I’d rather be reading

Bouffant_barbie_1_5       From Loretta:
      
      In the U.S. it’s a holiday weekend, THE holiday shopping weekend.  The stores are opening at insane hours, like 6AM.  I am trying to figure out what is so important to buy at some alleged sale price that one would get up at 6AM to obtain same.  OK, there are two books I can think of doing that for, if I could get them for less than a mortgage payment but otherwise, no, I wouldn’t do it.  Not even for a Barbie.  Really.

  But then, I am not an early riser and never was.  Wish it were otherwise.  The world, it seems to me–at least my part of it–is designed for early risers.
      I recently read that people are driving to work earlier and earlier in hopes of beating the traffic and all they are doing is making more traffic.  Here are some fascinating statistics from our local newspaper, in a set of Then and Now columns:
      U.S. population in 1967:  200 million
      U.S. population in 2006:  300 million
     Autooldsilhouette
       Registered motor vehicles in 1967:  98.9 million
      Registered motor vehicles in 2006:  237.2 million
      
      Since the numbers speak for themselves, I’ll move on to the next topic.  Or, the original one, which is, here it is Thanksgiving weekend, and I’m thinking of maybe taking in a show at the Worcester Art Museum http://www.worcesterart.org/ which ends on Sunday, called, Horrors of War.  It’s a collection of works from the permanent collection dealing with–yes, you guessed it–war.  This art museum is another Massachusetts jewel.  Also on view (and this one runs until June 2007) is an amazing exhibition of works in jade, which I oohed and ahed over during my last visit.  After the high culture, I’ll head out midafternoon to see the new James Bond (though my heart is broken because it isn’t Pierce Brosnan, I’m trying to have an open mind).
      But all I really wanna do is sit back in a comfy chair and read my book.  I am already getting ideas for my next opus, which means this quiet time will soon be over.  So I’m treating myself to Patrick O’Brian, because his works, it seems to me, deserve quality time, i.e., when one is not embroiled in one’s own fictional world.  Also, I have to be careful what I read while working on a book because I’m very easily influenced.  My characters could end up sounding like sea captains or drunken sailors and I might start spouting incomprehensible stuff about forecastles and yardarms and furled sails skinned up in the bunt.  Well, probably not but since I don’t know where my ideas come from, it makes sense, when I’m actively writing, to exercise caution about my reading, like avoiding fiction set in my time period, for instance.
      All of which is to say that my brain is enjoying a vacation and, not wanting to exert itself too much, whispered in my ear (really easy for a brain, what with being right there next to your ear and all), “Why not ask THE QUESTION?”
      So I will.
      What are you reading now?
      And would you like to give the rest of us a taste by quoting the last paragraph of Chapter Six?
      The_ionian_mission Here’s mine, from Patrick O’Brian’s The Ionian Mission:
      “He took a few turns up and down the quarterdeck in order not to evade the disappointed looks of the crews housing their guns, the sullen, disappointed atmosphere, the flat sense of anticlimax.  The ship was profoundly dissatisfied with him:  he was profoundly dissatisfied with himself.”
      

36 thoughts on “I’d rather be reading”

  1. Loretta, I hope non-fiction counts. It’s the weekend after Thanksgiving and I’m on a “health” kick. I’m reading YOUNGER NEXT YEAR FOR WOMEN. Here’s the last paragraph of Chapter Six.
    “Second, if you were not an athlete as a girl, there is every reason to anticipate that your Personal Best is still ahead and that you have years and years of getting Younger Every Year. A pesonal story: I am seventy-one years old, and I have never skied better in my life. Literally, I was not much of a skier at twenty-eight, to be sure, but now I am a god. Better than, say, 60 percent of the people on a serious mountain on a given day. Do you have any idea what fun that is? To come sweeping down those hills with a turn of speed and a touch of grace at this late state in the day? I grin for the pleasure of it. Ridiculous old fool? You bet. Shamefully behind people who can really ski? You bet. And I love it. Race you to the bottom!”

