In the hands of hairdressers…

1valchloesmall  Anne here. Thinking about Nicola's blog about what she does when she's finished a book, I realized one thing I invariably do when I've completed a book — or indeed, any big, long-term task, is go and get a haircut. 

    I love the feeling of going into the hairdresser's tired and a bit dreary and coming out feeling transformed, even if it's not a transformation that's terribly visible to others. I enjoy the pampering, the scalp massage, and the final result — the slightly new-and-better me I have to present to the world. 
14hairdresser_291_20090513-143029  

    At the same time there's also a certain level of anxiety — I'm sure we've all experienced it, haven't we — the baaaaad haircut or the nasty dye job. The time when you emerge from under the towels and the goop and the blow-drying and stare appalled into the mirror and realize there is nothing that can be done except go home and stick a paper bag over your head for a week or two. (OK, you can also wear a hat, but hey, where's the drama in that?) 

    For most of my life, hairdressers were a non-event for me — I had long hair and all it needed was an occasional trim across the bottom, and I always got a friend to do it.   It was easy to manage — I could leave it loose, plait it, braid it, or knot it. I could even stick a chopstick through it and the knot would stay all day.  But when I finally cut off my long hair the world of hairdressing opened up.

    The thing about hairdressers, is you need to shop around to find one who suits you. That means each time you try a new one, you risk your hair —and your ego.

   
Hairdresser   One time I went into the hairdresser's with overlong, shaggy hair — I'd decided to go for a longer look, so had grown it out. I asked for a cut and blonde highlights. I was born a blonde and was naturally silvery blonde until my late twenties, when my hair started to darken — in all the pictures on my life story on my website, the hair is untreated, apart from summer sun-bleaching. These days it's just plain mouse brown, so now I pay money to return it to what I think of as my natural color.

    So there I was with my hairstyle and color grown out, and I told the stylist what I wanted: a longer style and creamy blonde highlights — subtext: a fresh new gorgeous me, please. 

    I came out of that place with very short hair (about an inch all over) dyed an ash gray, feeling and looking a lot older than I'd gone in, and wishing I'd brought a large paper bag with me. I know I could have demanded they fix the color, at least, but I don't much trust people who've ruined your hair once. So I never went back and now I've found me a new hairdresser and so far have been very happy.
1960s_hair_04  

    I originally went in there because I was going on TV the following day, and the only other time I'd been on TV the make-up department had teased my hair up into a style I'd never in my life wear — I call it Helmet o' Hair and I felt like an escapee from the 1960's. Ghastly. So I went to my new hairdresser with the brief that I wanted a hair cut which would render a Helmet o' Hair-do impossible. I'm glad to say he succeeded. It's the cut in the picture on the sidebar.

    A good haircut or hairdo is, I think, essential to feeling good. In my upcoming (October) book my heroine has a friend who's a dairymaid — the worst dairymaid in the world — she hates cows. Her aim in life is to become a lady's maid, and she practices creating hairstyles on my heroine. It's a period of time out and pleasure for both of them.

What fascinates me is how wildly hair fashions change from period to period, and the huge time, expense and money we women go to to achieve it. And at any one time, the current fashionable style looks hideous on a good proportion of the population.

    Think how it would have been to go from this:
Marie_Antoinette_hair
 

    To this.
Lamb-Caro
 

    All in a generation or so. (The pics are of Queen Marie Antoinette of France and Lady Caroline Lamb, by the way)

    Not all that different to this, in scope, I suppose, in just a few years. Anyone own to any of these styles in their past?

Farah Jennifer-aniston-straight3 
Mullet-for-a-girl 
Punk-hair Ihana60s 124256734_5d3b912b91 802 
372568_f260 AudreyHepburn-pixie
 
       But if I thought the torture of a tipping cap (like being pecked by a hundred birds) was bad (thank goodness for foils) imagine what these women would have had to endure to achieve these styles. created over frames of wire, and with loads of fake hair and curls and all kinds of interesting ornaments and combs and decorations attached. The weight of it! The balance! The heat! The neck-ache!

18thCdetail
    Of course, the more extreme styles would have been wigs, and they'd probably have short cropped hair underneath, but even so, imagine walking or dancing or eating with such towering edifice on your head. I can just imagine sitting down to a bowl of soup and splash! there goes my expensive hairdo into the soup and me left bald and blushing. 

    So glad my heroine and her friend only have to cope with regency hairdos and not these monstrosities. And very glad I was born when I was.
 
   So let's talk hair — did any of the styles shown in the pics ring a bell for you? And what's the worst bad hair experience you've had?

155 thoughts on “In the hands of hairdressers…”

  1. I remember trying to curl my bangs like Farrah Fawcett, but they never would hold – my hair is too fine. And it’s interesting that Audrey Hepburn’s hairstyle is just as up-to-date today as it was in the 50s.
    While living in Malaysia I had some “adventures in hair styling.” My fine hair would give the stylists fits and I had a couple of color “mishaps” since they’d leave the color on too long. However, I loved the head and neck massage I’d get during a haircut. It was ten minutes of pure bliss that would almost put me to sleep!

    Reply
  2. I remember trying to curl my bangs like Farrah Fawcett, but they never would hold – my hair is too fine. And it’s interesting that Audrey Hepburn’s hairstyle is just as up-to-date today as it was in the 50s.
    While living in Malaysia I had some “adventures in hair styling.” My fine hair would give the stylists fits and I had a couple of color “mishaps” since they’d leave the color on too long. However, I loved the head and neck massage I’d get during a haircut. It was ten minutes of pure bliss that would almost put me to sleep!

    Reply
  3. I remember trying to curl my bangs like Farrah Fawcett, but they never would hold – my hair is too fine. And it’s interesting that Audrey Hepburn’s hairstyle is just as up-to-date today as it was in the 50s.
    While living in Malaysia I had some “adventures in hair styling.” My fine hair would give the stylists fits and I had a couple of color “mishaps” since they’d leave the color on too long. However, I loved the head and neck massage I’d get during a haircut. It was ten minutes of pure bliss that would almost put me to sleep!

    Reply
  4. I remember trying to curl my bangs like Farrah Fawcett, but they never would hold – my hair is too fine. And it’s interesting that Audrey Hepburn’s hairstyle is just as up-to-date today as it was in the 50s.
    While living in Malaysia I had some “adventures in hair styling.” My fine hair would give the stylists fits and I had a couple of color “mishaps” since they’d leave the color on too long. However, I loved the head and neck massage I’d get during a haircut. It was ten minutes of pure bliss that would almost put me to sleep!

    Reply
  5. I remember trying to curl my bangs like Farrah Fawcett, but they never would hold – my hair is too fine. And it’s interesting that Audrey Hepburn’s hairstyle is just as up-to-date today as it was in the 50s.
    While living in Malaysia I had some “adventures in hair styling.” My fine hair would give the stylists fits and I had a couple of color “mishaps” since they’d leave the color on too long. However, I loved the head and neck massage I’d get during a haircut. It was ten minutes of pure bliss that would almost put me to sleep!

    Reply
  6. (Oh my gosh that mullet!) I tried (and failed) the Farrah, back in the day. And I did have pink hair, even if my work life never let me go for a mohawk, modified or otherwise. But mostly, it’s been fine, straight, and brown.
    I’ve been bald, of course, and I rather liked it. Not enough to commit to doing it on purpose, but there is a freedom in not having to worry about your hair at all. My worst was when I first moved here (greater Palm Beach) and was looking for a hairdresser. I went places that cost $30, I went places that cost $200. For years I kept ending up with odd variations of Jackie O’s hairstyles, before and after Camelot. I was in my 30’s. It was the 90’s.
    Finally, I found a stylist other people ask me about, and she works at a $15 salon. I don’t know if it confuses her when I tip 100%, but I’d more than willing to do it!

    Reply
  7. (Oh my gosh that mullet!) I tried (and failed) the Farrah, back in the day. And I did have pink hair, even if my work life never let me go for a mohawk, modified or otherwise. But mostly, it’s been fine, straight, and brown.
    I’ve been bald, of course, and I rather liked it. Not enough to commit to doing it on purpose, but there is a freedom in not having to worry about your hair at all. My worst was when I first moved here (greater Palm Beach) and was looking for a hairdresser. I went places that cost $30, I went places that cost $200. For years I kept ending up with odd variations of Jackie O’s hairstyles, before and after Camelot. I was in my 30’s. It was the 90’s.
    Finally, I found a stylist other people ask me about, and she works at a $15 salon. I don’t know if it confuses her when I tip 100%, but I’d more than willing to do it!

    Reply
  8. (Oh my gosh that mullet!) I tried (and failed) the Farrah, back in the day. And I did have pink hair, even if my work life never let me go for a mohawk, modified or otherwise. But mostly, it’s been fine, straight, and brown.
    I’ve been bald, of course, and I rather liked it. Not enough to commit to doing it on purpose, but there is a freedom in not having to worry about your hair at all. My worst was when I first moved here (greater Palm Beach) and was looking for a hairdresser. I went places that cost $30, I went places that cost $200. For years I kept ending up with odd variations of Jackie O’s hairstyles, before and after Camelot. I was in my 30’s. It was the 90’s.
    Finally, I found a stylist other people ask me about, and she works at a $15 salon. I don’t know if it confuses her when I tip 100%, but I’d more than willing to do it!

    Reply
  9. (Oh my gosh that mullet!) I tried (and failed) the Farrah, back in the day. And I did have pink hair, even if my work life never let me go for a mohawk, modified or otherwise. But mostly, it’s been fine, straight, and brown.
    I’ve been bald, of course, and I rather liked it. Not enough to commit to doing it on purpose, but there is a freedom in not having to worry about your hair at all. My worst was when I first moved here (greater Palm Beach) and was looking for a hairdresser. I went places that cost $30, I went places that cost $200. For years I kept ending up with odd variations of Jackie O’s hairstyles, before and after Camelot. I was in my 30’s. It was the 90’s.
    Finally, I found a stylist other people ask me about, and she works at a $15 salon. I don’t know if it confuses her when I tip 100%, but I’d more than willing to do it!

    Reply
  10. (Oh my gosh that mullet!) I tried (and failed) the Farrah, back in the day. And I did have pink hair, even if my work life never let me go for a mohawk, modified or otherwise. But mostly, it’s been fine, straight, and brown.
    I’ve been bald, of course, and I rather liked it. Not enough to commit to doing it on purpose, but there is a freedom in not having to worry about your hair at all. My worst was when I first moved here (greater Palm Beach) and was looking for a hairdresser. I went places that cost $30, I went places that cost $200. For years I kept ending up with odd variations of Jackie O’s hairstyles, before and after Camelot. I was in my 30’s. It was the 90’s.
    Finally, I found a stylist other people ask me about, and she works at a $15 salon. I don’t know if it confuses her when I tip 100%, but I’d more than willing to do it!

    Reply
  11. What fun, Anne! And I’d have loved to see you with your chopsticked knot!
    But you’ve hit on something very real about how our hair is wired to our moods and self-image. Biologically, a fine head of thick, shiny hair tells the world “Young and nubile!”
    My worst hair disaster was in college, when they were going to take the senior pictures. My hair was long, but fine and prone to split ends, and I thought I should get it trimmed up a bit.
    I’d worked in a downtown department store over the summer, so I decided to go to the salon there since I didn’t know any others. I told the guy I wanted my hair long but trimmed a little, he agreed that long hair would look good on me–and he took off six or eight inches. I was weeping uncontrollably when I left the salon, and I’m still sorry that I was so upset that I actually PAID for the cut.
    Now I’ve been going to the same lovely woman for–25 years? 30? A long time, at any rate. There might be minor variations from time to time, but I trust that when I leave, I’ll still recognize myself, and that she’ll keep my hair pretty close to original equipment color.

    Reply
  12. What fun, Anne! And I’d have loved to see you with your chopsticked knot!
    But you’ve hit on something very real about how our hair is wired to our moods and self-image. Biologically, a fine head of thick, shiny hair tells the world “Young and nubile!”
    My worst hair disaster was in college, when they were going to take the senior pictures. My hair was long, but fine and prone to split ends, and I thought I should get it trimmed up a bit.
    I’d worked in a downtown department store over the summer, so I decided to go to the salon there since I didn’t know any others. I told the guy I wanted my hair long but trimmed a little, he agreed that long hair would look good on me–and he took off six or eight inches. I was weeping uncontrollably when I left the salon, and I’m still sorry that I was so upset that I actually PAID for the cut.
    Now I’ve been going to the same lovely woman for–25 years? 30? A long time, at any rate. There might be minor variations from time to time, but I trust that when I leave, I’ll still recognize myself, and that she’ll keep my hair pretty close to original equipment color.

