I left my flash card in San Francisco!

At least, I think that’s what it’s called. The little thing on which the pics are stored in a digital camera. But fear not! It wasn’t the one with the pics. It was the backup, and this is going to be my paparazza blog. (I hope that’s correct for one, female celebrity-snapping photographer.)

Sometimes, however, things are just too small. Too easy to lose. Too fiddly to operate. Do you agree? Jomeg
When I replace my backup card, I’ll pack it in something bigger, and also find a way to clip or velcro it into the pouch in which I carry the camera (see pouch at left), because that’s what I think happened. I had it in the pouch at the Harlequin party, but at some point when I pulled out the camera to snap a moment, I pulled out the card, too. Billy_charlie_nytimes_balloonIt’s so small, it was probably speared by a stiletto heel without anyone noticing. (For heels, see below.)

The picture is of me and my fabulous agent, Meg Ruley, at last having a chance to celebrate in person A Lady’s Secret’s four week run on the in-print NYT list.
Pendant

(Close up of pendant I was wearing. Yes, it’s a fertility goddess — only meant to generate fertility of the imagination, I assure you!)

A certain amount of dress-up is part of the fun of the conference, and I snapped this pic of a pair of fabulous shoes. Unfortunately, I didn’t get the Fishshoes
name of the wearer. Perhaps she’ll hear and come to claim the glory.

Do you have an opportunity to play dress-up? Do you like it? I think it’s a hoot. But I don’t do that kind of shoe.

The shoes were spotted at Nora’s champagne reception before the RITA awards — not that I’m name- or event-dropping or anything.*G*

Returning to the subject of too-tiny gadgets, at Nora’s party, Heather Graham‘s husband, Dennis, was having troubleHgp
operating her camera because it was a bit small for his big hands. (Heather also writes historical romance as Shannon Drake, of course.) There are Heather and Dennis, along with Eileen Dreyer (who also writes as Kathleen Korbel.)

Vicki Lewis Thompson — this year’s winner of the Nora Roberts Lifetime Achievement Award (read more about that here)  — made some witty comments about the power of three names, noting what a high proportion of previous winners had had them. Phillis A. Whitney, Jayne Ann Krentz, Linda Lael Miller, Susan Elizabeth Phillips et al. We later decided that Mary Jo Putney counts, as does Susan Holloway Scott. Perhaps I should become M Josephine Beverley. (Yes, technically I’m a Mary Jo, too!)

There’s only one one-name author, though, isn’t there? Nora.

Who successfully eluded my lens.
Mjpcat

Speaking of Mary Jo, however, when I saw a cat apron at a local craft fair here, I couldn’t resist buying it for her.

Conniesusie

Another three name author is Susan Kay Law, seen here with Connie Brockway, the luncheon speaker this year. She gave a very clever power point presentation. She’s also writing historicals again, which I know will delight many. The other featured speaker was historical author, Victoria Alexander who also escaped my camera.

Patrsign
The conference includes book giveaways (extremely popular, as you can imagine.) In fact, Wench Pat looks a bit glum at having exhausted her largesse.

Naomi_2
Here’s my friend and critique partner, Naomi Bellis, before the signing, very happy to be about to distribute pleasure and joy.
Her Theft of Shadows is set in 1799 and has paranormal elements. Thefts_3

Last but not least, I played keen girl reporter and snapped pictures of the winners of the historical RITAs, Julia Quinn and Madeline Hunter, who I took unawares. The full list of winners is here.
RITA winners

JquinnJulie’s golden lady was for The Secret Diaries of Miss Miranda Cheever  , and  Madeline’s was for Lessons of Desire.Mhunter
A grand time was had by all, and I also had the pleasure of meeting Jane George, Kalen Hughes, and other Wenchly ladies. Who did I miss. Roll call! Who was there?

Did any of you track the awards on line? How did that go?

Want to discuss the results? Did a favorite lose out? We won’t get into the fabulous books and stories that weren’t chosen as finalists.*G*

 

Next year is in Washington, DC, and I hope many of you will be there, whether attending the conference, or the signing, or both.

Not that I’m planning one, but if the RWA conference had fan tracks, like an SF Con, would you want to attend?

Now I have to recover and prepare for Australia in 3 weeks!

Jo

110 thoughts on “I left my flash card in San Francisco!”

  1. Great job, Lois Lane! Thanks so much for sharing. I did follow the conference from afar and hope to get to DC next year. We’ll see. I ‘know’–as in online knowing—several of the GH finalists, who, alas, did not win. But I’m pretty sure they’ll get published, and that’s the important thing.

    Reply
  2. Great job, Lois Lane! Thanks so much for sharing. I did follow the conference from afar and hope to get to DC next year. We’ll see. I ‘know’–as in online knowing—several of the GH finalists, who, alas, did not win. But I’m pretty sure they’ll get published, and that’s the important thing.