    Reply
  2. Loretta, I hope non-fiction counts. It’s the weekend after Thanksgiving and I’m on a “health” kick. I’m reading YOUNGER NEXT YEAR FOR WOMEN. Here’s the last paragraph of Chapter Six.
    “Second, if you were not an athlete as a girl, there is every reason to anticipate that your Personal Best is still ahead and that you have years and years of getting Younger Every Year. A pesonal story: I am seventy-one years old, and I have never skied better in my life. Literally, I was not much of a skier at twenty-eight, to be sure, but now I am a god. Better than, say, 60 percent of the people on a serious mountain on a given day. Do you have any idea what fun that is? To come sweeping down those hills with a turn of speed and a touch of grace at this late state in the day? I grin for the pleasure of it. Ridiculous old fool? You bet. Shamefully behind people who can really ski? You bet. And I love it. Race you to the bottom!”

    Reply
  3. Loretta, I hope non-fiction counts. It’s the weekend after Thanksgiving and I’m on a “health” kick. I’m reading YOUNGER NEXT YEAR FOR WOMEN. Here’s the last paragraph of Chapter Six.
    “Second, if you were not an athlete as a girl, there is every reason to anticipate that your Personal Best is still ahead and that you have years and years of getting Younger Every Year. A pesonal story: I am seventy-one years old, and I have never skied better in my life. Literally, I was not much of a skier at twenty-eight, to be sure, but now I am a god. Better than, say, 60 percent of the people on a serious mountain on a given day. Do you have any idea what fun that is? To come sweeping down those hills with a turn of speed and a touch of grace at this late state in the day? I grin for the pleasure of it. Ridiculous old fool? You bet. Shamefully behind people who can really ski? You bet. And I love it. Race you to the bottom!”

    Reply
  4. I’m reading three books. Having just finished my latest wip, and plotting, slowly, my next, I decided it would be a good idea to read nearly everything from this year’s RITA finalists and do my research for the next work.
    Plus I wanted to read one of my favorite Julie Garwood novels to remind myself why I liked those stories so well. I did not know, then, how much she head-hopped, but well into the story, I’m noticing it less and finding I’m still a fan.
    Here’s the good news for the wenches–I’m such a loyal fan! A life-long reader of your books, Loretta, Mary Jo, Jo, et al.
    Honor’s Splendour by Julie Garwood, Chapter 6, last paragraph:
    Duncan smiled. Lady Madelyne had obviously become accustomed to having him near, too, and his arrogant grin was all because he knew she wasn’t aware of it…yet.
    Pretty typical Garwood, really, with the alpha hero confident of the heroine’s affections.
    Now from the other book I’m reading — The Misted Cliffs by Catherine Asaro:
    Then it was done. Cobalt was consort of the heir to the Jaguar Throne. It should have been his father’s throne, not that of the yellow-haired man who was now his father-in-law, but this would have to do. Only time would reveal if his ill-conceived marriage could stop a war.
    I do not know if this is typical of Asaro as this is my first book by her.
    Now for my research book, which I just received from Amazon.co.uk:
    Actually the war, as we have told it, was not quite over for there was another campaign and other ship engagements, but when all phases of it had closed and termpers eased, the Gazette was pleased to endorse the general verdict: ‘We fought [it] to be beaten, and we negotiated only to be deceived.*
    This from: Bermuda from Sail to Steam: A History of the Island from 1784 to 1901 by H. C. Wilkinson

