If the Prize is right…

Readmodernladytablecitygig
  …will you accept a Professor Pat post?

I’ve been taking tax classes for volunteers these past few weeks and not getting much writing done and no research at all.  So unless our readers really wish to hear about the latest IRS inanities, I’ll reach into the question bin to pull out two reader questions. The winners—Mary Falls and Kay Spears—are entitled to a Patricia Rice book of their choice—if I can find their choice. One never knows what lurks in the depths of my basement.

Mary Falls asks “what facts affect an author choosing a point of view?  Is first person writing considered more effective than the others?  Or simply a more intimate (or personal) approach?  And last, are there any statistics available on which POV is most often used?” 

I doubt if anyone has tried to tally statistics on fictional POVs, but I can tell you from years of reading Librariangraphic
experience that third person prevails, hands down, in the romance genre. I suspect first person may prevail by a slim margin in mysteries.  And chances are good, if anyone is writing in second person, it would be some person experimenting with science fiction/fantasy or literary pretensions, although there are exceptions to every rule.

Third person probably prevails in romance because we tend to concentrate on the relationship between the hero and heroine, and we want to pull out their innards and examine them to see how they work from the inside out.  That’s far easier done through the minds and eyes of both characters. There are several forms of third person, but I really don’t want to go into literature lecture mode, so check out Writesville if you want more about omniscient, objective, etc POV.

Chicklit favors first person because that genre is more interested in the heroine’s journey than in the hero’s, which is why many of them end without a true romantic relationship, just the possibility of one. Chicklit
First person is intimate and immediate, but the reader can only see the world through the protagonist’s POV.  The old gothics were part mystery, part romance, and favored first person to intensify the suspense, a tactic mysteries still use.  If you want the reader to see through just one set of eyes, first person is the way to go, but the experience is limiting.  We really don’t know how others see the protagonist, just how she views herself, so she’d better be a broad-minded heroine, or there’s a good chance the book will end up against a wall. That’s one of the many reasons romance editors prefer third person.

Second person is pretty impossible for most fiction. "You knew the ax would fall" just doesn’t work quite as well as "I knew the ax would fall." As pointed out earlier, “I” is immediate, putting the reader in the place of the protagonist.  “You” distances the reader from the character and the narrator, and that Bright_lights
distance prevents the reader from being sucked into the story, even if the narrator is referring to his audience.  It may be a fun place to play, but readers aren’t accustomed to it.  Just as many readers reject first person because it’s strange to their reading tastes, they’ll reject second person as far too bizarre and uncomfortable for most genres. Try the excerpt from BRIGHT LIGHTS, BIG CITY by Jay Mcinerey.

And my question, Mary, is why do you ask?  I always like to hear the story behind the story! 

Kay Spears writes “I’ve been trying to write for years…it’s a cathartic exercise.  Anyway, when I first started writing I would put on music, but find that eventually the music was distracting me and I’d end up dancing around the room instead of writing.  Do the Wenches use music or do they find it distracting?  And have they removed "games" from the computers?”

Ddanceballroom
Isn’t writing a wonderful way of pouring out all the emotion and thoughts we experience but aren’t allowed to express in everyday communication?  I think most writers write for mental and emotional therapy as well for the sheer creative joy of it.  Once we turn our writing into a business, however, the experience changes, which is a whole ‘nuther topic.

Music, too, is a creative expression.  I can’t speak for all the wenches, but I can only write to background music.  Words would interfere with my writing. If you’ve been around the wenches awhile, you’ve read some of my posts about music (  EARWORMS is one example).  Catchy tunes and simple lyrics will end up in my book via my ears and fingers, bypassing my brain.  So I can play Tchaikovsky when I’m writing drama or some haunting Celtic aria while writing a tearful scene, but I’m definitely not playing anything I can dance or sing to! I’ve also learned the benefits of streaming radio–Wench Sherrie shared with us a great site for classical music at Live 365.  Try it.

As for games—you’ll note the reference to ADD distraction in the referenced post.  I really really REALLY don’t need any more distraction than my mind provides.  Far better that I get distracted by a text on Solitaire
  Aztec mysteries than sucked into a mindless game that can only frustrate me.  If I’m going to waste time, it might as well be creatively.  Probably an eldest child, over-achiever syndrome.   Or maybe I rather write about situations that I know I’ll win.  Writers do have a tendency toward Master of Our World complexes.

How about our readers–do you prefer a particular POV in general or per genre? Do you have games on
your computer?  And when was the last time you got up and danced at your desk?

And if you have a question you’d like to see the Wenches expound upon, drop a note to our Wench mistress Sherrie.  You’ll see her head at the bottom on the left. Give her a click!

100 thoughts on “If the Prize is right…”

  1. I like both first and third-person POVs, but I think first-person is tricky to pull off. Some Regencies by Joan Smith that are in first-person are on my keeper shelf.
    I have lots of games on my computer (and even more on my PS2 ^_^), but none are really quick, so if I start playing them, I’ll be there for at least an hour.
    When I’m working on the computer, I definitely want iTunes on in the background, and sometimes I will get up and dance to a song, and often sing along. The only time I can’t listen to music is if I’m doing something that demands all my concentration, like translating something complex.

    Reply
  2. I like both first and third-person POVs, but I think first-person is tricky to pull off. Some Regencies by Joan Smith that are in first-person are on my keeper shelf.
    I have lots of games on my computer (and even more on my PS2 ^_^), but none are really quick, so if I start playing them, I’ll be there for at least an hour.
    When I’m working on the computer, I definitely want iTunes on in the background, and sometimes I will get up and dance to a song, and often sing along. The only time I can’t listen to music is if I’m doing something that demands all my concentration, like translating something complex.

    Reply
  3. I like both first and third-person POVs, but I think first-person is tricky to pull off. Some Regencies by Joan Smith that are in first-person are on my keeper shelf.
    I have lots of games on my computer (and even more on my PS2 ^_^), but none are really quick, so if I start playing them, I’ll be there for at least an hour.
    When I’m working on the computer, I definitely want iTunes on in the background, and sometimes I will get up and dance to a song, and often sing along. The only time I can’t listen to music is if I’m doing something that demands all my concentration, like translating something complex.

    Reply
  4. I like both first and third-person POVs, but I think first-person is tricky to pull off. Some Regencies by Joan Smith that are in first-person are on my keeper shelf.
    I have lots of games on my computer (and even more on my PS2 ^_^), but none are really quick, so if I start playing them, I’ll be there for at least an hour.
    When I’m working on the computer, I definitely want iTunes on in the background, and sometimes I will get up and dance to a song, and often sing along. The only time I can’t listen to music is if I’m doing something that demands all my concentration, like translating something complex.

    Reply
  5. I like both first and third-person POVs, but I think first-person is tricky to pull off. Some Regencies by Joan Smith that are in first-person are on my keeper shelf.
    I have lots of games on my computer (and even more on my PS2 ^_^), but none are really quick, so if I start playing them, I’ll be there for at least an hour.
    When I’m working on the computer, I definitely want iTunes on in the background, and sometimes I will get up and dance to a song, and often sing along. The only time I can’t listen to music is if I’m doing something that demands all my concentration, like translating something complex.

