In Search of Lost Kings

Richard III car parkNicola here! Today I’m thinking about lost kings, by which I mean those monarchs whose bodies have vanished and whose current whereabouts are unknown. This may seem an odd thing to be thinking about (but you know writers – we think about all kinds of weird stuff!) but two things have put it in my mind. First there’s the ongoing debate about where King Richard III is to be re-buried after the sensational discovery of his body last year beneath a car park in the city of Leicester. The other reason I’m musing on lost kings is that much to my surprise, whilst doing the research for my current manuscript I discovered I’m actually writing about one – Frederick of Bohemia, whose body disappeared in the 1630s. More on Frederick later.

The archaeological dig to find the burial site of King Richard III last year fascinated people in the UK and far beyond. Perhaps it was because Richard has always been one of the most controversial of English kings, bitterly dividing opinion over whether he was a good guy or not. Perhaps it was also the fact that his death in battle and subsequent fate was the stuff of rumour and legend. Whilst the discovery could not throw any light on the biggest mystery of all that surrounds Richard – that of the fate of his nephews, the Princes in the Tower – it did reveal a wealth of information about the king himself, his physical appearance and the way in which he died.

It’s no secret that Richard III has always been a hero of mine, right from the first time I read The The daughter of time Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey. It’s interesting how influential that book has been on so many people and how such a strong debate has arisen over Richard’s character and actions. The discovery of Richard’s body led to much excitement over lost kings and it’s interesting how many of them there are. (When I was checking this out I couldn’t find any lost queens but maybe there are some of them too.)

We tend to expect kings and queens to be buried in cathedrals with all due ceremony. A surprising number are not and I suppose that if a king falls in battle the chances of a proper burial diminish considerably. However, the big culprit as far as losing the bodies of monarchs is concerned was Henry VIII. Yes, as a result of the dissolution of the monasteries from the 1530s onwards a number of kings were misplaced including Henry I and James IV of Scotland. King Harold, who was defeated by William the Conqueror at Hastings in 1066, may be buried at Waltham Abbey but this is not definite. Even Charles I’s tomb was mislaid after the Civil War, although though it was known to be in St George’s Chapel at Windsor, and was only rediscovered in 1813. (That would make for an interesting background to a Regency story!)

Hyde AbbeyAfter Richard III had been found archaeologists turned their attention to King Alfred the Great. It was rumoured that Alfred too was beneath a car park in Winchester (which says a lot about parking in English cities) but this proved to be false. An excavation in the churchyard where Alfred was supposed to have been re-buried after Hyde Abbey was destroyed only found skeletons from a later era. However, a pelvic bone excavated in a previous dig that had lain in a box in a museum for years was re-examined and dated to the correct period. Archaeologists are now returning to the site of the previous dig to see if they can find any further evidence.

Meanwhile, there’s Frederick of Bohemia. Frederick was a German Prince who married Elizabeth Stuart, Frederick
the sister of King Charles I, in 1613. Elizabeth and Frederick both feature in my new book, which has intertwined stories set in the 17th, 19th and 21st centuries. Frederick ruled briefly as King of Bohemia before being defeated at the Battle of the White Mountain in 1620. He and Elizabeth and their young family were forced into exile in Holland. Twelve years later, in 1632, Frederick had an opportunity to regain his ancestral lands but was struck down by a pestilential fever and died. His body was first buried in Germany but three years later his burial place was threatened by enemy troops so poor Frederick was dug up and taken travelling again, looking for safe burial in France. There is no record of his final resting place and it’s an intriguing mystery, as Elizabeth’s letters give no clues as to his eventual fate.

CrownFrederick’s story caught my imagination, especially as I had also read about the curse of St Wenceslas. Kings of Bohemia were traditionally crowned with this rather blingy crown of St Wenceslas but there was a curse attached – any ruler who usurped the throne was doomed to die within a year. There were plenty of people who considered Frederick a usurper and he lost his throne a year and 4 days after taking it. He did not die within the year but he never regained his patrimony, ending his life in exile and with his body still “continuing on its melancholy travels” as one historian commented. It's fair to say that if Frederick was not cursed he was certainly very unlucky.

This was writing catnip to me. Frederick and Elizabeth’s story, and Frederick’s fate, forms one of the main threads in the story I’m currently writing. The 17th century is such a rich period, and tying it in to the Regency meant that I had the best of both worlds.

As far as I know, no one has ever searched for Frederick in the way they have for Richard III or King Alfred. Perhaps this is because Frederick was considered one of history’s failures and he’s now forgotten. In the case of Richard III perhaps the discovery of his body caught the public imagination because he was already a historical figure who commanded such strong feelings. What do you think? Why are some kings searched for and other forgotten? Is it right to go looking for the final resting places of lost kings? And – dare I ask? – do you think Richard III was a good guy? Or not?

105 thoughts on “In Search of Lost Kings”

  1. Well Nicola you know my opinion as to whether Richard was good or bad – GOOD. Like you I first discovered him via Josephine Tey, wonderful book – time for a re-issue methinks.
    I knew nothing about Frederick until I read your blog today. Fascinating. (My Dad was called Frederick and being of German stock I think after Frederick the Great! – which he was, my dad, of course). I can’t wait to read your book on this period. Fresh fields to plough – do hurry along now, don’t waste any time in finishing it!

    Reply
  2. Well Nicola you know my opinion as to whether Richard was good or bad – GOOD. Like you I first discovered him via Josephine Tey, wonderful book – time for a re-issue methinks.
    I knew nothing about Frederick until I read your blog today. Fascinating. (My Dad was called Frederick and being of German stock I think after Frederick the Great! – which he was, my dad, of course). I can’t wait to read your book on this period. Fresh fields to plough – do hurry along now, don’t waste any time in finishing it!

