Indoor Plants

Anne here, and today I'm talking about growing plants inside, in pots. Even though I've always had an outdoor garden, I've still loved growing pot plants indoors. And every winter, the cheerful splash of color from indoor flowering plants makes me smile. The color here is from a cyclamen, and each year I buy one or two that are about to start flowering, and their vivid blooms keep me feeling cheerful all through the gloom of winter. (This photo was taken last winter.)

MyPotPlantsWinter

For centuries people from all sorts of cultures have valued scented and flowering plants —Hanging Gardens of Babylon, anyone?— and bringing them indoors so that their fragrance and blooms could be enjoyed, perhaps also masking unpleasant smells.

From the 15th century, European explorers and colonizers brought home all kinds of "treasure" from the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Oceania — including botanical specimens — though few of these survived except under special conditions.

But as technology advanced to the point where whole buildings could be made of glass and steel, plants unsuited to cold Northern European climates — plants such as oranges, lemons, pineapples, and other delicate fruits — could be grown under glass.

VictorianConserv
By the 17th century, citrus trees were a status symbol among the wealthiest in society, and greenhouses and orangeries were built to protect these highly coveted specimens during winter. They might be called conservatories, orangeries, succession houses, or ferneries, depending on what they were growing.  (The photo on the left is a gorgeous modern version of the Victorian style conservatory, from this site.)

Flowering spring bulbs, such as narcissi, hyacinths and tulips, grown in pots, could easily be brought indoors when in flower. By the end of the 17th century, these were being ‘forced’ to flower early in winter by starting off the bulbs in the warmth of indoors. Hyacinths, with their heady fragrance were particularly popular.

In Anglo/European society, the keeping of indoor plants really took off in the Victorian era, when houses were built with larger windows and higher ceilings, and most importantly, with efficient heating — as long as you were lucky enough to be in the middle or upper classes. These warmer, lighter living conditions allowed people to keep plants inside. At the same time, global trade (and colonization) enabled the mass importing of exotic plants, at a price that the middle classes could afford.

VictorianEra

Indoor plants became wildly fashionable and people proudly displayed their multitudes of ferns, palms, aspidistras and more. The maidenhair fern in particular, but ferns in general, were so popular that a new word was coined to describe the craze: pteridomania (fern mania).

Such was the demand for ferns that a black market in fern collecting flourished. These tender ferns needed winter protection and glasshouses, known as ferneries, became the latest horticultural fashion among the wealthy. For those without the income or space for a fernery, ornamental Wardian cases were perfect for displaying ferns indoors. (A Wardian case was a small, portable glasshouse, also known as a terrarium.  Scroll down to photo below right.)

Victorians didn't only grow them — fern motifs appeared on "pottery, glass, metal, textiles, wood, printed paper, and sculpture, with ferns appearing on everything from christening presents to gravestones and memorials".(Wikipedia) 

No respectable Victorian home would be without an aspidistra, also known as the ‘Cast-Iron Plant’. First introduced from China in 1823 it quickly proved itself capable of surviving the darkest, most fume-polluted Victorian homes. 

BulbPotPottery makers designed pots especially for growing and displaying plants. Josiah Wedgwood was among the first of the English manufacturers to produce versions of the French cache-pot, literally a pot in which to hide another. 

This Barr, Flight and Barr-factory bulb-pot was made in Worcester, around 1804–7 and was designed for a mantelpiece. Nozzles in the cover support the bulbs and the small holes were designed to hold wooden sticks to support the plant stems, preventing them from toppling over and smashing the pot.  

By the mid-19th century, the nursery trade was booming and public botanical gardens, such as Kew’s Palm House, which opened in 1840, became a source of inspiration. Gardening books and magazines flourished alongside home decoration advice manuals, where houseplants increasingly played a role in interior design.

WardianCase

After World War 1, houseplants had become so associated with the Victorian era that they were considered old fashioned, and started to fall out of favor. In the 1930's cacti and succulents became the houseplants of choice as their more architectural shapes fitted the style of the day. 

As urbanization increased, and more and more people lived in flats and apartments without gardens, indoor plants came back into fashion. Their popularity has waxed and waned over the years but today houseplants are firmly back in fashion, possibly encouraged by CoVid and Lockdown. 

My mother loved her indoor plants, even though she and Dad had a large garden, and I picked up the love of them from her. As she did, I grow begonias and saxifragas (strawberry begonias) and I particularly enjoy propagating plants, which she taught me to do as a child. She also had hundreds of cacti, which I don't have — she ranged them on every windowsill whenever she and Dad went travelling, her theory being their spines would deter burglars. <g> 

MyMaidenhairAt my old house I had to leave behind a huge philodendron that had grown through its pot and into the ground, and almost reached the roof. I'd had it since I was a student and it was a little plantlet bought at the market. 

I certainly get a lot of pleasure out of my indoor plants. I'm lucky because my new house is even lighter than my old one was. I'm particularly happy with this maidenhair, which I forgot to water last year and all the fronds died off. I thought it was dead, but I kept watering and hoping — and look at it now.

Do you keep any indoor plants? What are your favorites?

110 thoughts on “Indoor Plants”

  1. I have tried to keep many types of indoor plants over the years but the only kind I can’t seem to kill are the Christmas cacti. No matter what I do to them, they survive! I sometimes have success with resurrecting orchids and getting them to flower again, but everything else is a lost cause. Guess I just don’t have green fingers, but I do love having plants on my windowsills. For many years I had a myrtle plant my grandmother gave me. She said I had to keep it alive until I married, as it’s tradition in our family to wear a crown of myrtle as a bride. Somehow (with the help of friends) I managed it and wore it proudly, but it was a huge relief when I didn’t have to look after it any more after my marriage!

    Reply
  2. I have tried to keep many types of indoor plants over the years but the only kind I can’t seem to kill are the Christmas cacti. No matter what I do to them, they survive! I sometimes have success with resurrecting orchids and getting them to flower again, but everything else is a lost cause. Guess I just don’t have green fingers, but I do love having plants on my windowsills. For many years I had a myrtle plant my grandmother gave me. She said I had to keep it alive until I married, as it’s tradition in our family to wear a crown of myrtle as a bride. Somehow (with the help of friends) I managed it and wore it proudly, but it was a huge relief when I didn’t have to look after it any more after my marriage!

    Reply
  3. I have tried to keep many types of indoor plants over the years but the only kind I can’t seem to kill are the Christmas cacti. No matter what I do to them, they survive! I sometimes have success with resurrecting orchids and getting them to flower again, but everything else is a lost cause. Guess I just don’t have green fingers, but I do love having plants on my windowsills. For many years I had a myrtle plant my grandmother gave me. She said I had to keep it alive until I married, as it’s tradition in our family to wear a crown of myrtle as a bride. Somehow (with the help of friends) I managed it and wore it proudly, but it was a huge relief when I didn’t have to look after it any more after my marriage!

    Reply
  4. I have tried to keep many types of indoor plants over the years but the only kind I can’t seem to kill are the Christmas cacti. No matter what I do to them, they survive! I sometimes have success with resurrecting orchids and getting them to flower again, but everything else is a lost cause. Guess I just don’t have green fingers, but I do love having plants on my windowsills. For many years I had a myrtle plant my grandmother gave me. She said I had to keep it alive until I married, as it’s tradition in our family to wear a crown of myrtle as a bride. Somehow (with the help of friends) I managed it and wore it proudly, but it was a huge relief when I didn’t have to look after it any more after my marriage!

    Reply
  5. I have tried to keep many types of indoor plants over the years but the only kind I can’t seem to kill are the Christmas cacti. No matter what I do to them, they survive! I sometimes have success with resurrecting orchids and getting them to flower again, but everything else is a lost cause. Guess I just don’t have green fingers, but I do love having plants on my windowsills. For many years I had a myrtle plant my grandmother gave me. She said I had to keep it alive until I married, as it’s tradition in our family to wear a crown of myrtle as a bride. Somehow (with the help of friends) I managed it and wore it proudly, but it was a huge relief when I didn’t have to look after it any more after my marriage!

    Reply
  6. Back in the day, when I rented, I usually had a plant or two in the apartment. But when I got my own place, I found that my animal roommates (especially the cats) just wouldn’t leave them alone. So I resorted to artificial plants and flowers. There are some pretty realistic ones out there. Some of them were so well made that the cats wanted to tear them up too (smile).