    Reply
  5. I’m reading three books. Having just finished my latest wip, and plotting, slowly, my next, I decided it would be a good idea to read nearly everything from this year’s RITA finalists and do my research for the next work.
    Plus I wanted to read one of my favorite Julie Garwood novels to remind myself why I liked those stories so well. I did not know, then, how much she head-hopped, but well into the story, I’m noticing it less and finding I’m still a fan.
    Here’s the good news for the wenches–I’m such a loyal fan! A life-long reader of your books, Loretta, Mary Jo, Jo, et al.
    Honor’s Splendour by Julie Garwood, Chapter 6, last paragraph:
    Duncan smiled. Lady Madelyne had obviously become accustomed to having him near, too, and his arrogant grin was all because he knew she wasn’t aware of it…yet.
    Pretty typical Garwood, really, with the alpha hero confident of the heroine’s affections.
    Now from the other book I’m reading — The Misted Cliffs by Catherine Asaro:
    Then it was done. Cobalt was consort of the heir to the Jaguar Throne. It should have been his father’s throne, not that of the yellow-haired man who was now his father-in-law, but this would have to do. Only time would reveal if his ill-conceived marriage could stop a war.
    I do not know if this is typical of Asaro as this is my first book by her.
    Now for my research book, which I just received from Amazon.co.uk:
    Actually the war, as we have told it, was not quite over for there was another campaign and other ship engagements, but when all phases of it had closed and termpers eased, the Gazette was pleased to endorse the general verdict: ‘We fought [it] to be beaten, and we negotiated only to be deceived.*
    This from: Bermuda from Sail to Steam: A History of the Island from 1784 to 1901 by H. C. Wilkinson

    Reply
  6. I’m reading three books. Having just finished my latest wip, and plotting, slowly, my next, I decided it would be a good idea to read nearly everything from this year’s RITA finalists and do my research for the next work.
    Plus I wanted to read one of my favorite Julie Garwood novels to remind myself why I liked those stories so well. I did not know, then, how much she head-hopped, but well into the story, I’m noticing it less and finding I’m still a fan.
    Here’s the good news for the wenches–I’m such a loyal fan! A life-long reader of your books, Loretta, Mary Jo, Jo, et al.
    Honor’s Splendour by Julie Garwood, Chapter 6, last paragraph:
    Duncan smiled. Lady Madelyne had obviously become accustomed to having him near, too, and his arrogant grin was all because he knew she wasn’t aware of it…yet.
    Pretty typical Garwood, really, with the alpha hero confident of the heroine’s affections.
    Now from the other book I’m reading — The Misted Cliffs by Catherine Asaro:
    Then it was done. Cobalt was consort of the heir to the Jaguar Throne. It should have been his father’s throne, not that of the yellow-haired man who was now his father-in-law, but this would have to do. Only time would reveal if his ill-conceived marriage could stop a war.
    I do not know if this is typical of Asaro as this is my first book by her.
    Now for my research book, which I just received from Amazon.co.uk:
    Actually the war, as we have told it, was not quite over for there was another campaign and other ship engagements, but when all phases of it had closed and termpers eased, the Gazette was pleased to endorse the general verdict: ‘We fought [it] to be beaten, and we negotiated only to be deceived.*
    This from: Bermuda from Sail to Steam: A History of the Island from 1784 to 1901 by H. C. Wilkinson

    Reply
  7. I’m reading “An Accidental Goddess” by Linnea Sinclair (Sci Fi).
    The last para in chapter 6 is a one liner:
    “We’ll think of something, Simon. We’ll think of something.”
    Which doesn’t give anyone a taste of what it’s about. It’s about a woman who wakes up in sick bay of a space station 300+ years in the future and discovers that she’s been made a goddess. She has the hots for the station commander, parrots are free-flying everywhere, she’s trying to hide who she really is, and the station is under attack. A fun read.

    Reply
  8. I’m reading “An Accidental Goddess” by Linnea Sinclair (Sci Fi).
    The last para in chapter 6 is a one liner:
    “We’ll think of something, Simon. We’ll think of something.”
    Which doesn’t give anyone a taste of what it’s about. It’s about a woman who wakes up in sick bay of a space station 300+ years in the future and discovers that she’s been made a goddess. She has the hots for the station commander, parrots are free-flying everywhere, she’s trying to hide who she really is, and the station is under attack. A fun read.

    Reply
  9. I’m reading “An Accidental Goddess” by Linnea Sinclair (Sci Fi).
    The last para in chapter 6 is a one liner:
    “We’ll think of something, Simon. We’ll think of something.”
    Which doesn’t give anyone a taste of what it’s about. It’s about a woman who wakes up in sick bay of a space station 300+ years in the future and discovers that she’s been made a goddess. She has the hots for the station commander, parrots are free-flying everywhere, she’s trying to hide who she really is, and the station is under attack. A fun read.