    Reply
  3. Well Nicola you know my opinion as to whether Richard was good or bad – GOOD. Like you I first discovered him via Josephine Tey, wonderful book – time for a re-issue methinks.
    I knew nothing about Frederick until I read your blog today. Fascinating. (My Dad was called Frederick and being of German stock I think after Frederick the Great! – which he was, my dad, of course). I can’t wait to read your book on this period. Fresh fields to plough – do hurry along now, don’t waste any time in finishing it!

    Reply
  4. Well Nicola you know my opinion as to whether Richard was good or bad – GOOD. Like you I first discovered him via Josephine Tey, wonderful book – time for a re-issue methinks.
    I knew nothing about Frederick until I read your blog today. Fascinating. (My Dad was called Frederick and being of German stock I think after Frederick the Great! – which he was, my dad, of course). I can’t wait to read your book on this period. Fresh fields to plough – do hurry along now, don’t waste any time in finishing it!

    Reply
  5. Well Nicola you know my opinion as to whether Richard was good or bad – GOOD. Like you I first discovered him via Josephine Tey, wonderful book – time for a re-issue methinks.
    I knew nothing about Frederick until I read your blog today. Fascinating. (My Dad was called Frederick and being of German stock I think after Frederick the Great! – which he was, my dad, of course). I can’t wait to read your book on this period. Fresh fields to plough – do hurry along now, don’t waste any time in finishing it!

    Reply
  6. I saw an image of Richard III the other day with the caption: Hide and Seek World Record Holder!
    I don’t think I’m enough of an expert to have an opinion on the good vs. bad debate.
    People pick and choose their history. Some people and events are remembered, others not so much. For example, everyone can talk about the Holocaust, but nobody much knows about the genocide in Ukraine – the Holodomor – that happened only a few years before. The man who designed my city (Canberra) is still famous, but nobody remembers his wife who worked alongside him (but I suspect that has more to do with sexism than anything!).
    So many lost, fascinating stories and people from the past.

    Reply
  7. I saw an image of Richard III the other day with the caption: Hide and Seek World Record Holder!
    I don’t think I’m enough of an expert to have an opinion on the good vs. bad debate.
    People pick and choose their history. Some people and events are remembered, others not so much. For example, everyone can talk about the Holocaust, but nobody much knows about the genocide in Ukraine – the Holodomor – that happened only a few years before. The man who designed my city (Canberra) is still famous, but nobody remembers his wife who worked alongside him (but I suspect that has more to do with sexism than anything!).
    So many lost, fascinating stories and people from the past.

    Reply
  8. I saw an image of Richard III the other day with the caption: Hide and Seek World Record Holder!
    I don’t think I’m enough of an expert to have an opinion on the good vs. bad debate.
    People pick and choose their history. Some people and events are remembered, others not so much. For example, everyone can talk about the Holocaust, but nobody much knows about the genocide in Ukraine – the Holodomor – that happened only a few years before. The man who designed my city (Canberra) is still famous, but nobody remembers his wife who worked alongside him (but I suspect that has more to do with sexism than anything!).
    So many lost, fascinating stories and people from the past.

    Reply
  9. I saw an image of Richard III the other day with the caption: Hide and Seek World Record Holder!
    I don’t think I’m enough of an expert to have an opinion on the good vs. bad debate.
    People pick and choose their history. Some people and events are remembered, others not so much. For example, everyone can talk about the Holocaust, but nobody much knows about the genocide in Ukraine – the Holodomor – that happened only a few years before. The man who designed my city (Canberra) is still famous, but nobody remembers his wife who worked alongside him (but I suspect that has more to do with sexism than anything!).
    So many lost, fascinating stories and people from the past.

    Reply
  10. I saw an image of Richard III the other day with the caption: Hide and Seek World Record Holder!
    I don’t think I’m enough of an expert to have an opinion on the good vs. bad debate.
    People pick and choose their history. Some people and events are remembered, others not so much. For example, everyone can talk about the Holocaust, but nobody much knows about the genocide in Ukraine – the Holodomor – that happened only a few years before. The man who designed my city (Canberra) is still famous, but nobody remembers his wife who worked alongside him (but I suspect that has more to do with sexism than anything!).
    So many lost, fascinating stories and people from the past.

    Reply
  11. The dilemma with Richard is the motive and opportunity. He certainly had both, but so probably did several others who would have had the money, placement, and access to have spirited the princes away. The bottom line on Richard is that he came to a kingdom that had been torn asunder by years of war and family conflict. Not everyone, but a lot of people, had switched loyalties to be on the winning side… and did so again when Henry came to the throne. Part of loyalty was to disparage old opponents. So thus was the myth of evil Richard was built.
    I had never thought much about missing kings until your post. There’s something comforting to know that a person has a safe place to rest. I think of families who lost loved ones in World War II where the graves are far away. I remember that after DNA became more affordable that one of the unknowns in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers was identified, removed, and buried in his family’s plot.
    Your post brought forth a historical “memory” of Helen of Constantine who traveled modern day Middle East and determined a lot of biblical sites’ locations.

    Reply
  12. The dilemma with Richard is the motive and opportunity. He certainly had both, but so probably did several others who would have had the money, placement, and access to have spirited the princes away. The bottom line on Richard is that he came to a kingdom that had been torn asunder by years of war and family conflict. Not everyone, but a lot of people, had switched loyalties to be on the winning side… and did so again when Henry came to the throne. Part of loyalty was to disparage old opponents. So thus was the myth of evil Richard was built.
    I had never thought much about missing kings until your post. There’s something comforting to know that a person has a safe place to rest. I think of families who lost loved ones in World War II where the graves are far away. I remember that after DNA became more affordable that one of the unknowns in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers was identified, removed, and buried in his family’s plot.
    Your post brought forth a historical “memory” of Helen of Constantine who traveled modern day Middle East and determined a lot of biblical sites’ locations.