    Reply
  7. Back in the day, when I rented, I usually had a plant or two in the apartment. But when I got my own place, I found that my animal roommates (especially the cats) just wouldn’t leave them alone. So I resorted to artificial plants and flowers. There are some pretty realistic ones out there. Some of them were so well made that the cats wanted to tear them up too (smile).

    Reply
  8. Back in the day, when I rented, I usually had a plant or two in the apartment. But when I got my own place, I found that my animal roommates (especially the cats) just wouldn’t leave them alone. So I resorted to artificial plants and flowers. There are some pretty realistic ones out there. Some of them were so well made that the cats wanted to tear them up too (smile).

    Reply
  9. Back in the day, when I rented, I usually had a plant or two in the apartment. But when I got my own place, I found that my animal roommates (especially the cats) just wouldn’t leave them alone. So I resorted to artificial plants and flowers. There are some pretty realistic ones out there. Some of them were so well made that the cats wanted to tear them up too (smile).

    Reply
  10. Back in the day, when I rented, I usually had a plant or two in the apartment. But when I got my own place, I found that my animal roommates (especially the cats) just wouldn’t leave them alone. So I resorted to artificial plants and flowers. There are some pretty realistic ones out there. Some of them were so well made that the cats wanted to tear them up too (smile).

    Reply
  11. Wow, Christina, talk about pressure! I’ve never tried to grow a myrtle plant. Glad yours survived — at least until after the wedding.
    And Christmas cacti are lovely. My mother used to grow them and madly propagate them — all the same color, with a kind of ht pink flower, which I didn’t love at that time. Then when I moved into my new house a friend gave me two Christmas cacti — one a lovely red and the other with gorgeous ruffled pink flowers and I’m hooked.

    Reply
  12. Wow, Christina, talk about pressure! I’ve never tried to grow a myrtle plant. Glad yours survived — at least until after the wedding.
    And Christmas cacti are lovely. My mother used to grow them and madly propagate them — all the same color, with a kind of ht pink flower, which I didn’t love at that time. Then when I moved into my new house a friend gave me two Christmas cacti — one a lovely red and the other with gorgeous ruffled pink flowers and I’m hooked.

    Reply
  13. Wow, Christina, talk about pressure! I’ve never tried to grow a myrtle plant. Glad yours survived — at least until after the wedding.
    And Christmas cacti are lovely. My mother used to grow them and madly propagate them — all the same color, with a kind of ht pink flower, which I didn’t love at that time. Then when I moved into my new house a friend gave me two Christmas cacti — one a lovely red and the other with gorgeous ruffled pink flowers and I’m hooked.

    Reply
  14. Wow, Christina, talk about pressure! I’ve never tried to grow a myrtle plant. Glad yours survived — at least until after the wedding.
    And Christmas cacti are lovely. My mother used to grow them and madly propagate them — all the same color, with a kind of ht pink flower, which I didn’t love at that time. Then when I moved into my new house a friend gave me two Christmas cacti — one a lovely red and the other with gorgeous ruffled pink flowers and I’m hooked.

    Reply
  15. Wow, Christina, talk about pressure! I’ve never tried to grow a myrtle plant. Glad yours survived — at least until after the wedding.
    And Christmas cacti are lovely. My mother used to grow them and madly propagate them — all the same color, with a kind of ht pink flower, which I didn’t love at that time. Then when I moved into my new house a friend gave me two Christmas cacti — one a lovely red and the other with gorgeous ruffled pink flowers and I’m hooked.

    Reply
  16. Oh, Mary, cats chewing on plants is a real problem, not only for the plants but so many of them are poisonous to animals like cats and dogs. I’ve never had a cat eat a plant — knock them over, sure, but luckily they never ate them.
    And yes, the fake plants are remarkably lifelike, I agree. In fact the other day at the supermarket I had to feel a plant to be sure it was real.

    Reply
  17. Oh, Mary, cats chewing on plants is a real problem, not only for the plants but so many of them are poisonous to animals like cats and dogs. I’ve never had a cat eat a plant — knock them over, sure, but luckily they never ate them.
    And yes, the fake plants are remarkably lifelike, I agree. In fact the other day at the supermarket I had to feel a plant to be sure it was real.

    Reply
  18. Oh, Mary, cats chewing on plants is a real problem, not only for the plants but so many of them are poisonous to animals like cats and dogs. I’ve never had a cat eat a plant — knock them over, sure, but luckily they never ate them.
    And yes, the fake plants are remarkably lifelike, I agree. In fact the other day at the supermarket I had to feel a plant to be sure it was real.

    Reply
  19. Oh, Mary, cats chewing on plants is a real problem, not only for the plants but so many of them are poisonous to animals like cats and dogs. I’ve never had a cat eat a plant — knock them over, sure, but luckily they never ate them.
    And yes, the fake plants are remarkably lifelike, I agree. In fact the other day at the supermarket I had to feel a plant to be sure it was real.

    Reply
  20. Oh, Mary, cats chewing on plants is a real problem, not only for the plants but so many of them are poisonous to animals like cats and dogs. I’ve never had a cat eat a plant — knock them over, sure, but luckily they never ate them.
    And yes, the fake plants are remarkably lifelike, I agree. In fact the other day at the supermarket I had to feel a plant to be sure it was real.

    Reply
  21. I grew up around house plants. I still have a snake plant and a monstera that were my grandmother’s and are over 50 years old. In fact, the monstera is presently living at my church since it outgrew both home and library space. We had to move it in the back of a truck!
    My present home is light-deprived, so most of my plants are clustered at the patio window/door. These include the remnant of the African violets that were my mother’s pride and joy – most of which are offspring of one of Grandmom’s stock. When Mom passed, I did a “rehoming” to family and friends, but there are still seven here!
    Other members of the greenery include pothos, beaucarnea, snake plants, ZZ plant (zamioculcas) dolphon plant (I had over 60 flowers on this last spring), 3 Christmas cactus, 3 orchids, and assorted others – a total of 37 as of this morning!

    Reply
  22. I grew up around house plants. I still have a snake plant and a monstera that were my grandmother’s and are over 50 years old. In fact, the monstera is presently living at my church since it outgrew both home and library space. We had to move it in the back of a truck!
    My present home is light-deprived, so most of my plants are clustered at the patio window/door. These include the remnant of the African violets that were my mother’s pride and joy – most of which are offspring of one of Grandmom’s stock. When Mom passed, I did a “rehoming” to family and friends, but there are still seven here!
    Other members of the greenery include pothos, beaucarnea, snake plants, ZZ plant (zamioculcas) dolphon plant (I had over 60 flowers on this last spring), 3 Christmas cactus, 3 orchids, and assorted others – a total of 37 as of this morning!

    Reply
  23. I grew up around house plants. I still have a snake plant and a monstera that were my grandmother’s and are over 50 years old. In fact, the monstera is presently living at my church since it outgrew both home and library space. We had to move it in the back of a truck!
    My present home is light-deprived, so most of my plants are clustered at the patio window/door. These include the remnant of the African violets that were my mother’s pride and joy – most of which are offspring of one of Grandmom’s stock. When Mom passed, I did a “rehoming” to family and friends, but there are still seven here!
    Other members of the greenery include pothos, beaucarnea, snake plants, ZZ plant (zamioculcas) dolphon plant (I had over 60 flowers on this last spring), 3 Christmas cactus, 3 orchids, and assorted others – a total of 37 as of this morning!

    Reply
  24. I grew up around house plants. I still have a snake plant and a monstera that were my grandmother’s and are over 50 years old. In fact, the monstera is presently living at my church since it outgrew both home and library space. We had to move it in the back of a truck!
    My present home is light-deprived, so most of my plants are clustered at the patio window/door. These include the remnant of the African violets that were my mother’s pride and joy – most of which are offspring of one of Grandmom’s stock. When Mom passed, I did a “rehoming” to family and friends, but there are still seven here!
    Other members of the greenery include pothos, beaucarnea, snake plants, ZZ plant (zamioculcas) dolphon plant (I had over 60 flowers on this last spring), 3 Christmas cactus, 3 orchids, and assorted others – a total of 37 as of this morning!

