Iceland – In the Footsteps of the Vikings (Part II)

Christina here. Today I continue the tale of my recent journey to Iceland. (You can find Part I here):-

Thingvellir waterfall 2A trip to Iceland would not be complete without a visit to two special places – Thingvellir (Þingvellir) and the Geysers. We drove south east to Thingvellir first, the place where the Vikings held their annual meetings (Alþingi) to dispense justice and decide on laws. It's a natural rock formation, a bit like a canyon with an amazing waterfall – Öxarárfoss – on one side. In a spectacular setting up on a hill overlooking a huge lake nearby, the waterfall came as a complete surprise. It’s hidden away among the rock formations that form two curtain walls, like fortifications on a castle. Views over the surrounding landscape are out of this world. There is a large grassy plateau below, where the Vikings taking part in the Alþingi would have raised their tents and camped out. When we were there, the place was incredibly windy and I nearly froze to death as the rocks acted like a wind tunnel. It was so cold!

Strokkur 3 and a halfThings improved at our next destination, the famous geyser Strokkur which wasn’t all that far away. The whole area smelled like rotten eggs because of the sulphur in the water, but it was fascinating to see the geyser erupt every five to seven minutes without warning. It was the only one at present, as another one nearby is dormant right now. All around were little smoking springs, as if the brown soil itself was smouldering. There were also pools of various sizes, beautiful and very inviting, but at 80-100 degrees extremely dangerous! You can’t even stick your hand in or your skin would burn off. Strokkur was not as big as I had imagined it, but still impressive and I’m so glad I got to see it.

An hour’s drive from there, we found ourselves in the middle of nowhere in yet another strange landscape – more like a moonscape actually that could be great as a backdrop for the Star Wars films. Nothing green anywhere, just stones, up a small bumpy rough dirt track that led to a place called Stöng in Þjórsárdalur. This was another archaeological dig where a Viking longhouse had been found buried under lava. It is believed to have been abandoned in 1104 AD due to a volcanic eruption of nearby Mt Hekla. In 1939 a farmstead was excavated here by a Nordic team of archaeologists who uncovered the farmhouse itself, a cattle shed and a smithy. A protective structure was built over the site in the 1950s and that is still in place today.

StongYou can go inside and walk around the stone foundations, which was brilliant for me as I was able to visualise how it would have looked. I was impressed by the sheer size of it – there was a huge main room, the hall (skáli), where people worked during the day in winter, ate around the hearth and slept on the wooden benches along the walls; a smaller living room (stofa) where looms stood and with a fireplace in the middle of the floor; as well as a pantry and an enormous bathroom with toilets. It must have been quite magnificent! A great Viking is supposed to have lived here – Gaukur Trandilsson, who is mentioned in the famous Icelandic saga, Njálssaga, as one of the biggest heroes of the Viking era. Unfortunately the manuscript of the Gaukssaga is lost, but on a rune stone at Maeshowe in Orkney there is an inscription that says Gaukur was here – Viking graffiti.

Seljalandsfoss smAt that point, we thought we were finished for the day and headed for our next hotel. However, along the way we spotted a spectacular waterfall called Seljalandsfoss. It looked small from afar when you spot it from the ring road, but is massive up close and it turned out you could go behind it to look at it from all sides. It’s the most beautiful one I’ve ever seen and it was exciting being so close to it. Very noisy, with water falling 65 metres from high above with some force, and when you go behind it and look out it’s absolutely magical. We were very lucky and the sun came out just as we went past so I got to see a rainbow in the water. Awesome!

VikWe ended the day in Vik, the southernmost town or village on the coast, which has a lovely black sand beach and views out to rock formations in the sea. Our hotel backed right onto a steep hill where seagulls nested – we spotted them from our bedroom and they were chattering all night. At that time of year, it doesn’t really get dark at all, and I could still see them clearly at half past midnight.

