In Conversation with Christina Courtenay

Christina Courtenay 2020Nicola here. Today it is my very great pleasure to welcome back to the blog one of our favourite Wench guests: Christina Courtenay. Christina is an award-winning author of historical romantic fiction and in particular time slip and time travel romance in the great tradition of Barbara Erskine and Susanna Kearsley so it's no wonder her books are an auto-buy for me and will appeal to a lot of Wench readers too! Her latest novel, Echoes of the Runes, is set in the present day and in the vivid 9th century world of the Vikings, and she is here today to tell us more about the book.

Christina, welcome back to the Wenches! Echoes of the Runes is getting some wonderful reviews and rightly so! Please tell us about the book.

Thank you, that’s very kind of you to say!  Echoes of the Runes is a Viking timeslip/dual time novel set mostly in Sweden, both in the present and the past. It tells the story of Ceri, a Welsh noblewoman who is taken hostage by a Viking, Haukr inn hvíti (“the White Hawk”), in 869AD. Back in the present day, an archaeological dig at her late grandmother’s home leads Mia Maddox to uncover secrets of the past which will influence her life in ways she could not have imagined. As the present begins to echo the past, and enemies threaten, they will all have to fight to protect what has become most precious to each of them.

What was the inspiration for this particular story and its setting?

When I had a significant birthday, my parents gave me a Viking style ring which is an exact replica of one kept in the so-called Gold Pic 39 Room at the Historical Museum in Stockholm (an amazing place – do visit if you ever get the chance!). As I’m a history buff, this was the perfect present for me. Of course, the next time I visited Stockholm I had to go and check out the real one, and when I stood there comparing the two (they really do look identical) I was struck by inspiration for a story. I couldn’t stop thinking about it, and although it was many years before the novel was finally finished, that was how it all started. (And I still go and look at that ring every time I’m in Stockholm – I can’t resist).

What an amazing gift and a wonderful piece of inspiration! Your love of Swedish history infuses the book with a particularly vivid atmosphere. It's beautiful! In what ways did growing up in Sweden influence your interest in story-telling and in history?

Well, first of all I lived in a small town surrounded by huge forests and hundreds of lakes. My Swedish grandmother used to tell me stories about elves and trolls, and I totally believed every word – you would too if you’d ever walked around those forests at night! 😊. When we started learning about history at school, I was fascinated by the Vikings and read all the Norse sagas. (I more or less lived at the local library, as I’m sure you all did too, and was always looking for something new to read.) Lots of places in Sweden have runestones and other Viking reminders, and I think growing up there you can’t fail to absorb this heritage. It’s part of your national consciousness.

Christina Ribe 2019You particularly enjoy travelling to research your novels and doing what I call “method research” where you get hands on with places, artifacts or whatever you are writing about. Why is this particularly important to you?

I think that it helps to infuse the stories with those tiny details that you can only get from actually experiencing something yourself. Obviously, we can’t know exactly what it was like in Viking times, but I found some amazing museums where they have recreated the Viking world in great detail. For example, in Ribe on Denmark’s west coast, at the Viking Centre there, they have built two chieftains’ halls (longhouses), workshops, a smithy, lots of other houses and even a very early Christian church. Sitting on a bench in the dim interior of a reconstructed longhouse, on top of a variety of dirty old pelts (sheep, wolf, lynx and even badger!), I could really imagine myself back in time. And at the Roskilde Viking Ship Museum I was able to go on a short journey in a reconstructed longship, where I had to help row it and watch the sail being hoisted. That sort of experience is invaluable!

In your research did you come across anything that surprised you or was particularly special to you?

I’m the sort of person who usually turns green at the sight of a mere row boat, so I was very surprised to find that I didn’t feel sick in the slightest on board that longship! It glided through the water so smoothly, I wasn’t aware of any up-and-down movement at all. That said, we were in a sheltered bay and I’m sure it would be different out on the open sea, but still …

It must be in your DNA! What is it that appeals to you about writing timeslip and time travel?

I find it fascinating because there are endless possibilities. As I said, I love history, but with timeslip and time travel you get an added dimension – the paranormal, magical or ghostly elements. It’s a combination that just really appeals to me and it is pure escapism, which is what I want when I read. I want to be fully immersed in the story and completely forget about the real world. I also really love the idea of twin souls, or love that can last for eternity if only you find that one special person you belong with, so the romantic possibilities of time slip/time travel are intriguing.

Which of the characters in Echoes of the Runes is your favourite?

I think it has to be Haukr, the Viking jarl (chieftain). He isn’t your stereotypical, bloodthirsty marauder, but a laid-back landowner, content with his lot for the most part. He just wants a peaceful life, working to improve his holdings and life for his dependents, but his avaricious wife has other ideas. When she questions his courage, he has no choice but to act – that is one insult he can’t let pass. He’s slow to anger, but once riled he gets really mad. Little did he know that his actions would lead to him meeting a woman who would be so much more perfect for him, if only he wasn’t married already …

I really liked Haukr too, not just because he was a very attractive hero (!) but he felt a very real and rounded character. I actually loved that he was a henpecked Viking and yet he still possessed all those heroic qualities we look for: courage, loyalty and integrity. 

If you could time travel for a day, what time and place would you go to? And what object would you bring back?

That’s a really difficult question as I have several favourite periods of history! I’d love to go back to Viking times, of course, and Pic 30would probably bring back a piece of gold jewellery (maybe like this massive Thor’s hammer necklace or a snake bangle?). But I’d also like to spend a day at the court of Charles I to meet some of his Cavalier courtiers (and his nephew Prince Rupert!) – in that case I’d try to bring back a Van Dyck painting – they are amazing!

Those are great choices. If a time machine becomes available a number of us may be lining up to meet Prince Rupert!

Who have been the biggest influences on your writing?

Barbara Erskine’s Lady of Hay first made me want to write in this sub-genre myself. All of Susanna Kearsley’s wonderful time slip books and yours, Nicola, also inspired me! Georgette Heyer for the sense of humour that infuses her books – I so wish I could do that! And I have always loved Johanna Lindsey’s books because of her amazing storytelling and the way she writes such incredibly satisfying endings, something I try to emulate.