    Reply
  25. I grew up around house plants. I still have a snake plant and a monstera that were my grandmother’s and are over 50 years old. In fact, the monstera is presently living at my church since it outgrew both home and library space. We had to move it in the back of a truck!
    My present home is light-deprived, so most of my plants are clustered at the patio window/door. These include the remnant of the African violets that were my mother’s pride and joy – most of which are offspring of one of Grandmom’s stock. When Mom passed, I did a “rehoming” to family and friends, but there are still seven here!
    Other members of the greenery include pothos, beaucarnea, snake plants, ZZ plant (zamioculcas) dolphon plant (I had over 60 flowers on this last spring), 3 Christmas cactus, 3 orchids, and assorted others – a total of 37 as of this morning!

    Reply
  26. What a lovely and educational post, Anne. I’ve loved house plants since a very young age as my Grandmother had a collection in her home. I can envision that space with near perfect recall. It was a combination bow window/window seat, (there being room for only one person to sit in the large space due to plants taking up the rest of it.) She and Grandpa traveled earlier in their lives and brought home some special ones. I have always wanted to recreate that, but alas…
    We have moved a lot ourselves, and I’ve built up some collections of indoor plants in several of those locations only to have to give them away the next time we moved. But I did have quite a nice collection in the last house we lived in for the longest time and when we moved across country I planned ahead and rooted my favorites in water then carefully wrapped them in moist towels and plastic bags and ended up with one large plastic storage tote that traveled with us in the car, of plants to re-pot as soon as we got to our temporary apartment while waiting for our house to be built. I made sure there was a designated space for my plants there! Most of those plants survived the move, including a favorite orchid. Since moving into our house I’ve collected more, and my plant space is rather crowded. I’ve mostly concentrated on violets (because they are small so I can have more) and orchids (because I have learned how to not kill them,) and both because when they bloom it’s such a great joy. Still not up to Grandma’s bow window but…
    I am unable to care for a large garden outdoors anymore but manage some pots of herbs and a handful of annuals each year. I love the photos you have shared with us of your outdoor plants (from the old house??) and I especially enjoyed the photos from your newsletter, of the terrarium you recently planted! I’ve always coveted those Victorian terrariums. I think I need a Cyclamen. You are experiencing Spring now, so have a beautiful Spring and Summer. And thank you for this wonderful post.

    Reply
  27. What a lovely and educational post, Anne. I’ve loved house plants since a very young age as my Grandmother had a collection in her home. I can envision that space with near perfect recall. It was a combination bow window/window seat, (there being room for only one person to sit in the large space due to plants taking up the rest of it.) She and Grandpa traveled earlier in their lives and brought home some special ones. I have always wanted to recreate that, but alas…
    We have moved a lot ourselves, and I’ve built up some collections of indoor plants in several of those locations only to have to give them away the next time we moved. But I did have quite a nice collection in the last house we lived in for the longest time and when we moved across country I planned ahead and rooted my favorites in water then carefully wrapped them in moist towels and plastic bags and ended up with one large plastic storage tote that traveled with us in the car, of plants to re-pot as soon as we got to our temporary apartment while waiting for our house to be built. I made sure there was a designated space for my plants there! Most of those plants survived the move, including a favorite orchid. Since moving into our house I’ve collected more, and my plant space is rather crowded. I’ve mostly concentrated on violets (because they are small so I can have more) and orchids (because I have learned how to not kill them,) and both because when they bloom it’s such a great joy. Still not up to Grandma’s bow window but…
    I am unable to care for a large garden outdoors anymore but manage some pots of herbs and a handful of annuals each year. I love the photos you have shared with us of your outdoor plants (from the old house??) and I especially enjoyed the photos from your newsletter, of the terrarium you recently planted! I’ve always coveted those Victorian terrariums. I think I need a Cyclamen. You are experiencing Spring now, so have a beautiful Spring and Summer. And thank you for this wonderful post.

    Reply
  28. What a lovely and educational post, Anne. I’ve loved house plants since a very young age as my Grandmother had a collection in her home. I can envision that space with near perfect recall. It was a combination bow window/window seat, (there being room for only one person to sit in the large space due to plants taking up the rest of it.) She and Grandpa traveled earlier in their lives and brought home some special ones. I have always wanted to recreate that, but alas…
    We have moved a lot ourselves, and I’ve built up some collections of indoor plants in several of those locations only to have to give them away the next time we moved. But I did have quite a nice collection in the last house we lived in for the longest time and when we moved across country I planned ahead and rooted my favorites in water then carefully wrapped them in moist towels and plastic bags and ended up with one large plastic storage tote that traveled with us in the car, of plants to re-pot as soon as we got to our temporary apartment while waiting for our house to be built. I made sure there was a designated space for my plants there! Most of those plants survived the move, including a favorite orchid. Since moving into our house I’ve collected more, and my plant space is rather crowded. I’ve mostly concentrated on violets (because they are small so I can have more) and orchids (because I have learned how to not kill them,) and both because when they bloom it’s such a great joy. Still not up to Grandma’s bow window but…
    I am unable to care for a large garden outdoors anymore but manage some pots of herbs and a handful of annuals each year. I love the photos you have shared with us of your outdoor plants (from the old house??) and I especially enjoyed the photos from your newsletter, of the terrarium you recently planted! I’ve always coveted those Victorian terrariums. I think I need a Cyclamen. You are experiencing Spring now, so have a beautiful Spring and Summer. And thank you for this wonderful post.

    Reply
  29. What a lovely and educational post, Anne. I’ve loved house plants since a very young age as my Grandmother had a collection in her home. I can envision that space with near perfect recall. It was a combination bow window/window seat, (there being room for only one person to sit in the large space due to plants taking up the rest of it.) She and Grandpa traveled earlier in their lives and brought home some special ones. I have always wanted to recreate that, but alas…
    We have moved a lot ourselves, and I’ve built up some collections of indoor plants in several of those locations only to have to give them away the next time we moved. But I did have quite a nice collection in the last house we lived in for the longest time and when we moved across country I planned ahead and rooted my favorites in water then carefully wrapped them in moist towels and plastic bags and ended up with one large plastic storage tote that traveled with us in the car, of plants to re-pot as soon as we got to our temporary apartment while waiting for our house to be built. I made sure there was a designated space for my plants there! Most of those plants survived the move, including a favorite orchid. Since moving into our house I’ve collected more, and my plant space is rather crowded. I’ve mostly concentrated on violets (because they are small so I can have more) and orchids (because I have learned how to not kill them,) and both because when they bloom it’s such a great joy. Still not up to Grandma’s bow window but…
    I am unable to care for a large garden outdoors anymore but manage some pots of herbs and a handful of annuals each year. I love the photos you have shared with us of your outdoor plants (from the old house??) and I especially enjoyed the photos from your newsletter, of the terrarium you recently planted! I’ve always coveted those Victorian terrariums. I think I need a Cyclamen. You are experiencing Spring now, so have a beautiful Spring and Summer. And thank you for this wonderful post.

    Reply
  30. What a lovely and educational post, Anne. I’ve loved house plants since a very young age as my Grandmother had a collection in her home. I can envision that space with near perfect recall. It was a combination bow window/window seat, (there being room for only one person to sit in the large space due to plants taking up the rest of it.) She and Grandpa traveled earlier in their lives and brought home some special ones. I have always wanted to recreate that, but alas…
    We have moved a lot ourselves, and I’ve built up some collections of indoor plants in several of those locations only to have to give them away the next time we moved. But I did have quite a nice collection in the last house we lived in for the longest time and when we moved across country I planned ahead and rooted my favorites in water then carefully wrapped them in moist towels and plastic bags and ended up with one large plastic storage tote that traveled with us in the car, of plants to re-pot as soon as we got to our temporary apartment while waiting for our house to be built. I made sure there was a designated space for my plants there! Most of those plants survived the move, including a favorite orchid. Since moving into our house I’ve collected more, and my plant space is rather crowded. I’ve mostly concentrated on violets (because they are small so I can have more) and orchids (because I have learned how to not kill them,) and both because when they bloom it’s such a great joy. Still not up to Grandma’s bow window but…
    I am unable to care for a large garden outdoors anymore but manage some pots of herbs and a handful of annuals each year. I love the photos you have shared with us of your outdoor plants (from the old house??) and I especially enjoyed the photos from your newsletter, of the terrarium you recently planted! I’ve always coveted those Victorian terrariums. I think I need a Cyclamen. You are experiencing Spring now, so have a beautiful Spring and Summer. And thank you for this wonderful post.