    Reply
  3. Great job, Lois Lane! Thanks so much for sharing. I did follow the conference from afar and hope to get to DC next year. We’ll see. I ‘know’–as in online knowing—several of the GH finalists, who, alas, did not win. But I’m pretty sure they’ll get published, and that’s the important thing.

    Reply
  4. Great job, Lois Lane! Thanks so much for sharing. I did follow the conference from afar and hope to get to DC next year. We’ll see. I ‘know’–as in online knowing—several of the GH finalists, who, alas, did not win. But I’m pretty sure they’ll get published, and that’s the important thing.

    Reply
  5. Great job, Lois Lane! Thanks so much for sharing. I did follow the conference from afar and hope to get to DC next year. We’ll see. I ‘know’–as in online knowing—several of the GH finalists, who, alas, did not win. But I’m pretty sure they’ll get published, and that’s the important thing.

    Reply
  6. I might get to this conference, since it is local. I wanted to go to DragonCon in Atlanta since Anne McCaffrey and Katherine Kurtz would be there, but my family teased me so much about being beyond geeky that I dropped it. (read some of every genre there is)
    As for camera cards, here is some advice I read, forgot and should follow myself. For the first picture take a picture of your email, snailmail or other “return address”. Most people will pop in a lost card and read it. One entire camera found in a NYC taxi was returned when the pictures were posted online and a friend of a friend recognized the subjects. Here’s to you only losing backups, never your original and definitely never your writer’s muse.

    Reply
  7. I might get to this conference, since it is local. I wanted to go to DragonCon in Atlanta since Anne McCaffrey and Katherine Kurtz would be there, but my family teased me so much about being beyond geeky that I dropped it. (read some of every genre there is)
    As for camera cards, here is some advice I read, forgot and should follow myself. For the first picture take a picture of your email, snailmail or other “return address”. Most people will pop in a lost card and read it. One entire camera found in a NYC taxi was returned when the pictures were posted online and a friend of a friend recognized the subjects. Here’s to you only losing backups, never your original and definitely never your writer’s muse.

    Reply
  8. I might get to this conference, since it is local. I wanted to go to DragonCon in Atlanta since Anne McCaffrey and Katherine Kurtz would be there, but my family teased me so much about being beyond geeky that I dropped it. (read some of every genre there is)
    As for camera cards, here is some advice I read, forgot and should follow myself. For the first picture take a picture of your email, snailmail or other “return address”. Most people will pop in a lost card and read it. One entire camera found in a NYC taxi was returned when the pictures were posted online and a friend of a friend recognized the subjects. Here’s to you only losing backups, never your original and definitely never your writer’s muse.

    Reply
  9. I might get to this conference, since it is local. I wanted to go to DragonCon in Atlanta since Anne McCaffrey and Katherine Kurtz would be there, but my family teased me so much about being beyond geeky that I dropped it. (read some of every genre there is)
    As for camera cards, here is some advice I read, forgot and should follow myself. For the first picture take a picture of your email, snailmail or other “return address”. Most people will pop in a lost card and read it. One entire camera found in a NYC taxi was returned when the pictures were posted online and a friend of a friend recognized the subjects. Here’s to you only losing backups, never your original and definitely never your writer’s muse.

    Reply
  10. I might get to this conference, since it is local. I wanted to go to DragonCon in Atlanta since Anne McCaffrey and Katherine Kurtz would be there, but my family teased me so much about being beyond geeky that I dropped it. (read some of every genre there is)
    As for camera cards, here is some advice I read, forgot and should follow myself. For the first picture take a picture of your email, snailmail or other “return address”. Most people will pop in a lost card and read it. One entire camera found in a NYC taxi was returned when the pictures were posted online and a friend of a friend recognized the subjects. Here’s to you only losing backups, never your original and definitely never your writer’s muse.

    Reply
  11. Thanks for reporting back, Jo!
    Lovely picture of you and Meg. You both look like you’re having a great time celebrating (but then Meg always seems to be having a great time wherever she goes– and I can say that, since she’s my agent, too. *g*)
    I kind of like M. Josephine Beverley. That initial M with the period almost sounds like a mysterious French gentleman….
    Susan S.

    Reply
  12. Thanks for reporting back, Jo!
    Lovely picture of you and Meg. You both look like you’re having a great time celebrating (but then Meg always seems to be having a great time wherever she goes– and I can say that, since she’s my agent, too. *g*)
    I kind of like M. Josephine Beverley. That initial M with the period almost sounds like a mysterious French gentleman….
    Susan S.

    Reply
  13. Thanks for reporting back, Jo!
    Lovely picture of you and Meg. You both look like you’re having a great time celebrating (but then Meg always seems to be having a great time wherever she goes– and I can say that, since she’s my agent, too. *g*)
    I kind of like M. Josephine Beverley. That initial M with the period almost sounds like a mysterious French gentleman….
    Susan S.

