If it’s March….

Charlieatversailles …it must be Tempting Fortune.

(That's Charlie hanging out in Versailles, a few years back.)

It's "interesting" to have such a busy publishing schedule. As soon as one book's out, another shoots in the door! Let's see — October, Lord Wraybourne's Betrothed; November, Lady Notorious in the UK; a breather over Christmas, and then January, Chalice of Roses; February, The Stanforth Secrets; March, Tempting Fortune in the UK; April, The Secret Duke.

I feel as if that should be a choral !!!!!!!! like "Five Golden Rings!"

June, The Stolen Bride; October, Emily and the Dark Angel.

(That green is called "spring frost." Rather strange. If it were frosted, would it be white? We've had a lot of that in the mornings recently.)

To add to the interest, being over in England does make me feel slightly less connected to the North American publishing scene. It makes no sense in this Global Village, but not seeing the books around is sort of odd.

Tfuk Book Of The Month

For any of you in the UK, Tempting Fortune will be out on the 22nd of March, though if you're in the Blackpool area you can get a copy on March 19th, when I'll be signing books at Morrison's there. This is the UK cover, and it's proving to be a bit controversial. One person on line called it "butt ugly" and I find it a bit grim. However some people love it.

They've chosen to show Portia on her way to be auctioned off in a brothel, which accounts for the grimness. What do you think?

There's an excerpt here.

This book is out of print in North America. If you're looking for a copy, you could order it from The Book Depository which ships free world wide.

Weather of the Month

I'm pleased to announce that spring is springing here in Britain. The air's still cold up here, but we have sunshine from a clear blue sky and birds are tweeting, twittering, and occasionally singing their little hearts out all around. It's not dawn chorus time yet. Apparently the official dawn chorus day is May 2nd, according to this site. You can listen to a recording of the dawn chorus there. It truly is a wonder. Though I remember as a student cursing it when I'd rolled back to my room in the early hours, and there it was, at incredible volume, celebrating the dawn.

Sparrow

One problem with Whitby is lack of trees, which probably means it'll be a very muted affair. We've been studying the local birds, however, trying to remember what's what after so long away. My husband took this rather nice photo of a sparrow.  Do click on it to see the bigger version.

Historical tid-bit.

On my blog, Minepast, I posted the following about sinecures, which were very common in the 18th century. One of the characters in the book I'm working on (An Unlikely Countess) celebrates the fact that he has a few, thus allowing him to live a gracious London life.

A sinecure is a job that provides income without requiring much if any
work. There are still a lot around today, requiring only occasional attendance as a figurehead. Promotional use of athletes in advertizing can be considered a sinecure as little actual work is involved for large amounts of money.

In the 18th century sinecures were usually actual jobs, but someone else was hired to do any necessary work at a
much lower income. There were also court
appointments which did require some work, at the least attendance, but
still paid very well while also giving access to royalty with all the
benefits that can bring. I came across a list of the household of
Princess Augusta in the mid 18th century.

Princess
Augusta was King George III's mother, so her household is grand. Why is
she not queen? Because her husband, the Prince of Wales, died before
becoming king.

Among the grander people of her household, we have:

Groom of Stole and Mistress of Robes
Lady Hamilton
had £500 as Groom of Stole and £400 as Mistress of Robes and possibly
also £400 as Lady of Bedchamber. 900 pounds a year was a lot of money back then.

When she retired as Groom of Stole and Mistress of Robes c 6 June
1745 she was granted pension of £1200

Perhaps the business people with their bonuses and grand severance packages are just following an old aristocratic tradition!

How's spring doing where you are? Or autumn, perhaps. Have you ever heard the dawn chorus? I'm not sure where it happens other than in the leafier parts of of Britain. Please report here if you have it near you.

I'll send a back list book to one randomly picked commenter this time. Anything I have (don't have everything!) published before 2007.

Jo

90 thoughts on “If it’s March….”

  1. I’ve always wanted to hear an English dawn chorus, but when I went to that site, the sound link froze my browser so I had to close it down. We do get a version of that here in the Eastern US, though it’s probably not up to the standard of the legendary English songbirds,
    That’s a gorgeous sparrow picture! I’m guessing the dh has a good telephoto lens. If England ever runs out of sparrows, there are plenty here to ship back to the old country. *g*

    Reply
  2. I’ve always wanted to hear an English dawn chorus, but when I went to that site, the sound link froze my browser so I had to close it down. We do get a version of that here in the Eastern US, though it’s probably not up to the standard of the legendary English songbirds,
    That’s a gorgeous sparrow picture! I’m guessing the dh has a good telephoto lens. If England ever runs out of sparrows, there are plenty here to ship back to the old country. *g*

