Humor in Books

Anne here, apologetically running in late. Sorry, I forgot what date it was. Today I'm pulling a question from the list of reader questions we've received over the years. And while I'm talking about that, I'll remind you all — if you submit a question for the wenches and one of us chooses it as a blog topic a blog, that person will win a book.

Today's topic is from Constance, who said… "It would also be very interesting to know how important humor is to each of you when creating characters. I’ve always found heroes with a self-deprecating sense of humor almost irresistible, and heroines who can match them in witty retort make it even better. But it can’t be easy to create that — or is it for the extremely talented writers you all are?"

PerfectRake45kb

Constance, I also love a hero who can make me laugh. But writing humor is never easy, especially if I set out trying to be funny. Forced humor can be horribly un-funny and usually gets deleted. Even when I think the story I'm writing is going to be a funny one, it doesn't always happen. 

People have very different senses of humor, so what is funny to one person completely passes another. I remember so often when I was a kid, my brother and I would be cracking up laughing at some TV show, and one of my older sisters would say crossly, "I don't know why you're laughing. That isn't funny at all." Which made my brother and me laugh even harder. And of course, if you have to explain why something is funny, it immediately kills the humor stone dead.

So all I can go on is what's funny to me. My funniest scenes usually come spontaneously in the writing. I'm 'in the zone' busily writing, a character says something unexpected and another one responds, and then . . . we're off. And when it happens, it's a joy. 

Most of my books have some funny moments, but some books are funnier than others. It's something to do with character chemistry. Some character combinations bring out humor better than others — a light-hearted, flippant hero and an earnest worrier of a heroine, for instance, sparked some funny scenes in my book, The Perfect Rake.

    “I would appreciate it if you would stop… stop… ogling me like that," she hissed, tugging her very modest neckline higher. "It is very embarrassing." She folded her arms across her breasts defensively. 
    He tried to look contrite. "It wasn't me," he confessed. "It was my eyes. They are bold and easily led and have no sense of propriety.”

WinterBride42kb
And particular character types can also lend themselves to humor. When my character, Freddy Monkton-Coombes first hit the page in The Winter Bride, I intended him to be a minor character, the hero's funny side-kick friend. But the more he appeared in the story the more I thought it might be fun to make him the hero of the next book. So I did—much against the advice of an experienced writer friend, who told me I'd never make a hero out of a muffin-fearing lightweight. And I have to say, most readers loved him. Despite this, it's often minor characters who spark the best humor.

Heyer had some deliciously funny minor characters in her books. Who can forget the battling valets in The Unknown Ajax, or the crashing bore, Lord Bromford in The Grand Sophy, or the gloriously silly ongoing conversation about "nemesis" in Friday's Child, not to mention the hilarious Pel and Pom conversation in The Convenient Marriage as, ever so slightly 'disguised' (ie drunk) they crash a card party in search of Hero's brooch. Then there's Damerel and Nurse and Nurse's dire predictions, in Venetia. I could go on. . . 

In fact I chose Freddy in The Winter Bride as my hero's name in a kind of indirect homage to Georgette Heyer's Freddy in Cotillion, whose masterful interpretation of the poem "Young Lochinvar" makes me smile every time I think of it. Here's a quote from The Winter Bride, explaining why my Freddy won't attend a literary society as requested. The humor in this exchange rests on a kind of in-joke — the reader's familiarity with Jane Austen's most famous book.

    “Not the literary society. The horror stories those girls read are enough to make a fellow’s hair stand on end.”
    Max frowned. “Horror stories? They don’t read horror stories, only entertaining tales of the kind ladies seem to enjoy, about girls and gossip and families—”
    “Horror stories, every last one of them,” Freddy said firmly. “You asked me to sit in on their literary society last month, when you went up to Manchester, remember? The story they were reading then . . .” He gave an eloquent shudder. “Horror from the very first line: It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife. Must he, indeed? What about the poor fellow’s wants, eh? Do they matter? No. Every female in the blasted story was plotting to hook some man for herself or her daughter or niece. If you don’t call that horror, I don’t know what is!”

Apart from laugh-out-loud kind of humor, there's also the dry, ironic kind of humor, often in the voice of a character who isn't a funny character as such. Some of Heyer's heroes are not funny as such, but their dry laconic utterances are wonderful. Here's an example from Heyer's Frederica, the hero resisting the efforts of his sister to manipulate him.