    Reply
  6. I’m not uncomfortable with first person. I used to read Mickey Spillane, for crying out loud. But I don’t like it in a romance. I like knowing what’s going on in both heads. Second person? Cold, cold, cold. Not for me.
    I don’t “write” write. Just blog, email, here, etc. I enjoy it and can have music or not. I like the idea of the background music and definitely need to check out Celtic. Something I haven’t listened to previously.
    Interesting topics today.

    Reply
  7. I’m not uncomfortable with first person. I used to read Mickey Spillane, for crying out loud. But I don’t like it in a romance. I like knowing what’s going on in both heads. Second person? Cold, cold, cold. Not for me.
    I don’t “write” write. Just blog, email, here, etc. I enjoy it and can have music or not. I like the idea of the background music and definitely need to check out Celtic. Something I haven’t listened to previously.
    Interesting topics today.

    Reply
  8. I’m not uncomfortable with first person. I used to read Mickey Spillane, for crying out loud. But I don’t like it in a romance. I like knowing what’s going on in both heads. Second person? Cold, cold, cold. Not for me.
    I don’t “write” write. Just blog, email, here, etc. I enjoy it and can have music or not. I like the idea of the background music and definitely need to check out Celtic. Something I haven’t listened to previously.
    Interesting topics today.

    Reply
  9. I’m not uncomfortable with first person. I used to read Mickey Spillane, for crying out loud. But I don’t like it in a romance. I like knowing what’s going on in both heads. Second person? Cold, cold, cold. Not for me.
    I don’t “write” write. Just blog, email, here, etc. I enjoy it and can have music or not. I like the idea of the background music and definitely need to check out Celtic. Something I haven’t listened to previously.
    Interesting topics today.

    Reply
  10. I’m not uncomfortable with first person. I used to read Mickey Spillane, for crying out loud. But I don’t like it in a romance. I like knowing what’s going on in both heads. Second person? Cold, cold, cold. Not for me.
    I don’t “write” write. Just blog, email, here, etc. I enjoy it and can have music or not. I like the idea of the background music and definitely need to check out Celtic. Something I haven’t listened to previously.
    Interesting topics today.

    Reply
  11. Since it’s snowy and cold here in St Louis, I’m staying inside and playing at taxes with the CDs on full blast on oldies right now. Comfort music. Kinda like the brownies I’ll make later! Try Celtic, though, Margaret. You’ll be jigging around your desk or weeping on your keyboard.
    I’m not sure why first person works so well for mysteries, but I do understand why third works better in romance.
    I agree, Jill, Joan Smith was an absolute artist at first person, but Regencies lend themselves a little more to it than sensual romances, IMO. Feel free to argue!

    Reply
  12. Since it’s snowy and cold here in St Louis, I’m staying inside and playing at taxes with the CDs on full blast on oldies right now. Comfort music. Kinda like the brownies I’ll make later! Try Celtic, though, Margaret. You’ll be jigging around your desk or weeping on your keyboard.
    I’m not sure why first person works so well for mysteries, but I do understand why third works better in romance.
    I agree, Jill, Joan Smith was an absolute artist at first person, but Regencies lend themselves a little more to it than sensual romances, IMO. Feel free to argue!

    Reply
  13. Since it’s snowy and cold here in St Louis, I’m staying inside and playing at taxes with the CDs on full blast on oldies right now. Comfort music. Kinda like the brownies I’ll make later! Try Celtic, though, Margaret. You’ll be jigging around your desk or weeping on your keyboard.
    I’m not sure why first person works so well for mysteries, but I do understand why third works better in romance.
    I agree, Jill, Joan Smith was an absolute artist at first person, but Regencies lend themselves a little more to it than sensual romances, IMO. Feel free to argue!

    Reply
  14. Since it’s snowy and cold here in St Louis, I’m staying inside and playing at taxes with the CDs on full blast on oldies right now. Comfort music. Kinda like the brownies I’ll make later! Try Celtic, though, Margaret. You’ll be jigging around your desk or weeping on your keyboard.
    I’m not sure why first person works so well for mysteries, but I do understand why third works better in romance.
    I agree, Jill, Joan Smith was an absolute artist at first person, but Regencies lend themselves a little more to it than sensual romances, IMO. Feel free to argue!

    Reply
  15. Since it’s snowy and cold here in St Louis, I’m staying inside and playing at taxes with the CDs on full blast on oldies right now. Comfort music. Kinda like the brownies I’ll make later! Try Celtic, though, Margaret. You’ll be jigging around your desk or weeping on your keyboard.
    I’m not sure why first person works so well for mysteries, but I do understand why third works better in romance.
    I agree, Jill, Joan Smith was an absolute artist at first person, but Regencies lend themselves a little more to it than sensual romances, IMO. Feel free to argue!

    Reply
  16. I think first person works better in mysteries because you are inside the protagonist’s head and, essentially, become the one who is doing the sleuthing. IMHO, anyway.
    In romance, I want what’s in both h/h’s heads so I can be be either one when I am reading their thoughts.
    Does that make sense? Or am I just as nuts as I’ve always suspected. LOL

    Reply
  17. I think first person works better in mysteries because you are inside the protagonist’s head and, essentially, become the one who is doing the sleuthing. IMHO, anyway.
    In romance, I want what’s in both h/h’s heads so I can be be either one when I am reading their thoughts.
    Does that make sense? Or am I just as nuts as I’ve always suspected. LOL

    Reply
  18. I think first person works better in mysteries because you are inside the protagonist’s head and, essentially, become the one who is doing the sleuthing. IMHO, anyway.
    In romance, I want what’s in both h/h’s heads so I can be be either one when I am reading their thoughts.
    Does that make sense? Or am I just as nuts as I’ve always suspected. LOL

    Reply
  19. I think first person works better in mysteries because you are inside the protagonist’s head and, essentially, become the one who is doing the sleuthing. IMHO, anyway.
    In romance, I want what’s in both h/h’s heads so I can be be either one when I am reading their thoughts.
    Does that make sense? Or am I just as nuts as I’ve always suspected. LOL

    Reply
  20. I think first person works better in mysteries because you are inside the protagonist’s head and, essentially, become the one who is doing the sleuthing. IMHO, anyway.
    In romance, I want what’s in both h/h’s heads so I can be be either one when I am reading their thoughts.
    Does that make sense? Or am I just as nuts as I’ve always suspected. LOL

    Reply
  21. Pat, I love St. Louis. One of my kids lived there for several years when her DH worked for Coca Cola. Her 2nd son was born there.
    I have pleasant, tho hazy, memories of a fun visit to the Mount Pleasant winery one fine Sunday. My SIL kept topping off my glass of wine while I wasn’t looking. It was a warm, lovely Sunday in October and I don’t drink very often. You can get the picture. And the wine was very good.