Thank you! That's wonderful company to be in. What part of the writing process do you find most difficult?

Editing – I’m a ‘pantser’, so I sit down and write and just get carried away by the story. That first draft is always fun as you don’t know exactly where it will take you, and the characters and story are all new and exciting. Once you get to the editing stage, and you’ve had input from your agent and editor, and changed things, the magic wears off. And when you’ve read through the book umpteen times, it starts to feel like the worst story ever written! I really don’t like that stage as that is when the doubts creep in – is anyone even going to want to read it?

Interesting! I love revising a manuscript but I think I'm maybe in a minority on that. I totally agree though that once you've read and revised a book umpteen times you're too close to judge quality properly. We all need some distance from our writing after a while!

If you weren’t an author what would you do?

I would love to be an archaeologist or perhaps study Old Norse? I’ve had a little taste of that language now, while writing this Viking series, and it’s fascinating to me as I speak Swedish, which is one of the languages descended from Old Norse.

What fascinating choices!

Please give us a preview of the sequel to Echoes of the Runes.

It’s called The Runes of Destiny and it features Linnea Berger, daughter of the present-day hero from Echoes of the Runes. While metal detecting, Linnea finds an exquisite brooch. When she reads its runic inscription, she blacks out, only to come to, surrounded by men in Viking costume who seem take re-enactment very seriously. She finds herself in the power of Hrafn, a Viking warrior who claims her as his thrall and takes her on a treacherous journey across the seas to sell her for profit. As they set sail, she is forced to confront the unthinkable: she has somehow travelled back in time to the ninth century …

Christina, thank you very much for visiting the Wenches today and for such an interesting chat!

Many thanks for inviting me!

Echoes of the Runes – blurb:-

Their love was forbidden. But echoed in eternity.

When Mia inherits her beloved grandmother’s summer cottage, Birch Thorpe, in Sweden, she faces a dilemma. Her fiancé Charles Echoes of the Runes_cover MEDIUMurges her to sell and buy a swanky London home, but Mia cannot let it go easily. The request to carry out an archaeological dig for more Viking artifacts like the gold ring Mia’s grandmother also left her, offers her a reprieve from a decision – and from Charles.

As Mia becomes absorbed in the dig’s discoveries, she finds herself drawn to archaeologist Haakon Berger. Like her, he can sense the past inhabitants whose lives are becoming more vivid every day. Trying to resist the growing attraction between them, Mia and Haakon begin to piece together the story of a Welsh noblewoman, Ceri, and the mysterious Viking, known as the ‘White Hawk’, who stole her away from her people in 869 AD.

As the present begins to echo the past, and enemies threaten Birch Thorpe’s inhabitants, they will all have to fight to protect what has become most precious to each of them …

Extract:

The archaeologist glared at her. ‘When you dig up an ancient artefact, you have to take it to the nearest museum or council, where someone will tell you whether you have found anything of interest or not. If you have, they will add the item to the register of antiquities, and then possibly they’ll make an appointment to view the site where it was found. In certain cases, you may be allowed to keep your find, but mostly you’ll be recompensed and the item placed in a museum.’

‘Yes, yes, I know all that,’ Mia said, ‘but—’

He interrupted once more. ‘Under no circumstances are you allowed to keep the item for yourself if it’s valuable. That is a crime.’ He emphasised the last word while he glanced at her ring, and Mia followed his gaze, again suppressing the urge to hide the snake.

‘Is that what you’re accusing me of, Mr Berger?’ she demanded, tired of being harangued. ‘You think I’ve dug up this ring and kept it without telling anyone?’

He nodded. ‘Judging by the length of time you stood in front of the display case downstairs, it can’t have escaped your notice that there is a ring exactly like it in the museum’s collection. As far as I’m aware, no permission has been granted to any jewellery company to make replicas of it, although I know a few of the others have been copied. That must mean that yours is as old as the one kept here. May I see it, please?

He held out an imperious hand and Mia felt obliged to remove the gold snake and pass it across to him. It was an almost physical wrench. That ring was her last link to her beloved grandmother, who had died only a week ago. She couldn’t bear to part with it now, and she could have sworn the serpent was just as unwilling to leave her, since it took her a moment to wriggle it off her finger.

He received it reverently, turning it this way and that so the gold glimmered in the light from the small window. After a while, he hunted in his desk drawers until he came up with a magnifying glass, then studied the ring some more. At length, he looked up again and regarded her with a solemn expression.

‘Viking. Ninth century, probably the middle to later part. An exact replica of the one downstairs, or as near as makes no difference. I happened to be looking at it only the other day. Now, I should very much like to know where you found it. Wherever it was, I’m afraid you can’t keep it. It belongs to the state.’

Mia took a deep breath to contain the anger swirling inside her. How dare he treat her like a thief? She was nothing of the sort, and she knew as much about the subject as he did. Staring him straight in the eyes, she prepared herself for a fight.

‘Now that’s where you’re wrong. And I can prove it.’

Echoes of the Runes purchase links:-

Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Echoes-Runes-sweeping-epic-forbidden-ebook/dp/B07T65CZPX/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=christina+courtenay&qid=1579114778&sr=8-1

Amazon US – https://www.amazon.com/Echoes-Runes-Christina-Courtenay/dp/1472268261/ref=sr_1_6?keywords=Christina+Courtenay&qid=1579624643&sr=8-6

The Runes of Destiny (published 10th Dec 2020):-

Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Runes-Destiny-Christina-Courtenay-ebook/dp/B084P2VJ6N/ref=sr_1_9?keywords=christina+courtenay&qid=1582570401&sr=8-9

Amazon US – https://www.amazon.com/Runes-Destiny-romantic-timeslip-adventure-ebook/dp/B084P2VJ6N/ref=sr_1_5?keywords=The+Runes+of+Destiny&qid=1583936747&sr=8-5

GiveawayAuthor links/social media:-

http://www.christinacourtenay.com

https://www.facebook.com/christinacourtenayauthor?fref=ts

https://twitter.com/PiaCCourtenay

https://www.instagram.com/ChristinaCourtenayAuthor/

Christina is giving away a copy of Echoes of the Runes and some other Viking-inspired gifts (see picture above!) to one lucky commenter between now and midnight on Thursday. To enter simply leave a question or comment for Christina on the blog, or tell us what you would bring back as a souvenir if you travelled back into the past!