    Reply
  10. Always fun.
    Of course I’m not on holiday, not that I’m pouting or anything…
    I’m reading Sharon Shinn’s Mystic and Rider.
    “He returned to his bedroll, lying wakeful for a long while. But he was a soldier; he could summon sleep in the middle of a battlefield. He closed his eyes and forced himself to sleep and he didn’t awake again until morning. By then, the strange experience seemed surreal enough, unlikely enough, that he was almost able to convince himself he’d dreamed it. Except that he was not the sort of man who dreamed.”
    Thanks for the ideas, BTW. Keep them coming!
    Jo

    Reply
  11. Always fun.
    Of course I’m not on holiday, not that I’m pouting or anything…
    I’m reading Sharon Shinn’s Mystic and Rider.
    “He returned to his bedroll, lying wakeful for a long while. But he was a soldier; he could summon sleep in the middle of a battlefield. He closed his eyes and forced himself to sleep and he didn’t awake again until morning. By then, the strange experience seemed surreal enough, unlikely enough, that he was almost able to convince himself he’d dreamed it. Except that he was not the sort of man who dreamed.”
    Thanks for the ideas, BTW. Keep them coming!
    Jo

    Reply
  12. Always fun.
    Of course I’m not on holiday, not that I’m pouting or anything…
    I’m reading Sharon Shinn’s Mystic and Rider.
    “He returned to his bedroll, lying wakeful for a long while. But he was a soldier; he could summon sleep in the middle of a battlefield. He closed his eyes and forced himself to sleep and he didn’t awake again until morning. By then, the strange experience seemed surreal enough, unlikely enough, that he was almost able to convince himself he’d dreamed it. Except that he was not the sort of man who dreamed.”
    Thanks for the ideas, BTW. Keep them coming!
    Jo

    Reply
  13. Ah, such fun stuff! Loretta, the world might be designed for early risers, but we creative writer types tend to be nocturnal as owls, so in our flock, the larks are a minority. (We have at least one lark-ish Wench, but I won’t blow her cover. 🙂
    As for the books–I’ve read several of the books referred to, including AN ACCIDENTAL GODDESS and MYSTIC AND RIDER. I’m also a big fan of Catherine Asaro. (In the interests of full disclosure, we’re also good friends.)
    Cathy, Asaro has three different series, each of which has a slightly different voice. She has her hard sf Skolian series, which is far future and often but not always romantic. She has the Luna romantic fantasy series you’re reading. She also has a near future series that is about AI (artificial intellence) and is very strongly romance. (Catherine has a PhD in chemical physics from Harvard, so she knows her science!)
    I’m currently reading the latest of Asaro’s AI books ALPHA. The hero is an Air Force general of mature years (the book is set in 2032) and the heroine is a gorgeous, sexy android who has been programmed by her creator, a nasty dude who is now dead. (Or is he?) The question is, can Alpha evolve into and independent, sentient being?
    The quote: Hmm, the last paragraph is just
    “Hello,” Alpha said.
    More context:
    The doctor walked into the room. He had his jacket on with the hood pulled up.
    “Is it raining?” Thomas asked.
    He pulled down his hood–and raised a gun.
    “Ah, hell,” Thomas said.
    “Hello,” Alpha said.
    (She’s about to kidnap him.)
    Mary Jo, enjoying book greatly.