    Reply
  13. The dilemma with Richard is the motive and opportunity. He certainly had both, but so probably did several others who would have had the money, placement, and access to have spirited the princes away. The bottom line on Richard is that he came to a kingdom that had been torn asunder by years of war and family conflict. Not everyone, but a lot of people, had switched loyalties to be on the winning side… and did so again when Henry came to the throne. Part of loyalty was to disparage old opponents. So thus was the myth of evil Richard was built.
    I had never thought much about missing kings until your post. There’s something comforting to know that a person has a safe place to rest. I think of families who lost loved ones in World War II where the graves are far away. I remember that after DNA became more affordable that one of the unknowns in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers was identified, removed, and buried in his family’s plot.
    Your post brought forth a historical “memory” of Helen of Constantine who traveled modern day Middle East and determined a lot of biblical sites’ locations.

    Reply
  14. The dilemma with Richard is the motive and opportunity. He certainly had both, but so probably did several others who would have had the money, placement, and access to have spirited the princes away. The bottom line on Richard is that he came to a kingdom that had been torn asunder by years of war and family conflict. Not everyone, but a lot of people, had switched loyalties to be on the winning side… and did so again when Henry came to the throne. Part of loyalty was to disparage old opponents. So thus was the myth of evil Richard was built.
    I had never thought much about missing kings until your post. There’s something comforting to know that a person has a safe place to rest. I think of families who lost loved ones in World War II where the graves are far away. I remember that after DNA became more affordable that one of the unknowns in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers was identified, removed, and buried in his family’s plot.
    Your post brought forth a historical “memory” of Helen of Constantine who traveled modern day Middle East and determined a lot of biblical sites’ locations.

    Reply
  15. The dilemma with Richard is the motive and opportunity. He certainly had both, but so probably did several others who would have had the money, placement, and access to have spirited the princes away. The bottom line on Richard is that he came to a kingdom that had been torn asunder by years of war and family conflict. Not everyone, but a lot of people, had switched loyalties to be on the winning side… and did so again when Henry came to the throne. Part of loyalty was to disparage old opponents. So thus was the myth of evil Richard was built.
    I had never thought much about missing kings until your post. There’s something comforting to know that a person has a safe place to rest. I think of families who lost loved ones in World War II where the graves are far away. I remember that after DNA became more affordable that one of the unknowns in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers was identified, removed, and buried in his family’s plot.
    Your post brought forth a historical “memory” of Helen of Constantine who traveled modern day Middle East and determined a lot of biblical sites’ locations.

    Reply
  16. Shakespeare didn’t do Richard III any favours tho of course he was writing to curry favour and makes you realise how history can be coloured by the politics of subsequent generations.I think he wasn’t all that bad and probably a fair ruler but there is always going to be the question of the princes.
    As for missing monarchs male or female it is quite facinating .Until they found Richard III I hadn’t really thought about it but I should imagine there are quite a few not where you would expect them to be.

    Reply
  17. Shakespeare didn’t do Richard III any favours tho of course he was writing to curry favour and makes you realise how history can be coloured by the politics of subsequent generations.I think he wasn’t all that bad and probably a fair ruler but there is always going to be the question of the princes.
    As for missing monarchs male or female it is quite facinating .Until they found Richard III I hadn’t really thought about it but I should imagine there are quite a few not where you would expect them to be.

    Reply
  18. Shakespeare didn’t do Richard III any favours tho of course he was writing to curry favour and makes you realise how history can be coloured by the politics of subsequent generations.I think he wasn’t all that bad and probably a fair ruler but there is always going to be the question of the princes.
    As for missing monarchs male or female it is quite facinating .Until they found Richard III I hadn’t really thought about it but I should imagine there are quite a few not where you would expect them to be.

    Reply
  19. Shakespeare didn’t do Richard III any favours tho of course he was writing to curry favour and makes you realise how history can be coloured by the politics of subsequent generations.I think he wasn’t all that bad and probably a fair ruler but there is always going to be the question of the princes.
    As for missing monarchs male or female it is quite facinating .Until they found Richard III I hadn’t really thought about it but I should imagine there are quite a few not where you would expect them to be.

    Reply
  20. Shakespeare didn’t do Richard III any favours tho of course he was writing to curry favour and makes you realise how history can be coloured by the politics of subsequent generations.I think he wasn’t all that bad and probably a fair ruler but there is always going to be the question of the princes.
    As for missing monarchs male or female it is quite facinating .Until they found Richard III I hadn’t really thought about it but I should imagine there are quite a few not where you would expect them to be.

    Reply
  21. LOL, Margaret, I do indeed know you are a fervent supporter of Richard III! Thank you very much for your kind words on my new project. I’m finding it a very interesting topic to research.

    Reply
  22. LOL, Margaret, I do indeed know you are a fervent supporter of Richard III! Thank you very much for your kind words on my new project. I’m finding it a very interesting topic to research.

    Reply
  23. LOL, Margaret, I do indeed know you are a fervent supporter of Richard III! Thank you very much for your kind words on my new project. I’m finding it a very interesting topic to research.

    Reply
  24. LOL, Margaret, I do indeed know you are a fervent supporter of Richard III! Thank you very much for your kind words on my new project. I’m finding it a very interesting topic to research.

    Reply
  25. LOL, Margaret, I do indeed know you are a fervent supporter of Richard III! Thank you very much for your kind words on my new project. I’m finding it a very interesting topic to research.