    Reply
  13. What fun, Anne! And I’d have loved to see you with your chopsticked knot!
    But you’ve hit on something very real about how our hair is wired to our moods and self-image. Biologically, a fine head of thick, shiny hair tells the world “Young and nubile!”
    My worst hair disaster was in college, when they were going to take the senior pictures. My hair was long, but fine and prone to split ends, and I thought I should get it trimmed up a bit.
    I’d worked in a downtown department store over the summer, so I decided to go to the salon there since I didn’t know any others. I told the guy I wanted my hair long but trimmed a little, he agreed that long hair would look good on me–and he took off six or eight inches. I was weeping uncontrollably when I left the salon, and I’m still sorry that I was so upset that I actually PAID for the cut.
    Now I’ve been going to the same lovely woman for–25 years? 30? A long time, at any rate. There might be minor variations from time to time, but I trust that when I leave, I’ll still recognize myself, and that she’ll keep my hair pretty close to original equipment color.

    Reply
  14. What fun, Anne! And I’d have loved to see you with your chopsticked knot!
    But you’ve hit on something very real about how our hair is wired to our moods and self-image. Biologically, a fine head of thick, shiny hair tells the world “Young and nubile!”
    My worst hair disaster was in college, when they were going to take the senior pictures. My hair was long, but fine and prone to split ends, and I thought I should get it trimmed up a bit.
    I’d worked in a downtown department store over the summer, so I decided to go to the salon there since I didn’t know any others. I told the guy I wanted my hair long but trimmed a little, he agreed that long hair would look good on me–and he took off six or eight inches. I was weeping uncontrollably when I left the salon, and I’m still sorry that I was so upset that I actually PAID for the cut.
    Now I’ve been going to the same lovely woman for–25 years? 30? A long time, at any rate. There might be minor variations from time to time, but I trust that when I leave, I’ll still recognize myself, and that she’ll keep my hair pretty close to original equipment color.

    Reply
  15. What fun, Anne! And I’d have loved to see you with your chopsticked knot!
    But you’ve hit on something very real about how our hair is wired to our moods and self-image. Biologically, a fine head of thick, shiny hair tells the world “Young and nubile!”
    My worst hair disaster was in college, when they were going to take the senior pictures. My hair was long, but fine and prone to split ends, and I thought I should get it trimmed up a bit.
    I’d worked in a downtown department store over the summer, so I decided to go to the salon there since I didn’t know any others. I told the guy I wanted my hair long but trimmed a little, he agreed that long hair would look good on me–and he took off six or eight inches. I was weeping uncontrollably when I left the salon, and I’m still sorry that I was so upset that I actually PAID for the cut.
    Now I’ve been going to the same lovely woman for–25 years? 30? A long time, at any rate. There might be minor variations from time to time, but I trust that when I leave, I’ll still recognize myself, and that she’ll keep my hair pretty close to original equipment color.

    Reply
  16. I sometimes think hair dictates our mood, or maybe it’s the other way around. A bad hair day makes for a bad day–although I adore hats because my hair is as bad as my mood all winter. “G”
    I’ve always had mousy, uncontrollable, nondescript hair. The only time I went to a hairdresser in my youth was for prom, otherwise my mother just whacked away at it. And my prom pictures will testify to the awfulness of the Jacki-O look.
    We move around so much that by the time I find a good hairdresser now, we move again. So I’ve pretty much given up any attempt at style. Trim lightly and let me out, please!

    Reply
  17. I sometimes think hair dictates our mood, or maybe it’s the other way around. A bad hair day makes for a bad day–although I adore hats because my hair is as bad as my mood all winter. “G”
    I’ve always had mousy, uncontrollable, nondescript hair. The only time I went to a hairdresser in my youth was for prom, otherwise my mother just whacked away at it. And my prom pictures will testify to the awfulness of the Jacki-O look.
    We move around so much that by the time I find a good hairdresser now, we move again. So I’ve pretty much given up any attempt at style. Trim lightly and let me out, please!

    Reply
  18. I sometimes think hair dictates our mood, or maybe it’s the other way around. A bad hair day makes for a bad day–although I adore hats because my hair is as bad as my mood all winter. “G”
    I’ve always had mousy, uncontrollable, nondescript hair. The only time I went to a hairdresser in my youth was for prom, otherwise my mother just whacked away at it. And my prom pictures will testify to the awfulness of the Jacki-O look.
    We move around so much that by the time I find a good hairdresser now, we move again. So I’ve pretty much given up any attempt at style. Trim lightly and let me out, please!

    Reply
  19. I sometimes think hair dictates our mood, or maybe it’s the other way around. A bad hair day makes for a bad day–although I adore hats because my hair is as bad as my mood all winter. “G”
    I’ve always had mousy, uncontrollable, nondescript hair. The only time I went to a hairdresser in my youth was for prom, otherwise my mother just whacked away at it. And my prom pictures will testify to the awfulness of the Jacki-O look.
    We move around so much that by the time I find a good hairdresser now, we move again. So I’ve pretty much given up any attempt at style. Trim lightly and let me out, please!

    Reply
  20. I sometimes think hair dictates our mood, or maybe it’s the other way around. A bad hair day makes for a bad day–although I adore hats because my hair is as bad as my mood all winter. “G”
    I’ve always had mousy, uncontrollable, nondescript hair. The only time I went to a hairdresser in my youth was for prom, otherwise my mother just whacked away at it. And my prom pictures will testify to the awfulness of the Jacki-O look.
    We move around so much that by the time I find a good hairdresser now, we move again. So I’ve pretty much given up any attempt at style. Trim lightly and let me out, please!

    Reply
  21. I have two problems finding a good hairdresser: my hair is very curly and I’m blind as a bat. The former is an issue because it’s harder to cut well. If not, the hot humid summer weather in DC often leads to frizzy hair, not attractive and not a look I favor. The latter is an issue because I have to take my glasses off when the hairdresser is at work, so I can’t see what’s going on during the process. It’s too late when I put my glasses back on at ehe end and am confronted with a disaster. Luckily I’ve found several wonderful hairdressers over the years; I’ve been going to my current one since pregnant with my youngest son (he’s now 21).
    Of course the upside of curly hair is that it can hide a multitude of sins. My hair is actually rather fine, but you’d never know because the curls create their own volume, no need for hairspray or teasing and no need to worry about limp hair. Plus, while the bane of my existence when younger when I wanted sleek and elegant, I’ve come to accept and even appreciate my curls.

    Reply
  22. I have two problems finding a good hairdresser: my hair is very curly and I’m blind as a bat. The former is an issue because it’s harder to cut well. If not, the hot humid summer weather in DC often leads to frizzy hair, not attractive and not a look I favor. The latter is an issue because I have to take my glasses off when the hairdresser is at work, so I can’t see what’s going on during the process. It’s too late when I put my glasses back on at ehe end and am confronted with a disaster. Luckily I’ve found several wonderful hairdressers over the years; I’ve been going to my current one since pregnant with my youngest son (he’s now 21).
    Of course the upside of curly hair is that it can hide a multitude of sins. My hair is actually rather fine, but you’d never know because the curls create their own volume, no need for hairspray or teasing and no need to worry about limp hair. Plus, while the bane of my existence when younger when I wanted sleek and elegant, I’ve come to accept and even appreciate my curls.

    Reply
  23. I have two problems finding a good hairdresser: my hair is very curly and I’m blind as a bat. The former is an issue because it’s harder to cut well. If not, the hot humid summer weather in DC often leads to frizzy hair, not attractive and not a look I favor. The latter is an issue because I have to take my glasses off when the hairdresser is at work, so I can’t see what’s going on during the process. It’s too late when I put my glasses back on at ehe end and am confronted with a disaster. Luckily I’ve found several wonderful hairdressers over the years; I’ve been going to my current one since pregnant with my youngest son (he’s now 21).
    Of course the upside of curly hair is that it can hide a multitude of sins. My hair is actually rather fine, but you’d never know because the curls create their own volume, no need for hairspray or teasing and no need to worry about limp hair. Plus, while the bane of my existence when younger when I wanted sleek and elegant, I’ve come to accept and even appreciate my curls.

    Reply
  24. I have two problems finding a good hairdresser: my hair is very curly and I’m blind as a bat. The former is an issue because it’s harder to cut well. If not, the hot humid summer weather in DC often leads to frizzy hair, not attractive and not a look I favor. The latter is an issue because I have to take my glasses off when the hairdresser is at work, so I can’t see what’s going on during the process. It’s too late when I put my glasses back on at ehe end and am confronted with a disaster. Luckily I’ve found several wonderful hairdressers over the years; I’ve been going to my current one since pregnant with my youngest son (he’s now 21).
    Of course the upside of curly hair is that it can hide a multitude of sins. My hair is actually rather fine, but you’d never know because the curls create their own volume, no need for hairspray or teasing and no need to worry about limp hair. Plus, while the bane of my existence when younger when I wanted sleek and elegant, I’ve come to accept and even appreciate my curls.

    Reply
  25. I have two problems finding a good hairdresser: my hair is very curly and I’m blind as a bat. The former is an issue because it’s harder to cut well. If not, the hot humid summer weather in DC often leads to frizzy hair, not attractive and not a look I favor. The latter is an issue because I have to take my glasses off when the hairdresser is at work, so I can’t see what’s going on during the process. It’s too late when I put my glasses back on at ehe end and am confronted with a disaster. Luckily I’ve found several wonderful hairdressers over the years; I’ve been going to my current one since pregnant with my youngest son (he’s now 21).
    Of course the upside of curly hair is that it can hide a multitude of sins. My hair is actually rather fine, but you’d never know because the curls create their own volume, no need for hairspray or teasing and no need to worry about limp hair. Plus, while the bane of my existence when younger when I wanted sleek and elegant, I’ve come to accept and even appreciate my curls.

    Reply
  26. It is a truth universally owned that women hate their hair! We always try to make it do what it doesn’t want to do! I have a hairdresser who is a gem – $21 for a cut and it always looks good, I have been going to her for 20 years. I actually hate having anyone mess with my hair so I am in and out in 30 minutes. I can’t understand today’s obsession with colouring hair. I would love to see women with natural hair colours rather than wood stains. My pet hate is the red mahogany shades on old ladies with the white stripe at the roots. It makes them look so much older as the harsh shade washes out the skin tones. I stopped colouring in my 40s and love the freedom from roots and chemicals.
    My one big disaster came when I was a poor student and I went to a salon trainee night. I got a punk rock, short on one side (think buzz cut) and below the ears on the other. When I got home my dad said, after a long pause, “well it’ll grow out in a few months”.

    Reply
  27. It is a truth universally owned that women hate their hair! We always try to make it do what it doesn’t want to do! I have a hairdresser who is a gem – $21 for a cut and it always looks good, I have been going to her for 20 years. I actually hate having anyone mess with my hair so I am in and out in 30 minutes. I can’t understand today’s obsession with colouring hair. I would love to see women with natural hair colours rather than wood stains. My pet hate is the red mahogany shades on old ladies with the white stripe at the roots. It makes them look so much older as the harsh shade washes out the skin tones. I stopped colouring in my 40s and love the freedom from roots and chemicals.
    My one big disaster came when I was a poor student and I went to a salon trainee night. I got a punk rock, short on one side (think buzz cut) and below the ears on the other. When I got home my dad said, after a long pause, “well it’ll grow out in a few months”.

    Reply
  28. It is a truth universally owned that women hate their hair! We always try to make it do what it doesn’t want to do! I have a hairdresser who is a gem – $21 for a cut and it always looks good, I have been going to her for 20 years. I actually hate having anyone mess with my hair so I am in and out in 30 minutes. I can’t understand today’s obsession with colouring hair. I would love to see women with natural hair colours rather than wood stains. My pet hate is the red mahogany shades on old ladies with the white stripe at the roots. It makes them look so much older as the harsh shade washes out the skin tones. I stopped colouring in my 40s and love the freedom from roots and chemicals.
    My one big disaster came when I was a poor student and I went to a salon trainee night. I got a punk rock, short on one side (think buzz cut) and below the ears on the other. When I got home my dad said, after a long pause, “well it’ll grow out in a few months”.

    Reply
  29. It is a truth universally owned that women hate their hair! We always try to make it do what it doesn’t want to do! I have a hairdresser who is a gem – $21 for a cut and it always looks good, I have been going to her for 20 years. I actually hate having anyone mess with my hair so I am in and out in 30 minutes. I can’t understand today’s obsession with colouring hair. I would love to see women with natural hair colours rather than wood stains. My pet hate is the red mahogany shades on old ladies with the white stripe at the roots. It makes them look so much older as the harsh shade washes out the skin tones. I stopped colouring in my 40s and love the freedom from roots and chemicals.
    My one big disaster came when I was a poor student and I went to a salon trainee night. I got a punk rock, short on one side (think buzz cut) and below the ears on the other. When I got home my dad said, after a long pause, “well it’ll grow out in a few months”.