    Reply
  31. I had a friend once who told me that all my plants died because I was too nice to them….I think she was wrong. I live in Texas where most tropical plants can be in pots on my patio. I have grown oaks and avocado trees from acorns and seeds. When they got too big for me to move them I gave them away. I am not as mobile now so, slowly but surely, I have lessened my number of plants. I have two begonias that are probably 10 or 15 years old. In the house, I have only one window sill with African violets.
    I have lots of spider plants, and Swedish Ivy and I love them because they grow like weeds. I have a bromeliad which has multiplied. I need to divide it now. They have the most interesting pink blooms annually. But it is not a flower, it is sharp and sticks very painfully.
    I am fortunate, I can generally start things from cuttings. But, anymore, I don’t have the energy to do that. Thanks for the interesting post. I had to look to see what a monstera was.

    Reply
  32. I had a friend once who told me that all my plants died because I was too nice to them….I think she was wrong. I live in Texas where most tropical plants can be in pots on my patio. I have grown oaks and avocado trees from acorns and seeds. When they got too big for me to move them I gave them away. I am not as mobile now so, slowly but surely, I have lessened my number of plants. I have two begonias that are probably 10 or 15 years old. In the house, I have only one window sill with African violets.
    I have lots of spider plants, and Swedish Ivy and I love them because they grow like weeds. I have a bromeliad which has multiplied. I need to divide it now. They have the most interesting pink blooms annually. But it is not a flower, it is sharp and sticks very painfully.
    I am fortunate, I can generally start things from cuttings. But, anymore, I don’t have the energy to do that. Thanks for the interesting post. I had to look to see what a monstera was.

    Reply
  33. I had a friend once who told me that all my plants died because I was too nice to them….I think she was wrong. I live in Texas where most tropical plants can be in pots on my patio. I have grown oaks and avocado trees from acorns and seeds. When they got too big for me to move them I gave them away. I am not as mobile now so, slowly but surely, I have lessened my number of plants. I have two begonias that are probably 10 or 15 years old. In the house, I have only one window sill with African violets.
    I have lots of spider plants, and Swedish Ivy and I love them because they grow like weeds. I have a bromeliad which has multiplied. I need to divide it now. They have the most interesting pink blooms annually. But it is not a flower, it is sharp and sticks very painfully.
    I am fortunate, I can generally start things from cuttings. But, anymore, I don’t have the energy to do that. Thanks for the interesting post. I had to look to see what a monstera was.

    Reply
  34. I had a friend once who told me that all my plants died because I was too nice to them….I think she was wrong. I live in Texas where most tropical plants can be in pots on my patio. I have grown oaks and avocado trees from acorns and seeds. When they got too big for me to move them I gave them away. I am not as mobile now so, slowly but surely, I have lessened my number of plants. I have two begonias that are probably 10 or 15 years old. In the house, I have only one window sill with African violets.
    I have lots of spider plants, and Swedish Ivy and I love them because they grow like weeds. I have a bromeliad which has multiplied. I need to divide it now. They have the most interesting pink blooms annually. But it is not a flower, it is sharp and sticks very painfully.
    I am fortunate, I can generally start things from cuttings. But, anymore, I don’t have the energy to do that. Thanks for the interesting post. I had to look to see what a monstera was.

    Reply
  35. I had a friend once who told me that all my plants died because I was too nice to them….I think she was wrong. I live in Texas where most tropical plants can be in pots on my patio. I have grown oaks and avocado trees from acorns and seeds. When they got too big for me to move them I gave them away. I am not as mobile now so, slowly but surely, I have lessened my number of plants. I have two begonias that are probably 10 or 15 years old. In the house, I have only one window sill with African violets.
    I have lots of spider plants, and Swedish Ivy and I love them because they grow like weeds. I have a bromeliad which has multiplied. I need to divide it now. They have the most interesting pink blooms annually. But it is not a flower, it is sharp and sticks very painfully.
    I am fortunate, I can generally start things from cuttings. But, anymore, I don’t have the energy to do that. Thanks for the interesting post. I had to look to see what a monstera was.

    Reply
  36. Do I have plants?!
    Oh, yes. And I keep propagating them, too. have given plants to many people in the US, from the East Coast to the West Coast. Succulents, cacti, etc. I even have two gingko trees I grew from seeds I found on a sidewalk in Brooklyn.
    I probably have too many indoor plants. But I do love them all.
    My now ex-husband once accused me with some heat that I loved my plants more than I loved him. I was tempted to say, “Your point being?”
    Glad I lost him, glad I still have the plants.

    Reply
  37. Do I have plants?!
    Oh, yes. And I keep propagating them, too. have given plants to many people in the US, from the East Coast to the West Coast. Succulents, cacti, etc. I even have two gingko trees I grew from seeds I found on a sidewalk in Brooklyn.
    I probably have too many indoor plants. But I do love them all.
    My now ex-husband once accused me with some heat that I loved my plants more than I loved him. I was tempted to say, “Your point being?”
    Glad I lost him, glad I still have the plants.

    Reply
  38. Do I have plants?!
    Oh, yes. And I keep propagating them, too. have given plants to many people in the US, from the East Coast to the West Coast. Succulents, cacti, etc. I even have two gingko trees I grew from seeds I found on a sidewalk in Brooklyn.
    I probably have too many indoor plants. But I do love them all.
    My now ex-husband once accused me with some heat that I loved my plants more than I loved him. I was tempted to say, “Your point being?”
    Glad I lost him, glad I still have the plants.

    Reply
  39. Do I have plants?!
    Oh, yes. And I keep propagating them, too. have given plants to many people in the US, from the East Coast to the West Coast. Succulents, cacti, etc. I even have two gingko trees I grew from seeds I found on a sidewalk in Brooklyn.
    I probably have too many indoor plants. But I do love them all.
    My now ex-husband once accused me with some heat that I loved my plants more than I loved him. I was tempted to say, “Your point being?”
    Glad I lost him, glad I still have the plants.

    Reply
  40. Do I have plants?!
    Oh, yes. And I keep propagating them, too. have given plants to many people in the US, from the East Coast to the West Coast. Succulents, cacti, etc. I even have two gingko trees I grew from seeds I found on a sidewalk in Brooklyn.
    I probably have too many indoor plants. But I do love them all.
    My now ex-husband once accused me with some heat that I loved my plants more than I loved him. I was tempted to say, “Your point being?”
    Glad I lost him, glad I still have the plants.

    Reply
  41. I have a batch of geraniums that I move inside every winter & place them in the sunniest window in the house where they bloom all winter long & I get to enjoy them. I also have several spider plants, christmas cactus, and a planter of succulents that all move in & out as the seasons permit. I have some pots of porthos (similar to philodendron) that stay in the living room year-round as it’s low on sunlight, and many pots of hostas that will get trimmed back this weekend, moved into a sheltered spot in the garage & covered with many layers of sheets, etc. Most of those will survive the winter & come back next year as they’re all moved back out to the porch. I also had cannas growing in a pot this year but I won’t try to carry them over thru the winter. Tried that last year, didn’t do very well. Ah well, gives me a reason for a trip to the nursery in the spring! I love that trip!

    Reply
  42. I have a batch of geraniums that I move inside every winter & place them in the sunniest window in the house where they bloom all winter long & I get to enjoy them. I also have several spider plants, christmas cactus, and a planter of succulents that all move in & out as the seasons permit. I have some pots of porthos (similar to philodendron) that stay in the living room year-round as it’s low on sunlight, and many pots of hostas that will get trimmed back this weekend, moved into a sheltered spot in the garage & covered with many layers of sheets, etc. Most of those will survive the winter & come back next year as they’re all moved back out to the porch. I also had cannas growing in a pot this year but I won’t try to carry them over thru the winter. Tried that last year, didn’t do very well. Ah well, gives me a reason for a trip to the nursery in the spring! I love that trip!