    Reply
  26. Hi Sonya! I love the sound of that image of Richard III! I think you hit the nail on the head over the selectivity of history. It’s fascinating to see who is famous versus who is forgotten. In the case of women’s history I think you are absolutely right that a lot of it is sexism in terms of “forgetting” or under-representing the role of women.

    Reply
  27. Hi Sonya! I love the sound of that image of Richard III! I think you hit the nail on the head over the selectivity of history. It’s fascinating to see who is famous versus who is forgotten. In the case of women’s history I think you are absolutely right that a lot of it is sexism in terms of “forgetting” or under-representing the role of women.

    Reply
  28. Hi Sonya! I love the sound of that image of Richard III! I think you hit the nail on the head over the selectivity of history. It’s fascinating to see who is famous versus who is forgotten. In the case of women’s history I think you are absolutely right that a lot of it is sexism in terms of “forgetting” or under-representing the role of women.

    Reply
  29. Hi Sonya! I love the sound of that image of Richard III! I think you hit the nail on the head over the selectivity of history. It’s fascinating to see who is famous versus who is forgotten. In the case of women’s history I think you are absolutely right that a lot of it is sexism in terms of “forgetting” or under-representing the role of women.

    Reply
  30. Hi Sonya! I love the sound of that image of Richard III! I think you hit the nail on the head over the selectivity of history. It’s fascinating to see who is famous versus who is forgotten. In the case of women’s history I think you are absolutely right that a lot of it is sexism in terms of “forgetting” or under-representing the role of women.

    Reply
  31. Thank you very much for your comments, Shannon. Of all the historical mysteries around I do think that the Princes in the Tower is one of the most compelling.
    That’s a really good point about having a safe place to rest. Something feels unfinished when someone’s resting place is unknown.

    Reply
  32. Thank you very much for your comments, Shannon. Of all the historical mysteries around I do think that the Princes in the Tower is one of the most compelling.
    That’s a really good point about having a safe place to rest. Something feels unfinished when someone’s resting place is unknown.

    Reply
  33. Thank you very much for your comments, Shannon. Of all the historical mysteries around I do think that the Princes in the Tower is one of the most compelling.
    That’s a really good point about having a safe place to rest. Something feels unfinished when someone’s resting place is unknown.

    Reply
  34. Thank you very much for your comments, Shannon. Of all the historical mysteries around I do think that the Princes in the Tower is one of the most compelling.
    That’s a really good point about having a safe place to rest. Something feels unfinished when someone’s resting place is unknown.

    Reply
  35. Thank you very much for your comments, Shannon. Of all the historical mysteries around I do think that the Princes in the Tower is one of the most compelling.
    That’s a really good point about having a safe place to rest. Something feels unfinished when someone’s resting place is unknown.

    Reply
  36. I agree, Jo. It hadn’t occurred to me that there might be all these monarchs who weren’t tucked away under a big monument in a cathedral! I think it’s a fascinating topic. I’d love to know if there are any missing queens as well as kings.

    Reply
  37. I agree, Jo. It hadn’t occurred to me that there might be all these monarchs who weren’t tucked away under a big monument in a cathedral! I think it’s a fascinating topic. I’d love to know if there are any missing queens as well as kings.

    Reply
  38. I agree, Jo. It hadn’t occurred to me that there might be all these monarchs who weren’t tucked away under a big monument in a cathedral! I think it’s a fascinating topic. I’d love to know if there are any missing queens as well as kings.

    Reply
  39. I agree, Jo. It hadn’t occurred to me that there might be all these monarchs who weren’t tucked away under a big monument in a cathedral! I think it’s a fascinating topic. I’d love to know if there are any missing queens as well as kings.

    Reply
  40. I agree, Jo. It hadn’t occurred to me that there might be all these monarchs who weren’t tucked away under a big monument in a cathedral! I think it’s a fascinating topic. I’d love to know if there are any missing queens as well as kings.

    Reply
  41. I’m another Ricardian, and yes, it’s all Josephine Tey’s fault. *G* The crown of Bohemia is dazzling for sure!
    I’m another who hadn’t realized just how many monarchs have been misplaced. One of the unintended consequences of Henry VIII’s break from Rome.
    I do love your initial car park sign. It’s hard to beat British humor!

    Reply
  42. I’m another Ricardian, and yes, it’s all Josephine Tey’s fault. *G* The crown of Bohemia is dazzling for sure!
    I’m another who hadn’t realized just how many monarchs have been misplaced. One of the unintended consequences of Henry VIII’s break from Rome.
    I do love your initial car park sign. It’s hard to beat British humor!

    Reply
  43. I’m another Ricardian, and yes, it’s all Josephine Tey’s fault. *G* The crown of Bohemia is dazzling for sure!
    I’m another who hadn’t realized just how many monarchs have been misplaced. One of the unintended consequences of Henry VIII’s break from Rome.
    I do love your initial car park sign. It’s hard to beat British humor!

    Reply
  44. I’m another Ricardian, and yes, it’s all Josephine Tey’s fault. *G* The crown of Bohemia is dazzling for sure!
    I’m another who hadn’t realized just how many monarchs have been misplaced. One of the unintended consequences of Henry VIII’s break from Rome.
    I do love your initial car park sign. It’s hard to beat British humor!

    Reply
  45. I’m another Ricardian, and yes, it’s all Josephine Tey’s fault. *G* The crown of Bohemia is dazzling for sure!
    I’m another who hadn’t realized just how many monarchs have been misplaced. One of the unintended consequences of Henry VIII’s break from Rome.
    I do love your initial car park sign. It’s hard to beat British humor!