    Reply
  30. It is a truth universally owned that women hate their hair! We always try to make it do what it doesn’t want to do! I have a hairdresser who is a gem – $21 for a cut and it always looks good, I have been going to her for 20 years. I actually hate having anyone mess with my hair so I am in and out in 30 minutes. I can’t understand today’s obsession with colouring hair. I would love to see women with natural hair colours rather than wood stains. My pet hate is the red mahogany shades on old ladies with the white stripe at the roots. It makes them look so much older as the harsh shade washes out the skin tones. I stopped colouring in my 40s and love the freedom from roots and chemicals.
    My one big disaster came when I was a poor student and I went to a salon trainee night. I got a punk rock, short on one side (think buzz cut) and below the ears on the other. When I got home my dad said, after a long pause, “well it’ll grow out in a few months”.

    Reply
  31. Sue – I remember that cut! I wanted it in the 80’s and couldn’t find a stylist willing to do it. I suppose it’s just as well!

    Reply
  32. Sue – I remember that cut! I wanted it in the 80’s and couldn’t find a stylist willing to do it. I suppose it’s just as well!

    Reply
  33. Sue – I remember that cut! I wanted it in the 80’s and couldn’t find a stylist willing to do it. I suppose it’s just as well!

    Reply
  34. Sue – I remember that cut! I wanted it in the 80’s and couldn’t find a stylist willing to do it. I suppose it’s just as well!

    Reply
  35. Sue – I remember that cut! I wanted it in the 80’s and couldn’t find a stylist willing to do it. I suppose it’s just as well!

    Reply
  36. Fun post, Anne, and timely, as it reminded me I have to make an appointment for my monthly cut. After a month filled with teen crises (my daughter) and a health scare with my mother, I’m REALLY looking forward to the time in the chair. There’s nothing so relaxing as sitting back in that chair and allowing yourself to be pampered.
    I think it’s true that we all want our hair to do the opposite of what it does. Mine has always been thick, coarse, with a slight wave. Naturally, I wanted finer hair that curled. Had a couple of perms, none of them disasters, but for years now I’ve stuck with a similar style – short, easy-care, and only needing a blow dry in winter. My motto when it comes to styling has always been “I’d rather be reading.”

    Reply
  37. Fun post, Anne, and timely, as it reminded me I have to make an appointment for my monthly cut. After a month filled with teen crises (my daughter) and a health scare with my mother, I’m REALLY looking forward to the time in the chair. There’s nothing so relaxing as sitting back in that chair and allowing yourself to be pampered.
    I think it’s true that we all want our hair to do the opposite of what it does. Mine has always been thick, coarse, with a slight wave. Naturally, I wanted finer hair that curled. Had a couple of perms, none of them disasters, but for years now I’ve stuck with a similar style – short, easy-care, and only needing a blow dry in winter. My motto when it comes to styling has always been “I’d rather be reading.”

    Reply
  38. Fun post, Anne, and timely, as it reminded me I have to make an appointment for my monthly cut. After a month filled with teen crises (my daughter) and a health scare with my mother, I’m REALLY looking forward to the time in the chair. There’s nothing so relaxing as sitting back in that chair and allowing yourself to be pampered.
    I think it’s true that we all want our hair to do the opposite of what it does. Mine has always been thick, coarse, with a slight wave. Naturally, I wanted finer hair that curled. Had a couple of perms, none of them disasters, but for years now I’ve stuck with a similar style – short, easy-care, and only needing a blow dry in winter. My motto when it comes to styling has always been “I’d rather be reading.”

    Reply
  39. Fun post, Anne, and timely, as it reminded me I have to make an appointment for my monthly cut. After a month filled with teen crises (my daughter) and a health scare with my mother, I’m REALLY looking forward to the time in the chair. There’s nothing so relaxing as sitting back in that chair and allowing yourself to be pampered.
    I think it’s true that we all want our hair to do the opposite of what it does. Mine has always been thick, coarse, with a slight wave. Naturally, I wanted finer hair that curled. Had a couple of perms, none of them disasters, but for years now I’ve stuck with a similar style – short, easy-care, and only needing a blow dry in winter. My motto when it comes to styling has always been “I’d rather be reading.”

    Reply
  40. Fun post, Anne, and timely, as it reminded me I have to make an appointment for my monthly cut. After a month filled with teen crises (my daughter) and a health scare with my mother, I’m REALLY looking forward to the time in the chair. There’s nothing so relaxing as sitting back in that chair and allowing yourself to be pampered.
    I think it’s true that we all want our hair to do the opposite of what it does. Mine has always been thick, coarse, with a slight wave. Naturally, I wanted finer hair that curled. Had a couple of perms, none of them disasters, but for years now I’ve stuck with a similar style – short, easy-care, and only needing a blow dry in winter. My motto when it comes to styling has always been “I’d rather be reading.”

    Reply
  41. I went to the same woman for almost ten years, she could do anything to my hair and it would look fabulous-I was so lucky. Since she left I can’t seem to find someone who won’t make it *worse*! I gave up and had my husband do it, which wasn’t too bad but he missed some spots! And now I’m preggers again my hair is extra wonky…I would still pick “The Rachel” though, love it!

    Reply
  42. I went to the same woman for almost ten years, she could do anything to my hair and it would look fabulous-I was so lucky. Since she left I can’t seem to find someone who won’t make it *worse*! I gave up and had my husband do it, which wasn’t too bad but he missed some spots! And now I’m preggers again my hair is extra wonky…I would still pick “The Rachel” though, love it!

    Reply
  43. I went to the same woman for almost ten years, she could do anything to my hair and it would look fabulous-I was so lucky. Since she left I can’t seem to find someone who won’t make it *worse*! I gave up and had my husband do it, which wasn’t too bad but he missed some spots! And now I’m preggers again my hair is extra wonky…I would still pick “The Rachel” though, love it!

    Reply
  44. I went to the same woman for almost ten years, she could do anything to my hair and it would look fabulous-I was so lucky. Since she left I can’t seem to find someone who won’t make it *worse*! I gave up and had my husband do it, which wasn’t too bad but he missed some spots! And now I’m preggers again my hair is extra wonky…I would still pick “The Rachel” though, love it!

    Reply
  45. I went to the same woman for almost ten years, she could do anything to my hair and it would look fabulous-I was so lucky. Since she left I can’t seem to find someone who won’t make it *worse*! I gave up and had my husband do it, which wasn’t too bad but he missed some spots! And now I’m preggers again my hair is extra wonky…I would still pick “The Rachel” though, love it!

    Reply
  46. Well, I don’t color or curl, but I hate, hate to get a haircut. I usually put it off until it’s long enough to start a ponytail or it gets annoying. I stayed with the same hair cutter until he retired…30 plus years.
    Long hair on a lady is my favorite.

    Reply
  47. Well, I don’t color or curl, but I hate, hate to get a haircut. I usually put it off until it’s long enough to start a ponytail or it gets annoying. I stayed with the same hair cutter until he retired…30 plus years.
    Long hair on a lady is my favorite.

    Reply
  48. Well, I don’t color or curl, but I hate, hate to get a haircut. I usually put it off until it’s long enough to start a ponytail or it gets annoying. I stayed with the same hair cutter until he retired…30 plus years.
    Long hair on a lady is my favorite.

    Reply
  49. Well, I don’t color or curl, but I hate, hate to get a haircut. I usually put it off until it’s long enough to start a ponytail or it gets annoying. I stayed with the same hair cutter until he retired…30 plus years.
    Long hair on a lady is my favorite.

    Reply
  50. Well, I don’t color or curl, but I hate, hate to get a haircut. I usually put it off until it’s long enough to start a ponytail or it gets annoying. I stayed with the same hair cutter until he retired…30 plus years.
    Long hair on a lady is my favorite.

    Reply
  51. MJ, my hair is fine, too. Hairdressers often tell me with surprise that it’s actually quite thick — it just doesn’t look like it because it’s fine. And straight.
    Meoskop, I had a mullet, once, though not quite as extravagant as the one in the pic. I liked it
    And I had an actress friend who went bald with chemo and got so fed up with her wig getting caught on rosebushes and slipping that she just went bald in public — even on TV. People were shocked at first and then there was a surge of positive response from women. Her hair grew back thick and lush and curly.
    The price of hair cuts you mention has me stunned. Only men’s haircuts are in the 20’s here. The cheapest women’s cut are around $50 and that’s very cheap. $100 is more normal — and that’s not counting the color — just the basic cut. Maybe I’ll get my hair cut in the US next time I come over.

    Reply
  52. MJ, my hair is fine, too. Hairdressers often tell me with surprise that it’s actually quite thick — it just doesn’t look like it because it’s fine. And straight.
    Meoskop, I had a mullet, once, though not quite as extravagant as the one in the pic. I liked it
    And I had an actress friend who went bald with chemo and got so fed up with her wig getting caught on rosebushes and slipping that she just went bald in public — even on TV. People were shocked at first and then there was a surge of positive response from women. Her hair grew back thick and lush and curly.
    The price of hair cuts you mention has me stunned. Only men’s haircuts are in the 20’s here. The cheapest women’s cut are around $50 and that’s very cheap. $100 is more normal — and that’s not counting the color — just the basic cut. Maybe I’ll get my hair cut in the US next time I come over.

    Reply
  53. MJ, my hair is fine, too. Hairdressers often tell me with surprise that it’s actually quite thick — it just doesn’t look like it because it’s fine. And straight.
    Meoskop, I had a mullet, once, though not quite as extravagant as the one in the pic. I liked it
    And I had an actress friend who went bald with chemo and got so fed up with her wig getting caught on rosebushes and slipping that she just went bald in public — even on TV. People were shocked at first and then there was a surge of positive response from women. Her hair grew back thick and lush and curly.
    The price of hair cuts you mention has me stunned. Only men’s haircuts are in the 20’s here. The cheapest women’s cut are around $50 and that’s very cheap. $100 is more normal — and that’s not counting the color — just the basic cut. Maybe I’ll get my hair cut in the US next time I come over.

    Reply
  54. MJ, my hair is fine, too. Hairdressers often tell me with surprise that it’s actually quite thick — it just doesn’t look like it because it’s fine. And straight.
    Meoskop, I had a mullet, once, though not quite as extravagant as the one in the pic. I liked it
    And I had an actress friend who went bald with chemo and got so fed up with her wig getting caught on rosebushes and slipping that she just went bald in public — even on TV. People were shocked at first and then there was a surge of positive response from women. Her hair grew back thick and lush and curly.
    The price of hair cuts you mention has me stunned. Only men’s haircuts are in the 20’s here. The cheapest women’s cut are around $50 and that’s very cheap. $100 is more normal — and that’s not counting the color — just the basic cut. Maybe I’ll get my hair cut in the US next time I come over.

    Reply
  55. MJ, my hair is fine, too. Hairdressers often tell me with surprise that it’s actually quite thick — it just doesn’t look like it because it’s fine. And straight.
    Meoskop, I had a mullet, once, though not quite as extravagant as the one in the pic. I liked it
    And I had an actress friend who went bald with chemo and got so fed up with her wig getting caught on rosebushes and slipping that she just went bald in public — even on TV. People were shocked at first and then there was a surge of positive response from women. Her hair grew back thick and lush and curly.
    The price of hair cuts you mention has me stunned. Only men’s haircuts are in the 20’s here. The cheapest women’s cut are around $50 and that’s very cheap. $100 is more normal — and that’s not counting the color — just the basic cut. Maybe I’ll get my hair cut in the US next time I come over.

    Reply
  56. Mary Jo, it’s awful when hairdressers don’t listen. And they LOVE to cut. It was feeling bald that made me leave my last hairdresser, and he was a lovely man and a superb cutter, but the cuts just kept getting shorter and shorter.
    The chopstick, BTW, was so easy. My hair was long — to my tailbone– but fine and straight, so I could actually tie it in a knot without anything to hold it, but it looked a bit messy at the back. I loved the chopstick and had a number of colorful ones and ones made from lovely woods and imitation tortoiseshell. But on occasions when I needed to tie it back in a hurry, I’d even use a pencil. (Not the most elegant of wenches, me. LOL)
    But fine hair also tangles easily, and I always wore my hair tied up, so in the end I wanted more variety so I cut it – and sold it, walking in the steps of the various story heroines of my childhood who sold their hair for a worthy cause, though mine was curiosity rather than worthiness. Later I discovered know you can donate hair to charity and I wish I’d done that.