    Reply
  43. I have a batch of geraniums that I move inside every winter & place them in the sunniest window in the house where they bloom all winter long & I get to enjoy them. I also have several spider plants, christmas cactus, and a planter of succulents that all move in & out as the seasons permit. I have some pots of porthos (similar to philodendron) that stay in the living room year-round as it’s low on sunlight, and many pots of hostas that will get trimmed back this weekend, moved into a sheltered spot in the garage & covered with many layers of sheets, etc. Most of those will survive the winter & come back next year as they’re all moved back out to the porch. I also had cannas growing in a pot this year but I won’t try to carry them over thru the winter. Tried that last year, didn’t do very well. Ah well, gives me a reason for a trip to the nursery in the spring! I love that trip!

    Reply
  44. I have a batch of geraniums that I move inside every winter & place them in the sunniest window in the house where they bloom all winter long & I get to enjoy them. I also have several spider plants, christmas cactus, and a planter of succulents that all move in & out as the seasons permit. I have some pots of porthos (similar to philodendron) that stay in the living room year-round as it’s low on sunlight, and many pots of hostas that will get trimmed back this weekend, moved into a sheltered spot in the garage & covered with many layers of sheets, etc. Most of those will survive the winter & come back next year as they’re all moved back out to the porch. I also had cannas growing in a pot this year but I won’t try to carry them over thru the winter. Tried that last year, didn’t do very well. Ah well, gives me a reason for a trip to the nursery in the spring! I love that trip!

    Reply
  45. I have a batch of geraniums that I move inside every winter & place them in the sunniest window in the house where they bloom all winter long & I get to enjoy them. I also have several spider plants, christmas cactus, and a planter of succulents that all move in & out as the seasons permit. I have some pots of porthos (similar to philodendron) that stay in the living room year-round as it’s low on sunlight, and many pots of hostas that will get trimmed back this weekend, moved into a sheltered spot in the garage & covered with many layers of sheets, etc. Most of those will survive the winter & come back next year as they’re all moved back out to the porch. I also had cannas growing in a pot this year but I won’t try to carry them over thru the winter. Tried that last year, didn’t do very well. Ah well, gives me a reason for a trip to the nursery in the spring! I love that trip!

    Reply
  46. I have quite a few house plants. Two Christmas cacti, pink and orange which are lovely when they come out. I have a Spider plant that my brother gave me over thirty years ago. It died, as I thought about a year ago and I put it out in the garage to dump but one day my husband noticed green shoots coming through and it’s back again!! I couldn’t believe it. Plants add something to a house I think.

    Reply
  47. I have quite a few house plants. Two Christmas cacti, pink and orange which are lovely when they come out. I have a Spider plant that my brother gave me over thirty years ago. It died, as I thought about a year ago and I put it out in the garage to dump but one day my husband noticed green shoots coming through and it’s back again!! I couldn’t believe it. Plants add something to a house I think.

    Reply
  48. I have quite a few house plants. Two Christmas cacti, pink and orange which are lovely when they come out. I have a Spider plant that my brother gave me over thirty years ago. It died, as I thought about a year ago and I put it out in the garage to dump but one day my husband noticed green shoots coming through and it’s back again!! I couldn’t believe it. Plants add something to a house I think.

    Reply
  49. I have quite a few house plants. Two Christmas cacti, pink and orange which are lovely when they come out. I have a Spider plant that my brother gave me over thirty years ago. It died, as I thought about a year ago and I put it out in the garage to dump but one day my husband noticed green shoots coming through and it’s back again!! I couldn’t believe it. Plants add something to a house I think.

    Reply
  50. I have quite a few house plants. Two Christmas cacti, pink and orange which are lovely when they come out. I have a Spider plant that my brother gave me over thirty years ago. It died, as I thought about a year ago and I put it out in the garage to dump but one day my husband noticed green shoots coming through and it’s back again!! I couldn’t believe it. Plants add something to a house I think.

    Reply
  51. Linda, I wish I’d been able to move my huge philodendron but it would also have taken a truck and I had enough on my plate with moving. I believe it’s been destroyed now, which makes me sad.
    My mother also had lots of African violets — so pretty — but for some reason I don’t have any. I kept one for years — it was a gift from the librarians at my first author talk, but sadly it got overwatered by an enthusiastic friend while I was away, and it rotted.
    Your current collection sounds lovely. Thanks for that list of plants you have — I’d never heard of beaucarnea, ZZ plant (zamioculcas) or the dolphon plant — and had fun looking them up.

    Reply
  52. Linda, I wish I’d been able to move my huge philodendron but it would also have taken a truck and I had enough on my plate with moving. I believe it’s been destroyed now, which makes me sad.
    My mother also had lots of African violets — so pretty — but for some reason I don’t have any. I kept one for years — it was a gift from the librarians at my first author talk, but sadly it got overwatered by an enthusiastic friend while I was away, and it rotted.
    Your current collection sounds lovely. Thanks for that list of plants you have — I’d never heard of beaucarnea, ZZ plant (zamioculcas) or the dolphon plant — and had fun looking them up.

    Reply
  53. Linda, I wish I’d been able to move my huge philodendron but it would also have taken a truck and I had enough on my plate with moving. I believe it’s been destroyed now, which makes me sad.
    My mother also had lots of African violets — so pretty — but for some reason I don’t have any. I kept one for years — it was a gift from the librarians at my first author talk, but sadly it got overwatered by an enthusiastic friend while I was away, and it rotted.
    Your current collection sounds lovely. Thanks for that list of plants you have — I’d never heard of beaucarnea, ZZ plant (zamioculcas) or the dolphon plant — and had fun looking them up.

    Reply
  54. Linda, I wish I’d been able to move my huge philodendron but it would also have taken a truck and I had enough on my plate with moving. I believe it’s been destroyed now, which makes me sad.
    My mother also had lots of African violets — so pretty — but for some reason I don’t have any. I kept one for years — it was a gift from the librarians at my first author talk, but sadly it got overwatered by an enthusiastic friend while I was away, and it rotted.
    Your current collection sounds lovely. Thanks for that list of plants you have — I’d never heard of beaucarnea, ZZ plant (zamioculcas) or the dolphon plant — and had fun looking them up.

    Reply
  55. Linda, I wish I’d been able to move my huge philodendron but it would also have taken a truck and I had enough on my plate with moving. I believe it’s been destroyed now, which makes me sad.
    My mother also had lots of African violets — so pretty — but for some reason I don’t have any. I kept one for years — it was a gift from the librarians at my first author talk, but sadly it got overwatered by an enthusiastic friend while I was away, and it rotted.
    Your current collection sounds lovely. Thanks for that list of plants you have — I’d never heard of beaucarnea, ZZ plant (zamioculcas) or the dolphon plant — and had fun looking them up.

    Reply
  56. Thanks, Michelle. I agree that moving frequently makes it difficult to keep plants. When I was a child we moved every few years, and it was the last house Mum and Dad lived in that I remember all the lovely potted plants Mum had. Then I moved frequently until I bought my old house.
    The cyclamens I bought have been wonderfully cheering through winter. The very first one I bought just before we started on our long period of many lockdowns. I popped it still in its pot, in the front garden when I moved into the new house, not expecting anything from it, but being unwilling to toss it out after it had done so well for me, and it has flowers again. Not a lot, but a few bright splashes of red, which make me smile. I remember in Greece, small cyclamens grew wild in huge drifts. I had a mild fit when I realized what I was walking on. Of course they weren’t flowering then, which would have alerted me earlier.

    Reply
  57. Thanks, Michelle. I agree that moving frequently makes it difficult to keep plants. When I was a child we moved every few years, and it was the last house Mum and Dad lived in that I remember all the lovely potted plants Mum had. Then I moved frequently until I bought my old house.
    The cyclamens I bought have been wonderfully cheering through winter. The very first one I bought just before we started on our long period of many lockdowns. I popped it still in its pot, in the front garden when I moved into the new house, not expecting anything from it, but being unwilling to toss it out after it had done so well for me, and it has flowers again. Not a lot, but a few bright splashes of red, which make me smile. I remember in Greece, small cyclamens grew wild in huge drifts. I had a mild fit when I realized what I was walking on. Of course they weren’t flowering then, which would have alerted me earlier.