    Reply
  46. I must admit I have always had a soft spot for Richard III. I was fascinated by the way they tracked down his body in the car park. Sleuthing at its best. As far as the princes in the tower, that is another mystery still to be solved.
    As far as the other mising kings, I did know about Frederick of Bohemia but a lot of the others I was unaware of. Of course it isn’t only British kings that have gone missing, but many in Europe have as well, especially France. But does it really matter? It is their legacy, good or bad, that is the more important I think, not the quality of the grass and flowers on top of them..

    Reply
  47. I must admit I have always had a soft spot for Richard III. I was fascinated by the way they tracked down his body in the car park. Sleuthing at its best. As far as the princes in the tower, that is another mystery still to be solved.
    As far as the other mising kings, I did know about Frederick of Bohemia but a lot of the others I was unaware of. Of course it isn’t only British kings that have gone missing, but many in Europe have as well, especially France. But does it really matter? It is their legacy, good or bad, that is the more important I think, not the quality of the grass and flowers on top of them..

    Reply
  48. I must admit I have always had a soft spot for Richard III. I was fascinated by the way they tracked down his body in the car park. Sleuthing at its best. As far as the princes in the tower, that is another mystery still to be solved.
    As far as the other mising kings, I did know about Frederick of Bohemia but a lot of the others I was unaware of. Of course it isn’t only British kings that have gone missing, but many in Europe have as well, especially France. But does it really matter? It is their legacy, good or bad, that is the more important I think, not the quality of the grass and flowers on top of them..

    Reply
  49. I must admit I have always had a soft spot for Richard III. I was fascinated by the way they tracked down his body in the car park. Sleuthing at its best. As far as the princes in the tower, that is another mystery still to be solved.
    As far as the other mising kings, I did know about Frederick of Bohemia but a lot of the others I was unaware of. Of course it isn’t only British kings that have gone missing, but many in Europe have as well, especially France. But does it really matter? It is their legacy, good or bad, that is the more important I think, not the quality of the grass and flowers on top of them..

    Reply
  50. I must admit I have always had a soft spot for Richard III. I was fascinated by the way they tracked down his body in the car park. Sleuthing at its best. As far as the princes in the tower, that is another mystery still to be solved.
    As far as the other mising kings, I did know about Frederick of Bohemia but a lot of the others I was unaware of. Of course it isn’t only British kings that have gone missing, but many in Europe have as well, especially France. But does it really matter? It is their legacy, good or bad, that is the more important I think, not the quality of the grass and flowers on top of them..

    Reply
  51. The crown of Bohemia is quite something, isn’t it, Mary Jo! I do think it’s fascinating that Henry’s break from Rome had the effect of losing is the graves of some monarchs (and indeed lots of other people.) Not much respect shown there, I fear.

    Reply
  52. The crown of Bohemia is quite something, isn’t it, Mary Jo! I do think it’s fascinating that Henry’s break from Rome had the effect of losing is the graves of some monarchs (and indeed lots of other people.) Not much respect shown there, I fear.

    Reply
  53. The crown of Bohemia is quite something, isn’t it, Mary Jo! I do think it’s fascinating that Henry’s break from Rome had the effect of losing is the graves of some monarchs (and indeed lots of other people.) Not much respect shown there, I fear.

    Reply
  54. The crown of Bohemia is quite something, isn’t it, Mary Jo! I do think it’s fascinating that Henry’s break from Rome had the effect of losing is the graves of some monarchs (and indeed lots of other people.) Not much respect shown there, I fear.

    Reply
  55. The crown of Bohemia is quite something, isn’t it, Mary Jo! I do think it’s fascinating that Henry’s break from Rome had the effect of losing is the graves of some monarchs (and indeed lots of other people.) Not much respect shown there, I fear.

    Reply
  56. Jenny, you’re the only person I know who has heard about Frederick. I think he is largely forgotten except perhaps in some parts of continental Europe. I’ve read a bit about the missing French kings. No one seems to quite catch the imagination like Richard III though perhaps that’s just a British perspective. An interesting point of view that it’s the legacy and not the person that is ultimately important. Thank you!

    Reply
  57. Jenny, you’re the only person I know who has heard about Frederick. I think he is largely forgotten except perhaps in some parts of continental Europe. I’ve read a bit about the missing French kings. No one seems to quite catch the imagination like Richard III though perhaps that’s just a British perspective. An interesting point of view that it’s the legacy and not the person that is ultimately important. Thank you!

    Reply
  58. Jenny, you’re the only person I know who has heard about Frederick. I think he is largely forgotten except perhaps in some parts of continental Europe. I’ve read a bit about the missing French kings. No one seems to quite catch the imagination like Richard III though perhaps that’s just a British perspective. An interesting point of view that it’s the legacy and not the person that is ultimately important. Thank you!

    Reply
  59. Jenny, you’re the only person I know who has heard about Frederick. I think he is largely forgotten except perhaps in some parts of continental Europe. I’ve read a bit about the missing French kings. No one seems to quite catch the imagination like Richard III though perhaps that’s just a British perspective. An interesting point of view that it’s the legacy and not the person that is ultimately important. Thank you!

    Reply
  60. Jenny, you’re the only person I know who has heard about Frederick. I think he is largely forgotten except perhaps in some parts of continental Europe. I’ve read a bit about the missing French kings. No one seems to quite catch the imagination like Richard III though perhaps that’s just a British perspective. An interesting point of view that it’s the legacy and not the person that is ultimately important. Thank you!