    Reply
  57. Mary Jo, it’s awful when hairdressers don’t listen. And they LOVE to cut. It was feeling bald that made me leave my last hairdresser, and he was a lovely man and a superb cutter, but the cuts just kept getting shorter and shorter.
    The chopstick, BTW, was so easy. My hair was long — to my tailbone– but fine and straight, so I could actually tie it in a knot without anything to hold it, but it looked a bit messy at the back. I loved the chopstick and had a number of colorful ones and ones made from lovely woods and imitation tortoiseshell. But on occasions when I needed to tie it back in a hurry, I’d even use a pencil. (Not the most elegant of wenches, me. LOL)
    But fine hair also tangles easily, and I always wore my hair tied up, so in the end I wanted more variety so I cut it – and sold it, walking in the steps of the various story heroines of my childhood who sold their hair for a worthy cause, though mine was curiosity rather than worthiness. Later I discovered know you can donate hair to charity and I wish I’d done that.

    Reply
  58. Mary Jo, it’s awful when hairdressers don’t listen. And they LOVE to cut. It was feeling bald that made me leave my last hairdresser, and he was a lovely man and a superb cutter, but the cuts just kept getting shorter and shorter.
    The chopstick, BTW, was so easy. My hair was long — to my tailbone– but fine and straight, so I could actually tie it in a knot without anything to hold it, but it looked a bit messy at the back. I loved the chopstick and had a number of colorful ones and ones made from lovely woods and imitation tortoiseshell. But on occasions when I needed to tie it back in a hurry, I’d even use a pencil. (Not the most elegant of wenches, me. LOL)
    But fine hair also tangles easily, and I always wore my hair tied up, so in the end I wanted more variety so I cut it – and sold it, walking in the steps of the various story heroines of my childhood who sold their hair for a worthy cause, though mine was curiosity rather than worthiness. Later I discovered know you can donate hair to charity and I wish I’d done that.

    Reply
  59. Mary Jo, it’s awful when hairdressers don’t listen. And they LOVE to cut. It was feeling bald that made me leave my last hairdresser, and he was a lovely man and a superb cutter, but the cuts just kept getting shorter and shorter.
    The chopstick, BTW, was so easy. My hair was long — to my tailbone– but fine and straight, so I could actually tie it in a knot without anything to hold it, but it looked a bit messy at the back. I loved the chopstick and had a number of colorful ones and ones made from lovely woods and imitation tortoiseshell. But on occasions when I needed to tie it back in a hurry, I’d even use a pencil. (Not the most elegant of wenches, me. LOL)
    But fine hair also tangles easily, and I always wore my hair tied up, so in the end I wanted more variety so I cut it – and sold it, walking in the steps of the various story heroines of my childhood who sold their hair for a worthy cause, though mine was curiosity rather than worthiness. Later I discovered know you can donate hair to charity and I wish I’d done that.

    Reply
  60. Mary Jo, it’s awful when hairdressers don’t listen. And they LOVE to cut. It was feeling bald that made me leave my last hairdresser, and he was a lovely man and a superb cutter, but the cuts just kept getting shorter and shorter.
    The chopstick, BTW, was so easy. My hair was long — to my tailbone– but fine and straight, so I could actually tie it in a knot without anything to hold it, but it looked a bit messy at the back. I loved the chopstick and had a number of colorful ones and ones made from lovely woods and imitation tortoiseshell. But on occasions when I needed to tie it back in a hurry, I’d even use a pencil. (Not the most elegant of wenches, me. LOL)
    But fine hair also tangles easily, and I always wore my hair tied up, so in the end I wanted more variety so I cut it – and sold it, walking in the steps of the various story heroines of my childhood who sold their hair for a worthy cause, though mine was curiosity rather than worthiness. Later I discovered know you can donate hair to charity and I wish I’d done that.

    Reply
  61. Pat, I think your hair is lovely, but it’s so true that when you feel your hair looks good it gives you more confidence.
    Susan/DC, congrats on finding a hairdresser you like and hanging onto him/her. And I’m envious of your curls. My mother had lovely curly hair all her life, but when she got old and stopped having it set and permed I discovered where I got my fine straight hair.
    Sue, I must confess I love mahogany hair and wish I had the coloring for it, but I do agree that as we age our color needs change. A friend of mine’s light brown hair grew back silvery white after chemo. She looked pale and washed out, but didn’t want to get into dying it and dealing with the white stripe. Her hair dresser now puts a few dramatic dark brown streaks in it and it looks lovely.

    Reply
  62. Pat, I think your hair is lovely, but it’s so true that when you feel your hair looks good it gives you more confidence.
    Susan/DC, congrats on finding a hairdresser you like and hanging onto him/her. And I’m envious of your curls. My mother had lovely curly hair all her life, but when she got old and stopped having it set and permed I discovered where I got my fine straight hair.
    Sue, I must confess I love mahogany hair and wish I had the coloring for it, but I do agree that as we age our color needs change. A friend of mine’s light brown hair grew back silvery white after chemo. She looked pale and washed out, but didn’t want to get into dying it and dealing with the white stripe. Her hair dresser now puts a few dramatic dark brown streaks in it and it looks lovely.

    Reply
  63. Pat, I think your hair is lovely, but it’s so true that when you feel your hair looks good it gives you more confidence.
    Susan/DC, congrats on finding a hairdresser you like and hanging onto him/her. And I’m envious of your curls. My mother had lovely curly hair all her life, but when she got old and stopped having it set and permed I discovered where I got my fine straight hair.
    Sue, I must confess I love mahogany hair and wish I had the coloring for it, but I do agree that as we age our color needs change. A friend of mine’s light brown hair grew back silvery white after chemo. She looked pale and washed out, but didn’t want to get into dying it and dealing with the white stripe. Her hair dresser now puts a few dramatic dark brown streaks in it and it looks lovely.

    Reply
  64. Pat, I think your hair is lovely, but it’s so true that when you feel your hair looks good it gives you more confidence.
    Susan/DC, congrats on finding a hairdresser you like and hanging onto him/her. And I’m envious of your curls. My mother had lovely curly hair all her life, but when she got old and stopped having it set and permed I discovered where I got my fine straight hair.
    Sue, I must confess I love mahogany hair and wish I had the coloring for it, but I do agree that as we age our color needs change. A friend of mine’s light brown hair grew back silvery white after chemo. She looked pale and washed out, but didn’t want to get into dying it and dealing with the white stripe. Her hair dresser now puts a few dramatic dark brown streaks in it and it looks lovely.

    Reply
  65. Pat, I think your hair is lovely, but it’s so true that when you feel your hair looks good it gives you more confidence.
    Susan/DC, congrats on finding a hairdresser you like and hanging onto him/her. And I’m envious of your curls. My mother had lovely curly hair all her life, but when she got old and stopped having it set and permed I discovered where I got my fine straight hair.
    Sue, I must confess I love mahogany hair and wish I had the coloring for it, but I do agree that as we age our color needs change. A friend of mine’s light brown hair grew back silvery white after chemo. She looked pale and washed out, but didn’t want to get into dying it and dealing with the white stripe. Her hair dresser now puts a few dramatic dark brown streaks in it and it looks lovely.

    Reply
  66. All day I’ve been thinking “who is that in the mod picture?” (to the side of the mohawk) I still can’t place the actress she reminds me of, but it also puts me in mind of author Ann Maxwell.
    And around here the ‘bump’ (or mini beehive) is gaining steam. I think it’s an odd style – like a slight skull deformity!

    Reply
  67. All day I’ve been thinking “who is that in the mod picture?” (to the side of the mohawk) I still can’t place the actress she reminds me of, but it also puts me in mind of author Ann Maxwell.
    And around here the ‘bump’ (or mini beehive) is gaining steam. I think it’s an odd style – like a slight skull deformity!

    Reply
  68. All day I’ve been thinking “who is that in the mod picture?” (to the side of the mohawk) I still can’t place the actress she reminds me of, but it also puts me in mind of author Ann Maxwell.
    And around here the ‘bump’ (or mini beehive) is gaining steam. I think it’s an odd style – like a slight skull deformity!

    Reply
  69. All day I’ve been thinking “who is that in the mod picture?” (to the side of the mohawk) I still can’t place the actress she reminds me of, but it also puts me in mind of author Ann Maxwell.
    And around here the ‘bump’ (or mini beehive) is gaining steam. I think it’s an odd style – like a slight skull deformity!

    Reply
  70. All day I’ve been thinking “who is that in the mod picture?” (to the side of the mohawk) I still can’t place the actress she reminds me of, but it also puts me in mind of author Ann Maxwell.
    And around here the ‘bump’ (or mini beehive) is gaining steam. I think it’s an odd style – like a slight skull deformity!

    Reply
  71. Sue and Liz, I always wanted pink and green stripes in my hair, but I was never game to have it because of my work. I suppose now I work from home I could do it, but that desire has passed.
    Cynthia, sorry to hear about your teen worries and mother worries. I hope it all works out. And that scalp massage and pampering you get is lovely, isn’t it? I think women often feel guilty at paying to be pampered, so getting it at the hairdressers where we are for practical reasons is a bonus. And yes on the “I’d rather be reading.” Some people love spending hours in the bathroom doing their hair. Not me.

    Reply
  72. Sue and Liz, I always wanted pink and green stripes in my hair, but I was never game to have it because of my work. I suppose now I work from home I could do it, but that desire has passed.
    Cynthia, sorry to hear about your teen worries and mother worries. I hope it all works out. And that scalp massage and pampering you get is lovely, isn’t it? I think women often feel guilty at paying to be pampered, so getting it at the hairdressers where we are for practical reasons is a bonus. And yes on the “I’d rather be reading.” Some people love spending hours in the bathroom doing their hair. Not me.

    Reply
  73. Sue and Liz, I always wanted pink and green stripes in my hair, but I was never game to have it because of my work. I suppose now I work from home I could do it, but that desire has passed.
    Cynthia, sorry to hear about your teen worries and mother worries. I hope it all works out. And that scalp massage and pampering you get is lovely, isn’t it? I think women often feel guilty at paying to be pampered, so getting it at the hairdressers where we are for practical reasons is a bonus. And yes on the “I’d rather be reading.” Some people love spending hours in the bathroom doing their hair. Not me.

    Reply
  74. Sue and Liz, I always wanted pink and green stripes in my hair, but I was never game to have it because of my work. I suppose now I work from home I could do it, but that desire has passed.
    Cynthia, sorry to hear about your teen worries and mother worries. I hope it all works out. And that scalp massage and pampering you get is lovely, isn’t it? I think women often feel guilty at paying to be pampered, so getting it at the hairdressers where we are for practical reasons is a bonus. And yes on the “I’d rather be reading.” Some people love spending hours in the bathroom doing their hair. Not me.

    Reply
  75. Sue and Liz, I always wanted pink and green stripes in my hair, but I was never game to have it because of my work. I suppose now I work from home I could do it, but that desire has passed.
    Cynthia, sorry to hear about your teen worries and mother worries. I hope it all works out. And that scalp massage and pampering you get is lovely, isn’t it? I think women often feel guilty at paying to be pampered, so getting it at the hairdressers where we are for practical reasons is a bonus. And yes on the “I’d rather be reading.” Some people love spending hours in the bathroom doing their hair. Not me.

    Reply
  76. Jen, it is sad when hairdressers leave — the cheek of them, when we neeeed them! 😉
    You’re very lucky your husband can cut hair. Best of luck with the new baby.
    Louis, I sometimes put off getting mine cut, too, but I know as soon as I reach for the scissors in front of the bathroom mirror, and start snipping, it’s time for me to go. I rather like long hair on some men, too.

    Reply
  77. Jen, it is sad when hairdressers leave — the cheek of them, when we neeeed them! 😉
    You’re very lucky your husband can cut hair. Best of luck with the new baby.
    Louis, I sometimes put off getting mine cut, too, but I know as soon as I reach for the scissors in front of the bathroom mirror, and start snipping, it’s time for me to go. I rather like long hair on some men, too.

    Reply
  78. Jen, it is sad when hairdressers leave — the cheek of them, when we neeeed them! 😉
    You’re very lucky your husband can cut hair. Best of luck with the new baby.
    Louis, I sometimes put off getting mine cut, too, but I know as soon as I reach for the scissors in front of the bathroom mirror, and start snipping, it’s time for me to go. I rather like long hair on some men, too.

    Reply
  79. Jen, it is sad when hairdressers leave — the cheek of them, when we neeeed them! 😉
    You’re very lucky your husband can cut hair. Best of luck with the new baby.
    Louis, I sometimes put off getting mine cut, too, but I know as soon as I reach for the scissors in front of the bathroom mirror, and start snipping, it’s time for me to go. I rather like long hair on some men, too.

    Reply
  80. Jen, it is sad when hairdressers leave — the cheek of them, when we neeeed them! 😉
    You’re very lucky your husband can cut hair. Best of luck with the new baby.
    Louis, I sometimes put off getting mine cut, too, but I know as soon as I reach for the scissors in front of the bathroom mirror, and start snipping, it’s time for me to go. I rather like long hair on some men, too.