    Reply
  22. Pat, I love St. Louis. One of my kids lived there for several years when her DH worked for Coca Cola. Her 2nd son was born there.
    I have pleasant, tho hazy, memories of a fun visit to the Mount Pleasant winery one fine Sunday. My SIL kept topping off my glass of wine while I wasn’t looking. It was a warm, lovely Sunday in October and I don’t drink very often. You can get the picture. And the wine was very good.

    Reply
  23. Pat, I love St. Louis. One of my kids lived there for several years when her DH worked for Coca Cola. Her 2nd son was born there.
    I have pleasant, tho hazy, memories of a fun visit to the Mount Pleasant winery one fine Sunday. My SIL kept topping off my glass of wine while I wasn’t looking. It was a warm, lovely Sunday in October and I don’t drink very often. You can get the picture. And the wine was very good.

    Reply
  24. Pat, I love St. Louis. One of my kids lived there for several years when her DH worked for Coca Cola. Her 2nd son was born there.
    I have pleasant, tho hazy, memories of a fun visit to the Mount Pleasant winery one fine Sunday. My SIL kept topping off my glass of wine while I wasn’t looking. It was a warm, lovely Sunday in October and I don’t drink very often. You can get the picture. And the wine was very good.

    Reply
  25. Pat, I love St. Louis. One of my kids lived there for several years when her DH worked for Coca Cola. Her 2nd son was born there.
    I have pleasant, tho hazy, memories of a fun visit to the Mount Pleasant winery one fine Sunday. My SIL kept topping off my glass of wine while I wasn’t looking. It was a warm, lovely Sunday in October and I don’t drink very often. You can get the picture. And the wine was very good.

    Reply
  26. ah yes, the wineries on a pleasant fall day, lovely! St Louis is a pretty cool city, but today, it’s just plain cold. But sunny!
    I think you’re probably right about mysteries, and I don’t think you’re crazy about romance. We want to see what the hero is thinking about the heroine and their relationship, is my take on it. Seeing inside a man’s head isn’t something we can do any other way!

    Reply
  27. ah yes, the wineries on a pleasant fall day, lovely! St Louis is a pretty cool city, but today, it’s just plain cold. But sunny!
    I think you’re probably right about mysteries, and I don’t think you’re crazy about romance. We want to see what the hero is thinking about the heroine and their relationship, is my take on it. Seeing inside a man’s head isn’t something we can do any other way!

    Reply
  28. ah yes, the wineries on a pleasant fall day, lovely! St Louis is a pretty cool city, but today, it’s just plain cold. But sunny!
    I think you’re probably right about mysteries, and I don’t think you’re crazy about romance. We want to see what the hero is thinking about the heroine and their relationship, is my take on it. Seeing inside a man’s head isn’t something we can do any other way!

    Reply
  29. ah yes, the wineries on a pleasant fall day, lovely! St Louis is a pretty cool city, but today, it’s just plain cold. But sunny!
    I think you’re probably right about mysteries, and I don’t think you’re crazy about romance. We want to see what the hero is thinking about the heroine and their relationship, is my take on it. Seeing inside a man’s head isn’t something we can do any other way!

    Reply
  30. ah yes, the wineries on a pleasant fall day, lovely! St Louis is a pretty cool city, but today, it’s just plain cold. But sunny!
    I think you’re probably right about mysteries, and I don’t think you’re crazy about romance. We want to see what the hero is thinking about the heroine and their relationship, is my take on it. Seeing inside a man’s head isn’t something we can do any other way!

    Reply
  31. I’m currently reading Janet Mullany’s The Rules of Gentility.
    In a witty “chick-lit” treatment of Regency romance, she uses first person, present tense for both the hero and heroine, alternating back and forth between the two protagonists. It’s sly and IMHO, brilliant.

    Reply
  32. I’m currently reading Janet Mullany’s The Rules of Gentility.
    In a witty “chick-lit” treatment of Regency romance, she uses first person, present tense for both the hero and heroine, alternating back and forth between the two protagonists. It’s sly and IMHO, brilliant.

    Reply
  33. I’m currently reading Janet Mullany’s The Rules of Gentility.
    In a witty “chick-lit” treatment of Regency romance, she uses first person, present tense for both the hero and heroine, alternating back and forth between the two protagonists. It’s sly and IMHO, brilliant.

    Reply
  34. I’m currently reading Janet Mullany’s The Rules of Gentility.
    In a witty “chick-lit” treatment of Regency romance, she uses first person, present tense for both the hero and heroine, alternating back and forth between the two protagonists. It’s sly and IMHO, brilliant.

    Reply
  35. I’m currently reading Janet Mullany’s The Rules of Gentility.
    In a witty “chick-lit” treatment of Regency romance, she uses first person, present tense for both the hero and heroine, alternating back and forth between the two protagonists. It’s sly and IMHO, brilliant.

    Reply
  36. Hey, Pat. Great topic today. To answer your questions, I can’t write to music. Never could. But I have a huge, varied collection, everything from Celtic and the old master composers, to Marty Robbins’ cowboy ballads that I can listen to if I need to get myself into a certain mode before writing. Yes, I do have mindless games on my computer. My latest waste of good writing time is Mah Jong. Now that’s mindless.
    Here’s a question for you. As writers, we all strive to go deeper and deeper with third person POV, until sometimes it almost sounds like first person. Have you ever thought about that, or has it always been that way and I just didn’t notice? I’m wondering if we are actually creating a whole new designation in our quest for Deep POV. What do you think?

    Reply
  37. Hey, Pat. Great topic today. To answer your questions, I can’t write to music. Never could. But I have a huge, varied collection, everything from Celtic and the old master composers, to Marty Robbins’ cowboy ballads that I can listen to if I need to get myself into a certain mode before writing. Yes, I do have mindless games on my computer. My latest waste of good writing time is Mah Jong. Now that’s mindless.
    Here’s a question for you. As writers, we all strive to go deeper and deeper with third person POV, until sometimes it almost sounds like first person. Have you ever thought about that, or has it always been that way and I just didn’t notice? I’m wondering if we are actually creating a whole new designation in our quest for Deep POV. What do you think?

    Reply
  38. Hey, Pat. Great topic today. To answer your questions, I can’t write to music. Never could. But I have a huge, varied collection, everything from Celtic and the old master composers, to Marty Robbins’ cowboy ballads that I can listen to if I need to get myself into a certain mode before writing. Yes, I do have mindless games on my computer. My latest waste of good writing time is Mah Jong. Now that’s mindless.
    Here’s a question for you. As writers, we all strive to go deeper and deeper with third person POV, until sometimes it almost sounds like first person. Have you ever thought about that, or has it always been that way and I just didn’t notice? I’m wondering if we are actually creating a whole new designation in our quest for Deep POV. What do you think?