 

200 thoughts on “In Conversation with Christina Courtenay”

  1. Great interview! I’m really looking forward to reading the book. My maiden name has Viking roots 😊
    If I went into the past I would do my best to bring back a piece of jewellery, preferably a ring because rings are a weakness of mine. And made of gold! Gosh I don’t want much do I? 😉😀

    Reply
  2. Great interview! I’m really looking forward to reading the book. My maiden name has Viking roots 😊
    If I went into the past I would do my best to bring back a piece of jewellery, preferably a ring because rings are a weakness of mine. And made of gold! Gosh I don’t want much do I? 😉😀

    Reply
  3. Great interview! I’m really looking forward to reading the book. My maiden name has Viking roots 😊
    If I went into the past I would do my best to bring back a piece of jewellery, preferably a ring because rings are a weakness of mine. And made of gold! Gosh I don’t want much do I? 😉😀

    Reply
  4. Great interview! I’m really looking forward to reading the book. My maiden name has Viking roots 😊
    If I went into the past I would do my best to bring back a piece of jewellery, preferably a ring because rings are a weakness of mine. And made of gold! Gosh I don’t want much do I? 😉😀

    Reply
  5. Great interview! I’m really looking forward to reading the book. My maiden name has Viking roots 😊
    If I went into the past I would do my best to bring back a piece of jewellery, preferably a ring because rings are a weakness of mine. And made of gold! Gosh I don’t want much do I? 😉😀

    Reply
  6. Really enjoyed reading this interview, thank you! I’ve always been fascinated with Egypt. I was fortunate enough to travel there many years ago, and loved learning more about the country’s rich ancient history. I would love to go back to those times! I think I would bring back a piece of jewellery, maybe a bracelet. Or maybe a papyrus book! I would’ve said I’d bring back an Egyptian man, but I already have one; and I married him in 2018! 😉🥰 I can’t wait to read your book!

    Reply
  7. Really enjoyed reading this interview, thank you! I’ve always been fascinated with Egypt. I was fortunate enough to travel there many years ago, and loved learning more about the country’s rich ancient history. I would love to go back to those times! I think I would bring back a piece of jewellery, maybe a bracelet. Or maybe a papyrus book! I would’ve said I’d bring back an Egyptian man, but I already have one; and I married him in 2018! 😉🥰 I can’t wait to read your book!

    Reply
  8. Really enjoyed reading this interview, thank you! I’ve always been fascinated with Egypt. I was fortunate enough to travel there many years ago, and loved learning more about the country’s rich ancient history. I would love to go back to those times! I think I would bring back a piece of jewellery, maybe a bracelet. Or maybe a papyrus book! I would’ve said I’d bring back an Egyptian man, but I already have one; and I married him in 2018! 😉🥰 I can’t wait to read your book!

    Reply
  9. Really enjoyed reading this interview, thank you! I’ve always been fascinated with Egypt. I was fortunate enough to travel there many years ago, and loved learning more about the country’s rich ancient history. I would love to go back to those times! I think I would bring back a piece of jewellery, maybe a bracelet. Or maybe a papyrus book! I would’ve said I’d bring back an Egyptian man, but I already have one; and I married him in 2018! 😉🥰 I can’t wait to read your book!

    Reply
  10. Really enjoyed reading this interview, thank you! I’ve always been fascinated with Egypt. I was fortunate enough to travel there many years ago, and loved learning more about the country’s rich ancient history. I would love to go back to those times! I think I would bring back a piece of jewellery, maybe a bracelet. Or maybe a papyrus book! I would’ve said I’d bring back an Egyptian man, but I already have one; and I married him in 2018! 😉🥰 I can’t wait to read your book!

    Reply
  11. Thank you Angela, and that sounds perfectly reasonable to me! I love gold rings too and one can never have too many 😀 Lots of people have Viking roots, don’t they – I find genealogy fascinating.

    Reply
  12. Thank you Angela, and that sounds perfectly reasonable to me! I love gold rings too and one can never have too many 😀 Lots of people have Viking roots, don’t they – I find genealogy fascinating.

    Reply
  13. Thank you Angela, and that sounds perfectly reasonable to me! I love gold rings too and one can never have too many 😀 Lots of people have Viking roots, don’t they – I find genealogy fascinating.

    Reply
  14. Thank you Angela, and that sounds perfectly reasonable to me! I love gold rings too and one can never have too many 😀 Lots of people have Viking roots, don’t they – I find genealogy fascinating.

    Reply
  15. Thank you Angela, and that sounds perfectly reasonable to me! I love gold rings too and one can never have too many 😀 Lots of people have Viking roots, don’t they – I find genealogy fascinating.

    Reply
  16. Many thanks, Andie, and how lovely! I totally agree with you about Eqypt, it’s an amazing place. I was fortunate enough to visit when I was a teenager and although the extreme heat was difficult for a cold weather person like me, I was totally fascinated by everything I saw. Magical! And I recently went to an exhibition about Tutankhamun in London – so many beautiful objects, it would be hard to choose what to bring back 🙂

    Reply
  17. Many thanks, Andie, and how lovely! I totally agree with you about Eqypt, it’s an amazing place. I was fortunate enough to visit when I was a teenager and although the extreme heat was difficult for a cold weather person like me, I was totally fascinated by everything I saw. Magical! And I recently went to an exhibition about Tutankhamun in London – so many beautiful objects, it would be hard to choose what to bring back 🙂

    Reply
  18. Many thanks, Andie, and how lovely! I totally agree with you about Eqypt, it’s an amazing place. I was fortunate enough to visit when I was a teenager and although the extreme heat was difficult for a cold weather person like me, I was totally fascinated by everything I saw. Magical! And I recently went to an exhibition about Tutankhamun in London – so many beautiful objects, it would be hard to choose what to bring back 🙂