    Reply
  58. Thanks, Michelle. I agree that moving frequently makes it difficult to keep plants. When I was a child we moved every few years, and it was the last house Mum and Dad lived in that I remember all the lovely potted plants Mum had. Then I moved frequently until I bought my old house.
    The cyclamens I bought have been wonderfully cheering through winter. The very first one I bought just before we started on our long period of many lockdowns. I popped it still in its pot, in the front garden when I moved into the new house, not expecting anything from it, but being unwilling to toss it out after it had done so well for me, and it has flowers again. Not a lot, but a few bright splashes of red, which make me smile. I remember in Greece, small cyclamens grew wild in huge drifts. I had a mild fit when I realized what I was walking on. Of course they weren’t flowering then, which would have alerted me earlier.

    Reply
  59. Thanks, Michelle. I agree that moving frequently makes it difficult to keep plants. When I was a child we moved every few years, and it was the last house Mum and Dad lived in that I remember all the lovely potted plants Mum had. Then I moved frequently until I bought my old house.
    The cyclamens I bought have been wonderfully cheering through winter. The very first one I bought just before we started on our long period of many lockdowns. I popped it still in its pot, in the front garden when I moved into the new house, not expecting anything from it, but being unwilling to toss it out after it had done so well for me, and it has flowers again. Not a lot, but a few bright splashes of red, which make me smile. I remember in Greece, small cyclamens grew wild in huge drifts. I had a mild fit when I realized what I was walking on. Of course they weren’t flowering then, which would have alerted me earlier.

    Reply
  60. Thanks, Michelle. I agree that moving frequently makes it difficult to keep plants. When I was a child we moved every few years, and it was the last house Mum and Dad lived in that I remember all the lovely potted plants Mum had. Then I moved frequently until I bought my old house.
    The cyclamens I bought have been wonderfully cheering through winter. The very first one I bought just before we started on our long period of many lockdowns. I popped it still in its pot, in the front garden when I moved into the new house, not expecting anything from it, but being unwilling to toss it out after it had done so well for me, and it has flowers again. Not a lot, but a few bright splashes of red, which make me smile. I remember in Greece, small cyclamens grew wild in huge drifts. I had a mild fit when I realized what I was walking on. Of course they weren’t flowering then, which would have alerted me earlier.

    Reply
  61. Oh Annette, that’s mean. I think some people do “kill with kindness” but it generally means they overwater the plants. I know I’ve done it at times, but now I’m much better at not doing that.
    I also love those plants that grow like weeds, and those that are easily grown from cuttings. I was shocked recently when I saw some being sold in plant nurseries for around $30. I muttered to my friend that all you needed was a tiny sprig and you could grow them easily. But it’s getting that initial tiny sprig that’s the tricky bit.
    I ended up ordering a saxifraga (strawberry begonia) on line, just for remembrance. Mum used to call it “mother of thousands” — quite different from the US plant of that name. And it’s having babies now, which takes me back to my childhood and gives me such pleasure.

    Reply
  62. Oh Annette, that’s mean. I think some people do “kill with kindness” but it generally means they overwater the plants. I know I’ve done it at times, but now I’m much better at not doing that.
    I also love those plants that grow like weeds, and those that are easily grown from cuttings. I was shocked recently when I saw some being sold in plant nurseries for around $30. I muttered to my friend that all you needed was a tiny sprig and you could grow them easily. But it’s getting that initial tiny sprig that’s the tricky bit.
    I ended up ordering a saxifraga (strawberry begonia) on line, just for remembrance. Mum used to call it “mother of thousands” — quite different from the US plant of that name. And it’s having babies now, which takes me back to my childhood and gives me such pleasure.

    Reply
  63. Oh Annette, that’s mean. I think some people do “kill with kindness” but it generally means they overwater the plants. I know I’ve done it at times, but now I’m much better at not doing that.
    I also love those plants that grow like weeds, and those that are easily grown from cuttings. I was shocked recently when I saw some being sold in plant nurseries for around $30. I muttered to my friend that all you needed was a tiny sprig and you could grow them easily. But it’s getting that initial tiny sprig that’s the tricky bit.
    I ended up ordering a saxifraga (strawberry begonia) on line, just for remembrance. Mum used to call it “mother of thousands” — quite different from the US plant of that name. And it’s having babies now, which takes me back to my childhood and gives me such pleasure.

    Reply
  64. Oh Annette, that’s mean. I think some people do “kill with kindness” but it generally means they overwater the plants. I know I’ve done it at times, but now I’m much better at not doing that.
    I also love those plants that grow like weeds, and those that are easily grown from cuttings. I was shocked recently when I saw some being sold in plant nurseries for around $30. I muttered to my friend that all you needed was a tiny sprig and you could grow them easily. But it’s getting that initial tiny sprig that’s the tricky bit.
    I ended up ordering a saxifraga (strawberry begonia) on line, just for remembrance. Mum used to call it “mother of thousands” — quite different from the US plant of that name. And it’s having babies now, which takes me back to my childhood and gives me such pleasure.

    Reply
  65. Oh Annette, that’s mean. I think some people do “kill with kindness” but it generally means they overwater the plants. I know I’ve done it at times, but now I’m much better at not doing that.
    I also love those plants that grow like weeds, and those that are easily grown from cuttings. I was shocked recently when I saw some being sold in plant nurseries for around $30. I muttered to my friend that all you needed was a tiny sprig and you could grow them easily. But it’s getting that initial tiny sprig that’s the tricky bit.
    I ended up ordering a saxifraga (strawberry begonia) on line, just for remembrance. Mum used to call it “mother of thousands” — quite different from the US plant of that name. And it’s having babies now, which takes me back to my childhood and gives me such pleasure.

    Reply
  66. Well, this was a wonderful post and I love indoor plants, but I have a black thumb. I have no indoor plants at this time. I heard lavender in the bedroom was conducive to good sleep but that wouldn’t grow for me either. I have managed to keep some really cute succulents alive on my patio steps along with a shamrock plant. So that’s better than nothing, right?!

    Reply
  67. Well, this was a wonderful post and I love indoor plants, but I have a black thumb. I have no indoor plants at this time. I heard lavender in the bedroom was conducive to good sleep but that wouldn’t grow for me either. I have managed to keep some really cute succulents alive on my patio steps along with a shamrock plant. So that’s better than nothing, right?!

    Reply
  68. Well, this was a wonderful post and I love indoor plants, but I have a black thumb. I have no indoor plants at this time. I heard lavender in the bedroom was conducive to good sleep but that wouldn’t grow for me either. I have managed to keep some really cute succulents alive on my patio steps along with a shamrock plant. So that’s better than nothing, right?!

    Reply
  69. Well, this was a wonderful post and I love indoor plants, but I have a black thumb. I have no indoor plants at this time. I heard lavender in the bedroom was conducive to good sleep but that wouldn’t grow for me either. I have managed to keep some really cute succulents alive on my patio steps along with a shamrock plant. So that’s better than nothing, right?!

    Reply
  70. Well, this was a wonderful post and I love indoor plants, but I have a black thumb. I have no indoor plants at this time. I heard lavender in the bedroom was conducive to good sleep but that wouldn’t grow for me either. I have managed to keep some really cute succulents alive on my patio steps along with a shamrock plant. So that’s better than nothing, right?!

    Reply
  71. Camille, I love propagating plants too. I am especially impressed with your growing Gingko trees. I’ve never tried it, but in a local garden I’m very fond of there are some very old and stunningly beautiful gingko trees. They’re especially glorious in autumn, You can see some photos here – click on the right arrow to see a few more. https://www.flickr.com/photos/phunnyfotos/8761239705/in/photostream/
    Is there any such thing as too many plants? It’s a bit like too many books. If you love them and they give you pleasure, there’s never too many.

    Reply
  72. Camille, I love propagating plants too. I am especially impressed with your growing Gingko trees. I’ve never tried it, but in a local garden I’m very fond of there are some very old and stunningly beautiful gingko trees. They’re especially glorious in autumn, You can see some photos here – click on the right arrow to see a few more. https://www.flickr.com/photos/phunnyfotos/8761239705/in/photostream/
    Is there any such thing as too many plants? It’s a bit like too many books. If you love them and they give you pleasure, there’s never too many.

    Reply
  73. Camille, I love propagating plants too. I am especially impressed with your growing Gingko trees. I’ve never tried it, but in a local garden I’m very fond of there are some very old and stunningly beautiful gingko trees. They’re especially glorious in autumn, You can see some photos here – click on the right arrow to see a few more. https://www.flickr.com/photos/phunnyfotos/8761239705/in/photostream/
    Is there any such thing as too many plants? It’s a bit like too many books. If you love them and they give you pleasure, there’s never too many.