    Reply
  39. Hey, Pat. Great topic today. To answer your questions, I can’t write to music. Never could. But I have a huge, varied collection, everything from Celtic and the old master composers, to Marty Robbins’ cowboy ballads that I can listen to if I need to get myself into a certain mode before writing. Yes, I do have mindless games on my computer. My latest waste of good writing time is Mah Jong. Now that’s mindless.
    Here’s a question for you. As writers, we all strive to go deeper and deeper with third person POV, until sometimes it almost sounds like first person. Have you ever thought about that, or has it always been that way and I just didn’t notice? I’m wondering if we are actually creating a whole new designation in our quest for Deep POV. What do you think?

    Reply
  40. Hey, Pat. Great topic today. To answer your questions, I can’t write to music. Never could. But I have a huge, varied collection, everything from Celtic and the old master composers, to Marty Robbins’ cowboy ballads that I can listen to if I need to get myself into a certain mode before writing. Yes, I do have mindless games on my computer. My latest waste of good writing time is Mah Jong. Now that’s mindless.
    Here’s a question for you. As writers, we all strive to go deeper and deeper with third person POV, until sometimes it almost sounds like first person. Have you ever thought about that, or has it always been that way and I just didn’t notice? I’m wondering if we are actually creating a whole new designation in our quest for Deep POV. What do you think?

    Reply
  41. Never a day late! The comments come to my box so I always know when someone’s out there.
    I’ll have to check on Mullany, Jane. I’ve got my shopping list right beside me. A lot of people find present tense difficult to deal with, but I’ve toyed with it on a “play” manuscript I’ve been developing. I love the immediacy of it.
    Devon, I hear ya on deep 3rd person. We’ve been moving further and further from omniscient for a long time, which makes things danged inconvenient when you want to do a general description. I have no idea if we can call it a new level of POV. I’ll leave that up the grammarians. But I’m curious to know whether readers prefer that distant omniscient voice in their narrative, or if they want everything dialogue and deep POV. I prefer balance myself.

    Reply
  42. Never a day late! The comments come to my box so I always know when someone’s out there.
    I’ll have to check on Mullany, Jane. I’ve got my shopping list right beside me. A lot of people find present tense difficult to deal with, but I’ve toyed with it on a “play” manuscript I’ve been developing. I love the immediacy of it.
    Devon, I hear ya on deep 3rd person. We’ve been moving further and further from omniscient for a long time, which makes things danged inconvenient when you want to do a general description. I have no idea if we can call it a new level of POV. I’ll leave that up the grammarians. But I’m curious to know whether readers prefer that distant omniscient voice in their narrative, or if they want everything dialogue and deep POV. I prefer balance myself.

    Reply
  43. Never a day late! The comments come to my box so I always know when someone’s out there.
    I’ll have to check on Mullany, Jane. I’ve got my shopping list right beside me. A lot of people find present tense difficult to deal with, but I’ve toyed with it on a “play” manuscript I’ve been developing. I love the immediacy of it.
    Devon, I hear ya on deep 3rd person. We’ve been moving further and further from omniscient for a long time, which makes things danged inconvenient when you want to do a general description. I have no idea if we can call it a new level of POV. I’ll leave that up the grammarians. But I’m curious to know whether readers prefer that distant omniscient voice in their narrative, or if they want everything dialogue and deep POV. I prefer balance myself.

    Reply
  44. Never a day late! The comments come to my box so I always know when someone’s out there.
    I’ll have to check on Mullany, Jane. I’ve got my shopping list right beside me. A lot of people find present tense difficult to deal with, but I’ve toyed with it on a “play” manuscript I’ve been developing. I love the immediacy of it.
    Devon, I hear ya on deep 3rd person. We’ve been moving further and further from omniscient for a long time, which makes things danged inconvenient when you want to do a general description. I have no idea if we can call it a new level of POV. I’ll leave that up the grammarians. But I’m curious to know whether readers prefer that distant omniscient voice in their narrative, or if they want everything dialogue and deep POV. I prefer balance myself.

    Reply
  45. Never a day late! The comments come to my box so I always know when someone’s out there.
    I’ll have to check on Mullany, Jane. I’ve got my shopping list right beside me. A lot of people find present tense difficult to deal with, but I’ve toyed with it on a “play” manuscript I’ve been developing. I love the immediacy of it.
    Devon, I hear ya on deep 3rd person. We’ve been moving further and further from omniscient for a long time, which makes things danged inconvenient when you want to do a general description. I have no idea if we can call it a new level of POV. I’ll leave that up the grammarians. But I’m curious to know whether readers prefer that distant omniscient voice in their narrative, or if they want everything dialogue and deep POV. I prefer balance myself.

    Reply
  46. Ha! So Devon, you’re a Marty Robbins fans too! And you admitted it in public. Gosh. *g*
    I love love LOVE music. Can’t live without it. When I write or critique, I listen to classical music or Whisperings, commercial-free online” pianoradio” (classical and New Age).
    But my favorite “writing” CD is one I use ONLY for when I’m doing my own writing, and not critiquing a client manuscript: Thundering Rainstorm. It’s lovely, and it now triggers such a Pavlovian response in me that when I put it on, I go right into writing mode.
    Re POV: I like both 3rd person and 1st person, and as you do, Pat, I like a mix of omniscient and deep POV.
    On games: I love games, but only play a few, because I could get addicted. I love FreeCell and Spider Solitaire, and here are a few other games that are fun:
    Free Rice (Vocabulary game): http://www.freerice.com/index.php
    Jigzone (jigsaw puzzles): http://www.jigzone.com/
    Befuddlr: http://befuddlr.com/
    Paper Airplane: http://flightsimx.archive.amnesia.com.au/

    Reply
  47. Ha! So Devon, you’re a Marty Robbins fans too! And you admitted it in public. Gosh. *g*
    I love love LOVE music. Can’t live without it. When I write or critique, I listen to classical music or Whisperings, commercial-free online” pianoradio” (classical and New Age).
    But my favorite “writing” CD is one I use ONLY for when I’m doing my own writing, and not critiquing a client manuscript: Thundering Rainstorm. It’s lovely, and it now triggers such a Pavlovian response in me that when I put it on, I go right into writing mode.
    Re POV: I like both 3rd person and 1st person, and as you do, Pat, I like a mix of omniscient and deep POV.
    On games: I love games, but only play a few, because I could get addicted. I love FreeCell and Spider Solitaire, and here are a few other games that are fun:
    Free Rice (Vocabulary game): http://www.freerice.com/index.php
    Jigzone (jigsaw puzzles): http://www.jigzone.com/
    Befuddlr: http://befuddlr.com/
    Paper Airplane: http://flightsimx.archive.amnesia.com.au/