    Reply
  19. Many thanks, Andie, and how lovely! I totally agree with you about Eqypt, it’s an amazing place. I was fortunate enough to visit when I was a teenager and although the extreme heat was difficult for a cold weather person like me, I was totally fascinated by everything I saw. Magical! And I recently went to an exhibition about Tutankhamun in London – so many beautiful objects, it would be hard to choose what to bring back 🙂

    Reply
  20. Many thanks, Andie, and how lovely! I totally agree with you about Eqypt, it’s an amazing place. I was fortunate enough to visit when I was a teenager and although the extreme heat was difficult for a cold weather person like me, I was totally fascinated by everything I saw. Magical! And I recently went to an exhibition about Tutankhamun in London – so many beautiful objects, it would be hard to choose what to bring back 🙂

    Reply
  21. Thanks for such a wonderful interview, Christina. I read “Echoes” last week and loved it! (How lovely to see a picture of your ring!)I’m a total history and as kid wanted to be an archeologist, so it was such fun that your hunky modern-day Haakon is one! And loved learning more about the Vikings.

    Reply
  22. Thanks for such a wonderful interview, Christina. I read “Echoes” last week and loved it! (How lovely to see a picture of your ring!)I’m a total history and as kid wanted to be an archeologist, so it was such fun that your hunky modern-day Haakon is one! And loved learning more about the Vikings.

    Reply
  23. Thanks for such a wonderful interview, Christina. I read “Echoes” last week and loved it! (How lovely to see a picture of your ring!)I’m a total history and as kid wanted to be an archeologist, so it was such fun that your hunky modern-day Haakon is one! And loved learning more about the Vikings.

    Reply
  24. Thanks for such a wonderful interview, Christina. I read “Echoes” last week and loved it! (How lovely to see a picture of your ring!)I’m a total history and as kid wanted to be an archeologist, so it was such fun that your hunky modern-day Haakon is one! And loved learning more about the Vikings.

    Reply
  25. Thanks for such a wonderful interview, Christina. I read “Echoes” last week and loved it! (How lovely to see a picture of your ring!)I’m a total history and as kid wanted to be an archeologist, so it was such fun that your hunky modern-day Haakon is one! And loved learning more about the Vikings.

    Reply
  26. I did so enjoy your post Christina! I went to your web site and enjoyed that too, especially all the photos of the places you have been to doing research. How wonderful!
    I am a history nut and a time/slip novel fan as well. Lady of Hay was the first I ever read too and it made me seek out other authors and the same types of books.
    Thank you so much, you made my day!

    Reply
  27. I did so enjoy your post Christina! I went to your web site and enjoyed that too, especially all the photos of the places you have been to doing research. How wonderful!
    I am a history nut and a time/slip novel fan as well. Lady of Hay was the first I ever read too and it made me seek out other authors and the same types of books.
    Thank you so much, you made my day!

    Reply
  28. I did so enjoy your post Christina! I went to your web site and enjoyed that too, especially all the photos of the places you have been to doing research. How wonderful!
    I am a history nut and a time/slip novel fan as well. Lady of Hay was the first I ever read too and it made me seek out other authors and the same types of books.
    Thank you so much, you made my day!

    Reply
  29. I did so enjoy your post Christina! I went to your web site and enjoyed that too, especially all the photos of the places you have been to doing research. How wonderful!
    I am a history nut and a time/slip novel fan as well. Lady of Hay was the first I ever read too and it made me seek out other authors and the same types of books.
    Thank you so much, you made my day!

    Reply
  30. I did so enjoy your post Christina! I went to your web site and enjoyed that too, especially all the photos of the places you have been to doing research. How wonderful!
    I am a history nut and a time/slip novel fan as well. Lady of Hay was the first I ever read too and it made me seek out other authors and the same types of books.
    Thank you so much, you made my day!

    Reply
  31. Thank you so much, Andrea, that’s lovely! Really pleased you liked Haakon 🙂 And yes, I wish I’d studied to become an archaeologist now!

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  32. Thank you so much, Andrea, that’s lovely! Really pleased you liked Haakon 🙂 And yes, I wish I’d studied to become an archaeologist now!

    Reply
  33. Thank you so much, Andrea, that’s lovely! Really pleased you liked Haakon 🙂 And yes, I wish I’d studied to become an archaeologist now!

    Reply
  34. Thank you so much, Andrea, that’s lovely! Really pleased you liked Haakon 🙂 And yes, I wish I’d studied to become an archaeologist now!

    Reply
  35. Thank you so much, Andrea, that’s lovely! Really pleased you liked Haakon 🙂 And yes, I wish I’d studied to become an archaeologist now!

    Reply
  36. I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Donna, thank you! I think Lady of Hay was a starting point for so many of us, such a wonderful story. It certainly made me look out for time slip novels as well. And thank you for the lovely comments about my blog – I do enjoy going to various places for research purposes. It’s a great excuse for travelling!

    Reply
  37. I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Donna, thank you! I think Lady of Hay was a starting point for so many of us, such a wonderful story. It certainly made me look out for time slip novels as well. And thank you for the lovely comments about my blog – I do enjoy going to various places for research purposes. It’s a great excuse for travelling!

    Reply
  38. I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Donna, thank you! I think Lady of Hay was a starting point for so many of us, such a wonderful story. It certainly made me look out for time slip novels as well. And thank you for the lovely comments about my blog – I do enjoy going to various places for research purposes. It’s a great excuse for travelling!

    Reply
  39. I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Donna, thank you! I think Lady of Hay was a starting point for so many of us, such a wonderful story. It certainly made me look out for time slip novels as well. And thank you for the lovely comments about my blog – I do enjoy going to various places for research purposes. It’s a great excuse for travelling!

    Reply
  40. I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Donna, thank you! I think Lady of Hay was a starting point for so many of us, such a wonderful story. It certainly made me look out for time slip novels as well. And thank you for the lovely comments about my blog – I do enjoy going to various places for research purposes. It’s a great excuse for travelling!

    Reply
  41. That sounds wonderful Connie! I sometimes see writing slopes for sale at a local auction, the kind ladies took with them when they travelled. I’m always tempted to buy one. Have you ever tried writing with a quill? I haven’t but I bet it’s a lot harder than it looks not to splodge the ink 🙂 Thank you for your comment!