    “Do you forget that I am your sister?”
    “No; I’ve never been granted the opportunity to forget it.” 

And here's an example from my new book, Marry In Scarlet, my hero the duke, talking to his mother, who is also attempting to manipulate him. MarryInScarlet (1)

       “Do not fret yourself, my son, I shall try to weather the storm,” his mother said, rallying bravely. “It’s you I worry about, my dearest. I thought that you were all settled at last, and that finally I could go in peace.” She sank back feebly in her chair and closed her eyes.
        “Go where, Mother? Off to Bath again, are you?” He blotted the ink of his letter, folded it and reached for his seal. “Or perhaps a sea-bathing treatment this time? I’ve heard that a bracing dip in the cold salt sea does people a power of good.”
        She shuddered and clutched her vial feebly to her bosom. “Such a thing would kill me.”
        “Only if you drowned, and I believe there are muscular females at the dipping sites whose job it is to prevent that. It’s perfectly safe.”
         She sat up and glared at him. “Don’t be so obtuse, Redmond—my darling boy. You must know that the only thing that keeps me alive—the only thing, dearest—is the desire to see you settled. Married.”
         “Then I shall postpone my nuptials indefinitely and provide you with a long life.”

So that's it, Constance. If I could guarantee to write humor every time, I probably would. But as I hope I've explained, it all depends . . . 

So, wenchly readers, do you like a laugh in a book? What are your favorite books with humor? Throw some titles out there.

 

205 thoughts on “Humor in Books”

  1. What a fun post, Anne! I love a book with witty dialogue that makes me laugh. Julie James often hits the spot for me with her FBI/US Attorney Series.

    Reply
  2. What a fun post, Anne! I love a book with witty dialogue that makes me laugh. Julie James often hits the spot for me with her FBI/US Attorney Series.

    Reply
  3. What a fun post, Anne! I love a book with witty dialogue that makes me laugh. Julie James often hits the spot for me with her FBI/US Attorney Series.

    Reply
  4. What a fun post, Anne! I love a book with witty dialogue that makes me laugh. Julie James often hits the spot for me with her FBI/US Attorney Series.

    Reply
  5. What a fun post, Anne! I love a book with witty dialogue that makes me laugh. Julie James often hits the spot for me with her FBI/US Attorney Series.

    Reply
  6. “Dying is easy, humor is hard!” I think Freddy first appeared in THE AUTUMN BRIDE? I was one of the ones who had grave doubts that Freddy had hero potential, and you did it brilliantly! He was such a sweetheart, and much smarter than he first appeared. *G*

    Reply
  7. “Dying is easy, humor is hard!” I think Freddy first appeared in THE AUTUMN BRIDE? I was one of the ones who had grave doubts that Freddy had hero potential, and you did it brilliantly! He was such a sweetheart, and much smarter than he first appeared. *G*

    Reply
  8. “Dying is easy, humor is hard!” I think Freddy first appeared in THE AUTUMN BRIDE? I was one of the ones who had grave doubts that Freddy had hero potential, and you did it brilliantly! He was such a sweetheart, and much smarter than he first appeared. *G*

    Reply
  9. “Dying is easy, humor is hard!” I think Freddy first appeared in THE AUTUMN BRIDE? I was one of the ones who had grave doubts that Freddy had hero potential, and you did it brilliantly! He was such a sweetheart, and much smarter than he first appeared. *G*

    Reply
  10. “Dying is easy, humor is hard!” I think Freddy first appeared in THE AUTUMN BRIDE? I was one of the ones who had grave doubts that Freddy had hero potential, and you did it brilliantly! He was such a sweetheart, and much smarter than he first appeared. *G*

    Reply
  11. Thanks, Mary Jo — and BTW, you were not the author I was referring to when I said I was warned Freddy would not make a good hero. It was none of the wenches. And yes, he was much smarter than he appeared. Coldness, arrogance or faux foolishness are all masks some of my heroes have worn.

    Reply
  12. Thanks, Mary Jo — and BTW, you were not the author I was referring to when I said I was warned Freddy would not make a good hero. It was none of the wenches. And yes, he was much smarter than he appeared. Coldness, arrogance or faux foolishness are all masks some of my heroes have worn.