    Reply
  14. Thanks for reporting back, Jo!
    Lovely picture of you and Meg. You both look like you’re having a great time celebrating (but then Meg always seems to be having a great time wherever she goes– and I can say that, since she’s my agent, too. *g*)
    I kind of like M. Josephine Beverley. That initial M with the period almost sounds like a mysterious French gentleman….
    Susan S.

    Reply
  15. Thanks for reporting back, Jo!
    Lovely picture of you and Meg. You both look like you’re having a great time celebrating (but then Meg always seems to be having a great time wherever she goes– and I can say that, since she’s my agent, too. *g*)
    I kind of like M. Josephine Beverley. That initial M with the period almost sounds like a mysterious French gentleman….
    Susan S.

    Reply
  16. Thanks so much for sharing the photos! I did check the rita winners online late Saturday night, but I looked at the dearauthor site as opposed to the RWA site.
    And, I’m glad that Susan Kay Law is writing historicals again. 🙂

    Reply
  17. Thanks so much for sharing the photos! I did check the rita winners online late Saturday night, but I looked at the dearauthor site as opposed to the RWA site.
    And, I’m glad that Susan Kay Law is writing historicals again. 🙂

    Reply
  18. Thanks so much for sharing the photos! I did check the rita winners online late Saturday night, but I looked at the dearauthor site as opposed to the RWA site.
    And, I’m glad that Susan Kay Law is writing historicals again. 🙂

    Reply
  19. Thanks so much for sharing the photos! I did check the rita winners online late Saturday night, but I looked at the dearauthor site as opposed to the RWA site.
    And, I’m glad that Susan Kay Law is writing historicals again. 🙂

    Reply
  20. Thanks so much for sharing the photos! I did check the rita winners online late Saturday night, but I looked at the dearauthor site as opposed to the RWA site.
    And, I’m glad that Susan Kay Law is writing historicals again. 🙂

    Reply
  21. The next RWA will be in Washington, DC? I am beyond excited — the DC in my name indicates that I live within a Metro ride of the next meeting. Be still my beating heart!

    Reply
  22. The next RWA will be in Washington, DC? I am beyond excited — the DC in my name indicates that I live within a Metro ride of the next meeting. Be still my beating heart!

    Reply
  23. The next RWA will be in Washington, DC? I am beyond excited — the DC in my name indicates that I live within a Metro ride of the next meeting. Be still my beating heart!

    Reply
  24. The next RWA will be in Washington, DC? I am beyond excited — the DC in my name indicates that I live within a Metro ride of the next meeting. Be still my beating heart!

    Reply
  25. The next RWA will be in Washington, DC? I am beyond excited — the DC in my name indicates that I live within a Metro ride of the next meeting. Be still my beating heart!

    Reply
  26. Is it Susan Kay Law or Connie Brockway who is writing the historical? I think it’s Connie Brockway.
    Those shoes were wonderful, but my feet are too old now. However, I remember a pair of wonderful red shoes with ankle straps I had 20 years ago.

    Reply
  27. Is it Susan Kay Law or Connie Brockway who is writing the historical? I think it’s Connie Brockway.
    Those shoes were wonderful, but my feet are too old now. However, I remember a pair of wonderful red shoes with ankle straps I had 20 years ago.

    Reply
  28. Is it Susan Kay Law or Connie Brockway who is writing the historical? I think it’s Connie Brockway.
    Those shoes were wonderful, but my feet are too old now. However, I remember a pair of wonderful red shoes with ankle straps I had 20 years ago.

    Reply
  29. Is it Susan Kay Law or Connie Brockway who is writing the historical? I think it’s Connie Brockway.
    Those shoes were wonderful, but my feet are too old now. However, I remember a pair of wonderful red shoes with ankle straps I had 20 years ago.

    Reply
  30. Is it Susan Kay Law or Connie Brockway who is writing the historical? I think it’s Connie Brockway.
    Those shoes were wonderful, but my feet are too old now. However, I remember a pair of wonderful red shoes with ankle straps I had 20 years ago.

    Reply
  31. Lyn, that’s a fabulous idea about a picture id on the cards! Thanks.
    Thumb drives are another problem. I string them on gaudy ribbon or such. Otherwise they’re easily lost. I know someone had a kid’s one that was a rubby ducky. That’d be great for the backup one that lives — somewhere — on my desk.
    What is it with black? Why is nearly all tech black with black buttons? It’s nuts.
    Yes, sorry, it’s Connie who has a historical coming out. I’m not sure of Susie’s plans.
    The news about the historical genre was all good. Sales are healthy and publishers seem even more interested in varied settings. But probably not too varied. Don’t get your hopes too high for that Russian Steppes book.
    Also, possibly, YA historical. With the success of the Meyer books, the publishers are definitely looking at that.
    As you can tell, I was still tired when I did my blog last night, so I didn’t remember everything.
    Someone mentioned a very popular late-teen historical romance series, but I couldn’t pin it down. Anyone know? If you have or know teenage girls 15-18, what are they reading?
    Jo

