In Praise of Librarians

Anne here, and today I'm talking about my love of libraries and librarians. So many old-fashioned movies and novels used to portray librarians as wispy, dowdy repressed creatures. That or grumpy people who go about shushing people endlessly. Such silly clichés. I always preferred the ones where the librarian revealed themselves to have brains and pizzaz and spines of steel. To me librarians have always been slightly magical. Librarian1

Books and reading open our minds to a variety of new worlds, whether fiction, fantasy or fact. I often say that libraries kept me 'fed' when I was a child. My parents owned plenty of books, but because we moved so often, they often remained in boxes and were inaccessible to me. Though I was an outdoors active kid during the day, in the evenings I was a total book worm. I pretty much read everything I could get my hands on, and a huge part of that process was thanks to the librarians who worked in the various libraries in the many towns I lived in through my childhood.

Usually, when we moved to a new town — mostly smallish country towns — the first thing I did was walk or ride my bike all around town to learn what was there, and high on my list was the local public library. And in each of those the attitude of the librarians was what made the difference in whether it was a friendly space or not. I'm glad to say most of them were very friendly spaces.

I owe so much to librarians. Once they realized what a voracious reader I was, they often introduced me to new authors and a wider range of books. "Have you tried this?" was often the start of what I would now call a "glom" of this author or that.

MyOldIbbotsonBooksIt was a librarian who introduced me to writers like Mary Stewart, Catherine Gaskin, Henry Treece, Rosemary Sutcliffe, PG Wodehouse, Agatha Christie and many more. And though it wasn't a librarian who introduced me to Georgette Heyer, she was indirectly responsible, because I wasn't yet officially old enough to borrow from the adult section of the library, but she didn't stop me from borrowing it.

Then there were various school librarians. At one primary school I attended, another student and I used to borrow a book every afternoon, and it became something of a competition between us, that the books had to be roughly the same size and we had to finish it overnight. The school librarian, Mr Tresize, used to test our knowledge of each book before he'd let us borrow another, and that turned us both into swift and efficient readers, a skill that really helped with later studies.

I soon learned to consult librarians when searching for research materials, all the way through school, and on to university, and later with my writing. It was a librarian in my local library who helped me do a search for a long out-of-print rare book, and explained to me that I could do an inter-library loan and have the book sent from the State Library to the local library for me to consult. That was hugely influential in my writing of my second book, Tallie's Knight.

In really rural areas, there was the bookmobile, and I remember waiting eagerly for it to arrive every week. The mobile librarians soon knew me and would take the trouble to bring me books they thought I'd enjoy.

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In other parts of the world, librarians went to huge personal efforts to get books to people in far flung regions, even to delivering books by horseback or burro.  Here's an article about the "book women of Kentucky" who would saddle up, usually at dawn, to pick their way along snowy hillsides and through muddy creeks with a simple goal: to deliver reading material to Kentucky’s isolated mountain communities. 

There are similar stories in other places. Librarians have long been heroic in their determination to bring books to isolated people. For example there's Luis Soriano who created the amazing donkey libraries of Colombia

Some of the most vulnerable groups in society rely on public libraries for access to a vast range of services and resources. During the recent pandemic, public library staff in Australia (and no doubt elsewhere) embraced the challenge. Home services expanded and deliveries of books were made to the housebound and elderly. Special provisions were made for homeless people so they could continue to use a library PC during lockdowns. Educational programs were delivered online through live streaming and published recordings. Children’s storytime became a virtual experience and families at home were able to tune in. Online events extended to author talks, workshops, tech sessions and other programs to help people develop their knowledge and stay connected.

LibraryGodessSpeaking of keeping people connected, there is a wonderful story here, written by Eva Ibbotson, about discovering a library and a librarian when she was a child, and came to England as a refugee from Nazi Germany. Don't skip this story — it's beautiful.


Throughout history and all over the world librarians have gone the extra mile to give people from all walks of life access to books and the worlds and knowledge within them. They have saved rare and worthy books from wanton destruction by so-called "authorities", they have nurtured young minds and older. They are the hub of our communities. In some places, libraries and librarians are coming under attack. We need to defend and support them.

Librarians of the world, I salute you!

Now, wenchly readers, what about you? Do you have a story about a librarian or a library experience to share? Do you still visit your local library? Do you still have one? Misguided "authorities" often think they're a waste of money. How wrong they are. 

Share your library or librarian stories.

180 thoughts on “In Praise of Librarians”

  1. I miss being able to physically go to the library, but I am fortunate to be able to visit on line. The libraries around here have changed with the times and offer all sorts of services now – including allowing house bound old ladies like me to still visit them without leaving home. But I do miss being able to just walk up and down the rows of books choosing one or two at random and just leafing through them.
    One of my fondest childhood memories is visiting the library. In the winter we mostly used the school library, but in the summer my friend and I would walk the 13 or 14 blocks to the public library. We would spend a couple of hours there (in the air conditioning) and then on the walk home we would stop at the deli and get an ice cold Coke. I remember that soda as much as the books (smile).

    Reply
  2. I miss being able to physically go to the library, but I am fortunate to be able to visit on line. The libraries around here have changed with the times and offer all sorts of services now – including allowing house bound old ladies like me to still visit them without leaving home. But I do miss being able to just walk up and down the rows of books choosing one or two at random and just leafing through them.
    One of my fondest childhood memories is visiting the library. In the winter we mostly used the school library, but in the summer my friend and I would walk the 13 or 14 blocks to the public library. We would spend a couple of hours there (in the air conditioning) and then on the walk home we would stop at the deli and get an ice cold Coke. I remember that soda as much as the books (smile).

    Reply
  3. I miss being able to physically go to the library, but I am fortunate to be able to visit on line. The libraries around here have changed with the times and offer all sorts of services now – including allowing house bound old ladies like me to still visit them without leaving home. But I do miss being able to just walk up and down the rows of books choosing one or two at random and just leafing through them.
    One of my fondest childhood memories is visiting the library. In the winter we mostly used the school library, but in the summer my friend and I would walk the 13 or 14 blocks to the public library. We would spend a couple of hours there (in the air conditioning) and then on the walk home we would stop at the deli and get an ice cold Coke. I remember that soda as much as the books (smile).

    Reply
  4. I miss being able to physically go to the library, but I am fortunate to be able to visit on line. The libraries around here have changed with the times and offer all sorts of services now – including allowing house bound old ladies like me to still visit them without leaving home. But I do miss being able to just walk up and down the rows of books choosing one or two at random and just leafing through them.
    One of my fondest childhood memories is visiting the library. In the winter we mostly used the school library, but in the summer my friend and I would walk the 13 or 14 blocks to the public library. We would spend a couple of hours there (in the air conditioning) and then on the walk home we would stop at the deli and get an ice cold Coke. I remember that soda as much as the books (smile).

    Reply
  5. I miss being able to physically go to the library, but I am fortunate to be able to visit on line. The libraries around here have changed with the times and offer all sorts of services now – including allowing house bound old ladies like me to still visit them without leaving home. But I do miss being able to just walk up and down the rows of books choosing one or two at random and just leafing through them.
    One of my fondest childhood memories is visiting the library. In the winter we mostly used the school library, but in the summer my friend and I would walk the 13 or 14 blocks to the public library. We would spend a couple of hours there (in the air conditioning) and then on the walk home we would stop at the deli and get an ice cold Coke. I remember that soda as much as the books (smile).

    Reply
  6. I am very fortunate to have my library just two blocks down from my house and I worked there for 17 years and loved every minute of it. I was termed a “technician” which means I worked on the check in/check out desk. I got to know so many wonderful people and what they liked to read. I especially enjoyed helping kids find books for their school projects and even turn some of them on to reading for pleasure. The original building was an Andrew Carnegie library and had that particular “look” that meant when you looked at it you instantly knew it was an important building. It sits on a hill and looks very imposing. The new addition was sorely needed but altho roomy and airy lacks that certain something all old libraries had. Very fond memories so thank you for this post.

    Reply
  7. I am very fortunate to have my library just two blocks down from my house and I worked there for 17 years and loved every minute of it. I was termed a “technician” which means I worked on the check in/check out desk. I got to know so many wonderful people and what they liked to read. I especially enjoyed helping kids find books for their school projects and even turn some of them on to reading for pleasure. The original building was an Andrew Carnegie library and had that particular “look” that meant when you looked at it you instantly knew it was an important building. It sits on a hill and looks very imposing. The new addition was sorely needed but altho roomy and airy lacks that certain something all old libraries had. Very fond memories so thank you for this post.

    Reply
  8. I am very fortunate to have my library just two blocks down from my house and I worked there for 17 years and loved every minute of it. I was termed a “technician” which means I worked on the check in/check out desk. I got to know so many wonderful people and what they liked to read. I especially enjoyed helping kids find books for their school projects and even turn some of them on to reading for pleasure. The original building was an Andrew Carnegie library and had that particular “look” that meant when you looked at it you instantly knew it was an important building. It sits on a hill and looks very imposing. The new addition was sorely needed but altho roomy and airy lacks that certain something all old libraries had. Very fond memories so thank you for this post.

    Reply
  9. I am very fortunate to have my library just two blocks down from my house and I worked there for 17 years and loved every minute of it. I was termed a “technician” which means I worked on the check in/check out desk. I got to know so many wonderful people and what they liked to read. I especially enjoyed helping kids find books for their school projects and even turn some of them on to reading for pleasure. The original building was an Andrew Carnegie library and had that particular “look” that meant when you looked at it you instantly knew it was an important building. It sits on a hill and looks very imposing. The new addition was sorely needed but altho roomy and airy lacks that certain something all old libraries had. Very fond memories so thank you for this post.

    Reply
  10. I am very fortunate to have my library just two blocks down from my house and I worked there for 17 years and loved every minute of it. I was termed a “technician” which means I worked on the check in/check out desk. I got to know so many wonderful people and what they liked to read. I especially enjoyed helping kids find books for their school projects and even turn some of them on to reading for pleasure. The original building was an Andrew Carnegie library and had that particular “look” that meant when you looked at it you instantly knew it was an important building. It sits on a hill and looks very imposing. The new addition was sorely needed but altho roomy and airy lacks that certain something all old libraries had. Very fond memories so thank you for this post.