    Reply
  13. Thanks, Mary Jo — and BTW, you were not the author I was referring to when I said I was warned Freddy would not make a good hero. It was none of the wenches. And yes, he was much smarter than he appeared. Coldness, arrogance or faux foolishness are all masks some of my heroes have worn.

    Reply
  14. Thanks, Mary Jo — and BTW, you were not the author I was referring to when I said I was warned Freddy would not make a good hero. It was none of the wenches. And yes, he was much smarter than he appeared. Coldness, arrogance or faux foolishness are all masks some of my heroes have worn.

    Reply
  15. Thanks, Mary Jo — and BTW, you were not the author I was referring to when I said I was warned Freddy would not make a good hero. It was none of the wenches. And yes, he was much smarter than he appeared. Coldness, arrogance or faux foolishness are all masks some of my heroes have worn.

    Reply
  16. I usually find humor where critters abound. E.g., the slightly decrepit street dog that Jane Chance adopts in The Spring Bride (with the assistance of Zachary Black leading the dog back to Jane’s home with the aid of a blue satin or silk leash). Which is followed by the scene of the dog and cat confrontation. (Spoiler alert: cats win.) In contemporary, more dogs. Linda Howard’s Troublemaker stars a Golden Retriever named Tricks who can tell time, act like HM the Queen, and keep everyone under her paw. Jennifer Crusie’s Anyone But You stars a Basset Hound named Fred. The book made me laugh until I cried. In addition to my copy, I bought 13 more and gave them to friends. Nora Roberts’ The Search is romantic suspense and yes, there are murders. But there’s also a hero whose mother gifts him with a totally untrained dog. Some of the scenes are hysterical. Another example is Beth Kendrick’s The Lucky Dog Matchmaking Service, where the heroine matches owners with dogs and vice versa. And lastly, Nancy Warren’s novella The Fourteen Million Dollar Poodle. Hero inherits the dog. The dog inherits the fourteen million. He needs a dog nanny who can speak French to the poodle, not to mention create palatable French doggy cuisine. Okay, I admit to being in a 4-legged canine rut. Thanks for the column, Anne. Regards to Finn (George’s dog in the “A Marriage of Convenience” series.

    Reply
  17. I usually find humor where critters abound. E.g., the slightly decrepit street dog that Jane Chance adopts in The Spring Bride (with the assistance of Zachary Black leading the dog back to Jane’s home with the aid of a blue satin or silk leash). Which is followed by the scene of the dog and cat confrontation. (Spoiler alert: cats win.) In contemporary, more dogs. Linda Howard’s Troublemaker stars a Golden Retriever named Tricks who can tell time, act like HM the Queen, and keep everyone under her paw. Jennifer Crusie’s Anyone But You stars a Basset Hound named Fred. The book made me laugh until I cried. In addition to my copy, I bought 13 more and gave them to friends. Nora Roberts’ The Search is romantic suspense and yes, there are murders. But there’s also a hero whose mother gifts him with a totally untrained dog. Some of the scenes are hysterical. Another example is Beth Kendrick’s The Lucky Dog Matchmaking Service, where the heroine matches owners with dogs and vice versa. And lastly, Nancy Warren’s novella The Fourteen Million Dollar Poodle. Hero inherits the dog. The dog inherits the fourteen million. He needs a dog nanny who can speak French to the poodle, not to mention create palatable French doggy cuisine. Okay, I admit to being in a 4-legged canine rut. Thanks for the column, Anne. Regards to Finn (George’s dog in the “A Marriage of Convenience” series.

    Reply
  18. I usually find humor where critters abound. E.g., the slightly decrepit street dog that Jane Chance adopts in The Spring Bride (with the assistance of Zachary Black leading the dog back to Jane’s home with the aid of a blue satin or silk leash). Which is followed by the scene of the dog and cat confrontation. (Spoiler alert: cats win.) In contemporary, more dogs. Linda Howard’s Troublemaker stars a Golden Retriever named Tricks who can tell time, act like HM the Queen, and keep everyone under her paw. Jennifer Crusie’s Anyone But You stars a Basset Hound named Fred. The book made me laugh until I cried. In addition to my copy, I bought 13 more and gave them to friends. Nora Roberts’ The Search is romantic suspense and yes, there are murders. But there’s also a hero whose mother gifts him with a totally untrained dog. Some of the scenes are hysterical. Another example is Beth Kendrick’s The Lucky Dog Matchmaking Service, where the heroine matches owners with dogs and vice versa. And lastly, Nancy Warren’s novella The Fourteen Million Dollar Poodle. Hero inherits the dog. The dog inherits the fourteen million. He needs a dog nanny who can speak French to the poodle, not to mention create palatable French doggy cuisine. Okay, I admit to being in a 4-legged canine rut. Thanks for the column, Anne. Regards to Finn (George’s dog in the “A Marriage of Convenience” series.

