included the Word Wenches URL for today’s post in the next newsletter. Nothing wrong with spreading the word about your new book far and wide.

    Reply
  27. Andrea – I have to agree with Mary Jo. The Peabody Library can’t help but take your breath away. In addition to being a great library, overflowing with rare books, it also has a 32,000 piece American sheet music collection. It’s also a coveted venue for weddings. But getting back to the Merton College Library – your post was fascinating. I should add that I do a bi-monthly newsletter – A Literary Miscellany – for a group of antiquarian book collectors, booksellers, etc. Upon reading your post, I knew they would find it fascinating, so I’ve included the Word Wenches URL for today’s post in the next newsletter. Nothing wrong with spreading the word about your new book far and wide.

    Reply
  28. Andrea – I have to agree with Mary Jo. The Peabody Library can’t help but take your breath away. In addition to being a great library, overflowing with rare books, it also has a 32,000 piece American sheet music collection. It’s also a coveted venue for weddings. But getting back to the Merton College Library – your post was fascinating. I should add that I do a bi-monthly newsletter – A Literary Miscellany – for a group of antiquarian book collectors, booksellers, etc. Upon reading your post, I knew they would find it fascinating, so I’ve included the Word Wenches URL for today’s post in the next newsletter. Nothing wrong with spreading the word about your new book far and wide.

    Reply
  29. Andrea – I have to agree with Mary Jo. The Peabody Library can’t help but take your breath away. In addition to being a great library, overflowing with rare books, it also has a 32,000 piece American sheet music collection. It’s also a coveted venue for weddings. But getting back to the Merton College Library – your post was fascinating. I should add that I do a bi-monthly newsletter – A Literary Miscellany – for a group of antiquarian book collectors, booksellers, etc. Upon reading your post, I knew they would find it fascinating, so I’ve included the Word Wenches URL for today’s post in the next newsletter. Nothing wrong with spreading the word about your new book far and wide.

    Reply
  30. Andrea – I have to agree with Mary Jo. The Peabody Library can’t help but take your breath away. In addition to being a great library, overflowing with rare books, it also has a 32,000 piece American sheet music collection. It’s also a coveted venue for weddings. But getting back to the Merton College Library – your post was fascinating. I should add that I do a bi-monthly newsletter – A Literary Miscellany – for a group of antiquarian book collectors, booksellers, etc. Upon reading your post, I knew they would find it fascinating, so I’ve included the Word Wenches URL for today’s post in the next newsletter. Nothing wrong with spreading the word about your new book far and wide.

    Reply
  31. Binnie, Thank you so much for including the link in your newsletter. I hope your group enjoys hearing a little backstory on the Merton College library.
    The Peabody sounds amazing. And what a special place for musicians to visit! I hope to visit it sometime.

    Reply
  32. Binnie, Thank you so much for including the link in your newsletter. I hope your group enjoys hearing a little backstory on the Merton College library.
    The Peabody sounds amazing. And what a special place for musicians to visit! I hope to visit it sometime.

    Reply
  33. Binnie, Thank you so much for including the link in your newsletter. I hope your group enjoys hearing a little backstory on the Merton College library.
    The Peabody sounds amazing. And what a special place for musicians to visit! I hope to visit it sometime.

    Reply
  34. Binnie, Thank you so much for including the link in your newsletter. I hope your group enjoys hearing a little backstory on the Merton College library.
    The Peabody sounds amazing. And what a special place for musicians to visit! I hope to visit it sometime.

    Reply
  35. Binnie, Thank you so much for including the link in your newsletter. I hope your group enjoys hearing a little backstory on the Merton College library.
    The Peabody sounds amazing. And what a special place for musicians to visit! I hope to visit it sometime.

    Reply
  36. Oh, I’ve heard of the Leeds Library, Joanna. I was at a writer’s conference in Leeds and really regret not having the time to go visit it. Thank you for the link. SO many many fabulous libraries to visit!

    Reply
  37. Oh, I’ve heard of the Leeds Library, Joanna. I was at a writer’s conference in Leeds and really regret not having the time to go visit it. Thank you for the link. SO many many fabulous libraries to visit!

    Reply
  38. Oh, I’ve heard of the Leeds Library, Joanna. I was at a writer’s conference in Leeds and really regret not having the time to go visit it. Thank you for the link. SO many many fabulous libraries to visit!

    Reply
  39. Oh, I’ve heard of the Leeds Library, Joanna. I was at a writer’s conference in Leeds and really regret not having the time to go visit it. Thank you for the link. SO many many fabulous libraries to visit!