    Reply
  11. Wonderful, Anne! I’m glad you linked to Eva Ibbotson’s piece about her experience of libraries a young refugee in London. I’ve read that to audiences when giving public talks, and it always leaves people breathless and sometimes teary-eyed with joy.
    I was a total library rat as a kid. I got a book a day from the school library and generally had it read by suppertime. There was a very long YA series about famous Americans in their early days. I read them all and learned a lot of history in the process.
    When I started writing, I’d head down to the Enoch Pratt central library with a very large tote bag, and I’d fill it up. Some books were useful, others not, so I’d get more titles from bibliographies and head back down. (The library was something like the designated Maryland research library so LOTS of choice!
    Libraries are magic and librarians are the brings of learning and pleasure.

    Reply
  12. Wonderful, Anne! I’m glad you linked to Eva Ibbotson’s piece about her experience of libraries a young refugee in London. I’ve read that to audiences when giving public talks, and it always leaves people breathless and sometimes teary-eyed with joy.
    I was a total library rat as a kid. I got a book a day from the school library and generally had it read by suppertime. There was a very long YA series about famous Americans in their early days. I read them all and learned a lot of history in the process.
    When I started writing, I’d head down to the Enoch Pratt central library with a very large tote bag, and I’d fill it up. Some books were useful, others not, so I’d get more titles from bibliographies and head back down. (The library was something like the designated Maryland research library so LOTS of choice!
    Libraries are magic and librarians are the brings of learning and pleasure.

    Reply
  13. Wonderful, Anne! I’m glad you linked to Eva Ibbotson’s piece about her experience of libraries a young refugee in London. I’ve read that to audiences when giving public talks, and it always leaves people breathless and sometimes teary-eyed with joy.
    I was a total library rat as a kid. I got a book a day from the school library and generally had it read by suppertime. There was a very long YA series about famous Americans in their early days. I read them all and learned a lot of history in the process.
    When I started writing, I’d head down to the Enoch Pratt central library with a very large tote bag, and I’d fill it up. Some books were useful, others not, so I’d get more titles from bibliographies and head back down. (The library was something like the designated Maryland research library so LOTS of choice!
    Libraries are magic and librarians are the brings of learning and pleasure.

    Reply
  14. Wonderful, Anne! I’m glad you linked to Eva Ibbotson’s piece about her experience of libraries a young refugee in London. I’ve read that to audiences when giving public talks, and it always leaves people breathless and sometimes teary-eyed with joy.
    I was a total library rat as a kid. I got a book a day from the school library and generally had it read by suppertime. There was a very long YA series about famous Americans in their early days. I read them all and learned a lot of history in the process.
    When I started writing, I’d head down to the Enoch Pratt central library with a very large tote bag, and I’d fill it up. Some books were useful, others not, so I’d get more titles from bibliographies and head back down. (The library was something like the designated Maryland research library so LOTS of choice!
    Libraries are magic and librarians are the brings of learning and pleasure.

    Reply
  15. Wonderful, Anne! I’m glad you linked to Eva Ibbotson’s piece about her experience of libraries a young refugee in London. I’ve read that to audiences when giving public talks, and it always leaves people breathless and sometimes teary-eyed with joy.
    I was a total library rat as a kid. I got a book a day from the school library and generally had it read by suppertime. There was a very long YA series about famous Americans in their early days. I read them all and learned a lot of history in the process.
    When I started writing, I’d head down to the Enoch Pratt central library with a very large tote bag, and I’d fill it up. Some books were useful, others not, so I’d get more titles from bibliographies and head back down. (The library was something like the designated Maryland research library so LOTS of choice!
    Libraries are magic and librarians are the brings of learning and pleasure.

    Reply
  16. The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek is a novel about the librarians in Kentucky who made their rounds on mules. Although Philadelphia has an excellent Library System (founded by Benjamin Franklin) with a branch somewhat in walking distance to home, I also visited the library bus that parked in front of our grade school every other week. I remember that YA series about famous Americans. As I recall, all the covers were orange.

    Reply
  17. The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek is a novel about the librarians in Kentucky who made their rounds on mules. Although Philadelphia has an excellent Library System (founded by Benjamin Franklin) with a branch somewhat in walking distance to home, I also visited the library bus that parked in front of our grade school every other week. I remember that YA series about famous Americans. As I recall, all the covers were orange.

    Reply
  18. The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek is a novel about the librarians in Kentucky who made their rounds on mules. Although Philadelphia has an excellent Library System (founded by Benjamin Franklin) with a branch somewhat in walking distance to home, I also visited the library bus that parked in front of our grade school every other week. I remember that YA series about famous Americans. As I recall, all the covers were orange.

    Reply
  19. The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek is a novel about the librarians in Kentucky who made their rounds on mules. Although Philadelphia has an excellent Library System (founded by Benjamin Franklin) with a branch somewhat in walking distance to home, I also visited the library bus that parked in front of our grade school every other week. I remember that YA series about famous Americans. As I recall, all the covers were orange.

    Reply
  20. The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek is a novel about the librarians in Kentucky who made their rounds on mules. Although Philadelphia has an excellent Library System (founded by Benjamin Franklin) with a branch somewhat in walking distance to home, I also visited the library bus that parked in front of our grade school every other week. I remember that YA series about famous Americans. As I recall, all the covers were orange.

    Reply
  21. What a lovely tribute to librarians, Anne! And I very much enjoyed rereading the Eva Ibbotson piece you linked.
    Like you, I moved a great deal as a child, and libraries were a wonderful resource to me. As an adult, I volunteered some fifteen years at my local library shelving returned books. (That was a dangerous occupation in that I generally found a few to borrow each time.) I also built/worked in a small library at a homeschooling resource center for six years. I had a budget of $1100 so had a lot of fun visiting thrift stores and library book sales to build the collection.

    Reply
  22. What a lovely tribute to librarians, Anne! And I very much enjoyed rereading the Eva Ibbotson piece you linked.
    Like you, I moved a great deal as a child, and libraries were a wonderful resource to me. As an adult, I volunteered some fifteen years at my local library shelving returned books. (That was a dangerous occupation in that I generally found a few to borrow each time.) I also built/worked in a small library at a homeschooling resource center for six years. I had a budget of $1100 so had a lot of fun visiting thrift stores and library book sales to build the collection.

    Reply
  23. What a lovely tribute to librarians, Anne! And I very much enjoyed rereading the Eva Ibbotson piece you linked.
    Like you, I moved a great deal as a child, and libraries were a wonderful resource to me. As an adult, I volunteered some fifteen years at my local library shelving returned books. (That was a dangerous occupation in that I generally found a few to borrow each time.) I also built/worked in a small library at a homeschooling resource center for six years. I had a budget of $1100 so had a lot of fun visiting thrift stores and library book sales to build the collection.

    Reply
  24. What a lovely tribute to librarians, Anne! And I very much enjoyed rereading the Eva Ibbotson piece you linked.
    Like you, I moved a great deal as a child, and libraries were a wonderful resource to me. As an adult, I volunteered some fifteen years at my local library shelving returned books. (That was a dangerous occupation in that I generally found a few to borrow each time.) I also built/worked in a small library at a homeschooling resource center for six years. I had a budget of $1100 so had a lot of fun visiting thrift stores and library book sales to build the collection.

    Reply
  25. What a lovely tribute to librarians, Anne! And I very much enjoyed rereading the Eva Ibbotson piece you linked.
    Like you, I moved a great deal as a child, and libraries were a wonderful resource to me. As an adult, I volunteered some fifteen years at my local library shelving returned books. (That was a dangerous occupation in that I generally found a few to borrow each time.) I also built/worked in a small library at a homeschooling resource center for six years. I had a budget of $1100 so had a lot of fun visiting thrift stores and library book sales to build the collection.

    Reply
  26. Thank you so much for this wonderful blog. As a public librarian for 47 years, I saw many, many changes in the profession. The love of books that fed the library’s clientele has continued, but the service of the library has grown beyond that to a real service to the general public for all purposes.
    Even though I own more books than I’ll ever be able to read, I still use my public library on a regular basis – especially for interlibrary loaning all the wonderful titles you ladies recommend!

    Reply
  27. Thank you so much for this wonderful blog. As a public librarian for 47 years, I saw many, many changes in the profession. The love of books that fed the library’s clientele has continued, but the service of the library has grown beyond that to a real service to the general public for all purposes.
    Even though I own more books than I’ll ever be able to read, I still use my public library on a regular basis – especially for interlibrary loaning all the wonderful titles you ladies recommend!

    Reply
  28. Thank you so much for this wonderful blog. As a public librarian for 47 years, I saw many, many changes in the profession. The love of books that fed the library’s clientele has continued, but the service of the library has grown beyond that to a real service to the general public for all purposes.
    Even though I own more books than I’ll ever be able to read, I still use my public library on a regular basis – especially for interlibrary loaning all the wonderful titles you ladies recommend!

    Reply
  29. Thank you so much for this wonderful blog. As a public librarian for 47 years, I saw many, many changes in the profession. The love of books that fed the library’s clientele has continued, but the service of the library has grown beyond that to a real service to the general public for all purposes.
    Even though I own more books than I’ll ever be able to read, I still use my public library on a regular basis – especially for interlibrary loaning all the wonderful titles you ladies recommend!

    Reply
  30. Thank you so much for this wonderful blog. As a public librarian for 47 years, I saw many, many changes in the profession. The love of books that fed the library’s clientele has continued, but the service of the library has grown beyond that to a real service to the general public for all purposes.
    Even though I own more books than I’ll ever be able to read, I still use my public library on a regular basis – especially for interlibrary loaning all the wonderful titles you ladies recommend!