    Reply
  19. I usually find humor where critters abound. E.g., the slightly decrepit street dog that Jane Chance adopts in The Spring Bride (with the assistance of Zachary Black leading the dog back to Jane’s home with the aid of a blue satin or silk leash). Which is followed by the scene of the dog and cat confrontation. (Spoiler alert: cats win.) In contemporary, more dogs. Linda Howard’s Troublemaker stars a Golden Retriever named Tricks who can tell time, act like HM the Queen, and keep everyone under her paw. Jennifer Crusie’s Anyone But You stars a Basset Hound named Fred. The book made me laugh until I cried. In addition to my copy, I bought 13 more and gave them to friends. Nora Roberts’ The Search is romantic suspense and yes, there are murders. But there’s also a hero whose mother gifts him with a totally untrained dog. Some of the scenes are hysterical. Another example is Beth Kendrick’s The Lucky Dog Matchmaking Service, where the heroine matches owners with dogs and vice versa. And lastly, Nancy Warren’s novella The Fourteen Million Dollar Poodle. Hero inherits the dog. The dog inherits the fourteen million. He needs a dog nanny who can speak French to the poodle, not to mention create palatable French doggy cuisine. Okay, I admit to being in a 4-legged canine rut. Thanks for the column, Anne. Regards to Finn (George’s dog in the “A Marriage of Convenience” series.

    Reply
  20. I usually find humor where critters abound. E.g., the slightly decrepit street dog that Jane Chance adopts in The Spring Bride (with the assistance of Zachary Black leading the dog back to Jane’s home with the aid of a blue satin or silk leash). Which is followed by the scene of the dog and cat confrontation. (Spoiler alert: cats win.) In contemporary, more dogs. Linda Howard’s Troublemaker stars a Golden Retriever named Tricks who can tell time, act like HM the Queen, and keep everyone under her paw. Jennifer Crusie’s Anyone But You stars a Basset Hound named Fred. The book made me laugh until I cried. In addition to my copy, I bought 13 more and gave them to friends. Nora Roberts’ The Search is romantic suspense and yes, there are murders. But there’s also a hero whose mother gifts him with a totally untrained dog. Some of the scenes are hysterical. Another example is Beth Kendrick’s The Lucky Dog Matchmaking Service, where the heroine matches owners with dogs and vice versa. And lastly, Nancy Warren’s novella The Fourteen Million Dollar Poodle. Hero inherits the dog. The dog inherits the fourteen million. He needs a dog nanny who can speak French to the poodle, not to mention create palatable French doggy cuisine. Okay, I admit to being in a 4-legged canine rut. Thanks for the column, Anne. Regards to Finn (George’s dog in the “A Marriage of Convenience” series.

    Reply
  21. The whole scene, start to finish, where Pru and Gideon meet The Perfect Rake still makes me laugh out loud, even having read it at least a dozen times. One of the things that makes it so funny for me is the fact that it’s all so natural and flows so easily. It doesn’t have to be laugh out loud though. When Hope and Sebastian are at the ‘opera’…I felt so bad for Bas but it was still so funny how he could only sit, ramrod straight so he didn’t give himself away.
    Life isn’t one big, serious time or at least, it shouldn’t be. Books should reflect that as well. Regardless of the era, it just makes the characters that much more relatable.

    Reply
  22. The whole scene, start to finish, where Pru and Gideon meet The Perfect Rake still makes me laugh out loud, even having read it at least a dozen times. One of the things that makes it so funny for me is the fact that it’s all so natural and flows so easily. It doesn’t have to be laugh out loud though. When Hope and Sebastian are at the ‘opera’…I felt so bad for Bas but it was still so funny how he could only sit, ramrod straight so he didn’t give himself away.
    Life isn’t one big, serious time or at least, it shouldn’t be. Books should reflect that as well. Regardless of the era, it just makes the characters that much more relatable.