    Reply
  61. There is some record in the royal archives or someplace where the expenses for the ZPrinces in the Tower were listed. I remember reading some time ago that these records exonerate RIII. Of course I also blame Tey for thinking RIII wasn’t as bad as Shakespeare painted him. My English lit professor was quite certain that Shakespeare’s portrait of RIII wowed more to his desire to please E I than historical fact.
    I am not surprised that the whereabouts of many bodies are unknown. However, I was shocked to learn that the resting place of Charles I had been lost. He was listed as Charles the martyr and January 30 was the day church services were held for him. In 1804 both houses of Parliament went to church for the sercive commenorating the day.
    don’t know about those buried under the floor of a church or in the walls of one but the graves in church yards were of necessity sometimes cleared out to make room for new internments.
    The crown of Bohemia would fit right in with the wardrobes of some media stars.

    Reply
  62. There is some record in the royal archives or someplace where the expenses for the ZPrinces in the Tower were listed. I remember reading some time ago that these records exonerate RIII. Of course I also blame Tey for thinking RIII wasn’t as bad as Shakespeare painted him. My English lit professor was quite certain that Shakespeare’s portrait of RIII wowed more to his desire to please E I than historical fact.
    I am not surprised that the whereabouts of many bodies are unknown. However, I was shocked to learn that the resting place of Charles I had been lost. He was listed as Charles the martyr and January 30 was the day church services were held for him. In 1804 both houses of Parliament went to church for the sercive commenorating the day.
    don’t know about those buried under the floor of a church or in the walls of one but the graves in church yards were of necessity sometimes cleared out to make room for new internments.
    The crown of Bohemia would fit right in with the wardrobes of some media stars.

    Reply
  63. There is some record in the royal archives or someplace where the expenses for the ZPrinces in the Tower were listed. I remember reading some time ago that these records exonerate RIII. Of course I also blame Tey for thinking RIII wasn’t as bad as Shakespeare painted him. My English lit professor was quite certain that Shakespeare’s portrait of RIII wowed more to his desire to please E I than historical fact.
    I am not surprised that the whereabouts of many bodies are unknown. However, I was shocked to learn that the resting place of Charles I had been lost. He was listed as Charles the martyr and January 30 was the day church services were held for him. In 1804 both houses of Parliament went to church for the sercive commenorating the day.
    don’t know about those buried under the floor of a church or in the walls of one but the graves in church yards were of necessity sometimes cleared out to make room for new internments.
    The crown of Bohemia would fit right in with the wardrobes of some media stars.

    Reply
  64. There is some record in the royal archives or someplace where the expenses for the ZPrinces in the Tower were listed. I remember reading some time ago that these records exonerate RIII. Of course I also blame Tey for thinking RIII wasn’t as bad as Shakespeare painted him. My English lit professor was quite certain that Shakespeare’s portrait of RIII wowed more to his desire to please E I than historical fact.
    I am not surprised that the whereabouts of many bodies are unknown. However, I was shocked to learn that the resting place of Charles I had been lost. He was listed as Charles the martyr and January 30 was the day church services were held for him. In 1804 both houses of Parliament went to church for the sercive commenorating the day.
    don’t know about those buried under the floor of a church or in the walls of one but the graves in church yards were of necessity sometimes cleared out to make room for new internments.
    The crown of Bohemia would fit right in with the wardrobes of some media stars.

    Reply
  65. There is some record in the royal archives or someplace where the expenses for the ZPrinces in the Tower were listed. I remember reading some time ago that these records exonerate RIII. Of course I also blame Tey for thinking RIII wasn’t as bad as Shakespeare painted him. My English lit professor was quite certain that Shakespeare’s portrait of RIII wowed more to his desire to please E I than historical fact.
    I am not surprised that the whereabouts of many bodies are unknown. However, I was shocked to learn that the resting place of Charles I had been lost. He was listed as Charles the martyr and January 30 was the day church services were held for him. In 1804 both houses of Parliament went to church for the sercive commenorating the day.
    don’t know about those buried under the floor of a church or in the walls of one but the graves in church yards were of necessity sometimes cleared out to make room for new internments.
    The crown of Bohemia would fit right in with the wardrobes of some media stars.

    Reply
  66. I haven’t read Ms Tey’s book, but I really believe Richard III wasn’t nearly as evil as everyone thinks. History is written by the winners after all. Also, as Nancy points out much of public opinion has been formed by Shakespeare and he wasn’t totally obsessed with historical accuracy – he wanted his plays to be a success and to stay in favor with the monarchy. 🙂
    I loved today’s post. I had no idea so many royal bodies have gone missing over the years. Thanks!

    Reply
  67. I haven’t read Ms Tey’s book, but I really believe Richard III wasn’t nearly as evil as everyone thinks. History is written by the winners after all. Also, as Nancy points out much of public opinion has been formed by Shakespeare and he wasn’t totally obsessed with historical accuracy – he wanted his plays to be a success and to stay in favor with the monarchy. 🙂
    I loved today’s post. I had no idea so many royal bodies have gone missing over the years. Thanks!

    Reply
  68. I haven’t read Ms Tey’s book, but I really believe Richard III wasn’t nearly as evil as everyone thinks. History is written by the winners after all. Also, as Nancy points out much of public opinion has been formed by Shakespeare and he wasn’t totally obsessed with historical accuracy – he wanted his plays to be a success and to stay in favor with the monarchy. 🙂
    I loved today’s post. I had no idea so many royal bodies have gone missing over the years. Thanks!

    Reply
  69. I haven’t read Ms Tey’s book, but I really believe Richard III wasn’t nearly as evil as everyone thinks. History is written by the winners after all. Also, as Nancy points out much of public opinion has been formed by Shakespeare and he wasn’t totally obsessed with historical accuracy – he wanted his plays to be a success and to stay in favor with the monarchy. 🙂
    I loved today’s post. I had no idea so many royal bodies have gone missing over the years. Thanks!