    Reply
  14. Ah, such fun stuff! Loretta, the world might be designed for early risers, but we creative writer types tend to be nocturnal as owls, so in our flock, the larks are a minority. (We have at least one lark-ish Wench, but I won’t blow her cover. 🙂
    As for the books–I’ve read several of the books referred to, including AN ACCIDENTAL GODDESS and MYSTIC AND RIDER. I’m also a big fan of Catherine Asaro. (In the interests of full disclosure, we’re also good friends.)
    Cathy, Asaro has three different series, each of which has a slightly different voice. She has her hard sf Skolian series, which is far future and often but not always romantic. She has the Luna romantic fantasy series you’re reading. She also has a near future series that is about AI (artificial intellence) and is very strongly romance. (Catherine has a PhD in chemical physics from Harvard, so she knows her science!)
    I’m currently reading the latest of Asaro’s AI books ALPHA. The hero is an Air Force general of mature years (the book is set in 2032) and the heroine is a gorgeous, sexy android who has been programmed by her creator, a nasty dude who is now dead. (Or is he?) The question is, can Alpha evolve into and independent, sentient being?
    The quote: Hmm, the last paragraph is just
    “Hello,” Alpha said.
    More context:
    The doctor walked into the room. He had his jacket on with the hood pulled up.
    “Is it raining?” Thomas asked.
    He pulled down his hood–and raised a gun.
    “Ah, hell,” Thomas said.
    “Hello,” Alpha said.
    (She’s about to kidnap him.)
    Mary Jo, enjoying book greatly.

    Reply
  15. Ah, such fun stuff! Loretta, the world might be designed for early risers, but we creative writer types tend to be nocturnal as owls, so in our flock, the larks are a minority. (We have at least one lark-ish Wench, but I won’t blow her cover. 🙂
    As for the books–I’ve read several of the books referred to, including AN ACCIDENTAL GODDESS and MYSTIC AND RIDER. I’m also a big fan of Catherine Asaro. (In the interests of full disclosure, we’re also good friends.)
    Cathy, Asaro has three different series, each of which has a slightly different voice. She has her hard sf Skolian series, which is far future and often but not always romantic. She has the Luna romantic fantasy series you’re reading. She also has a near future series that is about AI (artificial intellence) and is very strongly romance. (Catherine has a PhD in chemical physics from Harvard, so she knows her science!)
    I’m currently reading the latest of Asaro’s AI books ALPHA. The hero is an Air Force general of mature years (the book is set in 2032) and the heroine is a gorgeous, sexy android who has been programmed by her creator, a nasty dude who is now dead. (Or is he?) The question is, can Alpha evolve into and independent, sentient being?
    The quote: Hmm, the last paragraph is just
    “Hello,” Alpha said.
    More context:
    The doctor walked into the room. He had his jacket on with the hood pulled up.
    “Is it raining?” Thomas asked.
    He pulled down his hood–and raised a gun.
    “Ah, hell,” Thomas said.
    “Hello,” Alpha said.
    (She’s about to kidnap him.)
    Mary Jo, enjoying book greatly.

    Reply
  16. I have three books going at the moment too. I am rereading Eloisa’s James’s Essex Sisters books to be ready for the discussions when Pleasure for Pleasure is officially released next week; I have begun my annual Christmas reading ritual of rereading all my favorite Christmas books (a number of Wench titles in the mix); I am rereading Jasper Fforde’s The Eyre Affair because I am teaching it next week.
    from EJ’s Kiss Me, Annabel
    They bobbed around her, showing every sign of men who would kiss and grab, kiss and pant. Englishmen, both of them. (Annabel is determined to marry a wealthy Englishman and determined not to marry a fellow Scot.)
    A Regency Christmas Eve has only five novellas, so I will use the last paragraph of the fifth. Appropriately, the paragraph is from Edith Layton’s “The Christmas Thief.”
    “The happiest,” she said, and it was only true.
    From Fforde’s The Eyre Affair:
    As I got older I started to doubt the validity of my own memory, until by my eighteenth birthday I had written it off as the product of an overactive imagination. Rochester’s reappearance outside Styx’s apartment that night served only to confuse. Reality, to be sure, was beginning to bend.