    Reply
  23. The whole scene, start to finish, where Pru and Gideon meet The Perfect Rake still makes me laugh out loud, even having read it at least a dozen times. One of the things that makes it so funny for me is the fact that it’s all so natural and flows so easily. It doesn’t have to be laugh out loud though. When Hope and Sebastian are at the ‘opera’…I felt so bad for Bas but it was still so funny how he could only sit, ramrod straight so he didn’t give himself away.
    Life isn’t one big, serious time or at least, it shouldn’t be. Books should reflect that as well. Regardless of the era, it just makes the characters that much more relatable.

    Reply
  24. The whole scene, start to finish, where Pru and Gideon meet The Perfect Rake still makes me laugh out loud, even having read it at least a dozen times. One of the things that makes it so funny for me is the fact that it’s all so natural and flows so easily. It doesn’t have to be laugh out loud though. When Hope and Sebastian are at the ‘opera’…I felt so bad for Bas but it was still so funny how he could only sit, ramrod straight so he didn’t give himself away.
    Life isn’t one big, serious time or at least, it shouldn’t be. Books should reflect that as well. Regardless of the era, it just makes the characters that much more relatable.

    Reply
  25. The whole scene, start to finish, where Pru and Gideon meet The Perfect Rake still makes me laugh out loud, even having read it at least a dozen times. One of the things that makes it so funny for me is the fact that it’s all so natural and flows so easily. It doesn’t have to be laugh out loud though. When Hope and Sebastian are at the ‘opera’…I felt so bad for Bas but it was still so funny how he could only sit, ramrod straight so he didn’t give himself away.
    Life isn’t one big, serious time or at least, it shouldn’t be. Books should reflect that as well. Regardless of the era, it just makes the characters that much more relatable.

    Reply
  26. I’m one of those people who need laughter when I am feeling blue, worried or anxious. And I’m feeling all three of those right now. For some reason laughter helps me – I don’t know why – it just does.
    I have go-to movies and TV programs that are sure bets. I know that I will laugh even though I’ve seen them a million times.
    The same is true for books. My two main authors for laughs are Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger. I don’t believe either of these ladies writes any more. All of the books I have by them are on my kindle and they are old publications.
    My favorites by Joan Smith are PERDITA and SWEET AND TWENTY. It is hard to choose from Ms. Metzger’s works because all of her books make me laugh out loud. However, MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT is my all time favorite.
    You are right when you say that humor is subjective. We don’t all find the same things funny. But these two authors know just where my funny bone is.

    Reply
  27. I’m one of those people who need laughter when I am feeling blue, worried or anxious. And I’m feeling all three of those right now. For some reason laughter helps me – I don’t know why – it just does.
    I have go-to movies and TV programs that are sure bets. I know that I will laugh even though I’ve seen them a million times.
    The same is true for books. My two main authors for laughs are Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger. I don’t believe either of these ladies writes any more. All of the books I have by them are on my kindle and they are old publications.
    My favorites by Joan Smith are PERDITA and SWEET AND TWENTY. It is hard to choose from Ms. Metzger’s works because all of her books make me laugh out loud. However, MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT is my all time favorite.
    You are right when you say that humor is subjective. We don’t all find the same things funny. But these two authors know just where my funny bone is.

    Reply
  28. I’m one of those people who need laughter when I am feeling blue, worried or anxious. And I’m feeling all three of those right now. For some reason laughter helps me – I don’t know why – it just does.
    I have go-to movies and TV programs that are sure bets. I know that I will laugh even though I’ve seen them a million times.
    The same is true for books. My two main authors for laughs are Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger. I don’t believe either of these ladies writes any more. All of the books I have by them are on my kindle and they are old publications.
    My favorites by Joan Smith are PERDITA and SWEET AND TWENTY. It is hard to choose from Ms. Metzger’s works because all of her books make me laugh out loud. However, MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT is my all time favorite.
    You are right when you say that humor is subjective. We don’t all find the same things funny. But these two authors know just where my funny bone is.

    Reply
  29. I’m one of those people who need laughter when I am feeling blue, worried or anxious. And I’m feeling all three of those right now. For some reason laughter helps me – I don’t know why – it just does.
    I have go-to movies and TV programs that are sure bets. I know that I will laugh even though I’ve seen them a million times.
    The same is true for books. My two main authors for laughs are Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger. I don’t believe either of these ladies writes any more. All of the books I have by them are on my kindle and they are old publications.
    My favorites by Joan Smith are PERDITA and SWEET AND TWENTY. It is hard to choose from Ms. Metzger’s works because all of her books make me laugh out loud. However, MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT is my all time favorite.
    You are right when you say that humor is subjective. We don’t all find the same things funny. But these two authors know just where my funny bone is.