    Reply
  48. Ha! So Devon, you’re a Marty Robbins fans too! And you admitted it in public. Gosh. *g*
    I love love LOVE music. Can’t live without it. When I write or critique, I listen to classical music or Whisperings, commercial-free online” pianoradio” (classical and New Age).
    But my favorite “writing” CD is one I use ONLY for when I’m doing my own writing, and not critiquing a client manuscript: Thundering Rainstorm. It’s lovely, and it now triggers such a Pavlovian response in me that when I put it on, I go right into writing mode.
    Re POV: I like both 3rd person and 1st person, and as you do, Pat, I like a mix of omniscient and deep POV.
    On games: I love games, but only play a few, because I could get addicted. I love FreeCell and Spider Solitaire, and here are a few other games that are fun:
    Free Rice (Vocabulary game): http://www.freerice.com/index.php
    Jigzone (jigsaw puzzles): http://www.jigzone.com/
    Befuddlr: http://befuddlr.com/
    Paper Airplane: http://flightsimx.archive.amnesia.com.au/

    Reply
  49. Ha! So Devon, you’re a Marty Robbins fans too! And you admitted it in public. Gosh. *g*
    I love love LOVE music. Can’t live without it. When I write or critique, I listen to classical music or Whisperings, commercial-free online” pianoradio” (classical and New Age).
    But my favorite “writing” CD is one I use ONLY for when I’m doing my own writing, and not critiquing a client manuscript: Thundering Rainstorm. It’s lovely, and it now triggers such a Pavlovian response in me that when I put it on, I go right into writing mode.
    Re POV: I like both 3rd person and 1st person, and as you do, Pat, I like a mix of omniscient and deep POV.
    On games: I love games, but only play a few, because I could get addicted. I love FreeCell and Spider Solitaire, and here are a few other games that are fun:
    Free Rice (Vocabulary game): http://www.freerice.com/index.php
    Jigzone (jigsaw puzzles): http://www.jigzone.com/
    Befuddlr: http://befuddlr.com/
    Paper Airplane: http://flightsimx.archive.amnesia.com.au/

    Reply
  50. Ha! So Devon, you’re a Marty Robbins fans too! And you admitted it in public. Gosh. *g*
    I love love LOVE music. Can’t live without it. When I write or critique, I listen to classical music or Whisperings, commercial-free online” pianoradio” (classical and New Age).
    But my favorite “writing” CD is one I use ONLY for when I’m doing my own writing, and not critiquing a client manuscript: Thundering Rainstorm. It’s lovely, and it now triggers such a Pavlovian response in me that when I put it on, I go right into writing mode.
    Re POV: I like both 3rd person and 1st person, and as you do, Pat, I like a mix of omniscient and deep POV.
    On games: I love games, but only play a few, because I could get addicted. I love FreeCell and Spider Solitaire, and here are a few other games that are fun:
    Free Rice (Vocabulary game): http://www.freerice.com/index.php
    Jigzone (jigsaw puzzles): http://www.jigzone.com/
    Befuddlr: http://befuddlr.com/
    Paper Airplane: http://flightsimx.archive.amnesia.com.au/

    Reply
  51. Pat, I also like a blend. While I like deep pov when digging around in a character’s head, I still like those lovely descriptive passages that set a scene, just so long as they don’t drag on for paragraph after paragraph. Then, even the loveliest prose tends to run together and make my eyes grow unfocused. When I find myself writing those omniscient descriptive type passages, I usually go back and work in a line or two in the character’s voice so that it doesn’t sound quite so omniscient. If that makes sense.
    Sherri, yes, indeedy, I love Marty Robbins, and I’m not ashamed to admit it. :o) I have a favorite CD of his cowboy and gunfighter ballads. Each song is a story in itself. His voice, and the music take me there, right back to the time and place, and get me into the mood for writing western historicals. If you’ve never heard his “Ballad of the Alamo,” it’s absolutely haunting.
    For setting the mood for anything in the Medieval period, I still favor Clannad and Enya.

    Reply
  52. Pat, I also like a blend. While I like deep pov when digging around in a character’s head, I still like those lovely descriptive passages that set a scene, just so long as they don’t drag on for paragraph after paragraph. Then, even the loveliest prose tends to run together and make my eyes grow unfocused. When I find myself writing those omniscient descriptive type passages, I usually go back and work in a line or two in the character’s voice so that it doesn’t sound quite so omniscient. If that makes sense.
    Sherri, yes, indeedy, I love Marty Robbins, and I’m not ashamed to admit it. :o) I have a favorite CD of his cowboy and gunfighter ballads. Each song is a story in itself. His voice, and the music take me there, right back to the time and place, and get me into the mood for writing western historicals. If you’ve never heard his “Ballad of the Alamo,” it’s absolutely haunting.
    For setting the mood for anything in the Medieval period, I still favor Clannad and Enya.

    Reply
  53. Pat, I also like a blend. While I like deep pov when digging around in a character’s head, I still like those lovely descriptive passages that set a scene, just so long as they don’t drag on for paragraph after paragraph. Then, even the loveliest prose tends to run together and make my eyes grow unfocused. When I find myself writing those omniscient descriptive type passages, I usually go back and work in a line or two in the character’s voice so that it doesn’t sound quite so omniscient. If that makes sense.
    Sherri, yes, indeedy, I love Marty Robbins, and I’m not ashamed to admit it. :o) I have a favorite CD of his cowboy and gunfighter ballads. Each song is a story in itself. His voice, and the music take me there, right back to the time and place, and get me into the mood for writing western historicals. If you’ve never heard his “Ballad of the Alamo,” it’s absolutely haunting.
    For setting the mood for anything in the Medieval period, I still favor Clannad and Enya.

    Reply
  54. Pat, I also like a blend. While I like deep pov when digging around in a character’s head, I still like those lovely descriptive passages that set a scene, just so long as they don’t drag on for paragraph after paragraph. Then, even the loveliest prose tends to run together and make my eyes grow unfocused. When I find myself writing those omniscient descriptive type passages, I usually go back and work in a line or two in the character’s voice so that it doesn’t sound quite so omniscient. If that makes sense.
    Sherri, yes, indeedy, I love Marty Robbins, and I’m not ashamed to admit it. :o) I have a favorite CD of his cowboy and gunfighter ballads. Each song is a story in itself. His voice, and the music take me there, right back to the time and place, and get me into the mood for writing western historicals. If you’ve never heard his “Ballad of the Alamo,” it’s absolutely haunting.
    For setting the mood for anything in the Medieval period, I still favor Clannad and Enya.

    Reply
  55. Pat, I also like a blend. While I like deep pov when digging around in a character’s head, I still like those lovely descriptive passages that set a scene, just so long as they don’t drag on for paragraph after paragraph. Then, even the loveliest prose tends to run together and make my eyes grow unfocused. When I find myself writing those omniscient descriptive type passages, I usually go back and work in a line or two in the character’s voice so that it doesn’t sound quite so omniscient. If that makes sense.
    Sherri, yes, indeedy, I love Marty Robbins, and I’m not ashamed to admit it. :o) I have a favorite CD of his cowboy and gunfighter ballads. Each song is a story in itself. His voice, and the music take me there, right back to the time and place, and get me into the mood for writing western historicals. If you’ve never heard his “Ballad of the Alamo,” it’s absolutely haunting.
    For setting the mood for anything in the Medieval period, I still favor Clannad and Enya.