    Reply
  17. I have three books going at the moment too. I am rereading Eloisa’s James’s Essex Sisters books to be ready for the discussions when Pleasure for Pleasure is officially released next week; I have begun my annual Christmas reading ritual of rereading all my favorite Christmas books (a number of Wench titles in the mix); I am rereading Jasper Fforde’s The Eyre Affair because I am teaching it next week.
    from EJ’s Kiss Me, Annabel
    They bobbed around her, showing every sign of men who would kiss and grab, kiss and pant. Englishmen, both of them. (Annabel is determined to marry a wealthy Englishman and determined not to marry a fellow Scot.)
    A Regency Christmas Eve has only five novellas, so I will use the last paragraph of the fifth. Appropriately, the paragraph is from Edith Layton’s “The Christmas Thief.”
    “The happiest,” she said, and it was only true.
    From Fforde’s The Eyre Affair:
    As I got older I started to doubt the validity of my own memory, until by my eighteenth birthday I had written it off as the product of an overactive imagination. Rochester’s reappearance outside Styx’s apartment that night served only to confuse. Reality, to be sure, was beginning to bend.

    Reply
  18. I have three books going at the moment too. I am rereading Eloisa’s James’s Essex Sisters books to be ready for the discussions when Pleasure for Pleasure is officially released next week; I have begun my annual Christmas reading ritual of rereading all my favorite Christmas books (a number of Wench titles in the mix); I am rereading Jasper Fforde’s The Eyre Affair because I am teaching it next week.
    from EJ’s Kiss Me, Annabel
    They bobbed around her, showing every sign of men who would kiss and grab, kiss and pant. Englishmen, both of them. (Annabel is determined to marry a wealthy Englishman and determined not to marry a fellow Scot.)
    A Regency Christmas Eve has only five novellas, so I will use the last paragraph of the fifth. Appropriately, the paragraph is from Edith Layton’s “The Christmas Thief.”
    “The happiest,” she said, and it was only true.
    From Fforde’s The Eyre Affair:
    As I got older I started to doubt the validity of my own memory, until by my eighteenth birthday I had written it off as the product of an overactive imagination. Rochester’s reappearance outside Styx’s apartment that night served only to confuse. Reality, to be sure, was beginning to bend.

    Reply
  19. I’m reading a romantic suspense by Catherine Anderson, dated 1990 and just recently reissued by Harlequin, called Switchback.
    The last paragraph of chapter 6 goes as follows (I’m skipping ahead just for you! I haven’t got that far yet…):
    “My vote is his office. He was there when he collapsed, so it seems the most logical starting point. And if the key isn’t there, maybe we’ll find a clue to lead us to it.”

    Reply
  20. I’m reading a romantic suspense by Catherine Anderson, dated 1990 and just recently reissued by Harlequin, called Switchback.
    The last paragraph of chapter 6 goes as follows (I’m skipping ahead just for you! I haven’t got that far yet…):
    “My vote is his office. He was there when he collapsed, so it seems the most logical starting point. And if the key isn’t there, maybe we’ll find a clue to lead us to it.”

    Reply
  21. I’m reading a romantic suspense by Catherine Anderson, dated 1990 and just recently reissued by Harlequin, called Switchback.
    The last paragraph of chapter 6 goes as follows (I’m skipping ahead just for you! I haven’t got that far yet…):
    “My vote is his office. He was there when he collapsed, so it seems the most logical starting point. And if the key isn’t there, maybe we’ll find a clue to lead us to it.”

    Reply
  22. Evelyn, non-fiction counts. After all, depending on the day, I might be reading something like Philip Riden’s LOCAL HISTORY or John Vince’s OLD FARMS, with their not exactly cliffhanger ends of chapter. I guess I am a very nosy person because I am totally fascinated by what others are reading–and several of your last paragraphs are making me want to read those books!

    Reply
  23. Evelyn, non-fiction counts. After all, depending on the day, I might be reading something like Philip Riden’s LOCAL HISTORY or John Vince’s OLD FARMS, with their not exactly cliffhanger ends of chapter. I guess I am a very nosy person because I am totally fascinated by what others are reading–and several of your last paragraphs are making me want to read those books!

    Reply
  24. Evelyn, non-fiction counts. After all, depending on the day, I might be reading something like Philip Riden’s LOCAL HISTORY or John Vince’s OLD FARMS, with their not exactly cliffhanger ends of chapter. I guess I am a very nosy person because I am totally fascinated by what others are reading–and several of your last paragraphs are making me want to read those books!