    Reply
  32. Lyn, that’s a fabulous idea about a picture id on the cards! Thanks.
    Thumb drives are another problem. I string them on gaudy ribbon or such. Otherwise they’re easily lost. I know someone had a kid’s one that was a rubby ducky. That’d be great for the backup one that lives — somewhere — on my desk.
    What is it with black? Why is nearly all tech black with black buttons? It’s nuts.
    Yes, sorry, it’s Connie who has a historical coming out. I’m not sure of Susie’s plans.
    The news about the historical genre was all good. Sales are healthy and publishers seem even more interested in varied settings. But probably not too varied. Don’t get your hopes too high for that Russian Steppes book.
    Also, possibly, YA historical. With the success of the Meyer books, the publishers are definitely looking at that.
    As you can tell, I was still tired when I did my blog last night, so I didn’t remember everything.
    Someone mentioned a very popular late-teen historical romance series, but I couldn’t pin it down. Anyone know? If you have or know teenage girls 15-18, what are they reading?
    Jo

    Reply
  33. Lyn, that’s a fabulous idea about a picture id on the cards! Thanks.
    Thumb drives are another problem. I string them on gaudy ribbon or such. Otherwise they’re easily lost. I know someone had a kid’s one that was a rubby ducky. That’d be great for the backup one that lives — somewhere — on my desk.
    What is it with black? Why is nearly all tech black with black buttons? It’s nuts.
    Yes, sorry, it’s Connie who has a historical coming out. I’m not sure of Susie’s plans.
    The news about the historical genre was all good. Sales are healthy and publishers seem even more interested in varied settings. But probably not too varied. Don’t get your hopes too high for that Russian Steppes book.
    Also, possibly, YA historical. With the success of the Meyer books, the publishers are definitely looking at that.
    As you can tell, I was still tired when I did my blog last night, so I didn’t remember everything.
    Someone mentioned a very popular late-teen historical romance series, but I couldn’t pin it down. Anyone know? If you have or know teenage girls 15-18, what are they reading?
    Jo

    Reply
  34. Lyn, that’s a fabulous idea about a picture id on the cards! Thanks.
    Thumb drives are another problem. I string them on gaudy ribbon or such. Otherwise they’re easily lost. I know someone had a kid’s one that was a rubby ducky. That’d be great for the backup one that lives — somewhere — on my desk.
    What is it with black? Why is nearly all tech black with black buttons? It’s nuts.
    Yes, sorry, it’s Connie who has a historical coming out. I’m not sure of Susie’s plans.
    The news about the historical genre was all good. Sales are healthy and publishers seem even more interested in varied settings. But probably not too varied. Don’t get your hopes too high for that Russian Steppes book.
    Also, possibly, YA historical. With the success of the Meyer books, the publishers are definitely looking at that.
    As you can tell, I was still tired when I did my blog last night, so I didn’t remember everything.
    Someone mentioned a very popular late-teen historical romance series, but I couldn’t pin it down. Anyone know? If you have or know teenage girls 15-18, what are they reading?
    Jo

    Reply
  35. Lyn, that’s a fabulous idea about a picture id on the cards! Thanks.
    Thumb drives are another problem. I string them on gaudy ribbon or such. Otherwise they’re easily lost. I know someone had a kid’s one that was a rubby ducky. That’d be great for the backup one that lives — somewhere — on my desk.
    What is it with black? Why is nearly all tech black with black buttons? It’s nuts.
    Yes, sorry, it’s Connie who has a historical coming out. I’m not sure of Susie’s plans.
    The news about the historical genre was all good. Sales are healthy and publishers seem even more interested in varied settings. But probably not too varied. Don’t get your hopes too high for that Russian Steppes book.
    Also, possibly, YA historical. With the success of the Meyer books, the publishers are definitely looking at that.
    As you can tell, I was still tired when I did my blog last night, so I didn’t remember everything.
    Someone mentioned a very popular late-teen historical romance series, but I couldn’t pin it down. Anyone know? If you have or know teenage girls 15-18, what are they reading?
    Jo

    Reply
  36. I, er, kinda sorta inadvertently and clandestinely made Kresley Cole’s Immortals After Dark series available to my son’s girlfriend. She loves them. I brought her back a copy of the latest one; there were lots floating around RWA.
    The teens I know read everything from Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight series to more gritty books like Matthew Burgess’ Doing It.
    I’m currently working on a contemporary series for that age group. From what I can tell, historical, contemporary, or paranormal/fantasy isn’t as important as the DEPTH of feeling.
    That’s what makes them go, “Squee!”