    Reply
  42. That sounds wonderful Connie! I sometimes see writing slopes for sale at a local auction, the kind ladies took with them when they travelled. I’m always tempted to buy one. Have you ever tried writing with a quill? I haven’t but I bet it’s a lot harder than it looks not to splodge the ink 🙂 Thank you for your comment!

    Reply
  43. That sounds wonderful Connie! I sometimes see writing slopes for sale at a local auction, the kind ladies took with them when they travelled. I’m always tempted to buy one. Have you ever tried writing with a quill? I haven’t but I bet it’s a lot harder than it looks not to splodge the ink 🙂 Thank you for your comment!

    Reply
  44. That sounds wonderful Connie! I sometimes see writing slopes for sale at a local auction, the kind ladies took with them when they travelled. I’m always tempted to buy one. Have you ever tried writing with a quill? I haven’t but I bet it’s a lot harder than it looks not to splodge the ink 🙂 Thank you for your comment!

    Reply
  45. That sounds wonderful Connie! I sometimes see writing slopes for sale at a local auction, the kind ladies took with them when they travelled. I’m always tempted to buy one. Have you ever tried writing with a quill? I haven’t but I bet it’s a lot harder than it looks not to splodge the ink 🙂 Thank you for your comment!

    Reply
  46. What inspired you to write about the time of the Vikings? I recall a guide telling us they were so feared in England that the people changed the Lord’s Prayer to “,,,and deliver us from the Vikings”!

    Reply
  47. What inspired you to write about the time of the Vikings? I recall a guide telling us they were so feared in England that the people changed the Lord’s Prayer to “,,,and deliver us from the Vikings”!

    Reply
  48. What inspired you to write about the time of the Vikings? I recall a guide telling us they were so feared in England that the people changed the Lord’s Prayer to “,,,and deliver us from the Vikings”!

    Reply
  49. What inspired you to write about the time of the Vikings? I recall a guide telling us they were so feared in England that the people changed the Lord’s Prayer to “,,,and deliver us from the Vikings”!

    Reply
  50. What inspired you to write about the time of the Vikings? I recall a guide telling us they were so feared in England that the people changed the Lord’s Prayer to “,,,and deliver us from the Vikings”!

    Reply
  51. I’m half Swedish, Linda, so Vikings are in my blood! And the truth is that most of them were actually fairly peaceful people, traders and farmers. Only a small percentage went marauding although they must have been extremely fierce for the English to fear them so much! It’s a very interesting time in history – I find it fascinating!

    Reply
  52. I’m half Swedish, Linda, so Vikings are in my blood! And the truth is that most of them were actually fairly peaceful people, traders and farmers. Only a small percentage went marauding although they must have been extremely fierce for the English to fear them so much! It’s a very interesting time in history – I find it fascinating!

    Reply
  53. I’m half Swedish, Linda, so Vikings are in my blood! And the truth is that most of them were actually fairly peaceful people, traders and farmers. Only a small percentage went marauding although they must have been extremely fierce for the English to fear them so much! It’s a very interesting time in history – I find it fascinating!

    Reply
  54. I’m half Swedish, Linda, so Vikings are in my blood! And the truth is that most of them were actually fairly peaceful people, traders and farmers. Only a small percentage went marauding although they must have been extremely fierce for the English to fear them so much! It’s a very interesting time in history – I find it fascinating!

    Reply
  55. I’m half Swedish, Linda, so Vikings are in my blood! And the truth is that most of them were actually fairly peaceful people, traders and farmers. Only a small percentage went marauding although they must have been extremely fierce for the English to fear them so much! It’s a very interesting time in history – I find it fascinating!

    Reply
  56. What a fascinating interview! Thank you, Christina and Nicola. There are a number of time periods I’d like to visit. I think it would be interesting to meet my parents in their early twenties and get to know them as people rather than parents.
    If I traveled back to my own twenties, could I come back in my younger/healthier body? That would make a fine souvenir!

    Reply
  57. What a fascinating interview! Thank you, Christina and Nicola. There are a number of time periods I’d like to visit. I think it would be interesting to meet my parents in their early twenties and get to know them as people rather than parents.
    If I traveled back to my own twenties, could I come back in my younger/healthier body? That would make a fine souvenir!

    Reply
  58. What a fascinating interview! Thank you, Christina and Nicola. There are a number of time periods I’d like to visit. I think it would be interesting to meet my parents in their early twenties and get to know them as people rather than parents.
    If I traveled back to my own twenties, could I come back in my younger/healthier body? That would make a fine souvenir!

    Reply
  59. What a fascinating interview! Thank you, Christina and Nicola. There are a number of time periods I’d like to visit. I think it would be interesting to meet my parents in their early twenties and get to know them as people rather than parents.
    If I traveled back to my own twenties, could I come back in my younger/healthier body? That would make a fine souvenir!

    Reply
  60. What a fascinating interview! Thank you, Christina and Nicola. There are a number of time periods I’d like to visit. I think it would be interesting to meet my parents in their early twenties and get to know them as people rather than parents.
    If I traveled back to my own twenties, could I come back in my younger/healthier body? That would make a fine souvenir!

    Reply
  61. This isn’t particularly the subgenre of which I am most fond. But this interview has enticed me. I must find Echoes of the Runes.

    Reply
  62. This isn’t particularly the subgenre of which I am most fond. But this interview has enticed me. I must find Echoes of the Runes.

    Reply
  63. This isn’t particularly the subgenre of which I am most fond. But this interview has enticed me. I must find Echoes of the Runes.

    Reply
  64. This isn’t particularly the subgenre of which I am most fond. But this interview has enticed me. I must find Echoes of the Runes.

    Reply
  65. This isn’t particularly the subgenre of which I am most fond. But this interview has enticed me. I must find Echoes of the Runes.

    Reply
  66. What an intriguing idea, Kareni, meeting ones parents when they were young! That would be really interesting. And yes, going back to our twenties and coming back young would be wonderful!

    Reply
  67. What an intriguing idea, Kareni, meeting ones parents when they were young! That would be really interesting. And yes, going back to our twenties and coming back young would be wonderful!