    Reply
  3. I’ve always wanted to hear an English dawn chorus, but when I went to that site, the sound link froze my browser so I had to close it down. We do get a version of that here in the Eastern US, though it’s probably not up to the standard of the legendary English songbirds,
    That’s a gorgeous sparrow picture! I’m guessing the dh has a good telephoto lens. If England ever runs out of sparrows, there are plenty here to ship back to the old country. *g*

    Reply
  4. I’ve always wanted to hear an English dawn chorus, but when I went to that site, the sound link froze my browser so I had to close it down. We do get a version of that here in the Eastern US, though it’s probably not up to the standard of the legendary English songbirds,
    That’s a gorgeous sparrow picture! I’m guessing the dh has a good telephoto lens. If England ever runs out of sparrows, there are plenty here to ship back to the old country. *g*

    Reply
  5. I’ve always wanted to hear an English dawn chorus, but when I went to that site, the sound link froze my browser so I had to close it down. We do get a version of that here in the Eastern US, though it’s probably not up to the standard of the legendary English songbirds,
    That’s a gorgeous sparrow picture! I’m guessing the dh has a good telephoto lens. If England ever runs out of sparrows, there are plenty here to ship back to the old country. *g*

    Reply
  6. We had a lot of fun when we lived in the UK bird searching ( not watching } as they are so elusive in the woods. probably trying to keep the 4 children quiet. Brings back happy family outings. Looking forward to getting The Secret Duke next month. Joan W

    Reply
  7. We had a lot of fun when we lived in the UK bird searching ( not watching } as they are so elusive in the woods. probably trying to keep the 4 children quiet. Brings back happy family outings. Looking forward to getting The Secret Duke next month. Joan W

    Reply
  8. We had a lot of fun when we lived in the UK bird searching ( not watching } as they are so elusive in the woods. probably trying to keep the 4 children quiet. Brings back happy family outings. Looking forward to getting The Secret Duke next month. Joan W

    Reply
  9. We had a lot of fun when we lived in the UK bird searching ( not watching } as they are so elusive in the woods. probably trying to keep the 4 children quiet. Brings back happy family outings. Looking forward to getting The Secret Duke next month. Joan W

    Reply
  10. We had a lot of fun when we lived in the UK bird searching ( not watching } as they are so elusive in the woods. probably trying to keep the 4 children quiet. Brings back happy family outings. Looking forward to getting The Secret Duke next month. Joan W

    Reply
  11. It must make you almost out of breath just to type all your recent publishing activity. How gratifying it must be for you – congratulations! I’m definitely looking forward to The Secret Duke.
    Neither of my two trips to England were in the spring, so I missed hearing in person the kind of English dawn chorus that David Attenborough included in his series The Life Of Birds. But I do love the way birds sing to greet the day, wherever and whenever.
    It’s great to read all your news, Jo!
    Sylvia A

    Reply
  12. It must make you almost out of breath just to type all your recent publishing activity. How gratifying it must be for you – congratulations! I’m definitely looking forward to The Secret Duke.
    Neither of my two trips to England were in the spring, so I missed hearing in person the kind of English dawn chorus that David Attenborough included in his series The Life Of Birds. But I do love the way birds sing to greet the day, wherever and whenever.
    It’s great to read all your news, Jo!
    Sylvia A

    Reply
  13. It must make you almost out of breath just to type all your recent publishing activity. How gratifying it must be for you – congratulations! I’m definitely looking forward to The Secret Duke.
    Neither of my two trips to England were in the spring, so I missed hearing in person the kind of English dawn chorus that David Attenborough included in his series The Life Of Birds. But I do love the way birds sing to greet the day, wherever and whenever.
    It’s great to read all your news, Jo!
    Sylvia A

    Reply
  14. It must make you almost out of breath just to type all your recent publishing activity. How gratifying it must be for you – congratulations! I’m definitely looking forward to The Secret Duke.
    Neither of my two trips to England were in the spring, so I missed hearing in person the kind of English dawn chorus that David Attenborough included in his series The Life Of Birds. But I do love the way birds sing to greet the day, wherever and whenever.
    It’s great to read all your news, Jo!
    Sylvia A

    Reply
  15. It must make you almost out of breath just to type all your recent publishing activity. How gratifying it must be for you – congratulations! I’m definitely looking forward to The Secret Duke.
    Neither of my two trips to England were in the spring, so I missed hearing in person the kind of English dawn chorus that David Attenborough included in his series The Life Of Birds. But I do love the way birds sing to greet the day, wherever and whenever.
    It’s great to read all your news, Jo!
    Sylvia A

    Reply
  16. Sun and warmer here in the Midwest. Lots of bird chatter at dawn. I had no idea the “dawn chorus” could have a definite date! I just thought different birds woke up one morning and decided they were lonely and started chirping.
    But they chirp at dawn because the sound conditions are perfect for making the loudest noise!