Jokulsarlon 2The next day, we drove for two and a half hours each way just to see something called Diamond Beach. We found it on the south coast, along with the Jökulsárlón lagoon whose still blue waters are dotted with icebergs from the surrounding Breiðamerkurjökull glacier, part of the larger Vatnajökull glacier. The glacier lagoon flows through a short waterway into the Atlantic Ocean and some of the chunks of ice wash back up onto the beach, which is black sand (from the volcanic rock). The result is the most incredible sight – like diamonds on a bed of black velvet. Big pieces and small, some of them blue or turquoise in colour, others see-through. All different shapes, and I imagined one was a whale. In the lagoon itself, more pieces were floating around, bigger and heavier, moving from time to time. The water is turquoise too, such a beautiful sight and definitely worth going all that way for!

Dyrholey 1On the way back to Reykjavik we drove up a scarily steep dirt road to a clifftop at Dyrhólaey, where you could see nesting sea birds. It lies above Reynisfjara black sand beach, which stretches for miles along the coast, seemingly forever. Again, I nearly blew off the cliff; the wind was so strong I could barely hold the camera! There were some rock formations that looked like part of an arched bridge and apparently you can walk across the top, but we weren’t that brave.

On our final day, my long-suffering husband was dragged to yet another museum at Njarðvik, which contained a replica longship of the kind used by the settlers. Named Islendingur (Icelander), it had been built in the year 2000 by Gunnar Marel Eggertsson, a shipbuilder like his father and grandfather, who was related to the famous Leif Eiriksson through his mother. He and a crew sailed the ship to America to commemorate Leif’s journey and to prove that it could be done. It was absolutely huge (23 x 5.5 metres at the widest point) and it had to be as the settlers brought cattle and provisions etc for their new life. I was ecstatic at being allowed to sit on board and just see how it felt. Again, perfect for my story.

Ship 4After that we drove around trying to get a glimpse of the active volcano nearby, but it was nowhere near the roads and we would have had to take a three hour hike if we wanted to get close – being a confirmed couch potato, I didn't fancy that. So we had to make do with watching the plumes of smoke in the distance.

That evening, we tried eating fermented shark and dried stockfish – apparently staple fare for the Vikings – and I can safely say I don’t want to eat that again. I could still taste the dratted shark the following morning … It wasn’t as bad as Swedish surströmming (rotten herring basically), but I can live without both.

I can definitely recommend a visit to Iceland if you get the chance to go but bring warm clothing and be prepared to travel long distances. Your reward will be stunning views wherever you look and some fascinating sights. Well worth it!

Have you ever tried any weird types of food and did you like it? I tried chocolate covered ants once, but I won’t be in a hurry to repeat the experience …

 

100 thoughts on “Iceland – In the Footsteps of the Vikings (Part II)”

  1. What an interesting, informative post Christina! I enjoyed your photos very much. I think I will just take an “armchair” tour of Iceland though. It sounds cold!!!
    Brrrr!I remember taking a swig of 180 proof rum by mistake once, thought it was pop, and it took me two days to recover! On a trip through the Southern U.S. I took a bite of a muffin with jalapeno peppers in it. Surprise!
    My tongue and throat went numb. I had never tried the peppers before!

    Reply
  2. What an interesting, informative post Christina! I enjoyed your photos very much. I think I will just take an “armchair” tour of Iceland though. It sounds cold!!!
    Brrrr!I remember taking a swig of 180 proof rum by mistake once, thought it was pop, and it took me two days to recover! On a trip through the Southern U.S. I took a bite of a muffin with jalapeno peppers in it. Surprise!
    My tongue and throat went numb. I had never tried the peppers before!

    Reply
  3. What an interesting, informative post Christina! I enjoyed your photos very much. I think I will just take an “armchair” tour of Iceland though. It sounds cold!!!
    Brrrr!I remember taking a swig of 180 proof rum by mistake once, thought it was pop, and it took me two days to recover! On a trip through the Southern U.S. I took a bite of a muffin with jalapeno peppers in it. Surprise!
    My tongue and throat went numb. I had never tried the peppers before!