    Reply
  81. Meoskop, I lifted the 60’s photo from this site:
    http://www.ibero.fi/index.php?38 They mention Twiggy, but that’s not Twiggy. The model reminded me of Diana Rigg in the TV show The Avengers, but it’s not her, either. I think it will remain a mystery.
    It is interesting how particular people bring a hairstyle or hair color into fashion — Farrah, Mia Farrow, Princess Di, the “Rachel”. In Marie Antoinette’s time, her hair was so fashionable, there was a color named “cheveux de la reine” — hair-of-the-queen

    Reply
  82. Meoskop, I lifted the 60’s photo from this site:
    http://www.ibero.fi/index.php?38 They mention Twiggy, but that’s not Twiggy. The model reminded me of Diana Rigg in the TV show The Avengers, but it’s not her, either. I think it will remain a mystery.
    It is interesting how particular people bring a hairstyle or hair color into fashion — Farrah, Mia Farrow, Princess Di, the “Rachel”. In Marie Antoinette’s time, her hair was so fashionable, there was a color named “cheveux de la reine” — hair-of-the-queen

    Reply
  83. Meoskop, I lifted the 60’s photo from this site:
    http://www.ibero.fi/index.php?38 They mention Twiggy, but that’s not Twiggy. The model reminded me of Diana Rigg in the TV show The Avengers, but it’s not her, either. I think it will remain a mystery.
    It is interesting how particular people bring a hairstyle or hair color into fashion — Farrah, Mia Farrow, Princess Di, the “Rachel”. In Marie Antoinette’s time, her hair was so fashionable, there was a color named “cheveux de la reine” — hair-of-the-queen

    Reply
  84. Meoskop, I lifted the 60’s photo from this site:
    http://www.ibero.fi/index.php?38 They mention Twiggy, but that’s not Twiggy. The model reminded me of Diana Rigg in the TV show The Avengers, but it’s not her, either. I think it will remain a mystery.
    It is interesting how particular people bring a hairstyle or hair color into fashion — Farrah, Mia Farrow, Princess Di, the “Rachel”. In Marie Antoinette’s time, her hair was so fashionable, there was a color named “cheveux de la reine” — hair-of-the-queen

    Reply
  85. Meoskop, I lifted the 60’s photo from this site:
    http://www.ibero.fi/index.php?38 They mention Twiggy, but that’s not Twiggy. The model reminded me of Diana Rigg in the TV show The Avengers, but it’s not her, either. I think it will remain a mystery.
    It is interesting how particular people bring a hairstyle or hair color into fashion — Farrah, Mia Farrow, Princess Di, the “Rachel”. In Marie Antoinette’s time, her hair was so fashionable, there was a color named “cheveux de la reine” — hair-of-the-queen

    Reply
  86. I had the Farrah hair, not a conscious choice, it just worked out like that because I used hot rollers and that’s just the way it looked when I was done.
    My biggest hair fiasco was having my almost waist long hair cut into a ‘wedge’. I let the hairdresser talk me into it. Everyone said they loved it, but I’d lost my pseudo security blanket and was devastated.
    A couple weeks ago, DD2 had her just-graduated-beauty-school friend come over to cut DD2’s hair. She’d been talking about it for weeks. Well, the girl took a chunk of DD2’s waist length hair in the back, pulled it up and cut it off about two inches from her scalp. Before DD2 could say anything, she was so stunned, the girl took a couple more chunks off, all varying lengths and in different places. This was how she ‘layers’. She looked like her hair had gone through a blender.
    I said the same thing. It will grow out in a few months. Then I held a sobbing child until she calmed enough to make an appointment with MY hairdresser who actually was able to salvage most of it. But it’s lost well over a foot in length.
    Poor kid…

    Reply
  87. I had the Farrah hair, not a conscious choice, it just worked out like that because I used hot rollers and that’s just the way it looked when I was done.
    My biggest hair fiasco was having my almost waist long hair cut into a ‘wedge’. I let the hairdresser talk me into it. Everyone said they loved it, but I’d lost my pseudo security blanket and was devastated.
    A couple weeks ago, DD2 had her just-graduated-beauty-school friend come over to cut DD2’s hair. She’d been talking about it for weeks. Well, the girl took a chunk of DD2’s waist length hair in the back, pulled it up and cut it off about two inches from her scalp. Before DD2 could say anything, she was so stunned, the girl took a couple more chunks off, all varying lengths and in different places. This was how she ‘layers’. She looked like her hair had gone through a blender.
    I said the same thing. It will grow out in a few months. Then I held a sobbing child until she calmed enough to make an appointment with MY hairdresser who actually was able to salvage most of it. But it’s lost well over a foot in length.
    Poor kid…

    Reply
  88. I had the Farrah hair, not a conscious choice, it just worked out like that because I used hot rollers and that’s just the way it looked when I was done.
    My biggest hair fiasco was having my almost waist long hair cut into a ‘wedge’. I let the hairdresser talk me into it. Everyone said they loved it, but I’d lost my pseudo security blanket and was devastated.
    A couple weeks ago, DD2 had her just-graduated-beauty-school friend come over to cut DD2’s hair. She’d been talking about it for weeks. Well, the girl took a chunk of DD2’s waist length hair in the back, pulled it up and cut it off about two inches from her scalp. Before DD2 could say anything, she was so stunned, the girl took a couple more chunks off, all varying lengths and in different places. This was how she ‘layers’. She looked like her hair had gone through a blender.
    I said the same thing. It will grow out in a few months. Then I held a sobbing child until she calmed enough to make an appointment with MY hairdresser who actually was able to salvage most of it. But it’s lost well over a foot in length.
    Poor kid…

    Reply
  89. I had the Farrah hair, not a conscious choice, it just worked out like that because I used hot rollers and that’s just the way it looked when I was done.
    My biggest hair fiasco was having my almost waist long hair cut into a ‘wedge’. I let the hairdresser talk me into it. Everyone said they loved it, but I’d lost my pseudo security blanket and was devastated.
    A couple weeks ago, DD2 had her just-graduated-beauty-school friend come over to cut DD2’s hair. She’d been talking about it for weeks. Well, the girl took a chunk of DD2’s waist length hair in the back, pulled it up and cut it off about two inches from her scalp. Before DD2 could say anything, she was so stunned, the girl took a couple more chunks off, all varying lengths and in different places. This was how she ‘layers’. She looked like her hair had gone through a blender.
    I said the same thing. It will grow out in a few months. Then I held a sobbing child until she calmed enough to make an appointment with MY hairdresser who actually was able to salvage most of it. But it’s lost well over a foot in length.
    Poor kid…

    Reply
  90. I had the Farrah hair, not a conscious choice, it just worked out like that because I used hot rollers and that’s just the way it looked when I was done.
    My biggest hair fiasco was having my almost waist long hair cut into a ‘wedge’. I let the hairdresser talk me into it. Everyone said they loved it, but I’d lost my pseudo security blanket and was devastated.
    A couple weeks ago, DD2 had her just-graduated-beauty-school friend come over to cut DD2’s hair. She’d been talking about it for weeks. Well, the girl took a chunk of DD2’s waist length hair in the back, pulled it up and cut it off about two inches from her scalp. Before DD2 could say anything, she was so stunned, the girl took a couple more chunks off, all varying lengths and in different places. This was how she ‘layers’. She looked like her hair had gone through a blender.
    I said the same thing. It will grow out in a few months. Then I held a sobbing child until she calmed enough to make an appointment with MY hairdresser who actually was able to salvage most of it. But it’s lost well over a foot in length.
    Poor kid…

    Reply
  91. I thought of Diana Rigg too – it’s probably a hair model, I actually looked at the code for the image! (I hate that sort of thing, when it’s familiar but not placeable) She takes a GREAT photo, whoever she is.

    Reply
  92. I thought of Diana Rigg too – it’s probably a hair model, I actually looked at the code for the image! (I hate that sort of thing, when it’s familiar but not placeable) She takes a GREAT photo, whoever she is.

    Reply
  93. I thought of Diana Rigg too – it’s probably a hair model, I actually looked at the code for the image! (I hate that sort of thing, when it’s familiar but not placeable) She takes a GREAT photo, whoever she is.

    Reply
  94. I thought of Diana Rigg too – it’s probably a hair model, I actually looked at the code for the image! (I hate that sort of thing, when it’s familiar but not placeable) She takes a GREAT photo, whoever she is.

    Reply
  95. I thought of Diana Rigg too – it’s probably a hair model, I actually looked at the code for the image! (I hate that sort of thing, when it’s familiar but not placeable) She takes a GREAT photo, whoever she is.

    Reply
  96. Oh, what great fun, Anne! Love the historical pictures. In one of Eloisa James’s “Duchess” books, she has a mouse living in one of the hairdos . . the duchess went on to get a short haircut.
    I’ve had my share of bad hair days. There’s nothing worse than those “paper bag” moments. I used to wear mine short, but nowadays, I’ve let it get longer and just pull it back. Simple and it eliminates stress, LOL!

    Reply
  97. Oh, what great fun, Anne! Love the historical pictures. In one of Eloisa James’s “Duchess” books, she has a mouse living in one of the hairdos . . the duchess went on to get a short haircut.
    I’ve had my share of bad hair days. There’s nothing worse than those “paper bag” moments. I used to wear mine short, but nowadays, I’ve let it get longer and just pull it back. Simple and it eliminates stress, LOL!

    Reply
  98. Oh, what great fun, Anne! Love the historical pictures. In one of Eloisa James’s “Duchess” books, she has a mouse living in one of the hairdos . . the duchess went on to get a short haircut.
    I’ve had my share of bad hair days. There’s nothing worse than those “paper bag” moments. I used to wear mine short, but nowadays, I’ve let it get longer and just pull it back. Simple and it eliminates stress, LOL!

    Reply
  99. Oh, what great fun, Anne! Love the historical pictures. In one of Eloisa James’s “Duchess” books, she has a mouse living in one of the hairdos . . the duchess went on to get a short haircut.
    I’ve had my share of bad hair days. There’s nothing worse than those “paper bag” moments. I used to wear mine short, but nowadays, I’ve let it get longer and just pull it back. Simple and it eliminates stress, LOL!

    Reply
  100. Oh, what great fun, Anne! Love the historical pictures. In one of Eloisa James’s “Duchess” books, she has a mouse living in one of the hairdos . . the duchess went on to get a short haircut.
    I’ve had my share of bad hair days. There’s nothing worse than those “paper bag” moments. I used to wear mine short, but nowadays, I’ve let it get longer and just pull it back. Simple and it eliminates stress, LOL!

    Reply
  101. Sherrie, here. I had long hair most of my life, alternating with an occasional short cut. I’ve always had Big Hair because it’s thick and coarse–the best kind for doing just about anything. My hair frizzes if I don’t tame it with a perm, so I’ve had curly perms for years. I finally had to go with a shorter style a few years ago because it just started looking ratty as I got older.
    When I started turning gray I got so tired of having to touch it up every few weeks that I stopped coloring it. Now, I rather like my salt ‘n pepper color.
    I absolutely refuse to spend hours on my hair. I wash it and let it dry naturally. Sometimes I use electric rollers after the hair has dried. I don’t wash my hair every day, nor do I use a blow dryer or gels or other goop. It’s pretty much wash ‘n wear for me!
    Hair disasters: the first one was on my wedding day. She did a horrible job, making me look like I had a pumpkin sitting on my head. I went home in tears and brushed out the teasing with a vengeance and then washed and styled it myself for a more natural look.
    The second disaster was when I went to a new salon and they botched a frost job, turning me nearly blonde. Only it was orange, not blonde. I don’t know what I’ll do when my current hairdresser retires. She’s done my hair for 37 years!

    Reply
  102. Sherrie, here. I had long hair most of my life, alternating with an occasional short cut. I’ve always had Big Hair because it’s thick and coarse–the best kind for doing just about anything. My hair frizzes if I don’t tame it with a perm, so I’ve had curly perms for years. I finally had to go with a shorter style a few years ago because it just started looking ratty as I got older.
    When I started turning gray I got so tired of having to touch it up every few weeks that I stopped coloring it. Now, I rather like my salt ‘n pepper color.
    I absolutely refuse to spend hours on my hair. I wash it and let it dry naturally. Sometimes I use electric rollers after the hair has dried. I don’t wash my hair every day, nor do I use a blow dryer or gels or other goop. It’s pretty much wash ‘n wear for me!
    Hair disasters: the first one was on my wedding day. She did a horrible job, making me look like I had a pumpkin sitting on my head. I went home in tears and brushed out the teasing with a vengeance and then washed and styled it myself for a more natural look.
    The second disaster was when I went to a new salon and they botched a frost job, turning me nearly blonde. Only it was orange, not blonde. I don’t know what I’ll do when my current hairdresser retires. She’s done my hair for 37 years!