    Reply
  30. I’m one of those people who need laughter when I am feeling blue, worried or anxious. And I’m feeling all three of those right now. For some reason laughter helps me – I don’t know why – it just does.
    I have go-to movies and TV programs that are sure bets. I know that I will laugh even though I’ve seen them a million times.
    The same is true for books. My two main authors for laughs are Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger. I don’t believe either of these ladies writes any more. All of the books I have by them are on my kindle and they are old publications.
    My favorites by Joan Smith are PERDITA and SWEET AND TWENTY. It is hard to choose from Ms. Metzger’s works because all of her books make me laugh out loud. However, MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT is my all time favorite.
    You are right when you say that humor is subjective. We don’t all find the same things funny. But these two authors know just where my funny bone is.

    Reply
  31. What’s flowing through my Regency-stuffed head as I read this post: GeorgetteHeyerMarianChesneyBarbaraMetzgerAnneGracieYes!! AKA subtleslapstickcleverwittyfloatmyboat. I appreciate many authorial styles, but an innate sense of humor is my favorite.

    Reply
  32. What’s flowing through my Regency-stuffed head as I read this post: GeorgetteHeyerMarianChesneyBarbaraMetzgerAnneGracieYes!! AKA subtleslapstickcleverwittyfloatmyboat. I appreciate many authorial styles, but an innate sense of humor is my favorite.

    Reply
  33. What’s flowing through my Regency-stuffed head as I read this post: GeorgetteHeyerMarianChesneyBarbaraMetzgerAnneGracieYes!! AKA subtleslapstickcleverwittyfloatmyboat. I appreciate many authorial styles, but an innate sense of humor is my favorite.

    Reply
  34. What’s flowing through my Regency-stuffed head as I read this post: GeorgetteHeyerMarianChesneyBarbaraMetzgerAnneGracieYes!! AKA subtleslapstickcleverwittyfloatmyboat. I appreciate many authorial styles, but an innate sense of humor is my favorite.

    Reply
  35. What’s flowing through my Regency-stuffed head as I read this post: GeorgetteHeyerMarianChesneyBarbaraMetzgerAnneGracieYes!! AKA subtleslapstickcleverwittyfloatmyboat. I appreciate many authorial styles, but an innate sense of humor is my favorite.

    Reply
  36. The Luckiest Lady in London by Sherry Thomas, from the heartfelt sarcasm of the title until the end where it has become true, the dryness of her situations and dialogue, the way the author allows the reader to be in on the joke from beginning to end, and oh my goodness, those bust enhancers make this one of my favorite books.
    And, like Mary M. above, Marion Chesney also makes me laugh. Her outrageous characters are unique.
    Lyndsay Sands and her early books such as The Deed, and The Key, are also go-tos.
    G.A. Aiken’s dragonkin series is full of humor.
    And, Freddy Hyphen Hyphen is one of my favorite heroes ever; he can lead me to Roon anytime.

    Reply
  37. The Luckiest Lady in London by Sherry Thomas, from the heartfelt sarcasm of the title until the end where it has become true, the dryness of her situations and dialogue, the way the author allows the reader to be in on the joke from beginning to end, and oh my goodness, those bust enhancers make this one of my favorite books.
    And, like Mary M. above, Marion Chesney also makes me laugh. Her outrageous characters are unique.
    Lyndsay Sands and her early books such as The Deed, and The Key, are also go-tos.
    G.A. Aiken’s dragonkin series is full of humor.
    And, Freddy Hyphen Hyphen is one of my favorite heroes ever; he can lead me to Roon anytime.

    Reply
  38. The Luckiest Lady in London by Sherry Thomas, from the heartfelt sarcasm of the title until the end where it has become true, the dryness of her situations and dialogue, the way the author allows the reader to be in on the joke from beginning to end, and oh my goodness, those bust enhancers make this one of my favorite books.
    And, like Mary M. above, Marion Chesney also makes me laugh. Her outrageous characters are unique.
    Lyndsay Sands and her early books such as The Deed, and The Key, are also go-tos.
    G.A. Aiken’s dragonkin series is full of humor.
    And, Freddy Hyphen Hyphen is one of my favorite heroes ever; he can lead me to Roon anytime.