    Reply
  4. What an interesting, informative post Christina! I enjoyed your photos very much. I think I will just take an “armchair” tour of Iceland though. It sounds cold!!!
    Brrrr!I remember taking a swig of 180 proof rum by mistake once, thought it was pop, and it took me two days to recover! On a trip through the Southern U.S. I took a bite of a muffin with jalapeno peppers in it. Surprise!
    My tongue and throat went numb. I had never tried the peppers before!

    Reply
  5. What an interesting, informative post Christina! I enjoyed your photos very much. I think I will just take an “armchair” tour of Iceland though. It sounds cold!!!
    Brrrr!I remember taking a swig of 180 proof rum by mistake once, thought it was pop, and it took me two days to recover! On a trip through the Southern U.S. I took a bite of a muffin with jalapeno peppers in it. Surprise!
    My tongue and throat went numb. I had never tried the peppers before!

    Reply
  6. Thank you Donna, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes, it was pretty cold but very refreshing. Goodness, 180 proof rum! Not surprised that took a while to recover from 🙂 And jalapeno peppers are definitely not my thing either!

    Reply
  7. Thank you Donna, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes, it was pretty cold but very refreshing. Goodness, 180 proof rum! Not surprised that took a while to recover from 🙂 And jalapeno peppers are definitely not my thing either!

    Reply
  8. Thank you Donna, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes, it was pretty cold but very refreshing. Goodness, 180 proof rum! Not surprised that took a while to recover from 🙂 And jalapeno peppers are definitely not my thing either!

    Reply
  9. Thank you Donna, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes, it was pretty cold but very refreshing. Goodness, 180 proof rum! Not surprised that took a while to recover from 🙂 And jalapeno peppers are definitely not my thing either!

    Reply
  10. Thank you Donna, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes, it was pretty cold but very refreshing. Goodness, 180 proof rum! Not surprised that took a while to recover from 🙂 And jalapeno peppers are definitely not my thing either!

    Reply
  11. Christina, what at fascinating journey and pictures! No wonder Icelandic culture includes so many magical creatures in and above the land.
    Strange food? I’m kind of a wimp. In Australia I had a few bits of crocodile, but they were deep fried and could have been anything. *G* On a cruise of the upper Amazon, one night we were all given a strange, alarming looking little gray thing that looked like a destroyed rubber gasket from an old car. It was some kind of river bottom snail, I believe, and from what I saw when the dinner plates were collected, I’m not sure any of the passengers ate them. *G*

    Reply
  12. Christina, what at fascinating journey and pictures! No wonder Icelandic culture includes so many magical creatures in and above the land.
    Strange food? I’m kind of a wimp. In Australia I had a few bits of crocodile, but they were deep fried and could have been anything. *G* On a cruise of the upper Amazon, one night we were all given a strange, alarming looking little gray thing that looked like a destroyed rubber gasket from an old car. It was some kind of river bottom snail, I believe, and from what I saw when the dinner plates were collected, I’m not sure any of the passengers ate them. *G*

    Reply
  13. Christina, what at fascinating journey and pictures! No wonder Icelandic culture includes so many magical creatures in and above the land.
    Strange food? I’m kind of a wimp. In Australia I had a few bits of crocodile, but they were deep fried and could have been anything. *G* On a cruise of the upper Amazon, one night we were all given a strange, alarming looking little gray thing that looked like a destroyed rubber gasket from an old car. It was some kind of river bottom snail, I believe, and from what I saw when the dinner plates were collected, I’m not sure any of the passengers ate them. *G*

    Reply
  14. Christina, what at fascinating journey and pictures! No wonder Icelandic culture includes so many magical creatures in and above the land.
    Strange food? I’m kind of a wimp. In Australia I had a few bits of crocodile, but they were deep fried and could have been anything. *G* On a cruise of the upper Amazon, one night we were all given a strange, alarming looking little gray thing that looked like a destroyed rubber gasket from an old car. It was some kind of river bottom snail, I believe, and from what I saw when the dinner plates were collected, I’m not sure any of the passengers ate them. *G*

    Reply
  15. Christina, what at fascinating journey and pictures! No wonder Icelandic culture includes so many magical creatures in and above the land.
    Strange food? I’m kind of a wimp. In Australia I had a few bits of crocodile, but they were deep fried and could have been anything. *G* On a cruise of the upper Amazon, one night we were all given a strange, alarming looking little gray thing that looked like a destroyed rubber gasket from an old car. It was some kind of river bottom snail, I believe, and from what I saw when the dinner plates were collected, I’m not sure any of the passengers ate them. *G*

    Reply
  16. Thank you Mary Jo! I don’t like the sound of that snail but I tried gator bites when I was in New Orleans. Didn’t taste bad but I found them very chewy!