    Reply
  68. What an intriguing idea, Kareni, meeting ones parents when they were young! That would be really interesting. And yes, going back to our twenties and coming back young would be wonderful!

    Reply
  69. What an intriguing idea, Kareni, meeting ones parents when they were young! That would be really interesting. And yes, going back to our twenties and coming back young would be wonderful!

    Reply
  70. What an intriguing idea, Kareni, meeting ones parents when they were young! That would be really interesting. And yes, going back to our twenties and coming back young would be wonderful!

    Reply
  71. I enjoy time-slip novels as they dive into the past and connect it to the present.
    I would bring back a piece of jewelry that made me feel the love of an ancestor down the centuries to me directly.

    Reply
  72. I enjoy time-slip novels as they dive into the past and connect it to the present.
    I would bring back a piece of jewelry that made me feel the love of an ancestor down the centuries to me directly.

    Reply
  73. I enjoy time-slip novels as they dive into the past and connect it to the present.
    I would bring back a piece of jewelry that made me feel the love of an ancestor down the centuries to me directly.

    Reply
  74. I enjoy time-slip novels as they dive into the past and connect it to the present.
    I would bring back a piece of jewelry that made me feel the love of an ancestor down the centuries to me directly.

    Reply
  75. I enjoy time-slip novels as they dive into the past and connect it to the present.
    I would bring back a piece of jewelry that made me feel the love of an ancestor down the centuries to me directly.

    Reply
  76. Well! I clicked right over to Amazon and bought the Kindle version. I have literally never done that before. You have worked some magic here, Christina!

    Reply
  77. Well! I clicked right over to Amazon and bought the Kindle version. I have literally never done that before. You have worked some magic here, Christina!

    Reply
  78. Well! I clicked right over to Amazon and bought the Kindle version. I have literally never done that before. You have worked some magic here, Christina!

    Reply
  79. Well! I clicked right over to Amazon and bought the Kindle version. I have literally never done that before. You have worked some magic here, Christina!

    Reply
  80. Well! I clicked right over to Amazon and bought the Kindle version. I have literally never done that before. You have worked some magic here, Christina!

    Reply
  81. What a fascinating post which I enjoy greatly. The book is a real treasure. I would love to travel back as it would be very meaningful to be able to meet my ancestors.

    Reply
  82. What a fascinating post which I enjoy greatly. The book is a real treasure. I would love to travel back as it would be very meaningful to be able to meet my ancestors.

    Reply
  83. What a fascinating post which I enjoy greatly. The book is a real treasure. I would love to travel back as it would be very meaningful to be able to meet my ancestors.

    Reply
  84. What a fascinating post which I enjoy greatly. The book is a real treasure. I would love to travel back as it would be very meaningful to be able to meet my ancestors.

    Reply
  85. What a fascinating post which I enjoy greatly. The book is a real treasure. I would love to travel back as it would be very meaningful to be able to meet my ancestors.

    Reply
  86. This is a real treasure of a novel which interests me as time travel and historicals are memorable and intriguing. I love hearing about your background, writing and interests. I would love to know how you chose the name of the main character since my last name is Berger.

    Reply
  87. This is a real treasure of a novel which interests me as time travel and historicals are memorable and intriguing. I love hearing about your background, writing and interests. I would love to know how you chose the name of the main character since my last name is Berger.

    Reply
  88. This is a real treasure of a novel which interests me as time travel and historicals are memorable and intriguing. I love hearing about your background, writing and interests. I would love to know how you chose the name of the main character since my last name is Berger.

    Reply
  89. This is a real treasure of a novel which interests me as time travel and historicals are memorable and intriguing. I love hearing about your background, writing and interests. I would love to know how you chose the name of the main character since my last name is Berger.

    Reply
  90. This is a real treasure of a novel which interests me as time travel and historicals are memorable and intriguing. I love hearing about your background, writing and interests. I would love to know how you chose the name of the main character since my last name is Berger.

    Reply
  91. This sounds fascinating! I love that the Viking is not a crazed marauder (as the movies would depict) but an ordinary farmer/landowner. My paternal grandfather immigrated from Sweden prior to 1900. Too many kids to split the family farm! So several of his older siblings had already made the trip to North America.

    Reply
  92. This sounds fascinating! I love that the Viking is not a crazed marauder (as the movies would depict) but an ordinary farmer/landowner. My paternal grandfather immigrated from Sweden prior to 1900. Too many kids to split the family farm! So several of his older siblings had already made the trip to North America.

    Reply
  93. This sounds fascinating! I love that the Viking is not a crazed marauder (as the movies would depict) but an ordinary farmer/landowner. My paternal grandfather immigrated from Sweden prior to 1900. Too many kids to split the family farm! So several of his older siblings had already made the trip to North America.

    Reply
  94. This sounds fascinating! I love that the Viking is not a crazed marauder (as the movies would depict) but an ordinary farmer/landowner. My paternal grandfather immigrated from Sweden prior to 1900. Too many kids to split the family farm! So several of his older siblings had already made the trip to North America.

    Reply
  95. This sounds fascinating! I love that the Viking is not a crazed marauder (as the movies would depict) but an ordinary farmer/landowner. My paternal grandfather immigrated from Sweden prior to 1900. Too many kids to split the family farm! So several of his older siblings had already made the trip to North America.

    Reply
  96. I am intrigued with this story since it is unique and captivating. The time travel aspect is always wonderful. Who isn’t interested in time travel, the past and these colorful settings and locales. If I could travel back in time I would love to bring back my treasures from my childhood, freedom, going biking anywhere, anytime, playing outside all day with friends and walking to and from school alone. I would give much more importance to my parents, in other words, learn how they grew up and lived through The Depression and were never blue and triumphed over adversity.

    Reply
  97. I am intrigued with this story since it is unique and captivating. The time travel aspect is always wonderful. Who isn’t interested in time travel, the past and these colorful settings and locales. If I could travel back in time I would love to bring back my treasures from my childhood, freedom, going biking anywhere, anytime, playing outside all day with friends and walking to and from school alone. I would give much more importance to my parents, in other words, learn how they grew up and lived through The Depression and were never blue and triumphed over adversity.