    Reply
  70. I haven’t read Ms Tey’s book, but I really believe Richard III wasn’t nearly as evil as everyone thinks. History is written by the winners after all. Also, as Nancy points out much of public opinion has been formed by Shakespeare and he wasn’t totally obsessed with historical accuracy – he wanted his plays to be a success and to stay in favor with the monarchy. 🙂
    I loved today’s post. I had no idea so many royal bodies have gone missing over the years. Thanks!

    Reply
  71. I was shocked that they mislaid Charles I as well, Nancy, especially as they knew where he had been buried. It must have been extraordinary when they rediscovered him in the 19th century.
    Yes, the crown of Bohemia is pure bling!

    Reply
  72. I was shocked that they mislaid Charles I as well, Nancy, especially as they knew where he had been buried. It must have been extraordinary when they rediscovered him in the 19th century.
    Yes, the crown of Bohemia is pure bling!

    Reply
  73. I was shocked that they mislaid Charles I as well, Nancy, especially as they knew where he had been buried. It must have been extraordinary when they rediscovered him in the 19th century.
    Yes, the crown of Bohemia is pure bling!

    Reply
  74. I was shocked that they mislaid Charles I as well, Nancy, especially as they knew where he had been buried. It must have been extraordinary when they rediscovered him in the 19th century.
    Yes, the crown of Bohemia is pure bling!

    Reply
  75. I was shocked that they mislaid Charles I as well, Nancy, especially as they knew where he had been buried. It must have been extraordinary when they rediscovered him in the 19th century.
    Yes, the crown of Bohemia is pure bling!

    Reply
  76. That crown is amazing, Nicola ! I had heard of Frederick of Bohemia, but had no idea the poor man had no final resting place. I’ve lost my keys, my sunglasses and at times my mind, but losing a monarch brings carelessness to an entirely new level! 🙂
    Richard III was human, just like the rest of us. I am certain he was far less evil than he was painted. After all, history is written by the winners. Taken as a whole he was a good man, but powerful men are often surrounded by evil, ambitious men and those are the kind of men who can do horrible things in the name of loyalty. I would truly love to know what happened to the princes in the Tower, but we will probably never know.
    And the curious young girl who adores every aspect of British history will always be intrigued by the idea of finding those lost monarchs and bringing them home.

    Reply
  77. That crown is amazing, Nicola ! I had heard of Frederick of Bohemia, but had no idea the poor man had no final resting place. I’ve lost my keys, my sunglasses and at times my mind, but losing a monarch brings carelessness to an entirely new level! 🙂
    Richard III was human, just like the rest of us. I am certain he was far less evil than he was painted. After all, history is written by the winners. Taken as a whole he was a good man, but powerful men are often surrounded by evil, ambitious men and those are the kind of men who can do horrible things in the name of loyalty. I would truly love to know what happened to the princes in the Tower, but we will probably never know.
    And the curious young girl who adores every aspect of British history will always be intrigued by the idea of finding those lost monarchs and bringing them home.

    Reply
  78. That crown is amazing, Nicola ! I had heard of Frederick of Bohemia, but had no idea the poor man had no final resting place. I’ve lost my keys, my sunglasses and at times my mind, but losing a monarch brings carelessness to an entirely new level! 🙂
    Richard III was human, just like the rest of us. I am certain he was far less evil than he was painted. After all, history is written by the winners. Taken as a whole he was a good man, but powerful men are often surrounded by evil, ambitious men and those are the kind of men who can do horrible things in the name of loyalty. I would truly love to know what happened to the princes in the Tower, but we will probably never know.
    And the curious young girl who adores every aspect of British history will always be intrigued by the idea of finding those lost monarchs and bringing them home.

    Reply
  79. That crown is amazing, Nicola ! I had heard of Frederick of Bohemia, but had no idea the poor man had no final resting place. I’ve lost my keys, my sunglasses and at times my mind, but losing a monarch brings carelessness to an entirely new level! 🙂
    Richard III was human, just like the rest of us. I am certain he was far less evil than he was painted. After all, history is written by the winners. Taken as a whole he was a good man, but powerful men are often surrounded by evil, ambitious men and those are the kind of men who can do horrible things in the name of loyalty. I would truly love to know what happened to the princes in the Tower, but we will probably never know.
    And the curious young girl who adores every aspect of British history will always be intrigued by the idea of finding those lost monarchs and bringing them home.

    Reply
  80. That crown is amazing, Nicola ! I had heard of Frederick of Bohemia, but had no idea the poor man had no final resting place. I’ve lost my keys, my sunglasses and at times my mind, but losing a monarch brings carelessness to an entirely new level! 🙂
    Richard III was human, just like the rest of us. I am certain he was far less evil than he was painted. After all, history is written by the winners. Taken as a whole he was a good man, but powerful men are often surrounded by evil, ambitious men and those are the kind of men who can do horrible things in the name of loyalty. I would truly love to know what happened to the princes in the Tower, but we will probably never know.
    And the curious young girl who adores every aspect of British history will always be intrigued by the idea of finding those lost monarchs and bringing them home.

    Reply
  81. This curious “old” girl is also intrigued by the idea of finding lost monarchs, Louisa!:) I agree we’re never likely to know the fate of the princes for certain. If I had a time machine that is the first thing I would do, go and find out the truth!

    Reply
  82. This curious “old” girl is also intrigued by the idea of finding lost monarchs, Louisa!:) I agree we’re never likely to know the fate of the princes for certain. If I had a time machine that is the first thing I would do, go and find out the truth!