    Reply
  25. I *love* Patrick O’Brian.
    I just started CAPTAIN ALATRISTE, by Arturo Perez-Reverte. So far I’m enjoying it. Skipping way ahead, the last paragraph of Ch. 6 is:
    “In all, I had an uneasy feeling when I considered that this uncouth man shared a coach, and perhaps family ties, with the blonde and very young lady who had me enslaved. But the most disturbing thing about him was the strange brilliance of his eyes, and the hatred and choler I saw in them when the girl spoke the name of Captain Alatriste.”

    Reply
  26. I *love* Patrick O’Brian.
    I just started CAPTAIN ALATRISTE, by Arturo Perez-Reverte. So far I’m enjoying it. Skipping way ahead, the last paragraph of Ch. 6 is:
    “In all, I had an uneasy feeling when I considered that this uncouth man shared a coach, and perhaps family ties, with the blonde and very young lady who had me enslaved. But the most disturbing thing about him was the strange brilliance of his eyes, and the hatred and choler I saw in them when the girl spoke the name of Captain Alatriste.”

    Reply
  27. I *love* Patrick O’Brian.
    I just started CAPTAIN ALATRISTE, by Arturo Perez-Reverte. So far I’m enjoying it. Skipping way ahead, the last paragraph of Ch. 6 is:
    “In all, I had an uneasy feeling when I considered that this uncouth man shared a coach, and perhaps family ties, with the blonde and very young lady who had me enslaved. But the most disturbing thing about him was the strange brilliance of his eyes, and the hatred and choler I saw in them when the girl spoke the name of Captain Alatriste.”

    Reply
  28. I’m the lark, she said bravely. Always have been, and decades of long-standing practice have enforced my early morning madness. I’m usually writing by 6AM. “G” But I won’t go shopping at that hour and in fact, would rather shop online and stay home.
    I just finished Edith’s book, so I’m now down to three books and one’s downstairs. I’m too lazy to go get it. Since I’ve just finished two manuscripts, I’m digging into my reading pile and pulling out oldies.
    From Carl Hiaasen’s LUCKY YOU: “Relax,” he told her. Then with a sideways glance: “It’s time you started thinking like a millionaire.” (story–fascinating female heroine wins lottery but redneck slugs beat her up and steal it. She and reporter go after slugs.)
    From Evanovich’s TEN BIG ONES: (her chapters go on forever so this is the middle of the book)
    “I’m just glad it wasn’t in front of my house,” Grandma said. “I’d feel terrible if I had to find E.T. dead in a van.” I adore her wandering mind!

    Reply
  29. I’m the lark, she said bravely. Always have been, and decades of long-standing practice have enforced my early morning madness. I’m usually writing by 6AM. “G” But I won’t go shopping at that hour and in fact, would rather shop online and stay home.
    I just finished Edith’s book, so I’m now down to three books and one’s downstairs. I’m too lazy to go get it. Since I’ve just finished two manuscripts, I’m digging into my reading pile and pulling out oldies.
    From Carl Hiaasen’s LUCKY YOU: “Relax,” he told her. Then with a sideways glance: “It’s time you started thinking like a millionaire.” (story–fascinating female heroine wins lottery but redneck slugs beat her up and steal it. She and reporter go after slugs.)
    From Evanovich’s TEN BIG ONES: (her chapters go on forever so this is the middle of the book)
    “I’m just glad it wasn’t in front of my house,” Grandma said. “I’d feel terrible if I had to find E.T. dead in a van.” I adore her wandering mind!