    Reply
  17. Thank you Mary Jo! I don’t like the sound of that snail but I tried gator bites when I was in New Orleans. Didn’t taste bad but I found them very chewy!

    Reply
  18. Thank you Mary Jo! I don’t like the sound of that snail but I tried gator bites when I was in New Orleans. Didn’t taste bad but I found them very chewy!

    Reply
  19. Thank you Mary Jo! I don’t like the sound of that snail but I tried gator bites when I was in New Orleans. Didn’t taste bad but I found them very chewy!

    Reply
  20. Thank you Mary Jo! I don’t like the sound of that snail but I tried gator bites when I was in New Orleans. Didn’t taste bad but I found them very chewy!

    Reply
  21. Again many, many thank yous for the virtual tour.
    As for odd foods, the oddest I’ve tried was calimari (I think squid could qualify); it tasted like I imaging rubber bands taste.

    Reply
  22. Again many, many thank yous for the virtual tour.
    As for odd foods, the oddest I’ve tried was calimari (I think squid could qualify); it tasted like I imaging rubber bands taste.

    Reply
  23. Again many, many thank yous for the virtual tour.
    As for odd foods, the oddest I’ve tried was calimari (I think squid could qualify); it tasted like I imaging rubber bands taste.

    Reply
  24. Again many, many thank yous for the virtual tour.
    As for odd foods, the oddest I’ve tried was calimari (I think squid could qualify); it tasted like I imaging rubber bands taste.

    Reply
  25. Again many, many thank yous for the virtual tour.
    As for odd foods, the oddest I’ve tried was calimari (I think squid could qualify); it tasted like I imaging rubber bands taste.

    Reply
  26. How wonderful that you not only had this magical tour, Christina, but it related directly to your writing goals. I would have loved to experience that longboat with you, and stood behind the falls.
    I’ve tried many odd foods from all over. (I live in the southwest USA, what’s not to like about jalapeños?) Probably the one that gets the most upturned noses is stinky tofu. The Chinese restaurant owner bet me $10 I wouldn’t eat it. I did, though he never paid off, tried to go “double or nothing”, so I didn’t go back. Too many other interesting foods to try, though I can’t travel for them now. I do draw the line at identifiable insects, though. No scorpions-on-a-stick or crispy cricket snacks for me.

    Reply
  27. How wonderful that you not only had this magical tour, Christina, but it related directly to your writing goals. I would have loved to experience that longboat with you, and stood behind the falls.
    I’ve tried many odd foods from all over. (I live in the southwest USA, what’s not to like about jalapeños?) Probably the one that gets the most upturned noses is stinky tofu. The Chinese restaurant owner bet me $10 I wouldn’t eat it. I did, though he never paid off, tried to go “double or nothing”, so I didn’t go back. Too many other interesting foods to try, though I can’t travel for them now. I do draw the line at identifiable insects, though. No scorpions-on-a-stick or crispy cricket snacks for me.

    Reply
  28. How wonderful that you not only had this magical tour, Christina, but it related directly to your writing goals. I would have loved to experience that longboat with you, and stood behind the falls.
    I’ve tried many odd foods from all over. (I live in the southwest USA, what’s not to like about jalapeños?) Probably the one that gets the most upturned noses is stinky tofu. The Chinese restaurant owner bet me $10 I wouldn’t eat it. I did, though he never paid off, tried to go “double or nothing”, so I didn’t go back. Too many other interesting foods to try, though I can’t travel for them now. I do draw the line at identifiable insects, though. No scorpions-on-a-stick or crispy cricket snacks for me.