    Reply
  37. I, er, kinda sorta inadvertently and clandestinely made Kresley Cole’s Immortals After Dark series available to my son’s girlfriend. She loves them. I brought her back a copy of the latest one; there were lots floating around RWA.
    The teens I know read everything from Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight series to more gritty books like Matthew Burgess’ Doing It.
    I’m currently working on a contemporary series for that age group. From what I can tell, historical, contemporary, or paranormal/fantasy isn’t as important as the DEPTH of feeling.
    That’s what makes them go, “Squee!”

    Reply
  38. I, er, kinda sorta inadvertently and clandestinely made Kresley Cole’s Immortals After Dark series available to my son’s girlfriend. She loves them. I brought her back a copy of the latest one; there were lots floating around RWA.
    The teens I know read everything from Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight series to more gritty books like Matthew Burgess’ Doing It.
    I’m currently working on a contemporary series for that age group. From what I can tell, historical, contemporary, or paranormal/fantasy isn’t as important as the DEPTH of feeling.
    That’s what makes them go, “Squee!”

    Reply
  39. I, er, kinda sorta inadvertently and clandestinely made Kresley Cole’s Immortals After Dark series available to my son’s girlfriend. She loves them. I brought her back a copy of the latest one; there were lots floating around RWA.
    The teens I know read everything from Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight series to more gritty books like Matthew Burgess’ Doing It.
    I’m currently working on a contemporary series for that age group. From what I can tell, historical, contemporary, or paranormal/fantasy isn’t as important as the DEPTH of feeling.
    That’s what makes them go, “Squee!”

    Reply
  40. I, er, kinda sorta inadvertently and clandestinely made Kresley Cole’s Immortals After Dark series available to my son’s girlfriend. She loves them. I brought her back a copy of the latest one; there were lots floating around RWA.
    The teens I know read everything from Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight series to more gritty books like Matthew Burgess’ Doing It.
    I’m currently working on a contemporary series for that age group. From what I can tell, historical, contemporary, or paranormal/fantasy isn’t as important as the DEPTH of feeling.
    That’s what makes them go, “Squee!”

    Reply
  41. Jo, my daughter’s in that age group, and she and her friends think anything with a vampire in it is impossibly queer. However, they seem to be entirely in the minority for their age group — my local B&N had teenagers buying the new Meyer at midnight.
    Just not my teenager. *g*
    Susan S.

    Reply
  42. Jo, my daughter’s in that age group, and she and her friends think anything with a vampire in it is impossibly queer. However, they seem to be entirely in the minority for their age group — my local B&N had teenagers buying the new Meyer at midnight.
    Just not my teenager. *g*
    Susan S.

    Reply
  43. Jo, my daughter’s in that age group, and she and her friends think anything with a vampire in it is impossibly queer. However, they seem to be entirely in the minority for their age group — my local B&N had teenagers buying the new Meyer at midnight.
    Just not my teenager. *g*
    Susan S.

    Reply
  44. Jo, my daughter’s in that age group, and she and her friends think anything with a vampire in it is impossibly queer. However, they seem to be entirely in the minority for their age group — my local B&N had teenagers buying the new Meyer at midnight.
    Just not my teenager. *g*
    Susan S.

    Reply
  45. Jo, my daughter’s in that age group, and she and her friends think anything with a vampire in it is impossibly queer. However, they seem to be entirely in the minority for their age group — my local B&N had teenagers buying the new Meyer at midnight.
    Just not my teenager. *g*
    Susan S.

    Reply
  46. Jo wrote: Someone mentioned a very popular late-teen historical romance series, but I couldn’t pin it down. Anyone know?
    It’s got to be the Libba Bray series which started with A Great and Terrible Beauty.
    I read the first 100 or so pages of it and put it down, but I know many people rave about it.

    Reply
  47. Jo wrote: Someone mentioned a very popular late-teen historical romance series, but I couldn’t pin it down. Anyone know?
    It’s got to be the Libba Bray series which started with A Great and Terrible Beauty.
    I read the first 100 or so pages of it and put it down, but I know many people rave about it.

    Reply
  48. Jo wrote: Someone mentioned a very popular late-teen historical romance series, but I couldn’t pin it down. Anyone know?
    It’s got to be the Libba Bray series which started with A Great and Terrible Beauty.
    I read the first 100 or so pages of it and put it down, but I know many people rave about it.

    Reply
  49. Jo wrote: Someone mentioned a very popular late-teen historical romance series, but I couldn’t pin it down. Anyone know?
    It’s got to be the Libba Bray series which started with A Great and Terrible Beauty.
    I read the first 100 or so pages of it and put it down, but I know many people rave about it.

    Reply
  50. Jo wrote: Someone mentioned a very popular late-teen historical romance series, but I couldn’t pin it down. Anyone know?
    It’s got to be the Libba Bray series which started with A Great and Terrible Beauty.
    I read the first 100 or so pages of it and put it down, but I know many people rave about it.