    Reply
  17. Sun and warmer here in the Midwest. Lots of bird chatter at dawn. I had no idea the “dawn chorus” could have a definite date! I just thought different birds woke up one morning and decided they were lonely and started chirping.
    But they chirp at dawn because the sound conditions are perfect for making the loudest noise!

    Reply
  18. Sun and warmer here in the Midwest. Lots of bird chatter at dawn. I had no idea the “dawn chorus” could have a definite date! I just thought different birds woke up one morning and decided they were lonely and started chirping.
    But they chirp at dawn because the sound conditions are perfect for making the loudest noise!

    Reply
  19. Sun and warmer here in the Midwest. Lots of bird chatter at dawn. I had no idea the “dawn chorus” could have a definite date! I just thought different birds woke up one morning and decided they were lonely and started chirping.
    But they chirp at dawn because the sound conditions are perfect for making the loudest noise!

    Reply
  20. Sun and warmer here in the Midwest. Lots of bird chatter at dawn. I had no idea the “dawn chorus” could have a definite date! I just thought different birds woke up one morning and decided they were lonely and started chirping.
    But they chirp at dawn because the sound conditions are perfect for making the loudest noise!

    Reply
  21. Pat, I doubt there’s a date, but the people who want to celebrate it fixed something. There’s always the one bird that starts up, then a little while later they’re all at it.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  22. Pat, I doubt there’s a date, but the people who want to celebrate it fixed something. There’s always the one bird that starts up, then a little while later they’re all at it.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  23. Pat, I doubt there’s a date, but the people who want to celebrate it fixed something. There’s always the one bird that starts up, then a little while later they’re all at it.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  24. Pat, I doubt there’s a date, but the people who want to celebrate it fixed something. There’s always the one bird that starts up, then a little while later they’re all at it.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  25. Pat, I doubt there’s a date, but the people who want to celebrate it fixed something. There’s always the one bird that starts up, then a little while later they’re all at it.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  26. Jo, thanks for the entertaining blog. I just received my RT magazine – congrats on your 4 1/2 stars and Top Pick for The Secret Duke. Last month, you were listed as the author of The Irish Duke in the RT Newsletter – I’m sure Virginia Henley had a chuckle. Perhaps next month you can publish another Duke book!

    Reply
  27. Jo, thanks for the entertaining blog. I just received my RT magazine – congrats on your 4 1/2 stars and Top Pick for The Secret Duke. Last month, you were listed as the author of The Irish Duke in the RT Newsletter – I’m sure Virginia Henley had a chuckle. Perhaps next month you can publish another Duke book!

    Reply
  28. Jo, thanks for the entertaining blog. I just received my RT magazine – congrats on your 4 1/2 stars and Top Pick for The Secret Duke. Last month, you were listed as the author of The Irish Duke in the RT Newsletter – I’m sure Virginia Henley had a chuckle. Perhaps next month you can publish another Duke book!

    Reply
  29. Jo, thanks for the entertaining blog. I just received my RT magazine – congrats on your 4 1/2 stars and Top Pick for The Secret Duke. Last month, you were listed as the author of The Irish Duke in the RT Newsletter – I’m sure Virginia Henley had a chuckle. Perhaps next month you can publish another Duke book!

    Reply
  30. Jo, thanks for the entertaining blog. I just received my RT magazine – congrats on your 4 1/2 stars and Top Pick for The Secret Duke. Last month, you were listed as the author of The Irish Duke in the RT Newsletter – I’m sure Virginia Henley had a chuckle. Perhaps next month you can publish another Duke book!

    Reply
  31. It’s early autumn here (Orange, NSW). We have heaps of sulphur-crested cockatoos (very screechy) and magpies (much more melodious). The carolling of magpies always reminds me of childhood holidays on my grandparents’ farm.
    Am also looking forward to The Secret Duke.
    Lesley

    Reply
  32. It’s early autumn here (Orange, NSW). We have heaps of sulphur-crested cockatoos (very screechy) and magpies (much more melodious). The carolling of magpies always reminds me of childhood holidays on my grandparents’ farm.
    Am also looking forward to The Secret Duke.
    Lesley

    Reply
  33. It’s early autumn here (Orange, NSW). We have heaps of sulphur-crested cockatoos (very screechy) and magpies (much more melodious). The carolling of magpies always reminds me of childhood holidays on my grandparents’ farm.
    Am also looking forward to The Secret Duke.
    Lesley