    Reply
  29. How wonderful that you not only had this magical tour, Christina, but it related directly to your writing goals. I would have loved to experience that longboat with you, and stood behind the falls.
    I’ve tried many odd foods from all over. (I live in the southwest USA, what’s not to like about jalapeños?) Probably the one that gets the most upturned noses is stinky tofu. The Chinese restaurant owner bet me $10 I wouldn’t eat it. I did, though he never paid off, tried to go “double or nothing”, so I didn’t go back. Too many other interesting foods to try, though I can’t travel for them now. I do draw the line at identifiable insects, though. No scorpions-on-a-stick or crispy cricket snacks for me.

    Reply
  30. How wonderful that you not only had this magical tour, Christina, but it related directly to your writing goals. I would have loved to experience that longboat with you, and stood behind the falls.
    I’ve tried many odd foods from all over. (I live in the southwest USA, what’s not to like about jalapeños?) Probably the one that gets the most upturned noses is stinky tofu. The Chinese restaurant owner bet me $10 I wouldn’t eat it. I did, though he never paid off, tried to go “double or nothing”, so I didn’t go back. Too many other interesting foods to try, though I can’t travel for them now. I do draw the line at identifiable insects, though. No scorpions-on-a-stick or crispy cricket snacks for me.

    Reply
  31. That was definitely special, Mary M – thank you! The whole trip was so useful for my story, I was really grateful to have had that experience.
    Never tried stinky tofu! I love normal tofu so maybe I’d manage it? Will have to ask next time I’m in a Chinese restaurant 🙂 I’m with you on the insects – yuck!

    Reply
  32. That was definitely special, Mary M – thank you! The whole trip was so useful for my story, I was really grateful to have had that experience.
    Never tried stinky tofu! I love normal tofu so maybe I’d manage it? Will have to ask next time I’m in a Chinese restaurant 🙂 I’m with you on the insects – yuck!

    Reply
  33. That was definitely special, Mary M – thank you! The whole trip was so useful for my story, I was really grateful to have had that experience.
    Never tried stinky tofu! I love normal tofu so maybe I’d manage it? Will have to ask next time I’m in a Chinese restaurant 🙂 I’m with you on the insects – yuck!

    Reply
  34. That was definitely special, Mary M – thank you! The whole trip was so useful for my story, I was really grateful to have had that experience.
    Never tried stinky tofu! I love normal tofu so maybe I’d manage it? Will have to ask next time I’m in a Chinese restaurant 🙂 I’m with you on the insects – yuck!

    Reply
  35. That was definitely special, Mary M – thank you! The whole trip was so useful for my story, I was really grateful to have had that experience.
    Never tried stinky tofu! I love normal tofu so maybe I’d manage it? Will have to ask next time I’m in a Chinese restaurant 🙂 I’m with you on the insects – yuck!

    Reply
  36. My husband and I were on a day tour out of Puerto Vallarta years ago that hit the jungle and the beach. During the jungle walk the guide showed live foods to sample in situ. My husband tried the termites. I got brave and tried the live ant along with another tourist. Not bad. His take? Minty!

    Reply
  37. My husband and I were on a day tour out of Puerto Vallarta years ago that hit the jungle and the beach. During the jungle walk the guide showed live foods to sample in situ. My husband tried the termites. I got brave and tried the live ant along with another tourist. Not bad. His take? Minty!

    Reply
  38. My husband and I were on a day tour out of Puerto Vallarta years ago that hit the jungle and the beach. During the jungle walk the guide showed live foods to sample in situ. My husband tried the termites. I got brave and tried the live ant along with another tourist. Not bad. His take? Minty!

    Reply
  39. My husband and I were on a day tour out of Puerto Vallarta years ago that hit the jungle and the beach. During the jungle walk the guide showed live foods to sample in situ. My husband tried the termites. I got brave and tried the live ant along with another tourist. Not bad. His take? Minty!