    Reply
  31. I am eternally grateful for libraries. I could never have afforded to buy all the books I have read over the years, and the ebooks my library offers proved a godsend during the Covid madness.
    Many years ago, during the 1930s, my father, who had run away from an orphanage at age 12, got his high school diploma courtesy the Brooklyn Public Library. In those days, you could get the curriculum, find the necessary books in the library, and take the Regents exam. It took him three tries to pass French, but he did end up with a Regents Diploma.

    Reply
  32. I am eternally grateful for libraries. I could never have afforded to buy all the books I have read over the years, and the ebooks my library offers proved a godsend during the Covid madness.
    Many years ago, during the 1930s, my father, who had run away from an orphanage at age 12, got his high school diploma courtesy the Brooklyn Public Library. In those days, you could get the curriculum, find the necessary books in the library, and take the Regents exam. It took him three tries to pass French, but he did end up with a Regents Diploma.

    Reply
  33. I am eternally grateful for libraries. I could never have afforded to buy all the books I have read over the years, and the ebooks my library offers proved a godsend during the Covid madness.
    Many years ago, during the 1930s, my father, who had run away from an orphanage at age 12, got his high school diploma courtesy the Brooklyn Public Library. In those days, you could get the curriculum, find the necessary books in the library, and take the Regents exam. It took him three tries to pass French, but he did end up with a Regents Diploma.

    Reply
  34. I am eternally grateful for libraries. I could never have afforded to buy all the books I have read over the years, and the ebooks my library offers proved a godsend during the Covid madness.
    Many years ago, during the 1930s, my father, who had run away from an orphanage at age 12, got his high school diploma courtesy the Brooklyn Public Library. In those days, you could get the curriculum, find the necessary books in the library, and take the Regents exam. It took him three tries to pass French, but he did end up with a Regents Diploma.

    Reply
  35. I am eternally grateful for libraries. I could never have afforded to buy all the books I have read over the years, and the ebooks my library offers proved a godsend during the Covid madness.
    Many years ago, during the 1930s, my father, who had run away from an orphanage at age 12, got his high school diploma courtesy the Brooklyn Public Library. In those days, you could get the curriculum, find the necessary books in the library, and take the Regents exam. It took him three tries to pass French, but he did end up with a Regents Diploma.

    Reply
  36. Thanks Mary. Isn’t it wonderful how libraries can now be accessed via the web, but I agree, it’s not as personal. And browsing the shelves and pulling down all kinds of interesting-looking books is a real joy.
    I think a lot of people still go to libraries in extremes of weather — cold or hot — but your memories of the ritual of visiting the library and then walking home and getting an ice-cold Coke are priceless.

    Reply
  37. Thanks Mary. Isn’t it wonderful how libraries can now be accessed via the web, but I agree, it’s not as personal. And browsing the shelves and pulling down all kinds of interesting-looking books is a real joy.
    I think a lot of people still go to libraries in extremes of weather — cold or hot — but your memories of the ritual of visiting the library and then walking home and getting an ice-cold Coke are priceless.

    Reply
  38. Thanks Mary. Isn’t it wonderful how libraries can now be accessed via the web, but I agree, it’s not as personal. And browsing the shelves and pulling down all kinds of interesting-looking books is a real joy.
    I think a lot of people still go to libraries in extremes of weather — cold or hot — but your memories of the ritual of visiting the library and then walking home and getting an ice-cold Coke are priceless.

    Reply
  39. Thanks Mary. Isn’t it wonderful how libraries can now be accessed via the web, but I agree, it’s not as personal. And browsing the shelves and pulling down all kinds of interesting-looking books is a real joy.
    I think a lot of people still go to libraries in extremes of weather — cold or hot — but your memories of the ritual of visiting the library and then walking home and getting an ice-cold Coke are priceless.

    Reply
  40. Thanks Mary. Isn’t it wonderful how libraries can now be accessed via the web, but I agree, it’s not as personal. And browsing the shelves and pulling down all kinds of interesting-looking books is a real joy.
    I think a lot of people still go to libraries in extremes of weather — cold or hot — but your memories of the ritual of visiting the library and then walking home and getting an ice-cold Coke are priceless.

    Reply
  41. Thanks, Donna. I will look up “Andrew Carnegie libraries.” Many of our public libraries began as “Mechanic’s Institute” libraries — a way of making books and education available to working people who couldn’t afford education or books. They started here in the 1830’s, and many still operate. Our public libraries here are now funded by the federal government, and in the last few years many have been renewed, architect designed and built from scratch. As a result, we have so many stunning libraries that are a pleasure to visit.
    Here’s one that’s very close to my house:
    https://www.timeout.com/melbourne/attractions/bargoonga-nganjin-north-fitzroy-library
    And here’s another one that I spoke at a few years ago:
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341c84c753ef01a3fcc49dbb970b-popup

    Reply
  42. Thanks, Donna. I will look up “Andrew Carnegie libraries.” Many of our public libraries began as “Mechanic’s Institute” libraries — a way of making books and education available to working people who couldn’t afford education or books. They started here in the 1830’s, and many still operate. Our public libraries here are now funded by the federal government, and in the last few years many have been renewed, architect designed and built from scratch. As a result, we have so many stunning libraries that are a pleasure to visit.
    Here’s one that’s very close to my house:
    https://www.timeout.com/melbourne/attractions/bargoonga-nganjin-north-fitzroy-library
    And here’s another one that I spoke at a few years ago:
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341c84c753ef01a3fcc49dbb970b-popup

    Reply
  43. Thanks, Donna. I will look up “Andrew Carnegie libraries.” Many of our public libraries began as “Mechanic’s Institute” libraries — a way of making books and education available to working people who couldn’t afford education or books. They started here in the 1830’s, and many still operate. Our public libraries here are now funded by the federal government, and in the last few years many have been renewed, architect designed and built from scratch. As a result, we have so many stunning libraries that are a pleasure to visit.
    Here’s one that’s very close to my house:
    https://www.timeout.com/melbourne/attractions/bargoonga-nganjin-north-fitzroy-library
    And here’s another one that I spoke at a few years ago:
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341c84c753ef01a3fcc49dbb970b-popup

    Reply
  44. Thanks, Donna. I will look up “Andrew Carnegie libraries.” Many of our public libraries began as “Mechanic’s Institute” libraries — a way of making books and education available to working people who couldn’t afford education or books. They started here in the 1830’s, and many still operate. Our public libraries here are now funded by the federal government, and in the last few years many have been renewed, architect designed and built from scratch. As a result, we have so many stunning libraries that are a pleasure to visit.
    Here’s one that’s very close to my house:
    https://www.timeout.com/melbourne/attractions/bargoonga-nganjin-north-fitzroy-library
    And here’s another one that I spoke at a few years ago:
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341c84c753ef01a3fcc49dbb970b-popup

    Reply
  45. Thanks, Donna. I will look up “Andrew Carnegie libraries.” Many of our public libraries began as “Mechanic’s Institute” libraries — a way of making books and education available to working people who couldn’t afford education or books. They started here in the 1830’s, and many still operate. Our public libraries here are now funded by the federal government, and in the last few years many have been renewed, architect designed and built from scratch. As a result, we have so many stunning libraries that are a pleasure to visit.
    Here’s one that’s very close to my house:
    https://www.timeout.com/melbourne/attractions/bargoonga-nganjin-north-fitzroy-library
    And here’s another one that I spoke at a few years ago:
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341c84c753ef01a3fcc49dbb970b-popup

    Reply
  46. It’s a brilliant piece, isn’t it, Mary Jo. And yes, I often get choked up when reading it aloud, even though I’ve read it numerous times. In such a short piece she packs in the emotion and gives us a happy ending — just like her books.
    I think I learned most of my history from historical novels. I wish I’d kept a list of books I read as a kid.

    Reply
  47. It’s a brilliant piece, isn’t it, Mary Jo. And yes, I often get choked up when reading it aloud, even though I’ve read it numerous times. In such a short piece she packs in the emotion and gives us a happy ending — just like her books.
    I think I learned most of my history from historical novels. I wish I’d kept a list of books I read as a kid.

    Reply
  48. It’s a brilliant piece, isn’t it, Mary Jo. And yes, I often get choked up when reading it aloud, even though I’ve read it numerous times. In such a short piece she packs in the emotion and gives us a happy ending — just like her books.
    I think I learned most of my history from historical novels. I wish I’d kept a list of books I read as a kid.

    Reply
  49. It’s a brilliant piece, isn’t it, Mary Jo. And yes, I often get choked up when reading it aloud, even though I’ve read it numerous times. In such a short piece she packs in the emotion and gives us a happy ending — just like her books.
    I think I learned most of my history from historical novels. I wish I’d kept a list of books I read as a kid.

    Reply
  50. It’s a brilliant piece, isn’t it, Mary Jo. And yes, I often get choked up when reading it aloud, even though I’ve read it numerous times. In such a short piece she packs in the emotion and gives us a happy ending — just like her books.
    I think I learned most of my history from historical novels. I wish I’d kept a list of books I read as a kid.

    Reply
  51. The librarians (and teachers) who went that extra mile and more — often in difficult conditions — are true heroes! Thanks for mentioning the novel, Ernestine.

    Reply
  52. The librarians (and teachers) who went that extra mile and more — often in difficult conditions — are true heroes! Thanks for mentioning the novel, Ernestine.

    Reply
  53. The librarians (and teachers) who went that extra mile and more — often in difficult conditions — are true heroes! Thanks for mentioning the novel, Ernestine.

    Reply
  54. The librarians (and teachers) who went that extra mile and more — often in difficult conditions — are true heroes! Thanks for mentioning the novel, Ernestine.

    Reply
  55. The librarians (and teachers) who went that extra mile and more — often in difficult conditions — are true heroes! Thanks for mentioning the novel, Ernestine.