    Reply
  34. It’s early autumn here (Orange, NSW). We have heaps of sulphur-crested cockatoos (very screechy) and magpies (much more melodious). The carolling of magpies always reminds me of childhood holidays on my grandparents’ farm.
    Am also looking forward to The Secret Duke.
    Lesley

    Reply
  35. It’s early autumn here (Orange, NSW). We have heaps of sulphur-crested cockatoos (very screechy) and magpies (much more melodious). The carolling of magpies always reminds me of childhood holidays on my grandparents’ farm.
    Am also looking forward to The Secret Duke.
    Lesley

    Reply
  36. I read the excerpt for TEMPTING FORTUNE. I am going to have to search my boxes and shelves of books to see if I have it waiting for me.
    You have certainly been busy this past year. I can’t imagine writing that many books in such a short period of time.
    On the few mornings when I am awake at dawn I have heard the Dawn Chorus. It is interesting to lie there, listening as first one bird sings then the volume increases as many, many more join in.

    Reply
  37. I read the excerpt for TEMPTING FORTUNE. I am going to have to search my boxes and shelves of books to see if I have it waiting for me.
    You have certainly been busy this past year. I can’t imagine writing that many books in such a short period of time.
    On the few mornings when I am awake at dawn I have heard the Dawn Chorus. It is interesting to lie there, listening as first one bird sings then the volume increases as many, many more join in.

    Reply
  38. I read the excerpt for TEMPTING FORTUNE. I am going to have to search my boxes and shelves of books to see if I have it waiting for me.
    You have certainly been busy this past year. I can’t imagine writing that many books in such a short period of time.
    On the few mornings when I am awake at dawn I have heard the Dawn Chorus. It is interesting to lie there, listening as first one bird sings then the volume increases as many, many more join in.

    Reply
  39. I read the excerpt for TEMPTING FORTUNE. I am going to have to search my boxes and shelves of books to see if I have it waiting for me.
    You have certainly been busy this past year. I can’t imagine writing that many books in such a short period of time.
    On the few mornings when I am awake at dawn I have heard the Dawn Chorus. It is interesting to lie there, listening as first one bird sings then the volume increases as many, many more join in.

    Reply
  40. I read the excerpt for TEMPTING FORTUNE. I am going to have to search my boxes and shelves of books to see if I have it waiting for me.
    You have certainly been busy this past year. I can’t imagine writing that many books in such a short period of time.
    On the few mornings when I am awake at dawn I have heard the Dawn Chorus. It is interesting to lie there, listening as first one bird sings then the volume increases as many, many more join in.

    Reply
  41. Thanks, Kim. It’s nice to be a top pick. 🙂
    The Irish Duke, eh?
    Reminds me of when RT called The Unwilling Bride “The Unholy Bride.” And that was before paranormals became so hot!
    Patricia, I haven’t written all these books in the past year. Whew! Most are reissues, but it’s great to have the old Regencies out again.
    Jo

    Reply
  42. Thanks, Kim. It’s nice to be a top pick. 🙂
    The Irish Duke, eh?
    Reminds me of when RT called The Unwilling Bride “The Unholy Bride.” And that was before paranormals became so hot!
    Patricia, I haven’t written all these books in the past year. Whew! Most are reissues, but it’s great to have the old Regencies out again.
    Jo

    Reply
  43. Thanks, Kim. It’s nice to be a top pick. 🙂
    The Irish Duke, eh?
    Reminds me of when RT called The Unwilling Bride “The Unholy Bride.” And that was before paranormals became so hot!
    Patricia, I haven’t written all these books in the past year. Whew! Most are reissues, but it’s great to have the old Regencies out again.
    Jo

    Reply
  44. Thanks, Kim. It’s nice to be a top pick. 🙂
    The Irish Duke, eh?
    Reminds me of when RT called The Unwilling Bride “The Unholy Bride.” And that was before paranormals became so hot!
    Patricia, I haven’t written all these books in the past year. Whew! Most are reissues, but it’s great to have the old Regencies out again.
    Jo

    Reply
  45. Thanks, Kim. It’s nice to be a top pick. 🙂
    The Irish Duke, eh?
    Reminds me of when RT called The Unwilling Bride “The Unholy Bride.” And that was before paranormals became so hot!
    Patricia, I haven’t written all these books in the past year. Whew! Most are reissues, but it’s great to have the old Regencies out again.
    Jo

    Reply
  46. Jo, we get the dawn chorus in Australia, too, at all times of year, as our birds don’t disappear over winter. It’s really just pre-dawn that they’re the loudest, I think. Once the sun’s up they’re out and busy. Magpies carolling their song to the morning is one of my favourite sounds – so joyful and exuberant. I always think I’m going to have a good day when I hear them.
    Still, I’d love to hear an English bird chorus. I’ve never heard a nightingale or a lark sing — or lots of other birds, but they’re the ones I feel I’ve missed out on as they feature in books most often.
    Best of luck with the huge number of releases this year. Very exciting.