    Reply
  103. Sherrie, here. I had long hair most of my life, alternating with an occasional short cut. I’ve always had Big Hair because it’s thick and coarse–the best kind for doing just about anything. My hair frizzes if I don’t tame it with a perm, so I’ve had curly perms for years. I finally had to go with a shorter style a few years ago because it just started looking ratty as I got older.
    When I started turning gray I got so tired of having to touch it up every few weeks that I stopped coloring it. Now, I rather like my salt ‘n pepper color.
    I absolutely refuse to spend hours on my hair. I wash it and let it dry naturally. Sometimes I use electric rollers after the hair has dried. I don’t wash my hair every day, nor do I use a blow dryer or gels or other goop. It’s pretty much wash ‘n wear for me!
    Hair disasters: the first one was on my wedding day. She did a horrible job, making me look like I had a pumpkin sitting on my head. I went home in tears and brushed out the teasing with a vengeance and then washed and styled it myself for a more natural look.
    The second disaster was when I went to a new salon and they botched a frost job, turning me nearly blonde. Only it was orange, not blonde. I don’t know what I’ll do when my current hairdresser retires. She’s done my hair for 37 years!

    Reply
  104. Sherrie, here. I had long hair most of my life, alternating with an occasional short cut. I’ve always had Big Hair because it’s thick and coarse–the best kind for doing just about anything. My hair frizzes if I don’t tame it with a perm, so I’ve had curly perms for years. I finally had to go with a shorter style a few years ago because it just started looking ratty as I got older.
    When I started turning gray I got so tired of having to touch it up every few weeks that I stopped coloring it. Now, I rather like my salt ‘n pepper color.
    I absolutely refuse to spend hours on my hair. I wash it and let it dry naturally. Sometimes I use electric rollers after the hair has dried. I don’t wash my hair every day, nor do I use a blow dryer or gels or other goop. It’s pretty much wash ‘n wear for me!
    Hair disasters: the first one was on my wedding day. She did a horrible job, making me look like I had a pumpkin sitting on my head. I went home in tears and brushed out the teasing with a vengeance and then washed and styled it myself for a more natural look.
    The second disaster was when I went to a new salon and they botched a frost job, turning me nearly blonde. Only it was orange, not blonde. I don’t know what I’ll do when my current hairdresser retires. She’s done my hair for 37 years!

    Reply
  105. Sherrie, here. I had long hair most of my life, alternating with an occasional short cut. I’ve always had Big Hair because it’s thick and coarse–the best kind for doing just about anything. My hair frizzes if I don’t tame it with a perm, so I’ve had curly perms for years. I finally had to go with a shorter style a few years ago because it just started looking ratty as I got older.
    When I started turning gray I got so tired of having to touch it up every few weeks that I stopped coloring it. Now, I rather like my salt ‘n pepper color.
    I absolutely refuse to spend hours on my hair. I wash it and let it dry naturally. Sometimes I use electric rollers after the hair has dried. I don’t wash my hair every day, nor do I use a blow dryer or gels or other goop. It’s pretty much wash ‘n wear for me!
    Hair disasters: the first one was on my wedding day. She did a horrible job, making me look like I had a pumpkin sitting on my head. I went home in tears and brushed out the teasing with a vengeance and then washed and styled it myself for a more natural look.
    The second disaster was when I went to a new salon and they botched a frost job, turning me nearly blonde. Only it was orange, not blonde. I don’t know what I’ll do when my current hairdresser retires. She’s done my hair for 37 years!

    Reply
  106. I once decided to be a redhead. Huge mistake. My hair was so vibrantly orange that I was speechless. The hairdresser called me at home out of guilt and offered to open up the salon on a Sunday to fix it. Back to blonde, my childhood/young adult color.
    I’ve had numerous coloring disasters, often feeling like I am wearing a dead animal on my head. I’ve found a young woman who uses a semi-permanent color now which works much better on my silvering hair. I may need to go back more often but it’s worth it. But after 4 kids my hair is thinning and a wig (not quite as towering as your illustration) might be in my future!

    Reply
  107. I once decided to be a redhead. Huge mistake. My hair was so vibrantly orange that I was speechless. The hairdresser called me at home out of guilt and offered to open up the salon on a Sunday to fix it. Back to blonde, my childhood/young adult color.
    I’ve had numerous coloring disasters, often feeling like I am wearing a dead animal on my head. I’ve found a young woman who uses a semi-permanent color now which works much better on my silvering hair. I may need to go back more often but it’s worth it. But after 4 kids my hair is thinning and a wig (not quite as towering as your illustration) might be in my future!

    Reply
  108. I once decided to be a redhead. Huge mistake. My hair was so vibrantly orange that I was speechless. The hairdresser called me at home out of guilt and offered to open up the salon on a Sunday to fix it. Back to blonde, my childhood/young adult color.
    I’ve had numerous coloring disasters, often feeling like I am wearing a dead animal on my head. I’ve found a young woman who uses a semi-permanent color now which works much better on my silvering hair. I may need to go back more often but it’s worth it. But after 4 kids my hair is thinning and a wig (not quite as towering as your illustration) might be in my future!

    Reply
  109. I once decided to be a redhead. Huge mistake. My hair was so vibrantly orange that I was speechless. The hairdresser called me at home out of guilt and offered to open up the salon on a Sunday to fix it. Back to blonde, my childhood/young adult color.
    I’ve had numerous coloring disasters, often feeling like I am wearing a dead animal on my head. I’ve found a young woman who uses a semi-permanent color now which works much better on my silvering hair. I may need to go back more often but it’s worth it. But after 4 kids my hair is thinning and a wig (not quite as towering as your illustration) might be in my future!

    Reply
  110. I once decided to be a redhead. Huge mistake. My hair was so vibrantly orange that I was speechless. The hairdresser called me at home out of guilt and offered to open up the salon on a Sunday to fix it. Back to blonde, my childhood/young adult color.
    I’ve had numerous coloring disasters, often feeling like I am wearing a dead animal on my head. I’ve found a young woman who uses a semi-permanent color now which works much better on my silvering hair. I may need to go back more often but it’s worth it. But after 4 kids my hair is thinning and a wig (not quite as towering as your illustration) might be in my future!

    Reply
  111. I used to go to salons, but I haven’t for years. It’s not the money, it’s that I really don’t like being fussed over, or having to make conversation with a semi stranger, or sitting through a half hour blowout.
    So I started going to Supercuts, and they’re just fine. I’m in & out in half an hour, tops, and since my hair is pretty short now & styling is minimal, if the cutter I get that day doesn’t do a hot job, it’ll all be grown out in a couple of weeks anyway.
    When I was a kid my mom followed the styles of those years and would force a home permanent on me from time to time. I hated it. The smell was appalling, for one thing. For another, I wanted to be a kid, not a pretty doll with every hair in place. So I rebelled every way I could. God had made my hair straight and blonde and as near as I could tell, my hair was the least of my issues anyway. Poor woman, she just wanted my life to be better than hers, and somehow in her thinking Perfect Hair played a role there. I disagreed then and I still do 🙂
    Of all the styles you showed, Anne, I suppose mine is closest to Audrey Hepburn’s, with a David Tennant ruffle in the front. I don’t put anything on it other than some cheezball spray-on lightener from the bottom shelf at Rite Aid. I think it suits me, I like the convenience, and I get more compliments on it than I ever did during my perfectly permed days 🙂

    Reply
  112. I used to go to salons, but I haven’t for years. It’s not the money, it’s that I really don’t like being fussed over, or having to make conversation with a semi stranger, or sitting through a half hour blowout.
    So I started going to Supercuts, and they’re just fine. I’m in & out in half an hour, tops, and since my hair is pretty short now & styling is minimal, if the cutter I get that day doesn’t do a hot job, it’ll all be grown out in a couple of weeks anyway.
    When I was a kid my mom followed the styles of those years and would force a home permanent on me from time to time. I hated it. The smell was appalling, for one thing. For another, I wanted to be a kid, not a pretty doll with every hair in place. So I rebelled every way I could. God had made my hair straight and blonde and as near as I could tell, my hair was the least of my issues anyway. Poor woman, she just wanted my life to be better than hers, and somehow in her thinking Perfect Hair played a role there. I disagreed then and I still do 🙂
    Of all the styles you showed, Anne, I suppose mine is closest to Audrey Hepburn’s, with a David Tennant ruffle in the front. I don’t put anything on it other than some cheezball spray-on lightener from the bottom shelf at Rite Aid. I think it suits me, I like the convenience, and I get more compliments on it than I ever did during my perfectly permed days 🙂

    Reply
  113. I used to go to salons, but I haven’t for years. It’s not the money, it’s that I really don’t like being fussed over, or having to make conversation with a semi stranger, or sitting through a half hour blowout.
    So I started going to Supercuts, and they’re just fine. I’m in & out in half an hour, tops, and since my hair is pretty short now & styling is minimal, if the cutter I get that day doesn’t do a hot job, it’ll all be grown out in a couple of weeks anyway.
    When I was a kid my mom followed the styles of those years and would force a home permanent on me from time to time. I hated it. The smell was appalling, for one thing. For another, I wanted to be a kid, not a pretty doll with every hair in place. So I rebelled every way I could. God had made my hair straight and blonde and as near as I could tell, my hair was the least of my issues anyway. Poor woman, she just wanted my life to be better than hers, and somehow in her thinking Perfect Hair played a role there. I disagreed then and I still do 🙂
    Of all the styles you showed, Anne, I suppose mine is closest to Audrey Hepburn’s, with a David Tennant ruffle in the front. I don’t put anything on it other than some cheezball spray-on lightener from the bottom shelf at Rite Aid. I think it suits me, I like the convenience, and I get more compliments on it than I ever did during my perfectly permed days 🙂

    Reply
  114. I used to go to salons, but I haven’t for years. It’s not the money, it’s that I really don’t like being fussed over, or having to make conversation with a semi stranger, or sitting through a half hour blowout.
    So I started going to Supercuts, and they’re just fine. I’m in & out in half an hour, tops, and since my hair is pretty short now & styling is minimal, if the cutter I get that day doesn’t do a hot job, it’ll all be grown out in a couple of weeks anyway.
    When I was a kid my mom followed the styles of those years and would force a home permanent on me from time to time. I hated it. The smell was appalling, for one thing. For another, I wanted to be a kid, not a pretty doll with every hair in place. So I rebelled every way I could. God had made my hair straight and blonde and as near as I could tell, my hair was the least of my issues anyway. Poor woman, she just wanted my life to be better than hers, and somehow in her thinking Perfect Hair played a role there. I disagreed then and I still do 🙂
    Of all the styles you showed, Anne, I suppose mine is closest to Audrey Hepburn’s, with a David Tennant ruffle in the front. I don’t put anything on it other than some cheezball spray-on lightener from the bottom shelf at Rite Aid. I think it suits me, I like the convenience, and I get more compliments on it than I ever did during my perfectly permed days 🙂

    Reply
  115. I used to go to salons, but I haven’t for years. It’s not the money, it’s that I really don’t like being fussed over, or having to make conversation with a semi stranger, or sitting through a half hour blowout.
    So I started going to Supercuts, and they’re just fine. I’m in & out in half an hour, tops, and since my hair is pretty short now & styling is minimal, if the cutter I get that day doesn’t do a hot job, it’ll all be grown out in a couple of weeks anyway.
    When I was a kid my mom followed the styles of those years and would force a home permanent on me from time to time. I hated it. The smell was appalling, for one thing. For another, I wanted to be a kid, not a pretty doll with every hair in place. So I rebelled every way I could. God had made my hair straight and blonde and as near as I could tell, my hair was the least of my issues anyway. Poor woman, she just wanted my life to be better than hers, and somehow in her thinking Perfect Hair played a role there. I disagreed then and I still do 🙂
    Of all the styles you showed, Anne, I suppose mine is closest to Audrey Hepburn’s, with a David Tennant ruffle in the front. I don’t put anything on it other than some cheezball spray-on lightener from the bottom shelf at Rite Aid. I think it suits me, I like the convenience, and I get more compliments on it than I ever did during my perfectly permed days 🙂

    Reply
  116. Theo, that’s an awful story — your poor daughter. Sometimes girls can be so malicious.
    Cara/Andrea, I haven’t read that book, but I have seen reports that vermin were found in wigs quite often.
    Weird that later generations called pads of falsely added hair “rats.” 😉
    Sherrie, how awful to have your wedding day hairstyle so botched. Mind you, some people cultivated that pumpkin on the head look — in Year 8 I had a teacher who was really short, with hair cut very short and a bun somehow stuck to the top — and looking exactly like a pumpkin. We used to wonder how it was fastened, because her real hair seemed too short even to use bobby pins to hold the bun down.