    Reply
  56. Kareni, it’s a beautiful piece, isn’t it? Eva Ibbotson was a superb writer. I also started small libraries in several small community centres that I worked in and/or volunteered in. In one place I was teaching adults how to read, and I started a home-made “book basket” — and that ended up becoming a while new publishing venture for the organization — https://pageturners.prace.vic.edu.au/

    Reply
  57. Kareni, it’s a beautiful piece, isn’t it? Eva Ibbotson was a superb writer. I also started small libraries in several small community centres that I worked in and/or volunteered in. In one place I was teaching adults how to read, and I started a home-made “book basket” — and that ended up becoming a while new publishing venture for the organization — https://pageturners.prace.vic.edu.au/

    Reply
  58. Kareni, it’s a beautiful piece, isn’t it? Eva Ibbotson was a superb writer. I also started small libraries in several small community centres that I worked in and/or volunteered in. In one place I was teaching adults how to read, and I started a home-made “book basket” — and that ended up becoming a while new publishing venture for the organization — https://pageturners.prace.vic.edu.au/

    Reply
  59. Kareni, it’s a beautiful piece, isn’t it? Eva Ibbotson was a superb writer. I also started small libraries in several small community centres that I worked in and/or volunteered in. In one place I was teaching adults how to read, and I started a home-made “book basket” — and that ended up becoming a while new publishing venture for the organization — https://pageturners.prace.vic.edu.au/

    Reply
  60. Kareni, it’s a beautiful piece, isn’t it? Eva Ibbotson was a superb writer. I also started small libraries in several small community centres that I worked in and/or volunteered in. In one place I was teaching adults how to read, and I started a home-made “book basket” — and that ended up becoming a while new publishing venture for the organization — https://pageturners.prace.vic.edu.au/

    Reply
  61. Linda, thank you for all your wonderful service. Yes, libraries have changed a lot, but even more people use them. My own local library is always filled with people of all ages. It’s wonderful.

    Reply
  62. Linda, thank you for all your wonderful service. Yes, libraries have changed a lot, but even more people use them. My own local library is always filled with people of all ages. It’s wonderful.

    Reply
  63. Linda, thank you for all your wonderful service. Yes, libraries have changed a lot, but even more people use them. My own local library is always filled with people of all ages. It’s wonderful.

    Reply
  64. Linda, thank you for all your wonderful service. Yes, libraries have changed a lot, but even more people use them. My own local library is always filled with people of all ages. It’s wonderful.

    Reply
  65. Linda, thank you for all your wonderful service. Yes, libraries have changed a lot, but even more people use them. My own local library is always filled with people of all ages. It’s wonderful.

    Reply
  66. That’s wonderful, Lil. In those days so many people couldn’t afford schooling, but libraries and Mechanics’ institutes (which were for working people in general, not mechanics in the modern sense) made it possible. Several of Australia’s Prime Ministers were educated that way. Three had to leave school by the age of 12 or 13 in order to earn a wage to support their families. Thank goodness for libraries and librarians who made it possible for education to be a lifelong process.

    Reply
  67. That’s wonderful, Lil. In those days so many people couldn’t afford schooling, but libraries and Mechanics’ institutes (which were for working people in general, not mechanics in the modern sense) made it possible. Several of Australia’s Prime Ministers were educated that way. Three had to leave school by the age of 12 or 13 in order to earn a wage to support their families. Thank goodness for libraries and librarians who made it possible for education to be a lifelong process.

    Reply
  68. That’s wonderful, Lil. In those days so many people couldn’t afford schooling, but libraries and Mechanics’ institutes (which were for working people in general, not mechanics in the modern sense) made it possible. Several of Australia’s Prime Ministers were educated that way. Three had to leave school by the age of 12 or 13 in order to earn a wage to support their families. Thank goodness for libraries and librarians who made it possible for education to be a lifelong process.

    Reply
  69. That’s wonderful, Lil. In those days so many people couldn’t afford schooling, but libraries and Mechanics’ institutes (which were for working people in general, not mechanics in the modern sense) made it possible. Several of Australia’s Prime Ministers were educated that way. Three had to leave school by the age of 12 or 13 in order to earn a wage to support their families. Thank goodness for libraries and librarians who made it possible for education to be a lifelong process.

    Reply
  70. That’s wonderful, Lil. In those days so many people couldn’t afford schooling, but libraries and Mechanics’ institutes (which were for working people in general, not mechanics in the modern sense) made it possible. Several of Australia’s Prime Ministers were educated that way. Three had to leave school by the age of 12 or 13 in order to earn a wage to support their families. Thank goodness for libraries and librarians who made it possible for education to be a lifelong process.

    Reply
  71. Anne- a wonderful post. And so many thoughtful replies. As a former (university) librarian, it breaks my heart to observe the relentless wave of restrictions on libraries across the U.S. by people in favor of banning books. So many children are being deprived of windows on the world. Imagine coming into a school library and seeing empty shelves, because people have removed “objectionable” books. I shiver as I recall book burnings of an earlier era. My heart goes out to all the librarians who are risking their jobs – and sometimes much more- in an effort to keep the world of knowledge open and available to children and readers everywhere. Please forgive the rant. And lastly, thanks for exploding the myth of the cliche, fusspot librarian.

    Reply
  72. Anne- a wonderful post. And so many thoughtful replies. As a former (university) librarian, it breaks my heart to observe the relentless wave of restrictions on libraries across the U.S. by people in favor of banning books. So many children are being deprived of windows on the world. Imagine coming into a school library and seeing empty shelves, because people have removed “objectionable” books. I shiver as I recall book burnings of an earlier era. My heart goes out to all the librarians who are risking their jobs – and sometimes much more- in an effort to keep the world of knowledge open and available to children and readers everywhere. Please forgive the rant. And lastly, thanks for exploding the myth of the cliche, fusspot librarian.

    Reply
  73. Anne- a wonderful post. And so many thoughtful replies. As a former (university) librarian, it breaks my heart to observe the relentless wave of restrictions on libraries across the U.S. by people in favor of banning books. So many children are being deprived of windows on the world. Imagine coming into a school library and seeing empty shelves, because people have removed “objectionable” books. I shiver as I recall book burnings of an earlier era. My heart goes out to all the librarians who are risking their jobs – and sometimes much more- in an effort to keep the world of knowledge open and available to children and readers everywhere. Please forgive the rant. And lastly, thanks for exploding the myth of the cliche, fusspot librarian.

    Reply
  74. Anne- a wonderful post. And so many thoughtful replies. As a former (university) librarian, it breaks my heart to observe the relentless wave of restrictions on libraries across the U.S. by people in favor of banning books. So many children are being deprived of windows on the world. Imagine coming into a school library and seeing empty shelves, because people have removed “objectionable” books. I shiver as I recall book burnings of an earlier era. My heart goes out to all the librarians who are risking their jobs – and sometimes much more- in an effort to keep the world of knowledge open and available to children and readers everywhere. Please forgive the rant. And lastly, thanks for exploding the myth of the cliche, fusspot librarian.

    Reply
  75. Anne- a wonderful post. And so many thoughtful replies. As a former (university) librarian, it breaks my heart to observe the relentless wave of restrictions on libraries across the U.S. by people in favor of banning books. So many children are being deprived of windows on the world. Imagine coming into a school library and seeing empty shelves, because people have removed “objectionable” books. I shiver as I recall book burnings of an earlier era. My heart goes out to all the librarians who are risking their jobs – and sometimes much more- in an effort to keep the world of knowledge open and available to children and readers everywhere. Please forgive the rant. And lastly, thanks for exploding the myth of the cliche, fusspot librarian.

    Reply
  76. Lovely post, Anne! I have way too many librarian stories, so I will simply say, that since childhood libraries have had a special place in my heart! I love them and the joy they have always given me through the wondrous world of reading. I can’t imagine my life without books and all those fabulous places that give us access to them. Public libraries are the best idea ever!

    Reply
  77. Lovely post, Anne! I have way too many librarian stories, so I will simply say, that since childhood libraries have had a special place in my heart! I love them and the joy they have always given me through the wondrous world of reading. I can’t imagine my life without books and all those fabulous places that give us access to them. Public libraries are the best idea ever!

    Reply
  78. Lovely post, Anne! I have way too many librarian stories, so I will simply say, that since childhood libraries have had a special place in my heart! I love them and the joy they have always given me through the wondrous world of reading. I can’t imagine my life without books and all those fabulous places that give us access to them. Public libraries are the best idea ever!

    Reply
  79. Lovely post, Anne! I have way too many librarian stories, so I will simply say, that since childhood libraries have had a special place in my heart! I love them and the joy they have always given me through the wondrous world of reading. I can’t imagine my life without books and all those fabulous places that give us access to them. Public libraries are the best idea ever!

    Reply
  80. Lovely post, Anne! I have way too many librarian stories, so I will simply say, that since childhood libraries have had a special place in my heart! I love them and the joy they have always given me through the wondrous world of reading. I can’t imagine my life without books and all those fabulous places that give us access to them. Public libraries are the best idea ever!

    Reply
  81. Thank you for such a terrific post. I worked in a large city library and I was the entire staff of a start up small town library, I went to a book mobile when I lived in a rural area as a child.
    I am a fan of libraries and librarians and after reading the stories here, I realize how impressive librarians have always been.

    Reply
  82. Thank you for such a terrific post. I worked in a large city library and I was the entire staff of a start up small town library, I went to a book mobile when I lived in a rural area as a child.
    I am a fan of libraries and librarians and after reading the stories here, I realize how impressive librarians have always been.

    Reply
  83. Thank you for such a terrific post. I worked in a large city library and I was the entire staff of a start up small town library, I went to a book mobile when I lived in a rural area as a child.
    I am a fan of libraries and librarians and after reading the stories here, I realize how impressive librarians have always been.

    Reply
  84. Thank you for such a terrific post. I worked in a large city library and I was the entire staff of a start up small town library, I went to a book mobile when I lived in a rural area as a child.
    I am a fan of libraries and librarians and after reading the stories here, I realize how impressive librarians have always been.

    Reply
  85. Thank you for such a terrific post. I worked in a large city library and I was the entire staff of a start up small town library, I went to a book mobile when I lived in a rural area as a child.
    I am a fan of libraries and librarians and after reading the stories here, I realize how impressive librarians have always been.