    Reply
  47. Jo, we get the dawn chorus in Australia, too, at all times of year, as our birds don’t disappear over winter. It’s really just pre-dawn that they’re the loudest, I think. Once the sun’s up they’re out and busy. Magpies carolling their song to the morning is one of my favourite sounds – so joyful and exuberant. I always think I’m going to have a good day when I hear them.
    Still, I’d love to hear an English bird chorus. I’ve never heard a nightingale or a lark sing — or lots of other birds, but they’re the ones I feel I’ve missed out on as they feature in books most often.
    Best of luck with the huge number of releases this year. Very exciting.

    Reply
  48. Jo, we get the dawn chorus in Australia, too, at all times of year, as our birds don’t disappear over winter. It’s really just pre-dawn that they’re the loudest, I think. Once the sun’s up they’re out and busy. Magpies carolling their song to the morning is one of my favourite sounds – so joyful and exuberant. I always think I’m going to have a good day when I hear them.
    Still, I’d love to hear an English bird chorus. I’ve never heard a nightingale or a lark sing — or lots of other birds, but they’re the ones I feel I’ve missed out on as they feature in books most often.
    Best of luck with the huge number of releases this year. Very exciting.

    Reply
  49. Jo, we get the dawn chorus in Australia, too, at all times of year, as our birds don’t disappear over winter. It’s really just pre-dawn that they’re the loudest, I think. Once the sun’s up they’re out and busy. Magpies carolling their song to the morning is one of my favourite sounds – so joyful and exuberant. I always think I’m going to have a good day when I hear them.
    Still, I’d love to hear an English bird chorus. I’ve never heard a nightingale or a lark sing — or lots of other birds, but they’re the ones I feel I’ve missed out on as they feature in books most often.
    Best of luck with the huge number of releases this year. Very exciting.

    Reply
  50. Jo, we get the dawn chorus in Australia, too, at all times of year, as our birds don’t disappear over winter. It’s really just pre-dawn that they’re the loudest, I think. Once the sun’s up they’re out and busy. Magpies carolling their song to the morning is one of my favourite sounds – so joyful and exuberant. I always think I’m going to have a good day when I hear them.
    Still, I’d love to hear an English bird chorus. I’ve never heard a nightingale or a lark sing — or lots of other birds, but they’re the ones I feel I’ve missed out on as they feature in books most often.
    Best of luck with the huge number of releases this year. Very exciting.

    Reply
  51. Every time you post about your return to England, I am envious that you are living in Whitby. I spent a couple of weeks in Yorkshire with friends some years ago, and visited as many ruined abbey sites as I could – Yorkshire abounds in them. The drama of the setting of Whitby Abbey is hard to match. It was a good thing I visited when I did, as the friends have since moved to Aberdeen! I had a good time there recently though – used the north of Scotland as a jumping off point to the Orkney Islands. If you haven’t been there yet, you should go. I wonder what Orkney was like in the early 19th century…there are some grand mansions, so there were obviously local gentry! I am looking forward to “The Secret Duke.”

    Reply
  52. Every time you post about your return to England, I am envious that you are living in Whitby. I spent a couple of weeks in Yorkshire with friends some years ago, and visited as many ruined abbey sites as I could – Yorkshire abounds in them. The drama of the setting of Whitby Abbey is hard to match. It was a good thing I visited when I did, as the friends have since moved to Aberdeen! I had a good time there recently though – used the north of Scotland as a jumping off point to the Orkney Islands. If you haven’t been there yet, you should go. I wonder what Orkney was like in the early 19th century…there are some grand mansions, so there were obviously local gentry! I am looking forward to “The Secret Duke.”

    Reply
  53. Every time you post about your return to England, I am envious that you are living in Whitby. I spent a couple of weeks in Yorkshire with friends some years ago, and visited as many ruined abbey sites as I could – Yorkshire abounds in them. The drama of the setting of Whitby Abbey is hard to match. It was a good thing I visited when I did, as the friends have since moved to Aberdeen! I had a good time there recently though – used the north of Scotland as a jumping off point to the Orkney Islands. If you haven’t been there yet, you should go. I wonder what Orkney was like in the early 19th century…there are some grand mansions, so there were obviously local gentry! I am looking forward to “The Secret Duke.”