    Reply
  74. Camille, I love propagating plants too. I am especially impressed with your growing Gingko trees. I’ve never tried it, but in a local garden I’m very fond of there are some very old and stunningly beautiful gingko trees. They’re especially glorious in autumn, You can see some photos here – click on the right arrow to see a few more. https://www.flickr.com/photos/phunnyfotos/8761239705/in/photostream/
    Is there any such thing as too many plants? It’s a bit like too many books. If you love them and they give you pleasure, there’s never too many.

    Reply
  75. Camille, I love propagating plants too. I am especially impressed with your growing Gingko trees. I’ve never tried it, but in a local garden I’m very fond of there are some very old and stunningly beautiful gingko trees. They’re especially glorious in autumn, You can see some photos here – click on the right arrow to see a few more. https://www.flickr.com/photos/phunnyfotos/8761239705/in/photostream/
    Is there any such thing as too many plants? It’s a bit like too many books. If you love them and they give you pleasure, there’s never too many.

    Reply
  76. Karen your plants sound lovely. I’m fairly lucky in that we don’t have bitter winters, and I don’t have to move plants around. When I moved I put all my plants in a sort of covered courtyard as a temporary home, and some have done amazingly well there. My dark burgundy pelargonium, which I grew from a cutting, is now in flower and I’m so pleased.
    Trips to the nursery are such fun, I agree. I have a good friend who occasionally phones me up and says, “I’m going to the nursery — want to come?” I always say yes. I have several nurseries that I’m very fond of visiting, and when I travel (in the car) I will often stop off to visit a new-to-me nursery, just in case they have something different. And they often do.

    Reply
  77. Karen your plants sound lovely. I’m fairly lucky in that we don’t have bitter winters, and I don’t have to move plants around. When I moved I put all my plants in a sort of covered courtyard as a temporary home, and some have done amazingly well there. My dark burgundy pelargonium, which I grew from a cutting, is now in flower and I’m so pleased.
    Trips to the nursery are such fun, I agree. I have a good friend who occasionally phones me up and says, “I’m going to the nursery — want to come?” I always say yes. I have several nurseries that I’m very fond of visiting, and when I travel (in the car) I will often stop off to visit a new-to-me nursery, just in case they have something different. And they often do.

    Reply
  78. Karen your plants sound lovely. I’m fairly lucky in that we don’t have bitter winters, and I don’t have to move plants around. When I moved I put all my plants in a sort of covered courtyard as a temporary home, and some have done amazingly well there. My dark burgundy pelargonium, which I grew from a cutting, is now in flower and I’m so pleased.
    Trips to the nursery are such fun, I agree. I have a good friend who occasionally phones me up and says, “I’m going to the nursery — want to come?” I always say yes. I have several nurseries that I’m very fond of visiting, and when I travel (in the car) I will often stop off to visit a new-to-me nursery, just in case they have something different. And they often do.

    Reply
  79. Karen your plants sound lovely. I’m fairly lucky in that we don’t have bitter winters, and I don’t have to move plants around. When I moved I put all my plants in a sort of covered courtyard as a temporary home, and some have done amazingly well there. My dark burgundy pelargonium, which I grew from a cutting, is now in flower and I’m so pleased.
    Trips to the nursery are such fun, I agree. I have a good friend who occasionally phones me up and says, “I’m going to the nursery — want to come?” I always say yes. I have several nurseries that I’m very fond of visiting, and when I travel (in the car) I will often stop off to visit a new-to-me nursery, just in case they have something different. And they often do.

    Reply
  80. Karen your plants sound lovely. I’m fairly lucky in that we don’t have bitter winters, and I don’t have to move plants around. When I moved I put all my plants in a sort of covered courtyard as a temporary home, and some have done amazingly well there. My dark burgundy pelargonium, which I grew from a cutting, is now in flower and I’m so pleased.
    Trips to the nursery are such fun, I agree. I have a good friend who occasionally phones me up and says, “I’m going to the nursery — want to come?” I always say yes. I have several nurseries that I’m very fond of visiting, and when I travel (in the car) I will often stop off to visit a new-to-me nursery, just in case they have something different. And they often do.

    Reply
  81. Teresa, isn’t it wonderful how plants can sometimes surprise you and come back from the apparent dead? I’m so please your spider plant came back.
    Plants are a lovely addition to a house, I agree. I sometimes look at photos of house interiors — maybe on real estate sites or in magazines— and if they don’t have books or plants, I shake my head.

    Reply
  82. Teresa, isn’t it wonderful how plants can sometimes surprise you and come back from the apparent dead? I’m so please your spider plant came back.
    Plants are a lovely addition to a house, I agree. I sometimes look at photos of house interiors — maybe on real estate sites or in magazines— and if they don’t have books or plants, I shake my head.

    Reply
  83. Teresa, isn’t it wonderful how plants can sometimes surprise you and come back from the apparent dead? I’m so please your spider plant came back.
    Plants are a lovely addition to a house, I agree. I sometimes look at photos of house interiors — maybe on real estate sites or in magazines— and if they don’t have books or plants, I shake my head.

    Reply
  84. Teresa, isn’t it wonderful how plants can sometimes surprise you and come back from the apparent dead? I’m so please your spider plant came back.
    Plants are a lovely addition to a house, I agree. I sometimes look at photos of house interiors — maybe on real estate sites or in magazines— and if they don’t have books or plants, I shake my head.

    Reply
  85. Teresa, isn’t it wonderful how plants can sometimes surprise you and come back from the apparent dead? I’m so please your spider plant came back.
    Plants are a lovely addition to a house, I agree. I sometimes look at photos of house interiors — maybe on real estate sites or in magazines— and if they don’t have books or plants, I shake my head.

    Reply
  86. Thanks, Jeanne, having your very own shamrock has to be good, right? And my mother loved her (millions of) succulents and cacti and they can be really cute, as you say. Lavender is, I think, more of an outdoor plant and thrives in a sunny aspect and not particularly rich soil. At my old house I grew a lavender bush from a cutting and it thrived on neglect for decades. I’m planning to take some more cuttings.

    Reply
  87. Thanks, Jeanne, having your very own shamrock has to be good, right? And my mother loved her (millions of) succulents and cacti and they can be really cute, as you say. Lavender is, I think, more of an outdoor plant and thrives in a sunny aspect and not particularly rich soil. At my old house I grew a lavender bush from a cutting and it thrived on neglect for decades. I’m planning to take some more cuttings.

    Reply
  88. Thanks, Jeanne, having your very own shamrock has to be good, right? And my mother loved her (millions of) succulents and cacti and they can be really cute, as you say. Lavender is, I think, more of an outdoor plant and thrives in a sunny aspect and not particularly rich soil. At my old house I grew a lavender bush from a cutting and it thrived on neglect for decades. I’m planning to take some more cuttings.

    Reply
  89. Thanks, Jeanne, having your very own shamrock has to be good, right? And my mother loved her (millions of) succulents and cacti and they can be really cute, as you say. Lavender is, I think, more of an outdoor plant and thrives in a sunny aspect and not particularly rich soil. At my old house I grew a lavender bush from a cutting and it thrived on neglect for decades. I’m planning to take some more cuttings.

    Reply
  90. Thanks, Jeanne, having your very own shamrock has to be good, right? And my mother loved her (millions of) succulents and cacti and they can be really cute, as you say. Lavender is, I think, more of an outdoor plant and thrives in a sunny aspect and not particularly rich soil. At my old house I grew a lavender bush from a cutting and it thrived on neglect for decades. I’m planning to take some more cuttings.

    Reply
  91. I had Poinsettias, Philodendra, Christmas cactus, aloe, and a few others then we got another cat. Now, I have some succulents that have survived so far. Not all survived being put out on the balcony because of too much shade, too much sun, too little water, too much water. When I had a house I rarely had indoor plants. Wasn’t much of a gardener, either. I am rather Darwinian about plants. I do my best but only the hearty survive. I envy those who can grow plants from seed. I can’t get an avocado or a potato or such to grow but read that those are favorites in primary school where 6 year olds can make them grow!