    Reply
  40. Oh, I’ve heard of the Leeds Library, Joanna. I was at a writer’s conference in Leeds and really regret not having the time to go visit it. Thank you for the link. SO many many fabulous libraries to visit!

    Reply
  41. Now that we know the librarian has been murdered, Andrea, it’s easier to understand why your cover character is being allowed to run in the library – there’s no one to stop and shush him! 🙂 What a terrific cover!
    I agree with everyone that all libraries are special. Having grown up in a very small town that had only a weekly visit from a “book mobile” for many years, I have visited every library I’ve been lucky enough to be near since discovering they weren’t all located in repurposed vans. One of the most beautiful is the Biblioteca Marciana in Venice, which was built in the 16th century, and offers tours of its architecture and extensive art collection, as well as serving as a public and research library.

    Reply
  42. Now that we know the librarian has been murdered, Andrea, it’s easier to understand why your cover character is being allowed to run in the library – there’s no one to stop and shush him! 🙂 What a terrific cover!
    I agree with everyone that all libraries are special. Having grown up in a very small town that had only a weekly visit from a “book mobile” for many years, I have visited every library I’ve been lucky enough to be near since discovering they weren’t all located in repurposed vans. One of the most beautiful is the Biblioteca Marciana in Venice, which was built in the 16th century, and offers tours of its architecture and extensive art collection, as well as serving as a public and research library.

    Reply
  43. Now that we know the librarian has been murdered, Andrea, it’s easier to understand why your cover character is being allowed to run in the library – there’s no one to stop and shush him! 🙂 What a terrific cover!
    I agree with everyone that all libraries are special. Having grown up in a very small town that had only a weekly visit from a “book mobile” for many years, I have visited every library I’ve been lucky enough to be near since discovering they weren’t all located in repurposed vans. One of the most beautiful is the Biblioteca Marciana in Venice, which was built in the 16th century, and offers tours of its architecture and extensive art collection, as well as serving as a public and research library.

    Reply
  44. Now that we know the librarian has been murdered, Andrea, it’s easier to understand why your cover character is being allowed to run in the library – there’s no one to stop and shush him! 🙂 What a terrific cover!
    I agree with everyone that all libraries are special. Having grown up in a very small town that had only a weekly visit from a “book mobile” for many years, I have visited every library I’ve been lucky enough to be near since discovering they weren’t all located in repurposed vans. One of the most beautiful is the Biblioteca Marciana in Venice, which was built in the 16th century, and offers tours of its architecture and extensive art collection, as well as serving as a public and research library.

    Reply
  45. Now that we know the librarian has been murdered, Andrea, it’s easier to understand why your cover character is being allowed to run in the library – there’s no one to stop and shush him! 🙂 What a terrific cover!
    I agree with everyone that all libraries are special. Having grown up in a very small town that had only a weekly visit from a “book mobile” for many years, I have visited every library I’ve been lucky enough to be near since discovering they weren’t all located in repurposed vans. One of the most beautiful is the Biblioteca Marciana in Venice, which was built in the 16th century, and offers tours of its architecture and extensive art collection, as well as serving as a public and research library.

    Reply
  46. WOW- First – your book cover is terrific.
    Second – I love libraries of any shape or size. I am a true book addict. From the time I fell in love with a bookmobile when I was in second grade, I have been a fan of anyplace that has lots of books.
    I even had the privilege of being in on the ground floor of a library in a small town. We worked to get the library certified by the state of Texas. I was the entire staff, we had only donated books and we were in a small office in the front of the fire station.
    The library became a beautiful building and although I have not returned, it is used by the citizens of the town and that is a wonderful memory.
    But, compared to any of the libraries mentioned here, a small library in a small town in Texas is not much. But, if it brings one child the joy I have always had from being in a library and finding books, it is doing the job it was designed to do.
    Third – I have never had the privilege of being in a truly historic library. But, Andrea and everyone who has posted here have given me a tour of places I would love. Thank you very much.