    Reply
  86. Oh Anne – what a wonderful Eva Ibbotson story! Thank you for sharing. I too loved the library & practically lived in them when I was young & without much money. Of course now it’s so easy to just buy on my iPad. I think now that I’m retired I need to go renew my library card. The local branch has just opened after a big remodeling project so I’d like to see it. Plus I can make use of the online services. My favorite memory is of the bookmobile coming to our neighborhood when I was growing up. Ah, the good old days.

    Reply
  87. Oh Anne – what a wonderful Eva Ibbotson story! Thank you for sharing. I too loved the library & practically lived in them when I was young & without much money. Of course now it’s so easy to just buy on my iPad. I think now that I’m retired I need to go renew my library card. The local branch has just opened after a big remodeling project so I’d like to see it. Plus I can make use of the online services. My favorite memory is of the bookmobile coming to our neighborhood when I was growing up. Ah, the good old days.

    Reply
  88. Oh Anne – what a wonderful Eva Ibbotson story! Thank you for sharing. I too loved the library & practically lived in them when I was young & without much money. Of course now it’s so easy to just buy on my iPad. I think now that I’m retired I need to go renew my library card. The local branch has just opened after a big remodeling project so I’d like to see it. Plus I can make use of the online services. My favorite memory is of the bookmobile coming to our neighborhood when I was growing up. Ah, the good old days.

    Reply
  89. Oh Anne – what a wonderful Eva Ibbotson story! Thank you for sharing. I too loved the library & practically lived in them when I was young & without much money. Of course now it’s so easy to just buy on my iPad. I think now that I’m retired I need to go renew my library card. The local branch has just opened after a big remodeling project so I’d like to see it. Plus I can make use of the online services. My favorite memory is of the bookmobile coming to our neighborhood when I was growing up. Ah, the good old days.

    Reply
  90. Oh Anne – what a wonderful Eva Ibbotson story! Thank you for sharing. I too loved the library & practically lived in them when I was young & without much money. Of course now it’s so easy to just buy on my iPad. I think now that I’m retired I need to go renew my library card. The local branch has just opened after a big remodeling project so I’d like to see it. Plus I can make use of the online services. My favorite memory is of the bookmobile coming to our neighborhood when I was growing up. Ah, the good old days.

    Reply
  91. As a retired academic librarian, thank you for the kind words! Altho’ it has not been as difficult to reach the clientele for the academic as it has been for the public librarian, and is becoming again, unfortunately, that difficulty may be spreading to the academic level. In the State of Ohio, we have a bill going thru our legislature that will restrict what can be taught in class, discussed, etc. We always had some protests from community members regarding certain books in the Univ. libraries but we could say it was in support of the Univ. classes. That’s not going to work so well pretty soon, I fear. The bill will only affect State universities but students are already saying they’ll transfer out if it takes effect. Surely by the university level the kids can think for themselves!
    I do have fond memories, esp. from 4th to 10th grade, the library was 2 blocks away. I’d go, taking back & checking out a huge stack of books every time. Eventually, I learned to carry a bag! It was the school librarian in my 11th thru 12th grades that made me realize I could be a librarian also! The smallest school library I’ve ever been in but she made it work as much as she could. Way back before any electronics, etc. (I graduated in 1973)
    No, I don’t use the public library these days. They expect me to return the books by a certain date! I’m lousy at getting things read! But I do go to their monthly booksale every so often…like I need more books! HAH!

    Reply
  92. As a retired academic librarian, thank you for the kind words! Altho’ it has not been as difficult to reach the clientele for the academic as it has been for the public librarian, and is becoming again, unfortunately, that difficulty may be spreading to the academic level. In the State of Ohio, we have a bill going thru our legislature that will restrict what can be taught in class, discussed, etc. We always had some protests from community members regarding certain books in the Univ. libraries but we could say it was in support of the Univ. classes. That’s not going to work so well pretty soon, I fear. The bill will only affect State universities but students are already saying they’ll transfer out if it takes effect. Surely by the university level the kids can think for themselves!
    I do have fond memories, esp. from 4th to 10th grade, the library was 2 blocks away. I’d go, taking back & checking out a huge stack of books every time. Eventually, I learned to carry a bag! It was the school librarian in my 11th thru 12th grades that made me realize I could be a librarian also! The smallest school library I’ve ever been in but she made it work as much as she could. Way back before any electronics, etc. (I graduated in 1973)
    No, I don’t use the public library these days. They expect me to return the books by a certain date! I’m lousy at getting things read! But I do go to their monthly booksale every so often…like I need more books! HAH!

    Reply
  93. As a retired academic librarian, thank you for the kind words! Altho’ it has not been as difficult to reach the clientele for the academic as it has been for the public librarian, and is becoming again, unfortunately, that difficulty may be spreading to the academic level. In the State of Ohio, we have a bill going thru our legislature that will restrict what can be taught in class, discussed, etc. We always had some protests from community members regarding certain books in the Univ. libraries but we could say it was in support of the Univ. classes. That’s not going to work so well pretty soon, I fear. The bill will only affect State universities but students are already saying they’ll transfer out if it takes effect. Surely by the university level the kids can think for themselves!
    I do have fond memories, esp. from 4th to 10th grade, the library was 2 blocks away. I’d go, taking back & checking out a huge stack of books every time. Eventually, I learned to carry a bag! It was the school librarian in my 11th thru 12th grades that made me realize I could be a librarian also! The smallest school library I’ve ever been in but she made it work as much as she could. Way back before any electronics, etc. (I graduated in 1973)
    No, I don’t use the public library these days. They expect me to return the books by a certain date! I’m lousy at getting things read! But I do go to their monthly booksale every so often…like I need more books! HAH!

    Reply
  94. As a retired academic librarian, thank you for the kind words! Altho’ it has not been as difficult to reach the clientele for the academic as it has been for the public librarian, and is becoming again, unfortunately, that difficulty may be spreading to the academic level. In the State of Ohio, we have a bill going thru our legislature that will restrict what can be taught in class, discussed, etc. We always had some protests from community members regarding certain books in the Univ. libraries but we could say it was in support of the Univ. classes. That’s not going to work so well pretty soon, I fear. The bill will only affect State universities but students are already saying they’ll transfer out if it takes effect. Surely by the university level the kids can think for themselves!
    I do have fond memories, esp. from 4th to 10th grade, the library was 2 blocks away. I’d go, taking back & checking out a huge stack of books every time. Eventually, I learned to carry a bag! It was the school librarian in my 11th thru 12th grades that made me realize I could be a librarian also! The smallest school library I’ve ever been in but she made it work as much as she could. Way back before any electronics, etc. (I graduated in 1973)
    No, I don’t use the public library these days. They expect me to return the books by a certain date! I’m lousy at getting things read! But I do go to their monthly booksale every so often…like I need more books! HAH!

    Reply
  95. As a retired academic librarian, thank you for the kind words! Altho’ it has not been as difficult to reach the clientele for the academic as it has been for the public librarian, and is becoming again, unfortunately, that difficulty may be spreading to the academic level. In the State of Ohio, we have a bill going thru our legislature that will restrict what can be taught in class, discussed, etc. We always had some protests from community members regarding certain books in the Univ. libraries but we could say it was in support of the Univ. classes. That’s not going to work so well pretty soon, I fear. The bill will only affect State universities but students are already saying they’ll transfer out if it takes effect. Surely by the university level the kids can think for themselves!
    I do have fond memories, esp. from 4th to 10th grade, the library was 2 blocks away. I’d go, taking back & checking out a huge stack of books every time. Eventually, I learned to carry a bag! It was the school librarian in my 11th thru 12th grades that made me realize I could be a librarian also! The smallest school library I’ve ever been in but she made it work as much as she could. Way back before any electronics, etc. (I graduated in 1973)
    No, I don’t use the public library these days. They expect me to return the books by a certain date! I’m lousy at getting things read! But I do go to their monthly booksale every so often…like I need more books! HAH!

    Reply
  96. Thank you so much for sharing that Eve Ibbotson piece. I love libraries, and I still visit them to borrow books, besides borrowing e-books online. Sometimes I prefer getting the physical book, because I know that libraries can only lend out e-books a certain number of times before they “expire”, and they get charged whether I read the book or not. Whereas physical books can be lent out over and over again until they fall apart. I have been frequenting libraries my whole life. My mother would often drop me off at a library when I was a child, and I would browse for an hour while she did the grocery shopping.

    Reply
  97. Thank you so much for sharing that Eve Ibbotson piece. I love libraries, and I still visit them to borrow books, besides borrowing e-books online. Sometimes I prefer getting the physical book, because I know that libraries can only lend out e-books a certain number of times before they “expire”, and they get charged whether I read the book or not. Whereas physical books can be lent out over and over again until they fall apart. I have been frequenting libraries my whole life. My mother would often drop me off at a library when I was a child, and I would browse for an hour while she did the grocery shopping.

    Reply
  98. Thank you so much for sharing that Eve Ibbotson piece. I love libraries, and I still visit them to borrow books, besides borrowing e-books online. Sometimes I prefer getting the physical book, because I know that libraries can only lend out e-books a certain number of times before they “expire”, and they get charged whether I read the book or not. Whereas physical books can be lent out over and over again until they fall apart. I have been frequenting libraries my whole life. My mother would often drop me off at a library when I was a child, and I would browse for an hour while she did the grocery shopping.

    Reply
  99. Thank you so much for sharing that Eve Ibbotson piece. I love libraries, and I still visit them to borrow books, besides borrowing e-books online. Sometimes I prefer getting the physical book, because I know that libraries can only lend out e-books a certain number of times before they “expire”, and they get charged whether I read the book or not. Whereas physical books can be lent out over and over again until they fall apart. I have been frequenting libraries my whole life. My mother would often drop me off at a library when I was a child, and I would browse for an hour while she did the grocery shopping.