    Reply
  92. I had Poinsettias, Philodendra, Christmas cactus, aloe, and a few others then we got another cat. Now, I have some succulents that have survived so far. Not all survived being put out on the balcony because of too much shade, too much sun, too little water, too much water. When I had a house I rarely had indoor plants. Wasn’t much of a gardener, either. I am rather Darwinian about plants. I do my best but only the hearty survive. I envy those who can grow plants from seed. I can’t get an avocado or a potato or such to grow but read that those are favorites in primary school where 6 year olds can make them grow!

    Reply
  93. I had Poinsettias, Philodendra, Christmas cactus, aloe, and a few others then we got another cat. Now, I have some succulents that have survived so far. Not all survived being put out on the balcony because of too much shade, too much sun, too little water, too much water. When I had a house I rarely had indoor plants. Wasn’t much of a gardener, either. I am rather Darwinian about plants. I do my best but only the hearty survive. I envy those who can grow plants from seed. I can’t get an avocado or a potato or such to grow but read that those are favorites in primary school where 6 year olds can make them grow!

    Reply
  94. I had Poinsettias, Philodendra, Christmas cactus, aloe, and a few others then we got another cat. Now, I have some succulents that have survived so far. Not all survived being put out on the balcony because of too much shade, too much sun, too little water, too much water. When I had a house I rarely had indoor plants. Wasn’t much of a gardener, either. I am rather Darwinian about plants. I do my best but only the hearty survive. I envy those who can grow plants from seed. I can’t get an avocado or a potato or such to grow but read that those are favorites in primary school where 6 year olds can make them grow!

    Reply
  95. I had Poinsettias, Philodendra, Christmas cactus, aloe, and a few others then we got another cat. Now, I have some succulents that have survived so far. Not all survived being put out on the balcony because of too much shade, too much sun, too little water, too much water. When I had a house I rarely had indoor plants. Wasn’t much of a gardener, either. I am rather Darwinian about plants. I do my best but only the hearty survive. I envy those who can grow plants from seed. I can’t get an avocado or a potato or such to grow but read that those are favorites in primary school where 6 year olds can make them grow!

    Reply
  96. Nancy, don’t forget that those 6 year olds have a teacher supervising them, so of course they’re going to succeed. It’s hard to get plant requirements right, I agree. But it’s fun trying.

    Reply
  97. Nancy, don’t forget that those 6 year olds have a teacher supervising them, so of course they’re going to succeed. It’s hard to get plant requirements right, I agree. But it’s fun trying.

    Reply
  98. Nancy, don’t forget that those 6 year olds have a teacher supervising them, so of course they’re going to succeed. It’s hard to get plant requirements right, I agree. But it’s fun trying.

    Reply
  99. Nancy, don’t forget that those 6 year olds have a teacher supervising them, so of course they’re going to succeed. It’s hard to get plant requirements right, I agree. But it’s fun trying.

    Reply
  100. Nancy, don’t forget that those 6 year olds have a teacher supervising them, so of course they’re going to succeed. It’s hard to get plant requirements right, I agree. But it’s fun trying.

    Reply
  101. I got into the habit of buying one or two amaryllis plants every year, because the blooms are spectacular and really cheer up the house in the dead of winter. I wish they still made those bulb pots with the holes for support stakes, because amaryllis is so tall and top heavy. I improvised with long metal skewers used for grilling shish kebab. Anyway, a lot of people toss their amaryllis bulbs after blooming, but I always held on to them, because sometimes(or more often not!) they rebloom, and I can’t bear to throw away a living plant. It got to the point where I had a ridiculous number, so I gave the entire collection away. The woman who took them seemed very happy, and I wish her luck with them!

    Reply
  102. I got into the habit of buying one or two amaryllis plants every year, because the blooms are spectacular and really cheer up the house in the dead of winter. I wish they still made those bulb pots with the holes for support stakes, because amaryllis is so tall and top heavy. I improvised with long metal skewers used for grilling shish kebab. Anyway, a lot of people toss their amaryllis bulbs after blooming, but I always held on to them, because sometimes(or more often not!) they rebloom, and I can’t bear to throw away a living plant. It got to the point where I had a ridiculous number, so I gave the entire collection away. The woman who took them seemed very happy, and I wish her luck with them!

    Reply
  103. I got into the habit of buying one or two amaryllis plants every year, because the blooms are spectacular and really cheer up the house in the dead of winter. I wish they still made those bulb pots with the holes for support stakes, because amaryllis is so tall and top heavy. I improvised with long metal skewers used for grilling shish kebab. Anyway, a lot of people toss their amaryllis bulbs after blooming, but I always held on to them, because sometimes(or more often not!) they rebloom, and I can’t bear to throw away a living plant. It got to the point where I had a ridiculous number, so I gave the entire collection away. The woman who took them seemed very happy, and I wish her luck with them!

    Reply
  104. I got into the habit of buying one or two amaryllis plants every year, because the blooms are spectacular and really cheer up the house in the dead of winter. I wish they still made those bulb pots with the holes for support stakes, because amaryllis is so tall and top heavy. I improvised with long metal skewers used for grilling shish kebab. Anyway, a lot of people toss their amaryllis bulbs after blooming, but I always held on to them, because sometimes(or more often not!) they rebloom, and I can’t bear to throw away a living plant. It got to the point where I had a ridiculous number, so I gave the entire collection away. The woman who took them seemed very happy, and I wish her luck with them!

    Reply
  105. I got into the habit of buying one or two amaryllis plants every year, because the blooms are spectacular and really cheer up the house in the dead of winter. I wish they still made those bulb pots with the holes for support stakes, because amaryllis is so tall and top heavy. I improvised with long metal skewers used for grilling shish kebab. Anyway, a lot of people toss their amaryllis bulbs after blooming, but I always held on to them, because sometimes(or more often not!) they rebloom, and I can’t bear to throw away a living plant. It got to the point where I had a ridiculous number, so I gave the entire collection away. The woman who took them seemed very happy, and I wish her luck with them!

    Reply
  106. Thanks, Karin — that sounds like a lovely way to bring some cheerful color into the house. And I love your idea of the shish kebab sticks. I can’t throw away my cyclamens, either, but will plant them in the garden and hope they grow.
    I’ve grown Belladonna Lilies (aka Jersey Lilies) which are a kind of Amaryllis that are South African natives, and they used to bloom every year in my garden with no attention, so perhaps the lady who took your collection will be able to grow them in her garden. I suppose it depends on the climate..

    Reply
  107. Thanks, Karin — that sounds like a lovely way to bring some cheerful color into the house. And I love your idea of the shish kebab sticks. I can’t throw away my cyclamens, either, but will plant them in the garden and hope they grow.
    I’ve grown Belladonna Lilies (aka Jersey Lilies) which are a kind of Amaryllis that are South African natives, and they used to bloom every year in my garden with no attention, so perhaps the lady who took your collection will be able to grow them in her garden. I suppose it depends on the climate..

    Reply
  108. Thanks, Karin — that sounds like a lovely way to bring some cheerful color into the house. And I love your idea of the shish kebab sticks. I can’t throw away my cyclamens, either, but will plant them in the garden and hope they grow.
    I’ve grown Belladonna Lilies (aka Jersey Lilies) which are a kind of Amaryllis that are South African natives, and they used to bloom every year in my garden with no attention, so perhaps the lady who took your collection will be able to grow them in her garden. I suppose it depends on the climate..

    Reply
  109. Thanks, Karin — that sounds like a lovely way to bring some cheerful color into the house. And I love your idea of the shish kebab sticks. I can’t throw away my cyclamens, either, but will plant them in the garden and hope they grow.
    I’ve grown Belladonna Lilies (aka Jersey Lilies) which are a kind of Amaryllis that are South African natives, and they used to bloom every year in my garden with no attention, so perhaps the lady who took your collection will be able to grow them in her garden. I suppose it depends on the climate..

    Reply
  110. Thanks, Karin — that sounds like a lovely way to bring some cheerful color into the house. And I love your idea of the shish kebab sticks. I can’t throw away my cyclamens, either, but will plant them in the garden and hope they grow.
    I’ve grown Belladonna Lilies (aka Jersey Lilies) which are a kind of Amaryllis that are South African natives, and they used to bloom every year in my garden with no attention, so perhaps the lady who took your collection will be able to grow them in her garden. I suppose it depends on the climate..

    Reply

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