    Reply
  40. My husband and I were on a day tour out of Puerto Vallarta years ago that hit the jungle and the beach. During the jungle walk the guide showed live foods to sample in situ. My husband tried the termites. I got brave and tried the live ant along with another tourist. Not bad. His take? Minty!

    Reply
  41. Thanks so much for the terrific post. Of course you have ruined me from ever eating fermented shark. Actually I think from the very name it is not a thing I would like.
    You have made so much of the Icelandic beauty come through. Your pictures are lovely, but your descriptions add to my mind pictures.
    You have shown me the beauty of a place that at first glance would seem quite barren.
    Hope everyone is well and happy and safe.

    Reply
  42. Thanks so much for the terrific post. Of course you have ruined me from ever eating fermented shark. Actually I think from the very name it is not a thing I would like.
    You have made so much of the Icelandic beauty come through. Your pictures are lovely, but your descriptions add to my mind pictures.
    You have shown me the beauty of a place that at first glance would seem quite barren.
    Hope everyone is well and happy and safe.

    Reply
  43. Thanks so much for the terrific post. Of course you have ruined me from ever eating fermented shark. Actually I think from the very name it is not a thing I would like.
    You have made so much of the Icelandic beauty come through. Your pictures are lovely, but your descriptions add to my mind pictures.
    You have shown me the beauty of a place that at first glance would seem quite barren.
    Hope everyone is well and happy and safe.

    Reply
  44. Thanks so much for the terrific post. Of course you have ruined me from ever eating fermented shark. Actually I think from the very name it is not a thing I would like.
    You have made so much of the Icelandic beauty come through. Your pictures are lovely, but your descriptions add to my mind pictures.
    You have shown me the beauty of a place that at first glance would seem quite barren.
    Hope everyone is well and happy and safe.

    Reply
  45. Thanks so much for the terrific post. Of course you have ruined me from ever eating fermented shark. Actually I think from the very name it is not a thing I would like.
    You have made so much of the Icelandic beauty come through. Your pictures are lovely, but your descriptions add to my mind pictures.
    You have shown me the beauty of a place that at first glance would seem quite barren.
    Hope everyone is well and happy and safe.

    Reply
  46. Thanks for the tour. It’s interesting that the Vikings lived in longhouses like the Algonquins in North America.
    I don’t consider calamari to be weird; I love calamari, scungilli and octopus. And jalapenos are a regular part of our diet. But I guess sheep’s head is unusual, although I didn’t eat the eyeballs, thank you very much!

    Reply
  47. Thanks for the tour. It’s interesting that the Vikings lived in longhouses like the Algonquins in North America.
    I don’t consider calamari to be weird; I love calamari, scungilli and octopus. And jalapenos are a regular part of our diet. But I guess sheep’s head is unusual, although I didn’t eat the eyeballs, thank you very much!

    Reply
  48. Thanks for the tour. It’s interesting that the Vikings lived in longhouses like the Algonquins in North America.
    I don’t consider calamari to be weird; I love calamari, scungilli and octopus. And jalapenos are a regular part of our diet. But I guess sheep’s head is unusual, although I didn’t eat the eyeballs, thank you very much!

    Reply
  49. Thanks for the tour. It’s interesting that the Vikings lived in longhouses like the Algonquins in North America.
    I don’t consider calamari to be weird; I love calamari, scungilli and octopus. And jalapenos are a regular part of our diet. But I guess sheep’s head is unusual, although I didn’t eat the eyeballs, thank you very much!

    Reply
  50. Thanks for the tour. It’s interesting that the Vikings lived in longhouses like the Algonquins in North America.
    I don’t consider calamari to be weird; I love calamari, scungilli and octopus. And jalapenos are a regular part of our diet. But I guess sheep’s head is unusual, although I didn’t eat the eyeballs, thank you very much!

    Reply
  51. Thank you Karin! I don’t mind calamari either but don’t like anything spicy so jalapeños are out for me. I didn’t try the sheep’s head but I understand it’s a delicacy.

    Reply
  52. Thank you Karin! I don’t mind calamari either but don’t like anything spicy so jalapeños are out for me. I didn’t try the sheep’s head but I understand it’s a delicacy.