    Reply
  51. Jo, your report was almost as good as being there. Thank you so much for the pictures and the reporting!
    You asked how we stay-at-homers kept track of the festivities. I have a Twitter account, and RWA attendees were posting like crazy on Twitter. One lady posted all the RITA and GH winners as they happened, and her reporting was way faster than following it on the RWA site.
    I totally loved the cat apron you bought for Mary Jo! I’m at an age where I’ve begun wearing bib aprons again. Don’t know if it’s because my body real estate has expanded so that it’s closer to the stove when I cook, or if food is just more splattery, but I sure do love my aprons. At home, I even wear them if I’m eating sloppy food. *g*

    Reply
  52. Jo, your report was almost as good as being there. Thank you so much for the pictures and the reporting!
    You asked how we stay-at-homers kept track of the festivities. I have a Twitter account, and RWA attendees were posting like crazy on Twitter. One lady posted all the RITA and GH winners as they happened, and her reporting was way faster than following it on the RWA site.
    I totally loved the cat apron you bought for Mary Jo! I’m at an age where I’ve begun wearing bib aprons again. Don’t know if it’s because my body real estate has expanded so that it’s closer to the stove when I cook, or if food is just more splattery, but I sure do love my aprons. At home, I even wear them if I’m eating sloppy food. *g*

    Reply
  53. Jo, your report was almost as good as being there. Thank you so much for the pictures and the reporting!
    You asked how we stay-at-homers kept track of the festivities. I have a Twitter account, and RWA attendees were posting like crazy on Twitter. One lady posted all the RITA and GH winners as they happened, and her reporting was way faster than following it on the RWA site.
    I totally loved the cat apron you bought for Mary Jo! I’m at an age where I’ve begun wearing bib aprons again. Don’t know if it’s because my body real estate has expanded so that it’s closer to the stove when I cook, or if food is just more splattery, but I sure do love my aprons. At home, I even wear them if I’m eating sloppy food. *g*

    Reply
  54. Jo, your report was almost as good as being there. Thank you so much for the pictures and the reporting!
    You asked how we stay-at-homers kept track of the festivities. I have a Twitter account, and RWA attendees were posting like crazy on Twitter. One lady posted all the RITA and GH winners as they happened, and her reporting was way faster than following it on the RWA site.
    I totally loved the cat apron you bought for Mary Jo! I’m at an age where I’ve begun wearing bib aprons again. Don’t know if it’s because my body real estate has expanded so that it’s closer to the stove when I cook, or if food is just more splattery, but I sure do love my aprons. At home, I even wear them if I’m eating sloppy food. *g*

    Reply
  55. Jo, your report was almost as good as being there. Thank you so much for the pictures and the reporting!
    You asked how we stay-at-homers kept track of the festivities. I have a Twitter account, and RWA attendees were posting like crazy on Twitter. One lady posted all the RITA and GH winners as they happened, and her reporting was way faster than following it on the RWA site.
    I totally loved the cat apron you bought for Mary Jo! I’m at an age where I’ve begun wearing bib aprons again. Don’t know if it’s because my body real estate has expanded so that it’s closer to the stove when I cook, or if food is just more splattery, but I sure do love my aprons. At home, I even wear them if I’m eating sloppy food. *g*

    Reply
  56. Jo! I loved the photos and commentary! Thank you for being eyes and ears for us and sharing your photographic bounty.
    Congratulations to all the winners, but I’m especially thrilled that Deanna Raybourn won a RITA for “Silent in the Grave.” So well deserved. (And maybe those fab shoes belong to her?)
    I would love to go to RWA someday. . . perhaps I could volunteer to be the official RWA chaplain or something?

    Reply
  57. Jo! I loved the photos and commentary! Thank you for being eyes and ears for us and sharing your photographic bounty.
    Congratulations to all the winners, but I’m especially thrilled that Deanna Raybourn won a RITA for “Silent in the Grave.” So well deserved. (And maybe those fab shoes belong to her?)
    I would love to go to RWA someday. . . perhaps I could volunteer to be the official RWA chaplain or something?

    Reply
  58. Jo! I loved the photos and commentary! Thank you for being eyes and ears for us and sharing your photographic bounty.
    Congratulations to all the winners, but I’m especially thrilled that Deanna Raybourn won a RITA for “Silent in the Grave.” So well deserved. (And maybe those fab shoes belong to her?)
    I would love to go to RWA someday. . . perhaps I could volunteer to be the official RWA chaplain or something?

    Reply
  59. Jo! I loved the photos and commentary! Thank you for being eyes and ears for us and sharing your photographic bounty.
    Congratulations to all the winners, but I’m especially thrilled that Deanna Raybourn won a RITA for “Silent in the Grave.” So well deserved. (And maybe those fab shoes belong to her?)
    I would love to go to RWA someday. . . perhaps I could volunteer to be the official RWA chaplain or something?