    Reply
  47. WOW- First – your book cover is terrific.
    Second – I love libraries of any shape or size. I am a true book addict. From the time I fell in love with a bookmobile when I was in second grade, I have been a fan of anyplace that has lots of books.
    I even had the privilege of being in on the ground floor of a library in a small town. We worked to get the library certified by the state of Texas. I was the entire staff, we had only donated books and we were in a small office in the front of the fire station.
    The library became a beautiful building and although I have not returned, it is used by the citizens of the town and that is a wonderful memory.
    But, compared to any of the libraries mentioned here, a small library in a small town in Texas is not much. But, if it brings one child the joy I have always had from being in a library and finding books, it is doing the job it was designed to do.
    Third – I have never had the privilege of being in a truly historic library. But, Andrea and everyone who has posted here have given me a tour of places I would love. Thank you very much.

    Reply
  48. WOW- First – your book cover is terrific.
    Second – I love libraries of any shape or size. I am a true book addict. From the time I fell in love with a bookmobile when I was in second grade, I have been a fan of anyplace that has lots of books.
    I even had the privilege of being in on the ground floor of a library in a small town. We worked to get the library certified by the state of Texas. I was the entire staff, we had only donated books and we were in a small office in the front of the fire station.
    The library became a beautiful building and although I have not returned, it is used by the citizens of the town and that is a wonderful memory.
    But, compared to any of the libraries mentioned here, a small library in a small town in Texas is not much. But, if it brings one child the joy I have always had from being in a library and finding books, it is doing the job it was designed to do.
    Third – I have never had the privilege of being in a truly historic library. But, Andrea and everyone who has posted here have given me a tour of places I would love. Thank you very much.

    Reply
  49. WOW- First – your book cover is terrific.
    Second – I love libraries of any shape or size. I am a true book addict. From the time I fell in love with a bookmobile when I was in second grade, I have been a fan of anyplace that has lots of books.
    I even had the privilege of being in on the ground floor of a library in a small town. We worked to get the library certified by the state of Texas. I was the entire staff, we had only donated books and we were in a small office in the front of the fire station.
    The library became a beautiful building and although I have not returned, it is used by the citizens of the town and that is a wonderful memory.
    But, compared to any of the libraries mentioned here, a small library in a small town in Texas is not much. But, if it brings one child the joy I have always had from being in a library and finding books, it is doing the job it was designed to do.
    Third – I have never had the privilege of being in a truly historic library. But, Andrea and everyone who has posted here have given me a tour of places I would love. Thank you very much.

    Reply
  50. WOW- First – your book cover is terrific.
    Second – I love libraries of any shape or size. I am a true book addict. From the time I fell in love with a bookmobile when I was in second grade, I have been a fan of anyplace that has lots of books.
    I even had the privilege of being in on the ground floor of a library in a small town. We worked to get the library certified by the state of Texas. I was the entire staff, we had only donated books and we were in a small office in the front of the fire station.
    The library became a beautiful building and although I have not returned, it is used by the citizens of the town and that is a wonderful memory.
    But, compared to any of the libraries mentioned here, a small library in a small town in Texas is not much. But, if it brings one child the joy I have always had from being in a library and finding books, it is doing the job it was designed to do.
    Third – I have never had the privilege of being in a truly historic library. But, Andrea and everyone who has posted here have given me a tour of places I would love. Thank you very much.

    Reply
  51. Wow, that was fast! It seems like I just finished reading Murder at the Serpentine Bridge. I love all libraries. I have been to the main branch of the NY Public Library several times, it is impressive, and the reading room is beautiful.

    Reply
  52. Wow, that was fast! It seems like I just finished reading Murder at the Serpentine Bridge. I love all libraries. I have been to the main branch of the NY Public Library several times, it is impressive, and the reading room is beautiful.

    Reply
  53. Wow, that was fast! It seems like I just finished reading Murder at the Serpentine Bridge. I love all libraries. I have been to the main branch of the NY Public Library several times, it is impressive, and the reading room is beautiful.

    Reply
  54. Wow, that was fast! It seems like I just finished reading Murder at the Serpentine Bridge. I love all libraries. I have been to the main branch of the NY Public Library several times, it is impressive, and the reading room is beautiful.

    Reply
  55. Wow, that was fast! It seems like I just finished reading Murder at the Serpentine Bridge. I love all libraries. I have been to the main branch of the NY Public Library several times, it is impressive, and the reading room is beautiful.

    Reply
  56. The only famous library I’ve been in is Trinity College Library in Dublin. My daughter went to Trinity College and she took me to see the library on a visit. It’s fabulous!! I was lucky enough to see the Book of Kells while I was there. A truly beautiful book. The library was hushed and I was in seventh Heaven just walking through it.
    Can’t wait for the new book Andrea and once again the cover is gorgeous.