    Reply
  98. I am intrigued with this story since it is unique and captivating. The time travel aspect is always wonderful. Who isn’t interested in time travel, the past and these colorful settings and locales. If I could travel back in time I would love to bring back my treasures from my childhood, freedom, going biking anywhere, anytime, playing outside all day with friends and walking to and from school alone. I would give much more importance to my parents, in other words, learn how they grew up and lived through The Depression and were never blue and triumphed over adversity.

    Reply
  99. I am intrigued with this story since it is unique and captivating. The time travel aspect is always wonderful. Who isn’t interested in time travel, the past and these colorful settings and locales. If I could travel back in time I would love to bring back my treasures from my childhood, freedom, going biking anywhere, anytime, playing outside all day with friends and walking to and from school alone. I would give much more importance to my parents, in other words, learn how they grew up and lived through The Depression and were never blue and triumphed over adversity.

    Reply
  100. I am intrigued with this story since it is unique and captivating. The time travel aspect is always wonderful. Who isn’t interested in time travel, the past and these colorful settings and locales. If I could travel back in time I would love to bring back my treasures from my childhood, freedom, going biking anywhere, anytime, playing outside all day with friends and walking to and from school alone. I would give much more importance to my parents, in other words, learn how they grew up and lived through The Depression and were never blue and triumphed over adversity.

    Reply
  101. I LOVE time slip and time travel novels and have read Christina’s books. History is a wonderful subject and there are many eras I would love to go back to. I’d like to bring back an authentic piece of clothing from whatever time I ended up in. Enjoyed the interview enormously.

    Reply
  102. I LOVE time slip and time travel novels and have read Christina’s books. History is a wonderful subject and there are many eras I would love to go back to. I’d like to bring back an authentic piece of clothing from whatever time I ended up in. Enjoyed the interview enormously.

    Reply
  103. I LOVE time slip and time travel novels and have read Christina’s books. History is a wonderful subject and there are many eras I would love to go back to. I’d like to bring back an authentic piece of clothing from whatever time I ended up in. Enjoyed the interview enormously.

    Reply
  104. I LOVE time slip and time travel novels and have read Christina’s books. History is a wonderful subject and there are many eras I would love to go back to. I’d like to bring back an authentic piece of clothing from whatever time I ended up in. Enjoyed the interview enormously.

    Reply
  105. I LOVE time slip and time travel novels and have read Christina’s books. History is a wonderful subject and there are many eras I would love to go back to. I’d like to bring back an authentic piece of clothing from whatever time I ended up in. Enjoyed the interview enormously.

    Reply
  106. Ooh, I may seriously need to track down this book. Not my usual genre, perhaps, but I have a weakness for Sweden. Only traveled to Stockholm once – but picked up a souvenir from the Skansen museum of my initials in runes to have made into a necklace.

    Reply
  107. Ooh, I may seriously need to track down this book. Not my usual genre, perhaps, but I have a weakness for Sweden. Only traveled to Stockholm once – but picked up a souvenir from the Skansen museum of my initials in runes to have made into a necklace.

    Reply
  108. Ooh, I may seriously need to track down this book. Not my usual genre, perhaps, but I have a weakness for Sweden. Only traveled to Stockholm once – but picked up a souvenir from the Skansen museum of my initials in runes to have made into a necklace.

    Reply
  109. Ooh, I may seriously need to track down this book. Not my usual genre, perhaps, but I have a weakness for Sweden. Only traveled to Stockholm once – but picked up a souvenir from the Skansen museum of my initials in runes to have made into a necklace.

    Reply
  110. Ooh, I may seriously need to track down this book. Not my usual genre, perhaps, but I have a weakness for Sweden. Only traveled to Stockholm once – but picked up a souvenir from the Skansen museum of my initials in runes to have made into a necklace.

    Reply
  111. What to bring back from the past? So many options, I can’t even begin to decide! What I’d most like is something related to my family history — maybe an illustrated family tree or a Bible, that contained the answers to one of my brick walls!

    Reply
  112. What to bring back from the past? So many options, I can’t even begin to decide! What I’d most like is something related to my family history — maybe an illustrated family tree or a Bible, that contained the answers to one of my brick walls!

    Reply
  113. What to bring back from the past? So many options, I can’t even begin to decide! What I’d most like is something related to my family history — maybe an illustrated family tree or a Bible, that contained the answers to one of my brick walls!

    Reply
  114. What to bring back from the past? So many options, I can’t even begin to decide! What I’d most like is something related to my family history — maybe an illustrated family tree or a Bible, that contained the answers to one of my brick walls!

    Reply
  115. What to bring back from the past? So many options, I can’t even begin to decide! What I’d most like is something related to my family history — maybe an illustrated family tree or a Bible, that contained the answers to one of my brick walls!

    Reply
  116. Sorry to be late replying – that’s a lovely pendant! I can definitely see why you’d want to bring that back 🙂

    Reply
  117. Sorry to be late replying – that’s a lovely pendant! I can definitely see why you’d want to bring that back 🙂

    Reply
  118. Sorry to be late replying – that’s a lovely pendant! I can definitely see why you’d want to bring that back 🙂

    Reply
  119. Sorry to be late replying – that’s a lovely pendant! I can definitely see why you’d want to bring that back 🙂

    Reply
  120. Sorry to be late replying – that’s a lovely pendant! I can definitely see why you’d want to bring that back 🙂

    Reply
  121. Thank you Laini, I’m so glad you enjoyed it! I do genealogy and there are definitely a few of my ancestors I’d like meet and some I want to have a word with 🙂

    Reply
  122. Thank you Laini, I’m so glad you enjoyed it! I do genealogy and there are definitely a few of my ancestors I’d like meet and some I want to have a word with 🙂

    Reply
  123. Thank you Laini, I’m so glad you enjoyed it! I do genealogy and there are definitely a few of my ancestors I’d like meet and some I want to have a word with 🙂

    Reply
  124. Thank you Laini, I’m so glad you enjoyed it! I do genealogy and there are definitely a few of my ancestors I’d like meet and some I want to have a word with 🙂