    Reply
  60. Jo! I loved the photos and commentary! Thank you for being eyes and ears for us and sharing your photographic bounty.
    Congratulations to all the winners, but I’m especially thrilled that Deanna Raybourn won a RITA for “Silent in the Grave.” So well deserved. (And maybe those fab shoes belong to her?)
    I would love to go to RWA someday. . . perhaps I could volunteer to be the official RWA chaplain or something?

    Reply
  61. RevMelinda, if they stationed a chaplain in the waiting area for pitch appointments, she’d get plenty of work! Though I needed on more AFTER pitching at the Willamette Writers Conference this weekend–it went well and I got a request, but when I got back upstairs to my hotel room, I was eying the minibar longingly despite being A) cheap, er, I mean FRUGAL, and B) strictly a light social drinker.
    Jo, this is off-topic, but when you were at the Eastside RWA meeting near Seattle a couple months ago, you mentioned something about being able to get calendars for any year from a common software program. Would you remind me which one it was? I’m trying to create a timeline for my WIP, and I’d love to be able to scribble it all over an 1805 calendar!

    Reply
  62. RevMelinda, if they stationed a chaplain in the waiting area for pitch appointments, she’d get plenty of work! Though I needed on more AFTER pitching at the Willamette Writers Conference this weekend–it went well and I got a request, but when I got back upstairs to my hotel room, I was eying the minibar longingly despite being A) cheap, er, I mean FRUGAL, and B) strictly a light social drinker.
    Jo, this is off-topic, but when you were at the Eastside RWA meeting near Seattle a couple months ago, you mentioned something about being able to get calendars for any year from a common software program. Would you remind me which one it was? I’m trying to create a timeline for my WIP, and I’d love to be able to scribble it all over an 1805 calendar!

    Reply
  63. RevMelinda, if they stationed a chaplain in the waiting area for pitch appointments, she’d get plenty of work! Though I needed on more AFTER pitching at the Willamette Writers Conference this weekend–it went well and I got a request, but when I got back upstairs to my hotel room, I was eying the minibar longingly despite being A) cheap, er, I mean FRUGAL, and B) strictly a light social drinker.
    Jo, this is off-topic, but when you were at the Eastside RWA meeting near Seattle a couple months ago, you mentioned something about being able to get calendars for any year from a common software program. Would you remind me which one it was? I’m trying to create a timeline for my WIP, and I’d love to be able to scribble it all over an 1805 calendar!

    Reply
  64. RevMelinda, if they stationed a chaplain in the waiting area for pitch appointments, she’d get plenty of work! Though I needed on more AFTER pitching at the Willamette Writers Conference this weekend–it went well and I got a request, but when I got back upstairs to my hotel room, I was eying the minibar longingly despite being A) cheap, er, I mean FRUGAL, and B) strictly a light social drinker.
    Jo, this is off-topic, but when you were at the Eastside RWA meeting near Seattle a couple months ago, you mentioned something about being able to get calendars for any year from a common software program. Would you remind me which one it was? I’m trying to create a timeline for my WIP, and I’d love to be able to scribble it all over an 1805 calendar!

    Reply
  65. RevMelinda, if they stationed a chaplain in the waiting area for pitch appointments, she’d get plenty of work! Though I needed on more AFTER pitching at the Willamette Writers Conference this weekend–it went well and I got a request, but when I got back upstairs to my hotel room, I was eying the minibar longingly despite being A) cheap, er, I mean FRUGAL, and B) strictly a light social drinker.
    Jo, this is off-topic, but when you were at the Eastside RWA meeting near Seattle a couple months ago, you mentioned something about being able to get calendars for any year from a common software program. Would you remind me which one it was? I’m trying to create a timeline for my WIP, and I’d love to be able to scribble it all over an 1805 calendar!