    Reply
  54. Every time you post about your return to England, I am envious that you are living in Whitby. I spent a couple of weeks in Yorkshire with friends some years ago, and visited as many ruined abbey sites as I could – Yorkshire abounds in them. The drama of the setting of Whitby Abbey is hard to match. It was a good thing I visited when I did, as the friends have since moved to Aberdeen! I had a good time there recently though – used the north of Scotland as a jumping off point to the Orkney Islands. If you haven’t been there yet, you should go. I wonder what Orkney was like in the early 19th century…there are some grand mansions, so there were obviously local gentry! I am looking forward to “The Secret Duke.”

    Reply
  55. Every time you post about your return to England, I am envious that you are living in Whitby. I spent a couple of weeks in Yorkshire with friends some years ago, and visited as many ruined abbey sites as I could – Yorkshire abounds in them. The drama of the setting of Whitby Abbey is hard to match. It was a good thing I visited when I did, as the friends have since moved to Aberdeen! I had a good time there recently though – used the north of Scotland as a jumping off point to the Orkney Islands. If you haven’t been there yet, you should go. I wonder what Orkney was like in the early 19th century…there are some grand mansions, so there were obviously local gentry! I am looking forward to “The Secret Duke.”

    Reply
  56. Our dawn chorus at present is a Cardinal sitting outside our bedroom window with his distinctive song. This is the second year for Cardinals in our back garden and we are absolutely thrilled.
    How are the Malloren’s being received in the UK? Do they love them as much as over here?

    Reply
  57. Our dawn chorus at present is a Cardinal sitting outside our bedroom window with his distinctive song. This is the second year for Cardinals in our back garden and we are absolutely thrilled.
    How are the Malloren’s being received in the UK? Do they love them as much as over here?

    Reply
  58. Our dawn chorus at present is a Cardinal sitting outside our bedroom window with his distinctive song. This is the second year for Cardinals in our back garden and we are absolutely thrilled.
    How are the Malloren’s being received in the UK? Do they love them as much as over here?

    Reply
  59. Our dawn chorus at present is a Cardinal sitting outside our bedroom window with his distinctive song. This is the second year for Cardinals in our back garden and we are absolutely thrilled.
    How are the Malloren’s being received in the UK? Do they love them as much as over here?

    Reply
  60. Our dawn chorus at present is a Cardinal sitting outside our bedroom window with his distinctive song. This is the second year for Cardinals in our back garden and we are absolutely thrilled.
    How are the Malloren’s being received in the UK? Do they love them as much as over here?

    Reply
  61. The song of sunrise! How lovely to be a part of that chorus. We have a mockingbird that sits on a bush & I am sure that he must be the conductor of the bird symphony that we hear as our day begins. A day or so ago I heard the geese singing as they made their way far up in the sky. It never ceases to amaze me how each bird has it’s own song, it’s own migration patterns. I’m sure you are having a wonderful time rediscovering all those wonders in your “new” “old” home country. Always love your books! Am sure this new one will be a pleasure to read, too,

    Reply
  62. The song of sunrise! How lovely to be a part of that chorus. We have a mockingbird that sits on a bush & I am sure that he must be the conductor of the bird symphony that we hear as our day begins. A day or so ago I heard the geese singing as they made their way far up in the sky. It never ceases to amaze me how each bird has it’s own song, it’s own migration patterns. I’m sure you are having a wonderful time rediscovering all those wonders in your “new” “old” home country. Always love your books! Am sure this new one will be a pleasure to read, too,

    Reply
  63. The song of sunrise! How lovely to be a part of that chorus. We have a mockingbird that sits on a bush & I am sure that he must be the conductor of the bird symphony that we hear as our day begins. A day or so ago I heard the geese singing as they made their way far up in the sky. It never ceases to amaze me how each bird has it’s own song, it’s own migration patterns. I’m sure you are having a wonderful time rediscovering all those wonders in your “new” “old” home country. Always love your books! Am sure this new one will be a pleasure to read, too,

    Reply
  64. The song of sunrise! How lovely to be a part of that chorus. We have a mockingbird that sits on a bush & I am sure that he must be the conductor of the bird symphony that we hear as our day begins. A day or so ago I heard the geese singing as they made their way far up in the sky. It never ceases to amaze me how each bird has it’s own song, it’s own migration patterns. I’m sure you are having a wonderful time rediscovering all those wonders in your “new” “old” home country. Always love your books! Am sure this new one will be a pleasure to read, too,