    Reply
  100. Thank you so much for sharing that Eve Ibbotson piece. I love libraries, and I still visit them to borrow books, besides borrowing e-books online. Sometimes I prefer getting the physical book, because I know that libraries can only lend out e-books a certain number of times before they “expire”, and they get charged whether I read the book or not. Whereas physical books can be lent out over and over again until they fall apart. I have been frequenting libraries my whole life. My mother would often drop me off at a library when I was a child, and I would browse for an hour while she did the grocery shopping.

    Reply
  101. Binnie, I’m appalled by the wave of book banning that’s happening in the US, and the pressure that librarians and teachers are under and my heart goes out to them. And yes, I too, think of the book-burning of the past. No apology necessary for the rant.

    Reply
  102. Binnie, I’m appalled by the wave of book banning that’s happening in the US, and the pressure that librarians and teachers are under and my heart goes out to them. And yes, I too, think of the book-burning of the past. No apology necessary for the rant.

    Reply
  103. Binnie, I’m appalled by the wave of book banning that’s happening in the US, and the pressure that librarians and teachers are under and my heart goes out to them. And yes, I too, think of the book-burning of the past. No apology necessary for the rant.

    Reply
  104. Binnie, I’m appalled by the wave of book banning that’s happening in the US, and the pressure that librarians and teachers are under and my heart goes out to them. And yes, I too, think of the book-burning of the past. No apology necessary for the rant.

    Reply
  105. Binnie, I’m appalled by the wave of book banning that’s happening in the US, and the pressure that librarians and teachers are under and my heart goes out to them. And yes, I too, think of the book-burning of the past. No apology necessary for the rant.

    Reply
  106. Thanks, Andrea. Yu know, I still walk into libraries and look at the children’s section, especially and though my childhood libraries never had such cosy colourful, appealing spaces, or as many books, it takes me back, all the same.

    Reply
  107. Thanks, Andrea. Yu know, I still walk into libraries and look at the children’s section, especially and though my childhood libraries never had such cosy colourful, appealing spaces, or as many books, it takes me back, all the same.

    Reply
  108. Thanks, Andrea. Yu know, I still walk into libraries and look at the children’s section, especially and though my childhood libraries never had such cosy colourful, appealing spaces, or as many books, it takes me back, all the same.

    Reply
  109. Thanks, Andrea. Yu know, I still walk into libraries and look at the children’s section, especially and though my childhood libraries never had such cosy colourful, appealing spaces, or as many books, it takes me back, all the same.

    Reply
  110. Thanks, Andrea. Yu know, I still walk into libraries and look at the children’s section, especially and though my childhood libraries never had such cosy colourful, appealing spaces, or as many books, it takes me back, all the same.

    Reply
  111. Annette, yes, librarians have always been trail-blazing and impressive, I think — and they’re still just as impressive today, whether on horseback, or opposing spurious book-banning.

    Reply
  112. Annette, yes, librarians have always been trail-blazing and impressive, I think — and they’re still just as impressive today, whether on horseback, or opposing spurious book-banning.

    Reply
  113. Annette, yes, librarians have always been trail-blazing and impressive, I think — and they’re still just as impressive today, whether on horseback, or opposing spurious book-banning.

    Reply
  114. Annette, yes, librarians have always been trail-blazing and impressive, I think — and they’re still just as impressive today, whether on horseback, or opposing spurious book-banning.

    Reply
  115. Annette, yes, librarians have always been trail-blazing and impressive, I think — and they’re still just as impressive today, whether on horseback, or opposing spurious book-banning.

    Reply
  116. It’s a gorgeous story, isn’t it, Jeanne? I hold my breath every time I’m about to link to that article in case it’s gone, but there it is. Of course I have a copy on my computer and in hard copy, but it’s not so easy to post the whole story in a blog, so long live that link. And isn’t it interesting that we still needt o defend libraries from cost-cutting ignoramuses?

    Reply
  117. It’s a gorgeous story, isn’t it, Jeanne? I hold my breath every time I’m about to link to that article in case it’s gone, but there it is. Of course I have a copy on my computer and in hard copy, but it’s not so easy to post the whole story in a blog, so long live that link. And isn’t it interesting that we still needt o defend libraries from cost-cutting ignoramuses?

    Reply
  118. It’s a gorgeous story, isn’t it, Jeanne? I hold my breath every time I’m about to link to that article in case it’s gone, but there it is. Of course I have a copy on my computer and in hard copy, but it’s not so easy to post the whole story in a blog, so long live that link. And isn’t it interesting that we still needt o defend libraries from cost-cutting ignoramuses?

    Reply
  119. It’s a gorgeous story, isn’t it, Jeanne? I hold my breath every time I’m about to link to that article in case it’s gone, but there it is. Of course I have a copy on my computer and in hard copy, but it’s not so easy to post the whole story in a blog, so long live that link. And isn’t it interesting that we still needt o defend libraries from cost-cutting ignoramuses?

    Reply
  120. It’s a gorgeous story, isn’t it, Jeanne? I hold my breath every time I’m about to link to that article in case it’s gone, but there it is. Of course I have a copy on my computer and in hard copy, but it’s not so easy to post the whole story in a blog, so long live that link. And isn’t it interesting that we still needt o defend libraries from cost-cutting ignoramuses?

    Reply
  121. Karen, I’ve been horrified by the wave of book-banning that seems to be sweeping the US at the moment. Of course kids at university can think for themselves, and if you try to restrict their access to certain books it’s going to make them more determined to read them. I am so sorry for all those trying to resist this mindless banning.
    LOL at the public library’s expectation that you’ll instantly read and return the books by a certain date. I have several TBR piles, but you have to be in the right mood for some books, don’t you?

    Reply
  122. Karen, I’ve been horrified by the wave of book-banning that seems to be sweeping the US at the moment. Of course kids at university can think for themselves, and if you try to restrict their access to certain books it’s going to make them more determined to read them. I am so sorry for all those trying to resist this mindless banning.
    LOL at the public library’s expectation that you’ll instantly read and return the books by a certain date. I have several TBR piles, but you have to be in the right mood for some books, don’t you?

    Reply
  123. Karen, I’ve been horrified by the wave of book-banning that seems to be sweeping the US at the moment. Of course kids at university can think for themselves, and if you try to restrict their access to certain books it’s going to make them more determined to read them. I am so sorry for all those trying to resist this mindless banning.
    LOL at the public library’s expectation that you’ll instantly read and return the books by a certain date. I have several TBR piles, but you have to be in the right mood for some books, don’t you?

    Reply
  124. Karen, I’ve been horrified by the wave of book-banning that seems to be sweeping the US at the moment. Of course kids at university can think for themselves, and if you try to restrict their access to certain books it’s going to make them more determined to read them. I am so sorry for all those trying to resist this mindless banning.
    LOL at the public library’s expectation that you’ll instantly read and return the books by a certain date. I have several TBR piles, but you have to be in the right mood for some books, don’t you?

    Reply
  125. Karen, I’ve been horrified by the wave of book-banning that seems to be sweeping the US at the moment. Of course kids at university can think for themselves, and if you try to restrict their access to certain books it’s going to make them more determined to read them. I am so sorry for all those trying to resist this mindless banning.
    LOL at the public library’s expectation that you’ll instantly read and return the books by a certain date. I have several TBR piles, but you have to be in the right mood for some books, don’t you?

    Reply
  126. I’m glad you enjoyed that Eva Ibbotson piece, Karin. It’s lovely isn’t it?
    What a lovely idea for your mother to drop you at the library while she was shopping. My local library is close to a high school and I often see kids there doing their homework while waiting for their parents to collect them.

    Reply
  127. I’m glad you enjoyed that Eva Ibbotson piece, Karin. It’s lovely isn’t it?
    What a lovely idea for your mother to drop you at the library while she was shopping. My local library is close to a high school and I often see kids there doing their homework while waiting for their parents to collect them.

    Reply
  128. I’m glad you enjoyed that Eva Ibbotson piece, Karin. It’s lovely isn’t it?
    What a lovely idea for your mother to drop you at the library while she was shopping. My local library is close to a high school and I often see kids there doing their homework while waiting for their parents to collect them.

    Reply
  129. I’m glad you enjoyed that Eva Ibbotson piece, Karin. It’s lovely isn’t it?
    What a lovely idea for your mother to drop you at the library while she was shopping. My local library is close to a high school and I often see kids there doing their homework while waiting for their parents to collect them.

    Reply
  130. I’m glad you enjoyed that Eva Ibbotson piece, Karin. It’s lovely isn’t it?
    What a lovely idea for your mother to drop you at the library while she was shopping. My local library is close to a high school and I often see kids there doing their homework while waiting for their parents to collect them.

    Reply
  131. My public elementary school had no library, but a small branch of the city public library was in a church annex across the street from the school building. In the second grade, we were encouraged to apply for our first library card there. The day I received that peach-colored piece of paper with my name typed on it is one of the best memories of my childhood! By the end of the fourth grade, I had read everything in the kid’s section and with my parents’ permission, started in on the adult books. By the time Junior High School (7th grade) rolled around, a standardized test indicated that I was reading at the college level. After that, I rode the bus to the main public library downtown to check out my weekly reading fix. Those seem like halcyon days now because few books were banned or off limits to me; if any actually were, I likely wouldn’t have been interested in them anyway. Today I can no longer physically visit the library or afford to buy books, so anything I read is downloaded on my tablet or computer. Sadly, our local public libraries don’t seem to have the money to purchase complete e-book fiction series. My guess is some combination of AI and obscure algorithms tell them how to spend whatever taxpayers’ funds are allotted them.

    Reply
  132. My public elementary school had no library, but a small branch of the city public library was in a church annex across the street from the school building. In the second grade, we were encouraged to apply for our first library card there. The day I received that peach-colored piece of paper with my name typed on it is one of the best memories of my childhood! By the end of the fourth grade, I had read everything in the kid’s section and with my parents’ permission, started in on the adult books. By the time Junior High School (7th grade) rolled around, a standardized test indicated that I was reading at the college level. After that, I rode the bus to the main public library downtown to check out my weekly reading fix. Those seem like halcyon days now because few books were banned or off limits to me; if any actually were, I likely wouldn’t have been interested in them anyway. Today I can no longer physically visit the library or afford to buy books, so anything I read is downloaded on my tablet or computer. Sadly, our local public libraries don’t seem to have the money to purchase complete e-book fiction series. My guess is some combination of AI and obscure algorithms tell them how to spend whatever taxpayers’ funds are allotted them.