    Reply
  66. LOL, Tal on swapping moles for cats.
    Susan, Microsoft Publisher does calendars, and I think Word does, too.
    There’s also a site called calendarhome.com, that does free ones.
    It’s a great tool for historicals. As I said, I put in real events, large and small, then write in my book details as I go.
    Being one who does not pre-plot.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  67. LOL, Tal on swapping moles for cats.
    Susan, Microsoft Publisher does calendars, and I think Word does, too.
    There’s also a site called calendarhome.com, that does free ones.
    It’s a great tool for historicals. As I said, I put in real events, large and small, then write in my book details as I go.
    Being one who does not pre-plot.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  68. LOL, Tal on swapping moles for cats.
    Susan, Microsoft Publisher does calendars, and I think Word does, too.
    There’s also a site called calendarhome.com, that does free ones.
    It’s a great tool for historicals. As I said, I put in real events, large and small, then write in my book details as I go.
    Being one who does not pre-plot.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  69. LOL, Tal on swapping moles for cats.
    Susan, Microsoft Publisher does calendars, and I think Word does, too.
    There’s also a site called calendarhome.com, that does free ones.
    It’s a great tool for historicals. As I said, I put in real events, large and small, then write in my book details as I go.
    Being one who does not pre-plot.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  70. LOL, Tal on swapping moles for cats.
    Susan, Microsoft Publisher does calendars, and I think Word does, too.
    There’s also a site called calendarhome.com, that does free ones.
    It’s a great tool for historicals. As I said, I put in real events, large and small, then write in my book details as I go.
    Being one who does not pre-plot.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  71. Ah, I get it, Tal. You have excellent taste.
    My apron is coffee themed. Shows where my passions lie!
    Okay, does anyone else have an apron, and if so, what’s it like?
    I only took to one recently when it finally dawned on my that the marks on my t-shirts were grease spots.
    Messy cooker is me,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  72. Ah, I get it, Tal. You have excellent taste.
    My apron is coffee themed. Shows where my passions lie!
    Okay, does anyone else have an apron, and if so, what’s it like?
    I only took to one recently when it finally dawned on my that the marks on my t-shirts were grease spots.
    Messy cooker is me,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  73. Ah, I get it, Tal. You have excellent taste.
    My apron is coffee themed. Shows where my passions lie!
    Okay, does anyone else have an apron, and if so, what’s it like?
    I only took to one recently when it finally dawned on my that the marks on my t-shirts were grease spots.
    Messy cooker is me,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  74. Ah, I get it, Tal. You have excellent taste.
    My apron is coffee themed. Shows where my passions lie!
    Okay, does anyone else have an apron, and if so, what’s it like?
    I only took to one recently when it finally dawned on my that the marks on my t-shirts were grease spots.
    Messy cooker is me,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  75. Ah, I get it, Tal. You have excellent taste.
    My apron is coffee themed. Shows where my passions lie!
    Okay, does anyone else have an apron, and if so, what’s it like?
    I only took to one recently when it finally dawned on my that the marks on my t-shirts were grease spots.
    Messy cooker is me,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  76. Susan Wilbanks, you are welcome to crash at my house any time you like when you’re in Portland. (During or after a Willamette Writers Conference in the future?)
    Not only would the accomodations be free, but I could offer you a glass of wine (also free) after you’re done pitching. Plus I read anything written with words.

    Reply
  77. Susan Wilbanks, you are welcome to crash at my house any time you like when you’re in Portland. (During or after a Willamette Writers Conference in the future?)
    Not only would the accomodations be free, but I could offer you a glass of wine (also free) after you’re done pitching. Plus I read anything written with words.

    Reply
  78. Susan Wilbanks, you are welcome to crash at my house any time you like when you’re in Portland. (During or after a Willamette Writers Conference in the future?)
    Not only would the accomodations be free, but I could offer you a glass of wine (also free) after you’re done pitching. Plus I read anything written with words.

    Reply
  79. Susan Wilbanks, you are welcome to crash at my house any time you like when you’re in Portland. (During or after a Willamette Writers Conference in the future?)
    Not only would the accomodations be free, but I could offer you a glass of wine (also free) after you’re done pitching. Plus I read anything written with words.

    Reply
  80. Susan Wilbanks, you are welcome to crash at my house any time you like when you’re in Portland. (During or after a Willamette Writers Conference in the future?)
    Not only would the accomodations be free, but I could offer you a glass of wine (also free) after you’re done pitching. Plus I read anything written with words.

    Reply
  81. Jo, I gave Bruce, my best friend’s husband who does the cooking at their house, an apron that says AROUND HERE, CAT HAIR IS CONSIDERED A CONDIMENT. An appropriate sentiment, since they have cats the way some people have mice–six at last count, though three of them belong to housemates.

    Reply
  82. Jo, I gave Bruce, my best friend’s husband who does the cooking at their house, an apron that says AROUND HERE, CAT HAIR IS CONSIDERED A CONDIMENT. An appropriate sentiment, since they have cats the way some people have mice–six at last count, though three of them belong to housemates.

    Reply
  83. Jo, I gave Bruce, my best friend’s husband who does the cooking at their house, an apron that says AROUND HERE, CAT HAIR IS CONSIDERED A CONDIMENT. An appropriate sentiment, since they have cats the way some people have mice–six at last count, though three of them belong to housemates.

    Reply
  84. Jo, I gave Bruce, my best friend’s husband who does the cooking at their house, an apron that says AROUND HERE, CAT HAIR IS CONSIDERED A CONDIMENT. An appropriate sentiment, since they have cats the way some people have mice–six at last count, though three of them belong to housemates.

    Reply
  85. Jo, I gave Bruce, my best friend’s husband who does the cooking at their house, an apron that says AROUND HERE, CAT HAIR IS CONSIDERED A CONDIMENT. An appropriate sentiment, since they have cats the way some people have mice–six at last count, though three of them belong to housemates.

    Reply

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