    Reply
  56. Music immediately puts me in the right mood. I use the same expanded playlist over and over again. Some people use candles (color and fragrance) to set the mood, but I haven’t tried that yet.
    I haven’t written in first person yet, and I hadn’t read much of it till last year. “Sugar Daddy” by Lisa Kleypas converted me to how powerful it can be when done right.
    As for my question for the Wenches, I have two: Which of the Wenches are attending National? Who’s signing at the mega autographing event?

    Reply
  57. Music immediately puts me in the right mood. I use the same expanded playlist over and over again. Some people use candles (color and fragrance) to set the mood, but I haven’t tried that yet.
    I haven’t written in first person yet, and I hadn’t read much of it till last year. “Sugar Daddy” by Lisa Kleypas converted me to how powerful it can be when done right.
    As for my question for the Wenches, I have two: Which of the Wenches are attending National? Who’s signing at the mega autographing event?

    Reply
  58. Music immediately puts me in the right mood. I use the same expanded playlist over and over again. Some people use candles (color and fragrance) to set the mood, but I haven’t tried that yet.
    I haven’t written in first person yet, and I hadn’t read much of it till last year. “Sugar Daddy” by Lisa Kleypas converted me to how powerful it can be when done right.
    As for my question for the Wenches, I have two: Which of the Wenches are attending National? Who’s signing at the mega autographing event?

    Reply
  59. Music immediately puts me in the right mood. I use the same expanded playlist over and over again. Some people use candles (color and fragrance) to set the mood, but I haven’t tried that yet.
    I haven’t written in first person yet, and I hadn’t read much of it till last year. “Sugar Daddy” by Lisa Kleypas converted me to how powerful it can be when done right.
    As for my question for the Wenches, I have two: Which of the Wenches are attending National? Who’s signing at the mega autographing event?

    Reply
  60. Music immediately puts me in the right mood. I use the same expanded playlist over and over again. Some people use candles (color and fragrance) to set the mood, but I haven’t tried that yet.
    I haven’t written in first person yet, and I hadn’t read much of it till last year. “Sugar Daddy” by Lisa Kleypas converted me to how powerful it can be when done right.
    As for my question for the Wenches, I have two: Which of the Wenches are attending National? Who’s signing at the mega autographing event?

    Reply
  61. I’ll be at National, and as of this moment, I intend to be at the signing, depending on how travel arrangements work out. Will you be there, Keira? Would love to have a chance to meet you, although be warned, the event is so brain-frying that I’ve failed to recognize the name of my editor upon occasion. “G”
    Totally agreed on SUGAR DADDY. Loved the opening and I’m glad they allowed Lisa to get away with it.
    I’ve been experimenting with some of the “brain” music Jo told us about. Have no idea if it actually balances my brain, but it’s mindless enough to drown out all background noises without diverting my concentration, so it works like white noise.

    Reply
  62. I’ll be at National, and as of this moment, I intend to be at the signing, depending on how travel arrangements work out. Will you be there, Keira? Would love to have a chance to meet you, although be warned, the event is so brain-frying that I’ve failed to recognize the name of my editor upon occasion. “G”
    Totally agreed on SUGAR DADDY. Loved the opening and I’m glad they allowed Lisa to get away with it.
    I’ve been experimenting with some of the “brain” music Jo told us about. Have no idea if it actually balances my brain, but it’s mindless enough to drown out all background noises without diverting my concentration, so it works like white noise.

    Reply
  63. I’ll be at National, and as of this moment, I intend to be at the signing, depending on how travel arrangements work out. Will you be there, Keira? Would love to have a chance to meet you, although be warned, the event is so brain-frying that I’ve failed to recognize the name of my editor upon occasion. “G”
    Totally agreed on SUGAR DADDY. Loved the opening and I’m glad they allowed Lisa to get away with it.
    I’ve been experimenting with some of the “brain” music Jo told us about. Have no idea if it actually balances my brain, but it’s mindless enough to drown out all background noises without diverting my concentration, so it works like white noise.

    Reply
  64. I’ll be at National, and as of this moment, I intend to be at the signing, depending on how travel arrangements work out. Will you be there, Keira? Would love to have a chance to meet you, although be warned, the event is so brain-frying that I’ve failed to recognize the name of my editor upon occasion. “G”
    Totally agreed on SUGAR DADDY. Loved the opening and I’m glad they allowed Lisa to get away with it.
    I’ve been experimenting with some of the “brain” music Jo told us about. Have no idea if it actually balances my brain, but it’s mindless enough to drown out all background noises without diverting my concentration, so it works like white noise.

    Reply
  65. I’ll be at National, and as of this moment, I intend to be at the signing, depending on how travel arrangements work out. Will you be there, Keira? Would love to have a chance to meet you, although be warned, the event is so brain-frying that I’ve failed to recognize the name of my editor upon occasion. “G”
    Totally agreed on SUGAR DADDY. Loved the opening and I’m glad they allowed Lisa to get away with it.
    I’ve been experimenting with some of the “brain” music Jo told us about. Have no idea if it actually balances my brain, but it’s mindless enough to drown out all background noises without diverting my concentration, so it works like white noise.

    Reply
  66. Generally, I prefer 3rd person for the the superior viewpoint this gives the reader and for the look inside the hero’s head.
    But, I also really enjoy a well written 1st person. I know it’s tricky, but it can be very good when done well, IMO. It’s especially good for secret keeping since the reader only knows what the main character THINKS. I wonder if some of the dreaded Big Misunderstanding plots would work better as 1st person.
    For excellent examples of 1st person, try Mary Stewart’s The Ivy Tree and Elizabeth Vaughan’s Warprize.

    Reply
  67. Generally, I prefer 3rd person for the the superior viewpoint this gives the reader and for the look inside the hero’s head.
    But, I also really enjoy a well written 1st person. I know it’s tricky, but it can be very good when done well, IMO. It’s especially good for secret keeping since the reader only knows what the main character THINKS. I wonder if some of the dreaded Big Misunderstanding plots would work better as 1st person.
    For excellent examples of 1st person, try Mary Stewart’s The Ivy Tree and Elizabeth Vaughan’s Warprize.

    Reply
  68. Generally, I prefer 3rd person for the the superior viewpoint this gives the reader and for the look inside the hero’s head.
    But, I also really enjoy a well written 1st person. I know it’s tricky, but it can be very good when done well, IMO. It’s especially good for secret keeping since the reader only knows what the main character THINKS. I wonder if some of the dreaded Big Misunderstanding plots would work better as 1st person.
    For excellent examples of 1st person, try Mary Stewart’s The Ivy Tree and Elizabeth Vaughan’s Warprize.

    Reply
  69. Generally, I prefer 3rd person for the the superior viewpoint this gives the reader and for the look inside the hero’s head.
    But, I also really enjoy a well written 1st person. I know it’s tricky, but it can be very good when done well, IMO. It’s especially good for secret keeping since the reader only knows what the main character THINKS. I wonder if some of the dreaded Big Misunderstanding plots would work better as 1st person.
    For excellent examples of 1st person, try Mary Stewart’s The Ivy Tree and Elizabeth Vaughan’s Warprize.