    Reply
  125. Thank you Laini, I’m so glad you enjoyed it! I do genealogy and there are definitely a few of my ancestors I’d like meet and some I want to have a word with 🙂

    Reply
  126. Thank you so much Anne! I was looking for a Norwegian surname that wasn’t too long or difficult to pronounce, and when I came across Berger it seemed to fit. I think it also clicked as I’d also heard it previously because there was a music teacher at my high school with that surname. Plus there’s a Norwegian singer called Margaret Berger who’s Eurovision song entry I loved! (“Feed You My Love”)

    Reply
  127. Thank you so much Anne! I was looking for a Norwegian surname that wasn’t too long or difficult to pronounce, and when I came across Berger it seemed to fit. I think it also clicked as I’d also heard it previously because there was a music teacher at my high school with that surname. Plus there’s a Norwegian singer called Margaret Berger who’s Eurovision song entry I loved! (“Feed You My Love”)

    Reply
  128. Thank you so much Anne! I was looking for a Norwegian surname that wasn’t too long or difficult to pronounce, and when I came across Berger it seemed to fit. I think it also clicked as I’d also heard it previously because there was a music teacher at my high school with that surname. Plus there’s a Norwegian singer called Margaret Berger who’s Eurovision song entry I loved! (“Feed You My Love”)

    Reply
  129. Thank you so much Anne! I was looking for a Norwegian surname that wasn’t too long or difficult to pronounce, and when I came across Berger it seemed to fit. I think it also clicked as I’d also heard it previously because there was a music teacher at my high school with that surname. Plus there’s a Norwegian singer called Margaret Berger who’s Eurovision song entry I loved! (“Feed You My Love”)

    Reply
  130. Thank you so much Anne! I was looking for a Norwegian surname that wasn’t too long or difficult to pronounce, and when I came across Berger it seemed to fit. I think it also clicked as I’d also heard it previously because there was a music teacher at my high school with that surname. Plus there’s a Norwegian singer called Margaret Berger who’s Eurovision song entry I loved! (“Feed You My Love”)

    Reply
  131. That’s fascinating Pat! My mother comes from a part of Sweden called Småland which had a very high number of emigrants to America so I’ve read a lot about them. Thank you for your comment!

    Reply
  132. That’s fascinating Pat! My mother comes from a part of Sweden called Småland which had a very high number of emigrants to America so I’ve read a lot about them. Thank you for your comment!

    Reply
  133. That’s fascinating Pat! My mother comes from a part of Sweden called Småland which had a very high number of emigrants to America so I’ve read a lot about them. Thank you for your comment!

    Reply
  134. That’s fascinating Pat! My mother comes from a part of Sweden called Småland which had a very high number of emigrants to America so I’ve read a lot about them. Thank you for your comment!

    Reply
  135. That’s fascinating Pat! My mother comes from a part of Sweden called Småland which had a very high number of emigrants to America so I’ve read a lot about them. Thank you for your comment!

    Reply
  136. Many thanks Anne – that sounds great! I too miss those carefree days. Life now seems so much more dangerous and fraught!

    Reply
  137. Many thanks Anne – that sounds great! I too miss those carefree days. Life now seems so much more dangerous and fraught!

    Reply
  138. Many thanks Anne – that sounds great! I too miss those carefree days. Life now seems so much more dangerous and fraught!

    Reply
  139. Many thanks Anne – that sounds great! I too miss those carefree days. Life now seems so much more dangerous and fraught!

    Reply
  140. Many thanks Anne – that sounds great! I too miss those carefree days. Life now seems so much more dangerous and fraught!

    Reply
  141. Thank you Teresa! Oh, yes, that’s a great idea – you should bring back some Tudor clothing as I understand hardly any survives at all 🙂

    Reply
  142. Thank you Teresa! Oh, yes, that’s a great idea – you should bring back some Tudor clothing as I understand hardly any survives at all 🙂

    Reply
  143. Thank you Teresa! Oh, yes, that’s a great idea – you should bring back some Tudor clothing as I understand hardly any survives at all 🙂

    Reply
  144. Thank you Teresa! Oh, yes, that’s a great idea – you should bring back some Tudor clothing as I understand hardly any survives at all 🙂

    Reply
  145. Thank you Teresa! Oh, yes, that’s a great idea – you should bring back some Tudor clothing as I understand hardly any survives at all 🙂

    Reply
  146. I’m so glad you liked Sweden, Amy! I too have a necklace with my name in runes – they’re fascinating, aren’t they? And Skansen is a beautiful place.

    Reply
  147. I’m so glad you liked Sweden, Amy! I too have a necklace with my name in runes – they’re fascinating, aren’t they? And Skansen is a beautiful place.

    Reply
  148. I’m so glad you liked Sweden, Amy! I too have a necklace with my name in runes – they’re fascinating, aren’t they? And Skansen is a beautiful place.

    Reply
  149. I’m so glad you liked Sweden, Amy! I too have a necklace with my name in runes – they’re fascinating, aren’t they? And Skansen is a beautiful place.

    Reply
  150. I’m so glad you liked Sweden, Amy! I too have a necklace with my name in runes – they’re fascinating, aren’t they? And Skansen is a beautiful place.

    Reply
  151. Oh wow yes – ditto! I have so many brick walls in my family tree, it’s maddening 🙂 It’s as if some of our ancestors don’t want to be found. Great idea, Jane!

    Reply
  152. Oh wow yes – ditto! I have so many brick walls in my family tree, it’s maddening 🙂 It’s as if some of our ancestors don’t want to be found. Great idea, Jane!

    Reply
  153. Oh wow yes – ditto! I have so many brick walls in my family tree, it’s maddening 🙂 It’s as if some of our ancestors don’t want to be found. Great idea, Jane!

    Reply
  154. Oh wow yes – ditto! I have so many brick walls in my family tree, it’s maddening 🙂 It’s as if some of our ancestors don’t want to be found. Great idea, Jane!

    Reply
  155. Oh wow yes – ditto! I have so many brick walls in my family tree, it’s maddening 🙂 It’s as if some of our ancestors don’t want to be found. Great idea, Jane!

    Reply

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