    Reply
  57. The only famous library I’ve been in is Trinity College Library in Dublin. My daughter went to Trinity College and she took me to see the library on a visit. It’s fabulous!! I was lucky enough to see the Book of Kells while I was there. A truly beautiful book. The library was hushed and I was in seventh Heaven just walking through it.
    Can’t wait for the new book Andrea and once again the cover is gorgeous.

    Reply
  58. The only famous library I’ve been in is Trinity College Library in Dublin. My daughter went to Trinity College and she took me to see the library on a visit. It’s fabulous!! I was lucky enough to see the Book of Kells while I was there. A truly beautiful book. The library was hushed and I was in seventh Heaven just walking through it.
    Can’t wait for the new book Andrea and once again the cover is gorgeous.

    Reply
  59. The only famous library I’ve been in is Trinity College Library in Dublin. My daughter went to Trinity College and she took me to see the library on a visit. It’s fabulous!! I was lucky enough to see the Book of Kells while I was there. A truly beautiful book. The library was hushed and I was in seventh Heaven just walking through it.
    Can’t wait for the new book Andrea and once again the cover is gorgeous.

    Reply
  60. The only famous library I’ve been in is Trinity College Library in Dublin. My daughter went to Trinity College and she took me to see the library on a visit. It’s fabulous!! I was lucky enough to see the Book of Kells while I was there. A truly beautiful book. The library was hushed and I was in seventh Heaven just walking through it.
    Can’t wait for the new book Andrea and once again the cover is gorgeous.

    Reply
  61. Thanks, Annette. I’m so glad that you like the cover.
    What a wonderful story about you’re starting a libaray and getting it certified. You’re so right—it’s as beautiful as any of the famous ones mentioned here, because no matter how small or modest, any place that offers books to people so that they can learn and let their imagination be inspired is special beyond words.
    You should feel very proud of yourself!

    Reply
  62. Thanks, Annette. I’m so glad that you like the cover.
    What a wonderful story about you’re starting a libaray and getting it certified. You’re so right—it’s as beautiful as any of the famous ones mentioned here, because no matter how small or modest, any place that offers books to people so that they can learn and let their imagination be inspired is special beyond words.
    You should feel very proud of yourself!

    Reply
  63. Thanks, Annette. I’m so glad that you like the cover.
    What a wonderful story about you’re starting a libaray and getting it certified. You’re so right—it’s as beautiful as any of the famous ones mentioned here, because no matter how small or modest, any place that offers books to people so that they can learn and let their imagination be inspired is special beyond words.
    You should feel very proud of yourself!

    Reply
  64. Thanks, Annette. I’m so glad that you like the cover.
    What a wonderful story about you’re starting a libaray and getting it certified. You’re so right—it’s as beautiful as any of the famous ones mentioned here, because no matter how small or modest, any place that offers books to people so that they can learn and let their imagination be inspired is special beyond words.
    You should feel very proud of yourself!

    Reply
  65. Thanks, Annette. I’m so glad that you like the cover.
    What a wonderful story about you’re starting a libaray and getting it certified. You’re so right—it’s as beautiful as any of the famous ones mentioned here, because no matter how small or modest, any place that offers books to people so that they can learn and let their imagination be inspired is special beyond words.
    You should feel very proud of yourself!

    Reply
  66. That’s a VERY special library to have seen, Teresa! Lucky you! I hope to visit it some day. Seeing the Book of Kells would be a very special experience.
    THanks for the kind words about the cover. I’s so nice to hear that everyone likes it.

    Reply
  67. That’s a VERY special library to have seen, Teresa! Lucky you! I hope to visit it some day. Seeing the Book of Kells would be a very special experience.
    THanks for the kind words about the cover. I’s so nice to hear that everyone likes it.

    Reply
  68. That’s a VERY special library to have seen, Teresa! Lucky you! I hope to visit it some day. Seeing the Book of Kells would be a very special experience.
    THanks for the kind words about the cover. I’s so nice to hear that everyone likes it.

    Reply
  69. That’s a VERY special library to have seen, Teresa! Lucky you! I hope to visit it some day. Seeing the Book of Kells would be a very special experience.
    THanks for the kind words about the cover. I’s so nice to hear that everyone likes it.

    Reply
  70. That’s a VERY special library to have seen, Teresa! Lucky you! I hope to visit it some day. Seeing the Book of Kells would be a very special experience.
    THanks for the kind words about the cover. I’s so nice to hear that everyone likes it.

    Reply

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