    Reply
  70. Generally, I prefer 3rd person for the the superior viewpoint this gives the reader and for the look inside the hero’s head.
    But, I also really enjoy a well written 1st person. I know it’s tricky, but it can be very good when done well, IMO. It’s especially good for secret keeping since the reader only knows what the main character THINKS. I wonder if some of the dreaded Big Misunderstanding plots would work better as 1st person.
    For excellent examples of 1st person, try Mary Stewart’s The Ivy Tree and Elizabeth Vaughan’s Warprize.

    Reply
  71. Pat, so sorry for the late reply. But YES I’m going be at SF, and I’m dying to meet you. I met JoBev last year and was thrilled to do so (in fact, so thrilled, that I babbled endlessly–poor Jo!).

    Reply
  72. Pat, so sorry for the late reply. But YES I’m going be at SF, and I’m dying to meet you. I met JoBev last year and was thrilled to do so (in fact, so thrilled, that I babbled endlessly–poor Jo!).

    Reply
  73. Pat, so sorry for the late reply. But YES I’m going be at SF, and I’m dying to meet you. I met JoBev last year and was thrilled to do so (in fact, so thrilled, that I babbled endlessly–poor Jo!).

    Reply
  74. Pat, so sorry for the late reply. But YES I’m going be at SF, and I’m dying to meet you. I met JoBev last year and was thrilled to do so (in fact, so thrilled, that I babbled endlessly–poor Jo!).

    Reply
  75. Pat, so sorry for the late reply. But YES I’m going be at SF, and I’m dying to meet you. I met JoBev last year and was thrilled to do so (in fact, so thrilled, that I babbled endlessly–poor Jo!).

    Reply
  76. RE : listening to music whilst writing. I always thought I couldn’t write if there was music with words playing in the background. After all, I could only study to classical or instrumental music, so why would I be able to write with the distraction of lyrics? Right? Wrong! Last year I took a writing class and we did an exercise with music. Our instructor played a few selections & we just wrote what came to us. The first song was “Down on the Corner” by CCR. All of a sudden, my couple was at a street party dancing & watching fireworks. Then the music changed to the theme from The Pink Panther, and I found the pair trying to avoid a pesky sibling and sneaking off for some alone time. By the time Ravel’s Bolero ended, they were in the midst of a full-blown seduction on a rowboat in the middle of a pond. I have no idea where any of it came from. Well – except the rowboat scene…hehe….
    Another note – I’d never found writing to be particularly easy – but with the music, the words seemed to spurt out of my pen onto the page with little help from me. It was very enlightening. Now I always have some music playing when I write. The trick is finding the right song for the mood of the story.

    Reply
  77. RE : listening to music whilst writing. I always thought I couldn’t write if there was music with words playing in the background. After all, I could only study to classical or instrumental music, so why would I be able to write with the distraction of lyrics? Right? Wrong! Last year I took a writing class and we did an exercise with music. Our instructor played a few selections & we just wrote what came to us. The first song was “Down on the Corner” by CCR. All of a sudden, my couple was at a street party dancing & watching fireworks. Then the music changed to the theme from The Pink Panther, and I found the pair trying to avoid a pesky sibling and sneaking off for some alone time. By the time Ravel’s Bolero ended, they were in the midst of a full-blown seduction on a rowboat in the middle of a pond. I have no idea where any of it came from. Well – except the rowboat scene…hehe….
    Another note – I’d never found writing to be particularly easy – but with the music, the words seemed to spurt out of my pen onto the page with little help from me. It was very enlightening. Now I always have some music playing when I write. The trick is finding the right song for the mood of the story.

    Reply
  78. RE : listening to music whilst writing. I always thought I couldn’t write if there was music with words playing in the background. After all, I could only study to classical or instrumental music, so why would I be able to write with the distraction of lyrics? Right? Wrong! Last year I took a writing class and we did an exercise with music. Our instructor played a few selections & we just wrote what came to us. The first song was “Down on the Corner” by CCR. All of a sudden, my couple was at a street party dancing & watching fireworks. Then the music changed to the theme from The Pink Panther, and I found the pair trying to avoid a pesky sibling and sneaking off for some alone time. By the time Ravel’s Bolero ended, they were in the midst of a full-blown seduction on a rowboat in the middle of a pond. I have no idea where any of it came from. Well – except the rowboat scene…hehe….
    Another note – I’d never found writing to be particularly easy – but with the music, the words seemed to spurt out of my pen onto the page with little help from me. It was very enlightening. Now I always have some music playing when I write. The trick is finding the right song for the mood of the story.

    Reply
  79. RE : listening to music whilst writing. I always thought I couldn’t write if there was music with words playing in the background. After all, I could only study to classical or instrumental music, so why would I be able to write with the distraction of lyrics? Right? Wrong! Last year I took a writing class and we did an exercise with music. Our instructor played a few selections & we just wrote what came to us. The first song was “Down on the Corner” by CCR. All of a sudden, my couple was at a street party dancing & watching fireworks. Then the music changed to the theme from The Pink Panther, and I found the pair trying to avoid a pesky sibling and sneaking off for some alone time. By the time Ravel’s Bolero ended, they were in the midst of a full-blown seduction on a rowboat in the middle of a pond. I have no idea where any of it came from. Well – except the rowboat scene…hehe….
    Another note – I’d never found writing to be particularly easy – but with the music, the words seemed to spurt out of my pen onto the page with little help from me. It was very enlightening. Now I always have some music playing when I write. The trick is finding the right song for the mood of the story.

    Reply
  80. RE : listening to music whilst writing. I always thought I couldn’t write if there was music with words playing in the background. After all, I could only study to classical or instrumental music, so why would I be able to write with the distraction of lyrics? Right? Wrong! Last year I took a writing class and we did an exercise with music. Our instructor played a few selections & we just wrote what came to us. The first song was “Down on the Corner” by CCR. All of a sudden, my couple was at a street party dancing & watching fireworks. Then the music changed to the theme from The Pink Panther, and I found the pair trying to avoid a pesky sibling and sneaking off for some alone time. By the time Ravel’s Bolero ended, they were in the midst of a full-blown seduction on a rowboat in the middle of a pond. I have no idea where any of it came from. Well – except the rowboat scene…hehe….
    Another note – I’d never found writing to be particularly easy – but with the music, the words seemed to spurt out of my pen onto the page with little help from me. It was very enlightening. Now I always have some music playing when I write. The trick is finding the right song for the mood of the story.

    Reply
  81. Mary, I think the Big Misunderstanding plot can be carried off successfully in 3rd person if it’s done properly, which ain’t easy. If it can’t be done right in 3rd, I’m not sure they can carry off 1st with one character wandering around wondering why the other is so stupid. “G”
    Keira-cool! If I’m not hiding under my table somewhere, definitely come find me. We love babbling readers!
    And CJ, I totally understand that lyrics will entice me, which is why I must avoid them at all cost or my aging grandmother may end up boogeying down by the corner. “G” Takes way too much time for me to find the “right” music, so I try to stick with neutral music, or at least mood music, which can stimulate without putting words in my pen.