    Reply
  117. Theo, that’s an awful story — your poor daughter. Sometimes girls can be so malicious.
    Cara/Andrea, I haven’t read that book, but I have seen reports that vermin were found in wigs quite often.
    Weird that later generations called pads of falsely added hair “rats.” 😉
    Sherrie, how awful to have your wedding day hairstyle so botched. Mind you, some people cultivated that pumpkin on the head look — in Year 8 I had a teacher who was really short, with hair cut very short and a bun somehow stuck to the top — and looking exactly like a pumpkin. We used to wonder how it was fastened, because her real hair seemed too short even to use bobby pins to hold the bun down.

    Reply
  118. Theo, that’s an awful story — your poor daughter. Sometimes girls can be so malicious.
    Cara/Andrea, I haven’t read that book, but I have seen reports that vermin were found in wigs quite often.
    Weird that later generations called pads of falsely added hair “rats.” 😉
    Sherrie, how awful to have your wedding day hairstyle so botched. Mind you, some people cultivated that pumpkin on the head look — in Year 8 I had a teacher who was really short, with hair cut very short and a bun somehow stuck to the top — and looking exactly like a pumpkin. We used to wonder how it was fastened, because her real hair seemed too short even to use bobby pins to hold the bun down.

    Reply
  119. Theo, that’s an awful story — your poor daughter. Sometimes girls can be so malicious.
    Cara/Andrea, I haven’t read that book, but I have seen reports that vermin were found in wigs quite often.
    Weird that later generations called pads of falsely added hair “rats.” 😉
    Sherrie, how awful to have your wedding day hairstyle so botched. Mind you, some people cultivated that pumpkin on the head look — in Year 8 I had a teacher who was really short, with hair cut very short and a bun somehow stuck to the top — and looking exactly like a pumpkin. We used to wonder how it was fastened, because her real hair seemed too short even to use bobby pins to hold the bun down.

    Reply
  120. Theo, that’s an awful story — your poor daughter. Sometimes girls can be so malicious.
    Cara/Andrea, I haven’t read that book, but I have seen reports that vermin were found in wigs quite often.
    Weird that later generations called pads of falsely added hair “rats.” 😉
    Sherrie, how awful to have your wedding day hairstyle so botched. Mind you, some people cultivated that pumpkin on the head look — in Year 8 I had a teacher who was really short, with hair cut very short and a bun somehow stuck to the top — and looking exactly like a pumpkin. We used to wonder how it was fastened, because her real hair seemed too short even to use bobby pins to hold the bun down.

    Reply
  121. Maggie I love auburn hair — always wanted it — the very color that would clash horribly with my skin. But any color is a risk, I think.
    I worked with someone once who changed her color every week — quite dramatic sometimes, from black to red to blonde — and always Very Big. When she married for the second time, she asked her man to be what color he’d like her to have for the wedding. He said her natural color. “Who can remember?” she said. “It was obviously very forgettable!”
    Janice, why am I not surprised you have David Tennant ruffle? LOL I’m not sure what Supercuts is — sounds like a chain of cut price hairdressers and if so I hope they come downunder. I’m not one to fuss with my hair, and don’t even blow dry it unless I’m going out, but I do like a good cut and color.

    Reply
  122. Maggie I love auburn hair — always wanted it — the very color that would clash horribly with my skin. But any color is a risk, I think.
    I worked with someone once who changed her color every week — quite dramatic sometimes, from black to red to blonde — and always Very Big. When she married for the second time, she asked her man to be what color he’d like her to have for the wedding. He said her natural color. “Who can remember?” she said. “It was obviously very forgettable!”
    Janice, why am I not surprised you have David Tennant ruffle? LOL I’m not sure what Supercuts is — sounds like a chain of cut price hairdressers and if so I hope they come downunder. I’m not one to fuss with my hair, and don’t even blow dry it unless I’m going out, but I do like a good cut and color.

    Reply
  123. Maggie I love auburn hair — always wanted it — the very color that would clash horribly with my skin. But any color is a risk, I think.
    I worked with someone once who changed her color every week — quite dramatic sometimes, from black to red to blonde — and always Very Big. When she married for the second time, she asked her man to be what color he’d like her to have for the wedding. He said her natural color. “Who can remember?” she said. “It was obviously very forgettable!”
    Janice, why am I not surprised you have David Tennant ruffle? LOL I’m not sure what Supercuts is — sounds like a chain of cut price hairdressers and if so I hope they come downunder. I’m not one to fuss with my hair, and don’t even blow dry it unless I’m going out, but I do like a good cut and color.

    Reply
  124. Maggie I love auburn hair — always wanted it — the very color that would clash horribly with my skin. But any color is a risk, I think.
    I worked with someone once who changed her color every week — quite dramatic sometimes, from black to red to blonde — and always Very Big. When she married for the second time, she asked her man to be what color he’d like her to have for the wedding. He said her natural color. “Who can remember?” she said. “It was obviously very forgettable!”
    Janice, why am I not surprised you have David Tennant ruffle? LOL I’m not sure what Supercuts is — sounds like a chain of cut price hairdressers and if so I hope they come downunder. I’m not one to fuss with my hair, and don’t even blow dry it unless I’m going out, but I do like a good cut and color.

    Reply
  125. Maggie I love auburn hair — always wanted it — the very color that would clash horribly with my skin. But any color is a risk, I think.
    I worked with someone once who changed her color every week — quite dramatic sometimes, from black to red to blonde — and always Very Big. When she married for the second time, she asked her man to be what color he’d like her to have for the wedding. He said her natural color. “Who can remember?” she said. “It was obviously very forgettable!”
    Janice, why am I not surprised you have David Tennant ruffle? LOL I’m not sure what Supercuts is — sounds like a chain of cut price hairdressers and if so I hope they come downunder. I’m not one to fuss with my hair, and don’t even blow dry it unless I’m going out, but I do like a good cut and color.

    Reply
  126. I love my hair. It’s thick with just enough natural curl to be fun and grows very fast so bad haircuts don’t stick around for long. That being said, I’m very particular about who I let mess with it. I’ve been with Stephen, my current hairstylist for 10 years and have no plans to go anywhere else. Stephen knows me and knows my hair. It’s a good match. 😉
    Back in the early 80s, my hair had gotten a little straight and I decided I needed a mild body wave. Well, I walked into the salon looking like me and walked out looking like Little Orphan Annie. I kid you not! (I have the photos to prove it. Not pretty.) That was the last time I let anybody do anything to my hair other than cut…and in the past few years, color.
    Anne, I love your current cut. When I saw you last year at RWA I remember thinking that style suited you perfectly. Very flattering!
    Oh, as for your hairstyle photos, I’ve had the Farrah cut and the Audrey Hepburn pixie in years gone by.

    Reply
  127. I love my hair. It’s thick with just enough natural curl to be fun and grows very fast so bad haircuts don’t stick around for long. That being said, I’m very particular about who I let mess with it. I’ve been with Stephen, my current hairstylist for 10 years and have no plans to go anywhere else. Stephen knows me and knows my hair. It’s a good match. 😉
    Back in the early 80s, my hair had gotten a little straight and I decided I needed a mild body wave. Well, I walked into the salon looking like me and walked out looking like Little Orphan Annie. I kid you not! (I have the photos to prove it. Not pretty.) That was the last time I let anybody do anything to my hair other than cut…and in the past few years, color.
    Anne, I love your current cut. When I saw you last year at RWA I remember thinking that style suited you perfectly. Very flattering!
    Oh, as for your hairstyle photos, I’ve had the Farrah cut and the Audrey Hepburn pixie in years gone by.

    Reply
  128. I love my hair. It’s thick with just enough natural curl to be fun and grows very fast so bad haircuts don’t stick around for long. That being said, I’m very particular about who I let mess with it. I’ve been with Stephen, my current hairstylist for 10 years and have no plans to go anywhere else. Stephen knows me and knows my hair. It’s a good match. 😉
    Back in the early 80s, my hair had gotten a little straight and I decided I needed a mild body wave. Well, I walked into the salon looking like me and walked out looking like Little Orphan Annie. I kid you not! (I have the photos to prove it. Not pretty.) That was the last time I let anybody do anything to my hair other than cut…and in the past few years, color.
    Anne, I love your current cut. When I saw you last year at RWA I remember thinking that style suited you perfectly. Very flattering!
    Oh, as for your hairstyle photos, I’ve had the Farrah cut and the Audrey Hepburn pixie in years gone by.

    Reply
  129. I love my hair. It’s thick with just enough natural curl to be fun and grows very fast so bad haircuts don’t stick around for long. That being said, I’m very particular about who I let mess with it. I’ve been with Stephen, my current hairstylist for 10 years and have no plans to go anywhere else. Stephen knows me and knows my hair. It’s a good match. 😉
    Back in the early 80s, my hair had gotten a little straight and I decided I needed a mild body wave. Well, I walked into the salon looking like me and walked out looking like Little Orphan Annie. I kid you not! (I have the photos to prove it. Not pretty.) That was the last time I let anybody do anything to my hair other than cut…and in the past few years, color.
    Anne, I love your current cut. When I saw you last year at RWA I remember thinking that style suited you perfectly. Very flattering!
    Oh, as for your hairstyle photos, I’ve had the Farrah cut and the Audrey Hepburn pixie in years gone by.

    Reply
  130. I love my hair. It’s thick with just enough natural curl to be fun and grows very fast so bad haircuts don’t stick around for long. That being said, I’m very particular about who I let mess with it. I’ve been with Stephen, my current hairstylist for 10 years and have no plans to go anywhere else. Stephen knows me and knows my hair. It’s a good match. 😉
    Back in the early 80s, my hair had gotten a little straight and I decided I needed a mild body wave. Well, I walked into the salon looking like me and walked out looking like Little Orphan Annie. I kid you not! (I have the photos to prove it. Not pretty.) That was the last time I let anybody do anything to my hair other than cut…and in the past few years, color.
    Anne, I love your current cut. When I saw you last year at RWA I remember thinking that style suited you perfectly. Very flattering!
    Oh, as for your hairstyle photos, I’ve had the Farrah cut and the Audrey Hepburn pixie in years gone by.

    Reply
  131. I’m strictly a shampoo-and-go girl these days. I don’t even bother blow drying most of the time. I don’t color either. Nature has provided the frosting that I once paid to get, and I rather like it.
    I’m blessed that my hair is still thick and in good condition. When I think of the brush roller years and the oj cans and the ironing, I’m surprised I’m not bald. The only “celebrity do” I tried was the Dorothy Hamill. I actually loved that one and wore it way past the peak of its popularity.

    Reply
  132. I’m strictly a shampoo-and-go girl these days. I don’t even bother blow drying most of the time. I don’t color either. Nature has provided the frosting that I once paid to get, and I rather like it.
    I’m blessed that my hair is still thick and in good condition. When I think of the brush roller years and the oj cans and the ironing, I’m surprised I’m not bald. The only “celebrity do” I tried was the Dorothy Hamill. I actually loved that one and wore it way past the peak of its popularity.

    Reply
  133. I’m strictly a shampoo-and-go girl these days. I don’t even bother blow drying most of the time. I don’t color either. Nature has provided the frosting that I once paid to get, and I rather like it.
    I’m blessed that my hair is still thick and in good condition. When I think of the brush roller years and the oj cans and the ironing, I’m surprised I’m not bald. The only “celebrity do” I tried was the Dorothy Hamill. I actually loved that one and wore it way past the peak of its popularity.

    Reply
  134. I’m strictly a shampoo-and-go girl these days. I don’t even bother blow drying most of the time. I don’t color either. Nature has provided the frosting that I once paid to get, and I rather like it.
    I’m blessed that my hair is still thick and in good condition. When I think of the brush roller years and the oj cans and the ironing, I’m surprised I’m not bald. The only “celebrity do” I tried was the Dorothy Hamill. I actually loved that one and wore it way past the peak of its popularity.

    Reply
  135. I’m strictly a shampoo-and-go girl these days. I don’t even bother blow drying most of the time. I don’t color either. Nature has provided the frosting that I once paid to get, and I rather like it.
    I’m blessed that my hair is still thick and in good condition. When I think of the brush roller years and the oj cans and the ironing, I’m surprised I’m not bald. The only “celebrity do” I tried was the Dorothy Hamill. I actually loved that one and wore it way past the peak of its popularity.

    Reply
  136. I’ve never been much of one for fooling with my hair. As long as it’s not in my eyes and looks halfway good, I’m happy.
    One time I asked my stylist if he could cut my hair (about chin length) so that it would go under by itself. He could! Such a haircut exists, the Bevel cut! The hair underneath is slightly shorter (and I mean only a few millimeters)than the hair over it, so the top hair curls under. I wash my hair, comb it into shape (it needs a little work) and I don’t do anything until I wash it again. Add layered bangs, the sides slightly longer than the back, and I have a stylish, no-maintenance haircut. I love it!