    Reply
  65. The song of sunrise! How lovely to be a part of that chorus. We have a mockingbird that sits on a bush & I am sure that he must be the conductor of the bird symphony that we hear as our day begins. A day or so ago I heard the geese singing as they made their way far up in the sky. It never ceases to amaze me how each bird has it’s own song, it’s own migration patterns. I’m sure you are having a wonderful time rediscovering all those wonders in your “new” “old” home country. Always love your books! Am sure this new one will be a pleasure to read, too,

    Reply
  66. I came to you much later Jo, so I’ve been steadily buying up whatever’s available. I’m pleased as punch that they’re reissuing your oldies, because they’re not all available even at libraries, and I’m greedy, I want to hoard them.
    I’m sure as an author, having to deal with a release every month (sounds dirty) is tiring, but for us fans, I want to say: MOAR PLZ!
    Regarding the cover for TEMPTING FORTUNE, forgive me but this one’s terrible. Their first was fabulous, a six in cricket terminology; this one hit the stumps. It’s wrong for the story, the period, the mood, the tone.

    Reply
  67. I came to you much later Jo, so I’ve been steadily buying up whatever’s available. I’m pleased as punch that they’re reissuing your oldies, because they’re not all available even at libraries, and I’m greedy, I want to hoard them.
    I’m sure as an author, having to deal with a release every month (sounds dirty) is tiring, but for us fans, I want to say: MOAR PLZ!
    Regarding the cover for TEMPTING FORTUNE, forgive me but this one’s terrible. Their first was fabulous, a six in cricket terminology; this one hit the stumps. It’s wrong for the story, the period, the mood, the tone.

    Reply
  68. I came to you much later Jo, so I’ve been steadily buying up whatever’s available. I’m pleased as punch that they’re reissuing your oldies, because they’re not all available even at libraries, and I’m greedy, I want to hoard them.
    I’m sure as an author, having to deal with a release every month (sounds dirty) is tiring, but for us fans, I want to say: MOAR PLZ!
    Regarding the cover for TEMPTING FORTUNE, forgive me but this one’s terrible. Their first was fabulous, a six in cricket terminology; this one hit the stumps. It’s wrong for the story, the period, the mood, the tone.

    Reply
  69. I came to you much later Jo, so I’ve been steadily buying up whatever’s available. I’m pleased as punch that they’re reissuing your oldies, because they’re not all available even at libraries, and I’m greedy, I want to hoard them.
    I’m sure as an author, having to deal with a release every month (sounds dirty) is tiring, but for us fans, I want to say: MOAR PLZ!
    Regarding the cover for TEMPTING FORTUNE, forgive me but this one’s terrible. Their first was fabulous, a six in cricket terminology; this one hit the stumps. It’s wrong for the story, the period, the mood, the tone.

    Reply
  70. I came to you much later Jo, so I’ve been steadily buying up whatever’s available. I’m pleased as punch that they’re reissuing your oldies, because they’re not all available even at libraries, and I’m greedy, I want to hoard them.
    I’m sure as an author, having to deal with a release every month (sounds dirty) is tiring, but for us fans, I want to say: MOAR PLZ!
    Regarding the cover for TEMPTING FORTUNE, forgive me but this one’s terrible. Their first was fabulous, a six in cricket terminology; this one hit the stumps. It’s wrong for the story, the period, the mood, the tone.

    Reply
  71. Jo here.
    Helen, I don’t think of the Orkneys having grand mansions. Aristocratic living must have been different there! Intriguing.
    Hi Kiera,
    The Tempting Fortune cover isn’t entirely wrong, as it’s clearly of her about to be auctioned in the brothel, but she was deliberately made to look very young, which the cover doesn’t (and which would be creepy) and the hair is wrong. Too high.
    But as I said, some people really like the feel of it, the tension and darkness. I agree that Lady Notorious was better, though.
    Jo

    Reply
  72. Jo here.
    Helen, I don’t think of the Orkneys having grand mansions. Aristocratic living must have been different there! Intriguing.
    Hi Kiera,
    The Tempting Fortune cover isn’t entirely wrong, as it’s clearly of her about to be auctioned in the brothel, but she was deliberately made to look very young, which the cover doesn’t (and which would be creepy) and the hair is wrong. Too high.
    But as I said, some people really like the feel of it, the tension and darkness. I agree that Lady Notorious was better, though.
    Jo

    Reply
  73. Jo here.
    Helen, I don’t think of the Orkneys having grand mansions. Aristocratic living must have been different there! Intriguing.
    Hi Kiera,
    The Tempting Fortune cover isn’t entirely wrong, as it’s clearly of her about to be auctioned in the brothel, but she was deliberately made to look very young, which the cover doesn’t (and which would be creepy) and the hair is wrong. Too high.
    But as I said, some people really like the feel of it, the tension and darkness. I agree that Lady Notorious was better, though.
    Jo