    Reply
  83. This curious “old” girl is also intrigued by the idea of finding lost monarchs, Louisa!:) I agree we’re never likely to know the fate of the princes for certain. If I had a time machine that is the first thing I would do, go and find out the truth!

    Reply
  84. This curious “old” girl is also intrigued by the idea of finding lost monarchs, Louisa!:) I agree we’re never likely to know the fate of the princes for certain. If I had a time machine that is the first thing I would do, go and find out the truth!

    Reply
  85. This curious “old” girl is also intrigued by the idea of finding lost monarchs, Louisa!:) I agree we’re never likely to know the fate of the princes for certain. If I had a time machine that is the first thing I would do, go and find out the truth!

    Reply
  86. I think that some kings are searched for if they were important figures so looking for their bodies could be something historians or museums can get in the future something from that. You know, historical investigation needs money, too, and nobody is going to put money in something that cannot give them some money back. I guess nobody is interested in an obscure king from the Dark Ages, for instance.
    Yes, I think it’s right to go looking for the final resting places of lost kings and of any figure of the past. Burials give a lot of information that cannot be found in written history.
    It’s difficult to make a moral remark about a historical figure, considering that we cannot be sure of what we know and what we imagine, and we cannot apply our 21st century ideas to medieval actions. Shakespeare has its influence, of course. Generally speaking, I’m not sure I would consider him a ‘good guy’.

    Reply
  87. I think that some kings are searched for if they were important figures so looking for their bodies could be something historians or museums can get in the future something from that. You know, historical investigation needs money, too, and nobody is going to put money in something that cannot give them some money back. I guess nobody is interested in an obscure king from the Dark Ages, for instance.
    Yes, I think it’s right to go looking for the final resting places of lost kings and of any figure of the past. Burials give a lot of information that cannot be found in written history.
    It’s difficult to make a moral remark about a historical figure, considering that we cannot be sure of what we know and what we imagine, and we cannot apply our 21st century ideas to medieval actions. Shakespeare has its influence, of course. Generally speaking, I’m not sure I would consider him a ‘good guy’.

    Reply
  88. I think that some kings are searched for if they were important figures so looking for their bodies could be something historians or museums can get in the future something from that. You know, historical investigation needs money, too, and nobody is going to put money in something that cannot give them some money back. I guess nobody is interested in an obscure king from the Dark Ages, for instance.
    Yes, I think it’s right to go looking for the final resting places of lost kings and of any figure of the past. Burials give a lot of information that cannot be found in written history.
    It’s difficult to make a moral remark about a historical figure, considering that we cannot be sure of what we know and what we imagine, and we cannot apply our 21st century ideas to medieval actions. Shakespeare has its influence, of course. Generally speaking, I’m not sure I would consider him a ‘good guy’.

    Reply
  89. I think that some kings are searched for if they were important figures so looking for their bodies could be something historians or museums can get in the future something from that. You know, historical investigation needs money, too, and nobody is going to put money in something that cannot give them some money back. I guess nobody is interested in an obscure king from the Dark Ages, for instance.
    Yes, I think it’s right to go looking for the final resting places of lost kings and of any figure of the past. Burials give a lot of information that cannot be found in written history.
    It’s difficult to make a moral remark about a historical figure, considering that we cannot be sure of what we know and what we imagine, and we cannot apply our 21st century ideas to medieval actions. Shakespeare has its influence, of course. Generally speaking, I’m not sure I would consider him a ‘good guy’.

    Reply
  90. I think that some kings are searched for if they were important figures so looking for their bodies could be something historians or museums can get in the future something from that. You know, historical investigation needs money, too, and nobody is going to put money in something that cannot give them some money back. I guess nobody is interested in an obscure king from the Dark Ages, for instance.
    Yes, I think it’s right to go looking for the final resting places of lost kings and of any figure of the past. Burials give a lot of information that cannot be found in written history.
    It’s difficult to make a moral remark about a historical figure, considering that we cannot be sure of what we know and what we imagine, and we cannot apply our 21st century ideas to medieval actions. Shakespeare has its influence, of course. Generally speaking, I’m not sure I would consider him a ‘good guy’.

    Reply
  91. That is a very fair point about funding, Bona. Lovely as it would be to undertake projects on the basis of personal interest or even academic value, it’s naive to think this is viable without money invested and money returned.
    Interesting points on the interpretation of Richard III. Thank you. As a public historian I am constantly fascinated by the differences between academic interpretation and popular culture.

    Reply
  92. That is a very fair point about funding, Bona. Lovely as it would be to undertake projects on the basis of personal interest or even academic value, it’s naive to think this is viable without money invested and money returned.
    Interesting points on the interpretation of Richard III. Thank you. As a public historian I am constantly fascinated by the differences between academic interpretation and popular culture.

    Reply
  93. That is a very fair point about funding, Bona. Lovely as it would be to undertake projects on the basis of personal interest or even academic value, it’s naive to think this is viable without money invested and money returned.
    Interesting points on the interpretation of Richard III. Thank you. As a public historian I am constantly fascinated by the differences between academic interpretation and popular culture.

    Reply
  94. That is a very fair point about funding, Bona. Lovely as it would be to undertake projects on the basis of personal interest or even academic value, it’s naive to think this is viable without money invested and money returned.
    Interesting points on the interpretation of Richard III. Thank you. As a public historian I am constantly fascinated by the differences between academic interpretation and popular culture.

    Reply
  95. That is a very fair point about funding, Bona. Lovely as it would be to undertake projects on the basis of personal interest or even academic value, it’s naive to think this is viable without money invested and money returned.
    Interesting points on the interpretation of Richard III. Thank you. As a public historian I am constantly fascinated by the differences between academic interpretation and popular culture.

    Reply

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