    Reply
  133. My public elementary school had no library, but a small branch of the city public library was in a church annex across the street from the school building. In the second grade, we were encouraged to apply for our first library card there. The day I received that peach-colored piece of paper with my name typed on it is one of the best memories of my childhood! By the end of the fourth grade, I had read everything in the kid’s section and with my parents’ permission, started in on the adult books. By the time Junior High School (7th grade) rolled around, a standardized test indicated that I was reading at the college level. After that, I rode the bus to the main public library downtown to check out my weekly reading fix. Those seem like halcyon days now because few books were banned or off limits to me; if any actually were, I likely wouldn’t have been interested in them anyway. Today I can no longer physically visit the library or afford to buy books, so anything I read is downloaded on my tablet or computer. Sadly, our local public libraries don’t seem to have the money to purchase complete e-book fiction series. My guess is some combination of AI and obscure algorithms tell them how to spend whatever taxpayers’ funds are allotted them.

    Reply
  134. My public elementary school had no library, but a small branch of the city public library was in a church annex across the street from the school building. In the second grade, we were encouraged to apply for our first library card there. The day I received that peach-colored piece of paper with my name typed on it is one of the best memories of my childhood! By the end of the fourth grade, I had read everything in the kid’s section and with my parents’ permission, started in on the adult books. By the time Junior High School (7th grade) rolled around, a standardized test indicated that I was reading at the college level. After that, I rode the bus to the main public library downtown to check out my weekly reading fix. Those seem like halcyon days now because few books were banned or off limits to me; if any actually were, I likely wouldn’t have been interested in them anyway. Today I can no longer physically visit the library or afford to buy books, so anything I read is downloaded on my tablet or computer. Sadly, our local public libraries don’t seem to have the money to purchase complete e-book fiction series. My guess is some combination of AI and obscure algorithms tell them how to spend whatever taxpayers’ funds are allotted them.

    Reply
  135. My public elementary school had no library, but a small branch of the city public library was in a church annex across the street from the school building. In the second grade, we were encouraged to apply for our first library card there. The day I received that peach-colored piece of paper with my name typed on it is one of the best memories of my childhood! By the end of the fourth grade, I had read everything in the kid’s section and with my parents’ permission, started in on the adult books. By the time Junior High School (7th grade) rolled around, a standardized test indicated that I was reading at the college level. After that, I rode the bus to the main public library downtown to check out my weekly reading fix. Those seem like halcyon days now because few books were banned or off limits to me; if any actually were, I likely wouldn’t have been interested in them anyway. Today I can no longer physically visit the library or afford to buy books, so anything I read is downloaded on my tablet or computer. Sadly, our local public libraries don’t seem to have the money to purchase complete e-book fiction series. My guess is some combination of AI and obscure algorithms tell them how to spend whatever taxpayers’ funds are allotted them.

    Reply
  136. As a former librarian, I thank all of you for your affection for libraries. I too avidly consumed books as a kid from my public library in a small town.
    Got hooked on romance thru the Harlequins, Barbara Cartland, Heyer, Stewart and others in the adult section.
    I continue to remind people interlibrary loan can help get books from other places in various Facebook discussion groups–applies to older romances also. I too am concerned about both growing censorship and the lack of critical analysis of media. Libraries wil face difficult times in this environment. Loyal readers willing to speak out in support will be needed.

    Reply
  137. As a former librarian, I thank all of you for your affection for libraries. I too avidly consumed books as a kid from my public library in a small town.
    Got hooked on romance thru the Harlequins, Barbara Cartland, Heyer, Stewart and others in the adult section.
    I continue to remind people interlibrary loan can help get books from other places in various Facebook discussion groups–applies to older romances also. I too am concerned about both growing censorship and the lack of critical analysis of media. Libraries wil face difficult times in this environment. Loyal readers willing to speak out in support will be needed.

    Reply
  138. As a former librarian, I thank all of you for your affection for libraries. I too avidly consumed books as a kid from my public library in a small town.
    Got hooked on romance thru the Harlequins, Barbara Cartland, Heyer, Stewart and others in the adult section.
    I continue to remind people interlibrary loan can help get books from other places in various Facebook discussion groups–applies to older romances also. I too am concerned about both growing censorship and the lack of critical analysis of media. Libraries wil face difficult times in this environment. Loyal readers willing to speak out in support will be needed.

    Reply
  139. As a former librarian, I thank all of you for your affection for libraries. I too avidly consumed books as a kid from my public library in a small town.
    Got hooked on romance thru the Harlequins, Barbara Cartland, Heyer, Stewart and others in the adult section.
    I continue to remind people interlibrary loan can help get books from other places in various Facebook discussion groups–applies to older romances also. I too am concerned about both growing censorship and the lack of critical analysis of media. Libraries wil face difficult times in this environment. Loyal readers willing to speak out in support will be needed.

    Reply
  140. As a former librarian, I thank all of you for your affection for libraries. I too avidly consumed books as a kid from my public library in a small town.
    Got hooked on romance thru the Harlequins, Barbara Cartland, Heyer, Stewart and others in the adult section.
    I continue to remind people interlibrary loan can help get books from other places in various Facebook discussion groups–applies to older romances also. I too am concerned about both growing censorship and the lack of critical analysis of media. Libraries wil face difficult times in this environment. Loyal readers willing to speak out in support will be needed.

    Reply
  141. Forgot to say how charming the piece by Eva Ibbotson is. A recommendation to read her lovely books came from this page and I am extremely grateful. Jojo Moyes wrote a good book ‘The Giver of Stars’ about the mounted librarians of Kentucky – fascinating

    Reply
  142. Forgot to say how charming the piece by Eva Ibbotson is. A recommendation to read her lovely books came from this page and I am extremely grateful. Jojo Moyes wrote a good book ‘The Giver of Stars’ about the mounted librarians of Kentucky – fascinating

    Reply
  143. Forgot to say how charming the piece by Eva Ibbotson is. A recommendation to read her lovely books came from this page and I am extremely grateful. Jojo Moyes wrote a good book ‘The Giver of Stars’ about the mounted librarians of Kentucky – fascinating

    Reply
  144. Forgot to say how charming the piece by Eva Ibbotson is. A recommendation to read her lovely books came from this page and I am extremely grateful. Jojo Moyes wrote a good book ‘The Giver of Stars’ about the mounted librarians of Kentucky – fascinating

    Reply
  145. Forgot to say how charming the piece by Eva Ibbotson is. A recommendation to read her lovely books came from this page and I am extremely grateful. Jojo Moyes wrote a good book ‘The Giver of Stars’ about the mounted librarians of Kentucky – fascinating

    Reply
  146. When I was in junior high school my friend Judy Toivonen (whose father was a diamond merchant downtown) told me I should start going to the Downtown LA Central Library instead of the school library or the two local branch libraries which were small and not conveniently located; getting books back on time depended on cadging a ride from one of my brothers.
    My mom still believed that downtown LA was as safe as it was when she arrived in the city and I did not disabuse her of this notion. So for about six years, through junior high and high school, every Saturday I’d take the bus downtown, walk the few blocks to the Central Library, and lose myself there. The librarians got to know me and were very kind; they often let me take out redlined (adults only) books like Dorothy Sayers’s Busman’s Honeymoon (a wedding night love scene! I puzzled for hours over what they were talking about!).
    The library itself was (and still is) a beautiful art deco building with handsome mosaics, surrounded by lawns. When I knew it it was not also surrounded by skyscrapers and homeless encampments, but that’s another story.
    When I graduated from high school and started university, one of the perks of my scholarship (and the only one I ever used) was a stacks pass to the Powell, then the main library at UCLA. I spent many happy hours in the stacks reading their bound copies of 1930s and 1940s Astounding Science Fiction and looking at maps and histories instead of doing my assigned reading. Not only was this informative and entertaining — I had been sent to university primarily, I think, to find a guy and get married, as people then thought that was the only way a woman could have a decent standard of living; the library was my escape from that pressure. I never found the romance section or I might have wised up sooner 🙂

    Reply
  147. When I was in junior high school my friend Judy Toivonen (whose father was a diamond merchant downtown) told me I should start going to the Downtown LA Central Library instead of the school library or the two local branch libraries which were small and not conveniently located; getting books back on time depended on cadging a ride from one of my brothers.
    My mom still believed that downtown LA was as safe as it was when she arrived in the city and I did not disabuse her of this notion. So for about six years, through junior high and high school, every Saturday I’d take the bus downtown, walk the few blocks to the Central Library, and lose myself there. The librarians got to know me and were very kind; they often let me take out redlined (adults only) books like Dorothy Sayers’s Busman’s Honeymoon (a wedding night love scene! I puzzled for hours over what they were talking about!).
    The library itself was (and still is) a beautiful art deco building with handsome mosaics, surrounded by lawns. When I knew it it was not also surrounded by skyscrapers and homeless encampments, but that’s another story.
    When I graduated from high school and started university, one of the perks of my scholarship (and the only one I ever used) was a stacks pass to the Powell, then the main library at UCLA. I spent many happy hours in the stacks reading their bound copies of 1930s and 1940s Astounding Science Fiction and looking at maps and histories instead of doing my assigned reading. Not only was this informative and entertaining — I had been sent to university primarily, I think, to find a guy and get married, as people then thought that was the only way a woman could have a decent standard of living; the library was my escape from that pressure. I never found the romance section or I might have wised up sooner 🙂