    Reply
  53. Thank you Karin! I don’t mind calamari either but don’t like anything spicy so jalapeños are out for me. I didn’t try the sheep’s head but I understand it’s a delicacy.

    Reply
  54. Thank you Karin! I don’t mind calamari either but don’t like anything spicy so jalapeños are out for me. I didn’t try the sheep’s head but I understand it’s a delicacy.

    Reply
  55. Thank you Karin! I don’t mind calamari either but don’t like anything spicy so jalapeños are out for me. I didn’t try the sheep’s head but I understand it’s a delicacy.

    Reply
  56. Thank you for a wonderful post, Christina!
    I remember being in France at age 17 and dinner being sheep’s brain. It looked just as one might imagine. I declined. I’m rather a wimp when it comes to food!

    Reply
  57. Thank you for a wonderful post, Christina!
    I remember being in France at age 17 and dinner being sheep’s brain. It looked just as one might imagine. I declined. I’m rather a wimp when it comes to food!

    Reply
  58. Thank you for a wonderful post, Christina!
    I remember being in France at age 17 and dinner being sheep’s brain. It looked just as one might imagine. I declined. I’m rather a wimp when it comes to food!

    Reply
  59. Thank you for a wonderful post, Christina!
    I remember being in France at age 17 and dinner being sheep’s brain. It looked just as one might imagine. I declined. I’m rather a wimp when it comes to food!

    Reply
  60. Thank you for a wonderful post, Christina!
    I remember being in France at age 17 and dinner being sheep’s brain. It looked just as one might imagine. I declined. I’m rather a wimp when it comes to food!

    Reply
  61. Many thanks, Kareni, glad you enjoyed it! I would decline sheep’s brain as well – shudders! I was offered tripe once and couldn’t bring myself to taste that either – must be the way these things look!

    Reply
  62. Many thanks, Kareni, glad you enjoyed it! I would decline sheep’s brain as well – shudders! I was offered tripe once and couldn’t bring myself to taste that either – must be the way these things look!

    Reply
  63. Many thanks, Kareni, glad you enjoyed it! I would decline sheep’s brain as well – shudders! I was offered tripe once and couldn’t bring myself to taste that either – must be the way these things look!

    Reply
  64. Many thanks, Kareni, glad you enjoyed it! I would decline sheep’s brain as well – shudders! I was offered tripe once and couldn’t bring myself to taste that either – must be the way these things look!

    Reply
  65. Many thanks, Kareni, glad you enjoyed it! I would decline sheep’s brain as well – shudders! I was offered tripe once and couldn’t bring myself to taste that either – must be the way these things look!

    Reply
  66. My parents loved “brain” (it would have been beef, or more likely calf); I hated the taste and the texture, but the looks didn’t put me off. (It turns out, I’m fairly sensitive to organ foods in general; the appear to have to much of a good thing in the way of minerals for my body to tolerate.)

    Reply
  67. My parents loved “brain” (it would have been beef, or more likely calf); I hated the taste and the texture, but the looks didn’t put me off. (It turns out, I’m fairly sensitive to organ foods in general; the appear to have to much of a good thing in the way of minerals for my body to tolerate.)

    Reply
  68. My parents loved “brain” (it would have been beef, or more likely calf); I hated the taste and the texture, but the looks didn’t put me off. (It turns out, I’m fairly sensitive to organ foods in general; the appear to have to much of a good thing in the way of minerals for my body to tolerate.)

    Reply
  69. My parents loved “brain” (it would have been beef, or more likely calf); I hated the taste and the texture, but the looks didn’t put me off. (It turns out, I’m fairly sensitive to organ foods in general; the appear to have to much of a good thing in the way of minerals for my body to tolerate.)

    Reply
  70. My parents loved “brain” (it would have been beef, or more likely calf); I hated the taste and the texture, but the looks didn’t put me off. (It turns out, I’m fairly sensitive to organ foods in general; the appear to have to much of a good thing in the way of minerals for my body to tolerate.)