    Reply
  137. I’ve never been much of one for fooling with my hair. As long as it’s not in my eyes and looks halfway good, I’m happy.
    One time I asked my stylist if he could cut my hair (about chin length) so that it would go under by itself. He could! Such a haircut exists, the Bevel cut! The hair underneath is slightly shorter (and I mean only a few millimeters)than the hair over it, so the top hair curls under. I wash my hair, comb it into shape (it needs a little work) and I don’t do anything until I wash it again. Add layered bangs, the sides slightly longer than the back, and I have a stylish, no-maintenance haircut. I love it!

    Reply
  138. I’ve never been much of one for fooling with my hair. As long as it’s not in my eyes and looks halfway good, I’m happy.
    One time I asked my stylist if he could cut my hair (about chin length) so that it would go under by itself. He could! Such a haircut exists, the Bevel cut! The hair underneath is slightly shorter (and I mean only a few millimeters)than the hair over it, so the top hair curls under. I wash my hair, comb it into shape (it needs a little work) and I don’t do anything until I wash it again. Add layered bangs, the sides slightly longer than the back, and I have a stylish, no-maintenance haircut. I love it!

    Reply
  139. I’ve never been much of one for fooling with my hair. As long as it’s not in my eyes and looks halfway good, I’m happy.
    One time I asked my stylist if he could cut my hair (about chin length) so that it would go under by itself. He could! Such a haircut exists, the Bevel cut! The hair underneath is slightly shorter (and I mean only a few millimeters)than the hair over it, so the top hair curls under. I wash my hair, comb it into shape (it needs a little work) and I don’t do anything until I wash it again. Add layered bangs, the sides slightly longer than the back, and I have a stylish, no-maintenance haircut. I love it!

    Reply
  140. I’ve never been much of one for fooling with my hair. As long as it’s not in my eyes and looks halfway good, I’m happy.
    One time I asked my stylist if he could cut my hair (about chin length) so that it would go under by itself. He could! Such a haircut exists, the Bevel cut! The hair underneath is slightly shorter (and I mean only a few millimeters)than the hair over it, so the top hair curls under. I wash my hair, comb it into shape (it needs a little work) and I don’t do anything until I wash it again. Add layered bangs, the sides slightly longer than the back, and I have a stylish, no-maintenance haircut. I love it!

    Reply
  141. PJ, how lovely to hear someone say they love their hair — it’s pretty rare, I think. I hear you on the mild body wave — I remember when I was still a new author asking for one to give my fine hair a bit of body for the annual RW Australia conference. I looked like Orphan Annie, too — or an escapee from the 80s–or my grandmother. LOL.
    And thanks for the compliment — that was one of the first cuts from my new hairdresser, and I was very happy with it.
    Janga, great that you can enjoy ‘nature’s frosting’ — if my hair is anything like my mum or dad’s, I’ll go streaky, which will suit me fine. My mother’s hair, before she died, was a beautiful light brown ashy gray streaky color that people would pay for, and Dad was much the same.
    I looked up the Dorothy Hamill and I can see that it would have looked great on you. But I’m mystified by your oj cans reference. You poured oj on your hair? Wrapped it around cans?
    Linda, your haircut sounds perfect — elegant and no fuss and classic— the kind that will never go out of style. When I was a student teacher I got a cut something like that (chopped off several feet of hair) and I remember a supervisor commenting that “someone (ie me) clearly had a lot of time to waste in the morning blow drying her hair.” It was in fact, a great cut and I used to jump on my pushbike with wet hair and ride to work (15-20 minutes) By the time I arrived it was nicely blow-dried. This was before helmets became compulsory here. Can you imagine arriving with helmet hair? ugh.

    Reply
  142. PJ, how lovely to hear someone say they love their hair — it’s pretty rare, I think. I hear you on the mild body wave — I remember when I was still a new author asking for one to give my fine hair a bit of body for the annual RW Australia conference. I looked like Orphan Annie, too — or an escapee from the 80s–or my grandmother. LOL.
    And thanks for the compliment — that was one of the first cuts from my new hairdresser, and I was very happy with it.
    Janga, great that you can enjoy ‘nature’s frosting’ — if my hair is anything like my mum or dad’s, I’ll go streaky, which will suit me fine. My mother’s hair, before she died, was a beautiful light brown ashy gray streaky color that people would pay for, and Dad was much the same.
    I looked up the Dorothy Hamill and I can see that it would have looked great on you. But I’m mystified by your oj cans reference. You poured oj on your hair? Wrapped it around cans?
    Linda, your haircut sounds perfect — elegant and no fuss and classic— the kind that will never go out of style. When I was a student teacher I got a cut something like that (chopped off several feet of hair) and I remember a supervisor commenting that “someone (ie me) clearly had a lot of time to waste in the morning blow drying her hair.” It was in fact, a great cut and I used to jump on my pushbike with wet hair and ride to work (15-20 minutes) By the time I arrived it was nicely blow-dried. This was before helmets became compulsory here. Can you imagine arriving with helmet hair? ugh.

    Reply
  143. PJ, how lovely to hear someone say they love their hair — it’s pretty rare, I think. I hear you on the mild body wave — I remember when I was still a new author asking for one to give my fine hair a bit of body for the annual RW Australia conference. I looked like Orphan Annie, too — or an escapee from the 80s–or my grandmother. LOL.
    And thanks for the compliment — that was one of the first cuts from my new hairdresser, and I was very happy with it.
    Janga, great that you can enjoy ‘nature’s frosting’ — if my hair is anything like my mum or dad’s, I’ll go streaky, which will suit me fine. My mother’s hair, before she died, was a beautiful light brown ashy gray streaky color that people would pay for, and Dad was much the same.
    I looked up the Dorothy Hamill and I can see that it would have looked great on you. But I’m mystified by your oj cans reference. You poured oj on your hair? Wrapped it around cans?
    Linda, your haircut sounds perfect — elegant and no fuss and classic— the kind that will never go out of style. When I was a student teacher I got a cut something like that (chopped off several feet of hair) and I remember a supervisor commenting that “someone (ie me) clearly had a lot of time to waste in the morning blow drying her hair.” It was in fact, a great cut and I used to jump on my pushbike with wet hair and ride to work (15-20 minutes) By the time I arrived it was nicely blow-dried. This was before helmets became compulsory here. Can you imagine arriving with helmet hair? ugh.

    Reply
  144. PJ, how lovely to hear someone say they love their hair — it’s pretty rare, I think. I hear you on the mild body wave — I remember when I was still a new author asking for one to give my fine hair a bit of body for the annual RW Australia conference. I looked like Orphan Annie, too — or an escapee from the 80s–or my grandmother. LOL.
    And thanks for the compliment — that was one of the first cuts from my new hairdresser, and I was very happy with it.
    Janga, great that you can enjoy ‘nature’s frosting’ — if my hair is anything like my mum or dad’s, I’ll go streaky, which will suit me fine. My mother’s hair, before she died, was a beautiful light brown ashy gray streaky color that people would pay for, and Dad was much the same.
    I looked up the Dorothy Hamill and I can see that it would have looked great on you. But I’m mystified by your oj cans reference. You poured oj on your hair? Wrapped it around cans?
    Linda, your haircut sounds perfect — elegant and no fuss and classic— the kind that will never go out of style. When I was a student teacher I got a cut something like that (chopped off several feet of hair) and I remember a supervisor commenting that “someone (ie me) clearly had a lot of time to waste in the morning blow drying her hair.” It was in fact, a great cut and I used to jump on my pushbike with wet hair and ride to work (15-20 minutes) By the time I arrived it was nicely blow-dried. This was before helmets became compulsory here. Can you imagine arriving with helmet hair? ugh.

    Reply
  145. PJ, how lovely to hear someone say they love their hair — it’s pretty rare, I think. I hear you on the mild body wave — I remember when I was still a new author asking for one to give my fine hair a bit of body for the annual RW Australia conference. I looked like Orphan Annie, too — or an escapee from the 80s–or my grandmother. LOL.
    And thanks for the compliment — that was one of the first cuts from my new hairdresser, and I was very happy with it.
    Janga, great that you can enjoy ‘nature’s frosting’ — if my hair is anything like my mum or dad’s, I’ll go streaky, which will suit me fine. My mother’s hair, before she died, was a beautiful light brown ashy gray streaky color that people would pay for, and Dad was much the same.
    I looked up the Dorothy Hamill and I can see that it would have looked great on you. But I’m mystified by your oj cans reference. You poured oj on your hair? Wrapped it around cans?
    Linda, your haircut sounds perfect — elegant and no fuss and classic— the kind that will never go out of style. When I was a student teacher I got a cut something like that (chopped off several feet of hair) and I remember a supervisor commenting that “someone (ie me) clearly had a lot of time to waste in the morning blow drying her hair.” It was in fact, a great cut and I used to jump on my pushbike with wet hair and ride to work (15-20 minutes) By the time I arrived it was nicely blow-dried. This was before helmets became compulsory here. Can you imagine arriving with helmet hair? ugh.

    Reply
  146. Anne, I’ll answer the can question in case Janga doesn’t check back in. Back in the 60’s, before hair blowers and flat irons, to get our long hair silky straight we’d wash it then roll it on empty metal cans (the bigger the better) and let it dry. I don’t know about Janga but I actually slept with those babies attached to my head. Comfy? No! But I sure liked the results! lol!
    Btw, I didn’t see your name on the list for this year’s RWA signing. Are you coming to Orlando?

    Reply
  147. Anne, I’ll answer the can question in case Janga doesn’t check back in. Back in the 60’s, before hair blowers and flat irons, to get our long hair silky straight we’d wash it then roll it on empty metal cans (the bigger the better) and let it dry. I don’t know about Janga but I actually slept with those babies attached to my head. Comfy? No! But I sure liked the results! lol!
    Btw, I didn’t see your name on the list for this year’s RWA signing. Are you coming to Orlando?

    Reply
  148. Anne, I’ll answer the can question in case Janga doesn’t check back in. Back in the 60’s, before hair blowers and flat irons, to get our long hair silky straight we’d wash it then roll it on empty metal cans (the bigger the better) and let it dry. I don’t know about Janga but I actually slept with those babies attached to my head. Comfy? No! But I sure liked the results! lol!
    Btw, I didn’t see your name on the list for this year’s RWA signing. Are you coming to Orlando?

    Reply
  149. Anne, I’ll answer the can question in case Janga doesn’t check back in. Back in the 60’s, before hair blowers and flat irons, to get our long hair silky straight we’d wash it then roll it on empty metal cans (the bigger the better) and let it dry. I don’t know about Janga but I actually slept with those babies attached to my head. Comfy? No! But I sure liked the results! lol!
    Btw, I didn’t see your name on the list for this year’s RWA signing. Are you coming to Orlando?

    Reply
  150. Anne, I’ll answer the can question in case Janga doesn’t check back in. Back in the 60’s, before hair blowers and flat irons, to get our long hair silky straight we’d wash it then roll it on empty metal cans (the bigger the better) and let it dry. I don’t know about Janga but I actually slept with those babies attached to my head. Comfy? No! But I sure liked the results! lol!
    Btw, I didn’t see your name on the list for this year’s RWA signing. Are you coming to Orlando?

    Reply
  151. Ouch, PJ (and Janga) I can’t imagine sleeping in cans! The things we do for beauty. Thanks for letting me know.
    And no, I’m sorry I won’t be at Orlando this July. I have too much on my plate at the moment to be able to get away. I’m hoping to get to NY next year, though.
    Have fun for me.

    Reply
  152. Ouch, PJ (and Janga) I can’t imagine sleeping in cans! The things we do for beauty. Thanks for letting me know.
    And no, I’m sorry I won’t be at Orlando this July. I have too much on my plate at the moment to be able to get away. I’m hoping to get to NY next year, though.
    Have fun for me.

    Reply
  153. Ouch, PJ (and Janga) I can’t imagine sleeping in cans! The things we do for beauty. Thanks for letting me know.
    And no, I’m sorry I won’t be at Orlando this July. I have too much on my plate at the moment to be able to get away. I’m hoping to get to NY next year, though.
    Have fun for me.

    Reply
  154. Ouch, PJ (and Janga) I can’t imagine sleeping in cans! The things we do for beauty. Thanks for letting me know.
    And no, I’m sorry I won’t be at Orlando this July. I have too much on my plate at the moment to be able to get away. I’m hoping to get to NY next year, though.
    Have fun for me.

    Reply
  155. Ouch, PJ (and Janga) I can’t imagine sleeping in cans! The things we do for beauty. Thanks for letting me know.
    And no, I’m sorry I won’t be at Orlando this July. I have too much on my plate at the moment to be able to get away. I’m hoping to get to NY next year, though.
    Have fun for me.

    Reply

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