    Reply
  74. Jo here.
    Helen, I don’t think of the Orkneys having grand mansions. Aristocratic living must have been different there! Intriguing.
    Hi Kiera,
    The Tempting Fortune cover isn’t entirely wrong, as it’s clearly of her about to be auctioned in the brothel, but she was deliberately made to look very young, which the cover doesn’t (and which would be creepy) and the hair is wrong. Too high.
    But as I said, some people really like the feel of it, the tension and darkness. I agree that Lady Notorious was better, though.
    Jo

    Reply
  75. Jo here.
    Helen, I don’t think of the Orkneys having grand mansions. Aristocratic living must have been different there! Intriguing.
    Hi Kiera,
    The Tempting Fortune cover isn’t entirely wrong, as it’s clearly of her about to be auctioned in the brothel, but she was deliberately made to look very young, which the cover doesn’t (and which would be creepy) and the hair is wrong. Too high.
    But as I said, some people really like the feel of it, the tension and darkness. I agree that Lady Notorious was better, though.
    Jo

    Reply
  76. I think I mentioned that the hairdo on that cover sort of puts me off. It reminds me of “bumbling fools” more than anything else, a la Cirque du Soleil–sorry. But then, it’s not your fault. Was that a common coiffure of the day? Is this the book’s first publication in the UK? I’m sure some readers will have got the U.S. edition, but it’s great that more people will now have access to it.
    Talk about public service sinecures! Sometime soon, several 1000 Ontario workers will become federal employees by description. They will not have to move, or have longer trips to work, or have to organize new offices. Yet they will be getting an average of $45,000 in “severance” pay from the ON taxpayers–as per their public service contracts. Absolutely shameful. Wish I could get a sinecure too.

    Reply
  77. I think I mentioned that the hairdo on that cover sort of puts me off. It reminds me of “bumbling fools” more than anything else, a la Cirque du Soleil–sorry. But then, it’s not your fault. Was that a common coiffure of the day? Is this the book’s first publication in the UK? I’m sure some readers will have got the U.S. edition, but it’s great that more people will now have access to it.
    Talk about public service sinecures! Sometime soon, several 1000 Ontario workers will become federal employees by description. They will not have to move, or have longer trips to work, or have to organize new offices. Yet they will be getting an average of $45,000 in “severance” pay from the ON taxpayers–as per their public service contracts. Absolutely shameful. Wish I could get a sinecure too.

    Reply
  78. I think I mentioned that the hairdo on that cover sort of puts me off. It reminds me of “bumbling fools” more than anything else, a la Cirque du Soleil–sorry. But then, it’s not your fault. Was that a common coiffure of the day? Is this the book’s first publication in the UK? I’m sure some readers will have got the U.S. edition, but it’s great that more people will now have access to it.
    Talk about public service sinecures! Sometime soon, several 1000 Ontario workers will become federal employees by description. They will not have to move, or have longer trips to work, or have to organize new offices. Yet they will be getting an average of $45,000 in “severance” pay from the ON taxpayers–as per their public service contracts. Absolutely shameful. Wish I could get a sinecure too.

    Reply
  79. I think I mentioned that the hairdo on that cover sort of puts me off. It reminds me of “bumbling fools” more than anything else, a la Cirque du Soleil–sorry. But then, it’s not your fault. Was that a common coiffure of the day? Is this the book’s first publication in the UK? I’m sure some readers will have got the U.S. edition, but it’s great that more people will now have access to it.
    Talk about public service sinecures! Sometime soon, several 1000 Ontario workers will become federal employees by description. They will not have to move, or have longer trips to work, or have to organize new offices. Yet they will be getting an average of $45,000 in “severance” pay from the ON taxpayers–as per their public service contracts. Absolutely shameful. Wish I could get a sinecure too.

    Reply
  80. I think I mentioned that the hairdo on that cover sort of puts me off. It reminds me of “bumbling fools” more than anything else, a la Cirque du Soleil–sorry. But then, it’s not your fault. Was that a common coiffure of the day? Is this the book’s first publication in the UK? I’m sure some readers will have got the U.S. edition, but it’s great that more people will now have access to it.
    Talk about public service sinecures! Sometime soon, several 1000 Ontario workers will become federal employees by description. They will not have to move, or have longer trips to work, or have to organize new offices. Yet they will be getting an average of $45,000 in “severance” pay from the ON taxpayers–as per their public service contracts. Absolutely shameful. Wish I could get a sinecure too.

    Reply

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