    Reply
  82. Mary, I think the Big Misunderstanding plot can be carried off successfully in 3rd person if it’s done properly, which ain’t easy. If it can’t be done right in 3rd, I’m not sure they can carry off 1st with one character wandering around wondering why the other is so stupid. “G”
    Keira-cool! If I’m not hiding under my table somewhere, definitely come find me. We love babbling readers!
    And CJ, I totally understand that lyrics will entice me, which is why I must avoid them at all cost or my aging grandmother may end up boogeying down by the corner. “G” Takes way too much time for me to find the “right” music, so I try to stick with neutral music, or at least mood music, which can stimulate without putting words in my pen.

    Reply
  83. Mary, I think the Big Misunderstanding plot can be carried off successfully in 3rd person if it’s done properly, which ain’t easy. If it can’t be done right in 3rd, I’m not sure they can carry off 1st with one character wandering around wondering why the other is so stupid. “G”
    Keira-cool! If I’m not hiding under my table somewhere, definitely come find me. We love babbling readers!
    And CJ, I totally understand that lyrics will entice me, which is why I must avoid them at all cost or my aging grandmother may end up boogeying down by the corner. “G” Takes way too much time for me to find the “right” music, so I try to stick with neutral music, or at least mood music, which can stimulate without putting words in my pen.

    Reply
  84. Mary, I think the Big Misunderstanding plot can be carried off successfully in 3rd person if it’s done properly, which ain’t easy. If it can’t be done right in 3rd, I’m not sure they can carry off 1st with one character wandering around wondering why the other is so stupid. “G”
    Keira-cool! If I’m not hiding under my table somewhere, definitely come find me. We love babbling readers!
    And CJ, I totally understand that lyrics will entice me, which is why I must avoid them at all cost or my aging grandmother may end up boogeying down by the corner. “G” Takes way too much time for me to find the “right” music, so I try to stick with neutral music, or at least mood music, which can stimulate without putting words in my pen.

    Reply
  85. Mary, I think the Big Misunderstanding plot can be carried off successfully in 3rd person if it’s done properly, which ain’t easy. If it can’t be done right in 3rd, I’m not sure they can carry off 1st with one character wandering around wondering why the other is so stupid. “G”
    Keira-cool! If I’m not hiding under my table somewhere, definitely come find me. We love babbling readers!
    And CJ, I totally understand that lyrics will entice me, which is why I must avoid them at all cost or my aging grandmother may end up boogeying down by the corner. “G” Takes way too much time for me to find the “right” music, so I try to stick with neutral music, or at least mood music, which can stimulate without putting words in my pen.

    Reply
  86. A little late again ^_^ Pat, I never thought about it before but I totally agree, 1st person work better with Regencies than historicals – perhaps because in the ‘sweet’ Regencies, a lot of tension can come from NOT knowing what the hero is thinking, but for some reason historicals require…more.
    Hmm, perhaps there’s a continuum, from comedies of manners where sometimes no one’s inner thoughts are revealed, to Regencies where (in some) only the protagonist’s thoughts are shown, to historicals where several POVs are described.
    There’s my theory for the day 😀

    Reply
  87. A little late again ^_^ Pat, I never thought about it before but I totally agree, 1st person work better with Regencies than historicals – perhaps because in the ‘sweet’ Regencies, a lot of tension can come from NOT knowing what the hero is thinking, but for some reason historicals require…more.
    Hmm, perhaps there’s a continuum, from comedies of manners where sometimes no one’s inner thoughts are revealed, to Regencies where (in some) only the protagonist’s thoughts are shown, to historicals where several POVs are described.
    There’s my theory for the day 😀

    Reply
  88. A little late again ^_^ Pat, I never thought about it before but I totally agree, 1st person work better with Regencies than historicals – perhaps because in the ‘sweet’ Regencies, a lot of tension can come from NOT knowing what the hero is thinking, but for some reason historicals require…more.
    Hmm, perhaps there’s a continuum, from comedies of manners where sometimes no one’s inner thoughts are revealed, to Regencies where (in some) only the protagonist’s thoughts are shown, to historicals where several POVs are described.
    There’s my theory for the day 😀

    Reply
  89. A little late again ^_^ Pat, I never thought about it before but I totally agree, 1st person work better with Regencies than historicals – perhaps because in the ‘sweet’ Regencies, a lot of tension can come from NOT knowing what the hero is thinking, but for some reason historicals require…more.
    Hmm, perhaps there’s a continuum, from comedies of manners where sometimes no one’s inner thoughts are revealed, to Regencies where (in some) only the protagonist’s thoughts are shown, to historicals where several POVs are described.
    There’s my theory for the day 😀

    Reply
  90. A little late again ^_^ Pat, I never thought about it before but I totally agree, 1st person work better with Regencies than historicals – perhaps because in the ‘sweet’ Regencies, a lot of tension can come from NOT knowing what the hero is thinking, but for some reason historicals require…more.
    Hmm, perhaps there’s a continuum, from comedies of manners where sometimes no one’s inner thoughts are revealed, to Regencies where (in some) only the protagonist’s thoughts are shown, to historicals where several POVs are described.
    There’s my theory for the day 😀

    Reply
  91. And a very good theory it is, too. Some books are simply meant to have an omniscient viewpoint, where the author and reader stand back and watch the action. But romance isn’t romance unless we’re up and close personal. The degree of closeness is dictated by many things, but it does seem as if “Sweet” Regencies need that additional tension of not knowing what the hero is thinking. Good point!

    Reply
  92. And a very good theory it is, too. Some books are simply meant to have an omniscient viewpoint, where the author and reader stand back and watch the action. But romance isn’t romance unless we’re up and close personal. The degree of closeness is dictated by many things, but it does seem as if “Sweet” Regencies need that additional tension of not knowing what the hero is thinking. Good point!

    Reply
  93. And a very good theory it is, too. Some books are simply meant to have an omniscient viewpoint, where the author and reader stand back and watch the action. But romance isn’t romance unless we’re up and close personal. The degree of closeness is dictated by many things, but it does seem as if “Sweet” Regencies need that additional tension of not knowing what the hero is thinking. Good point!

    Reply
  94. And a very good theory it is, too. Some books are simply meant to have an omniscient viewpoint, where the author and reader stand back and watch the action. But romance isn’t romance unless we’re up and close personal. The degree of closeness is dictated by many things, but it does seem as if “Sweet” Regencies need that additional tension of not knowing what the hero is thinking. Good point!

    Reply
  95. And a very good theory it is, too. Some books are simply meant to have an omniscient viewpoint, where the author and reader stand back and watch the action. But romance isn’t romance unless we’re up and close personal. The degree of closeness is dictated by many things, but it does seem as if “Sweet” Regencies need that additional tension of not knowing what the hero is thinking. Good point!

    Reply

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