    Reply
  148. When I was in junior high school my friend Judy Toivonen (whose father was a diamond merchant downtown) told me I should start going to the Downtown LA Central Library instead of the school library or the two local branch libraries which were small and not conveniently located; getting books back on time depended on cadging a ride from one of my brothers.
    My mom still believed that downtown LA was as safe as it was when she arrived in the city and I did not disabuse her of this notion. So for about six years, through junior high and high school, every Saturday I’d take the bus downtown, walk the few blocks to the Central Library, and lose myself there. The librarians got to know me and were very kind; they often let me take out redlined (adults only) books like Dorothy Sayers’s Busman’s Honeymoon (a wedding night love scene! I puzzled for hours over what they were talking about!).
    The library itself was (and still is) a beautiful art deco building with handsome mosaics, surrounded by lawns. When I knew it it was not also surrounded by skyscrapers and homeless encampments, but that’s another story.
    When I graduated from high school and started university, one of the perks of my scholarship (and the only one I ever used) was a stacks pass to the Powell, then the main library at UCLA. I spent many happy hours in the stacks reading their bound copies of 1930s and 1940s Astounding Science Fiction and looking at maps and histories instead of doing my assigned reading. Not only was this informative and entertaining — I had been sent to university primarily, I think, to find a guy and get married, as people then thought that was the only way a woman could have a decent standard of living; the library was my escape from that pressure. I never found the romance section or I might have wised up sooner 🙂

    Reply
  149. When I was in junior high school my friend Judy Toivonen (whose father was a diamond merchant downtown) told me I should start going to the Downtown LA Central Library instead of the school library or the two local branch libraries which were small and not conveniently located; getting books back on time depended on cadging a ride from one of my brothers.
    My mom still believed that downtown LA was as safe as it was when she arrived in the city and I did not disabuse her of this notion. So for about six years, through junior high and high school, every Saturday I’d take the bus downtown, walk the few blocks to the Central Library, and lose myself there. The librarians got to know me and were very kind; they often let me take out redlined (adults only) books like Dorothy Sayers’s Busman’s Honeymoon (a wedding night love scene! I puzzled for hours over what they were talking about!).
    The library itself was (and still is) a beautiful art deco building with handsome mosaics, surrounded by lawns. When I knew it it was not also surrounded by skyscrapers and homeless encampments, but that’s another story.
    When I graduated from high school and started university, one of the perks of my scholarship (and the only one I ever used) was a stacks pass to the Powell, then the main library at UCLA. I spent many happy hours in the stacks reading their bound copies of 1930s and 1940s Astounding Science Fiction and looking at maps and histories instead of doing my assigned reading. Not only was this informative and entertaining — I had been sent to university primarily, I think, to find a guy and get married, as people then thought that was the only way a woman could have a decent standard of living; the library was my escape from that pressure. I never found the romance section or I might have wised up sooner 🙂

    Reply
  150. When I was in junior high school my friend Judy Toivonen (whose father was a diamond merchant downtown) told me I should start going to the Downtown LA Central Library instead of the school library or the two local branch libraries which were small and not conveniently located; getting books back on time depended on cadging a ride from one of my brothers.
    My mom still believed that downtown LA was as safe as it was when she arrived in the city and I did not disabuse her of this notion. So for about six years, through junior high and high school, every Saturday I’d take the bus downtown, walk the few blocks to the Central Library, and lose myself there. The librarians got to know me and were very kind; they often let me take out redlined (adults only) books like Dorothy Sayers’s Busman’s Honeymoon (a wedding night love scene! I puzzled for hours over what they were talking about!).
    The library itself was (and still is) a beautiful art deco building with handsome mosaics, surrounded by lawns. When I knew it it was not also surrounded by skyscrapers and homeless encampments, but that’s another story.
    When I graduated from high school and started university, one of the perks of my scholarship (and the only one I ever used) was a stacks pass to the Powell, then the main library at UCLA. I spent many happy hours in the stacks reading their bound copies of 1930s and 1940s Astounding Science Fiction and looking at maps and histories instead of doing my assigned reading. Not only was this informative and entertaining — I had been sent to university primarily, I think, to find a guy and get married, as people then thought that was the only way a woman could have a decent standard of living; the library was my escape from that pressure. I never found the romance section or I might have wised up sooner 🙂

    Reply
  151. My mom used to take all us children to the library when I was very young. We moved just before I went into 6th grade and by then I was a reading fool.
    I can’t remember when she decided I was old enough to ride my bike to the library. In the summer I’d ride up there several times a week.
    In junior HS I made it a point to start at the beginning of the A’s and read my way around to the Z’s. I read anything and everything. I too remember those junior biographies. Funnily enough, my sister became the Junior HS librarian 30 plus years later. They still had books in their collections that I had read!
    When I was in JH/HS I was also working my way from A to Z at the city library in the YA/Junior section. Again, anything and everything.
    Libraries have been a constant in my life because in Jr High I worked in the the library. In College that was where my work study job was and now I volunteer at my library.
    Plus check out books, attend programs, etc. Libraries are the best. Librarians are the best also.

    Reply
  152. My mom used to take all us children to the library when I was very young. We moved just before I went into 6th grade and by then I was a reading fool.
    I can’t remember when she decided I was old enough to ride my bike to the library. In the summer I’d ride up there several times a week.
    In junior HS I made it a point to start at the beginning of the A’s and read my way around to the Z’s. I read anything and everything. I too remember those junior biographies. Funnily enough, my sister became the Junior HS librarian 30 plus years later. They still had books in their collections that I had read!
    When I was in JH/HS I was also working my way from A to Z at the city library in the YA/Junior section. Again, anything and everything.
    Libraries have been a constant in my life because in Jr High I worked in the the library. In College that was where my work study job was and now I volunteer at my library.
    Plus check out books, attend programs, etc. Libraries are the best. Librarians are the best also.

    Reply
  153. My mom used to take all us children to the library when I was very young. We moved just before I went into 6th grade and by then I was a reading fool.
    I can’t remember when she decided I was old enough to ride my bike to the library. In the summer I’d ride up there several times a week.
    In junior HS I made it a point to start at the beginning of the A’s and read my way around to the Z’s. I read anything and everything. I too remember those junior biographies. Funnily enough, my sister became the Junior HS librarian 30 plus years later. They still had books in their collections that I had read!
    When I was in JH/HS I was also working my way from A to Z at the city library in the YA/Junior section. Again, anything and everything.
    Libraries have been a constant in my life because in Jr High I worked in the the library. In College that was where my work study job was and now I volunteer at my library.
    Plus check out books, attend programs, etc. Libraries are the best. Librarians are the best also.

    Reply
  154. My mom used to take all us children to the library when I was very young. We moved just before I went into 6th grade and by then I was a reading fool.
    I can’t remember when she decided I was old enough to ride my bike to the library. In the summer I’d ride up there several times a week.
    In junior HS I made it a point to start at the beginning of the A’s and read my way around to the Z’s. I read anything and everything. I too remember those junior biographies. Funnily enough, my sister became the Junior HS librarian 30 plus years later. They still had books in their collections that I had read!
    When I was in JH/HS I was also working my way from A to Z at the city library in the YA/Junior section. Again, anything and everything.
    Libraries have been a constant in my life because in Jr High I worked in the the library. In College that was where my work study job was and now I volunteer at my library.
    Plus check out books, attend programs, etc. Libraries are the best. Librarians are the best also.

    Reply
  155. My mom used to take all us children to the library when I was very young. We moved just before I went into 6th grade and by then I was a reading fool.
    I can’t remember when she decided I was old enough to ride my bike to the library. In the summer I’d ride up there several times a week.
    In junior HS I made it a point to start at the beginning of the A’s and read my way around to the Z’s. I read anything and everything. I too remember those junior biographies. Funnily enough, my sister became the Junior HS librarian 30 plus years later. They still had books in their collections that I had read!
    When I was in JH/HS I was also working my way from A to Z at the city library in the YA/Junior section. Again, anything and everything.
    Libraries have been a constant in my life because in Jr High I worked in the the library. In College that was where my work study job was and now I volunteer at my library.
    Plus check out books, attend programs, etc. Libraries are the best. Librarians are the best also.

    Reply
  156. You reminded me of a story from my Mother’s very small high school. Western Kansas, there were 7 in her graduating class in ’53. Apparently the elderly gentleman running the school library decided to “weed” the “dirty” books & he gave them to a couple h.s. boys to take to the furnace & burn. Nope, they didn’t make it to the furnace & that was an extremely well-read class that year! Mom said many of the books they couldn’t figure out what was so dirty about them!

    Reply
  157. You reminded me of a story from my Mother’s very small high school. Western Kansas, there were 7 in her graduating class in ’53. Apparently the elderly gentleman running the school library decided to “weed” the “dirty” books & he gave them to a couple h.s. boys to take to the furnace & burn. Nope, they didn’t make it to the furnace & that was an extremely well-read class that year! Mom said many of the books they couldn’t figure out what was so dirty about them!

    Reply
  158. You reminded me of a story from my Mother’s very small high school. Western Kansas, there were 7 in her graduating class in ’53. Apparently the elderly gentleman running the school library decided to “weed” the “dirty” books & he gave them to a couple h.s. boys to take to the furnace & burn. Nope, they didn’t make it to the furnace & that was an extremely well-read class that year! Mom said many of the books they couldn’t figure out what was so dirty about them!

    Reply
  159. You reminded me of a story from my Mother’s very small high school. Western Kansas, there were 7 in her graduating class in ’53. Apparently the elderly gentleman running the school library decided to “weed” the “dirty” books & he gave them to a couple h.s. boys to take to the furnace & burn. Nope, they didn’t make it to the furnace & that was an extremely well-read class that year! Mom said many of the books they couldn’t figure out what was so dirty about them!

    Reply
  160. You reminded me of a story from my Mother’s very small high school. Western Kansas, there were 7 in her graduating class in ’53. Apparently the elderly gentleman running the school library decided to “weed” the “dirty” books & he gave them to a couple h.s. boys to take to the furnace & burn. Nope, they didn’t make it to the furnace & that was an extremely well-read class that year! Mom said many of the books they couldn’t figure out what was so dirty about them!

    Reply

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