    Reply
  71. It’s a good thing we’re all different isn’t it – I’m very fussy with food but I’m sure I eat lots of things other people hate. We are also spoiled these days as in the past our ancestors probably had no choice but to eat everything!

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  72. It’s a good thing we’re all different isn’t it – I’m very fussy with food but I’m sure I eat lots of things other people hate. We are also spoiled these days as in the past our ancestors probably had no choice but to eat everything!

    Reply
  73. It’s a good thing we’re all different isn’t it – I’m very fussy with food but I’m sure I eat lots of things other people hate. We are also spoiled these days as in the past our ancestors probably had no choice but to eat everything!

    Reply
  74. It’s a good thing we’re all different isn’t it – I’m very fussy with food but I’m sure I eat lots of things other people hate. We are also spoiled these days as in the past our ancestors probably had no choice but to eat everything!

    Reply
  75. It’s a good thing we’re all different isn’t it – I’m very fussy with food but I’m sure I eat lots of things other people hate. We are also spoiled these days as in the past our ancestors probably had no choice but to eat everything!

    Reply
  76. Loved the article – can’t wait to travel again! Weirdest food was at home! Brains on toast! When I was a newly immigrated child in Canada we had very little money and Mum had to stretch each dollar till it snapped so we ate all the cuts Canadians didn’t like including calves brains on toast – which would now make me puke but then it was that or nothing so down it went! Dad’s birthday pick for supper was pickled pigs feet and mine was suet pudding. Oh the good old days!!!

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  77. Loved the article – can’t wait to travel again! Weirdest food was at home! Brains on toast! When I was a newly immigrated child in Canada we had very little money and Mum had to stretch each dollar till it snapped so we ate all the cuts Canadians didn’t like including calves brains on toast – which would now make me puke but then it was that or nothing so down it went! Dad’s birthday pick for supper was pickled pigs feet and mine was suet pudding. Oh the good old days!!!

    Reply
  78. Loved the article – can’t wait to travel again! Weirdest food was at home! Brains on toast! When I was a newly immigrated child in Canada we had very little money and Mum had to stretch each dollar till it snapped so we ate all the cuts Canadians didn’t like including calves brains on toast – which would now make me puke but then it was that or nothing so down it went! Dad’s birthday pick for supper was pickled pigs feet and mine was suet pudding. Oh the good old days!!!

    Reply
  79. Loved the article – can’t wait to travel again! Weirdest food was at home! Brains on toast! When I was a newly immigrated child in Canada we had very little money and Mum had to stretch each dollar till it snapped so we ate all the cuts Canadians didn’t like including calves brains on toast – which would now make me puke but then it was that or nothing so down it went! Dad’s birthday pick for supper was pickled pigs feet and mine was suet pudding. Oh the good old days!!!

    Reply
  80. Loved the article – can’t wait to travel again! Weirdest food was at home! Brains on toast! When I was a newly immigrated child in Canada we had very little money and Mum had to stretch each dollar till it snapped so we ate all the cuts Canadians didn’t like including calves brains on toast – which would now make me puke but then it was that or nothing so down it went! Dad’s birthday pick for supper was pickled pigs feet and mine was suet pudding. Oh the good old days!!!

    Reply
  81. Oh Janet that brought back memories! My dad used to eat what he called pigs’ trotters and no one else wanted any. I refused to even try but maybe I was missing out?

    Reply
  82. Oh Janet that brought back memories! My dad used to eat what he called pigs’ trotters and no one else wanted any. I refused to even try but maybe I was missing out?

    Reply
  83. Oh Janet that brought back memories! My dad used to eat what he called pigs’ trotters and no one else wanted any. I refused to even try but maybe I was missing out?

    Reply
  84. Oh Janet that brought back memories! My dad used to eat what he called pigs’ trotters and no one else wanted any. I refused to even try but maybe I was missing out?

    Reply
  85. Oh Janet that brought back memories! My dad used to eat what he called pigs’ trotters and no one else wanted any. I refused to even try but maybe I was missing out?

    Reply

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