    Reply
  30. I’m the lark, she said bravely. Always have been, and decades of long-standing practice have enforced my early morning madness. I’m usually writing by 6AM. “G” But I won’t go shopping at that hour and in fact, would rather shop online and stay home.
    I just finished Edith’s book, so I’m now down to three books and one’s downstairs. I’m too lazy to go get it. Since I’ve just finished two manuscripts, I’m digging into my reading pile and pulling out oldies.
    From Carl Hiaasen’s LUCKY YOU: “Relax,” he told her. Then with a sideways glance: “It’s time you started thinking like a millionaire.” (story–fascinating female heroine wins lottery but redneck slugs beat her up and steal it. She and reporter go after slugs.)
    From Evanovich’s TEN BIG ONES: (her chapters go on forever so this is the middle of the book)
    “I’m just glad it wasn’t in front of my house,” Grandma said. “I’d feel terrible if I had to find E.T. dead in a van.” I adore her wandering mind!

    Reply
  31. From the end of Chapter 7(Chapter 6 made no sense) of UNDER ORDERS, the latest from Dick Francis after his hiatus:
    “Bugger! I Thought. They’ve come to take Bill back in for questioning. A dawn raid.
    I climbed out of the car and was met by a wide-eyed Juliet Burns. ‘Bill’s killed himself,’ she said.”
    Sid Halley is my favorite Francis character, but I have to say that at several points so far he sounds like an awfully old and crotchety 35 year old detective!
    Jane

    Reply
  32. From the end of Chapter 7(Chapter 6 made no sense) of UNDER ORDERS, the latest from Dick Francis after his hiatus:
    “Bugger! I Thought. They’ve come to take Bill back in for questioning. A dawn raid.
    I climbed out of the car and was met by a wide-eyed Juliet Burns. ‘Bill’s killed himself,’ she said.”
    Sid Halley is my favorite Francis character, but I have to say that at several points so far he sounds like an awfully old and crotchety 35 year old detective!
    Jane

    Reply
  33. From the end of Chapter 7(Chapter 6 made no sense) of UNDER ORDERS, the latest from Dick Francis after his hiatus:
    “Bugger! I Thought. They’ve come to take Bill back in for questioning. A dawn raid.
    I climbed out of the car and was met by a wide-eyed Juliet Burns. ‘Bill’s killed himself,’ she said.”
    Sid Halley is my favorite Francis character, but I have to say that at several points so far he sounds like an awfully old and crotchety 35 year old detective!
    Jane

    Reply
  34. Cool idea! I just finished Earlene Fowler’s The Saddlemaker’s Wife (not one of her quilt museum series) and the last paragraph of chapter six reads:
    “He came closer, the crush of snow and ice hissing softly under his black boots. His lean, shadowed face showed no discernable expression. A few loose strands of his long hair were whipped around by the cold wind. ‘I tried calling today and his phone is disconnected. What’s happened to Cole?'”.
    A really good read. About contemporary life in a small ranching town in California. The main event happens before the book starts but the writing and the storytelling about how the secret is revealed and how it impacts various lives – very very good.
    Out in hardback, May 2006. Enjoy!

    Reply
  35. Cool idea! I just finished Earlene Fowler’s The Saddlemaker’s Wife (not one of her quilt museum series) and the last paragraph of chapter six reads:
    “He came closer, the crush of snow and ice hissing softly under his black boots. His lean, shadowed face showed no discernable expression. A few loose strands of his long hair were whipped around by the cold wind. ‘I tried calling today and his phone is disconnected. What’s happened to Cole?'”.
    A really good read. About contemporary life in a small ranching town in California. The main event happens before the book starts but the writing and the storytelling about how the secret is revealed and how it impacts various lives – very very good.
    Out in hardback, May 2006. Enjoy!

    Reply
  36. Cool idea! I just finished Earlene Fowler’s The Saddlemaker’s Wife (not one of her quilt museum series) and the last paragraph of chapter six reads:
    “He came closer, the crush of snow and ice hissing softly under his black boots. His lean, shadowed face showed no discernable expression. A few loose strands of his long hair were whipped around by the cold wind. ‘I tried calling today and his phone is disconnected. What’s happened to Cole?'”.
    A really good read. About contemporary life in a small ranching town in California. The main event happens before the book starts but the writing and the storytelling about how the secret is revealed and how it impacts various lives – very very good.
    Out in hardback, May 2006. Enjoy!

    Reply

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