    Reply
  39. The Luckiest Lady in London by Sherry Thomas, from the heartfelt sarcasm of the title until the end where it has become true, the dryness of her situations and dialogue, the way the author allows the reader to be in on the joke from beginning to end, and oh my goodness, those bust enhancers make this one of my favorite books.
    And, like Mary M. above, Marion Chesney also makes me laugh. Her outrageous characters are unique.
    Lyndsay Sands and her early books such as The Deed, and The Key, are also go-tos.
    G.A. Aiken’s dragonkin series is full of humor.
    And, Freddy Hyphen Hyphen is one of my favorite heroes ever; he can lead me to Roon anytime.

    Reply
  40. The Luckiest Lady in London by Sherry Thomas, from the heartfelt sarcasm of the title until the end where it has become true, the dryness of her situations and dialogue, the way the author allows the reader to be in on the joke from beginning to end, and oh my goodness, those bust enhancers make this one of my favorite books.
    And, like Mary M. above, Marion Chesney also makes me laugh. Her outrageous characters are unique.
    Lyndsay Sands and her early books such as The Deed, and The Key, are also go-tos.
    G.A. Aiken’s dragonkin series is full of humor.
    And, Freddy Hyphen Hyphen is one of my favorite heroes ever; he can lead me to Roon anytime.

    Reply
  41. I agree that animals make for good humor. I recently finished Beth O’Leary’s new book, The Switch, and there’s a scene with a dog that had me laughing out loud. If any one has ever been walking a dog and feel like you’ve been “walked” instead, you’d understand.

    Reply
  42. I agree that animals make for good humor. I recently finished Beth O’Leary’s new book, The Switch, and there’s a scene with a dog that had me laughing out loud. If any one has ever been walking a dog and feel like you’ve been “walked” instead, you’d understand.

    Reply
  43. I agree that animals make for good humor. I recently finished Beth O’Leary’s new book, The Switch, and there’s a scene with a dog that had me laughing out loud. If any one has ever been walking a dog and feel like you’ve been “walked” instead, you’d understand.

    Reply
  44. I agree that animals make for good humor. I recently finished Beth O’Leary’s new book, The Switch, and there’s a scene with a dog that had me laughing out loud. If any one has ever been walking a dog and feel like you’ve been “walked” instead, you’d understand.

    Reply
  45. I agree that animals make for good humor. I recently finished Beth O’Leary’s new book, The Switch, and there’s a scene with a dog that had me laughing out loud. If any one has ever been walking a dog and feel like you’ve been “walked” instead, you’d understand.

    Reply
  46. There is so much humor in Deanna Raybourn’s writing. I enjoyed the exchanges between Lady Julia and her husband Brisbane, before their marriage and after.
    I love the humor in her current Veronica Speedwell and Stoker relationship.
    The connections are strong, hilarious and deeply loving.

    Reply
  47. There is so much humor in Deanna Raybourn’s writing. I enjoyed the exchanges between Lady Julia and her husband Brisbane, before their marriage and after.
    I love the humor in her current Veronica Speedwell and Stoker relationship.
    The connections are strong, hilarious and deeply loving.

    Reply
  48. There is so much humor in Deanna Raybourn’s writing. I enjoyed the exchanges between Lady Julia and her husband Brisbane, before their marriage and after.
    I love the humor in her current Veronica Speedwell and Stoker relationship.
    The connections are strong, hilarious and deeply loving.

    Reply
  49. There is so much humor in Deanna Raybourn’s writing. I enjoyed the exchanges between Lady Julia and her husband Brisbane, before their marriage and after.
    I love the humor in her current Veronica Speedwell and Stoker relationship.
    The connections are strong, hilarious and deeply loving.

    Reply
  50. There is so much humor in Deanna Raybourn’s writing. I enjoyed the exchanges between Lady Julia and her husband Brisbane, before their marriage and after.
    I love the humor in her current Veronica Speedwell and Stoker relationship.
    The connections are strong, hilarious and deeply loving.

    Reply
  51. I love humor in books, and I will also say humor is very subjective. Also, sometimes ones mood just isn’t into the humor. For me humor is a very “visual” thing, and it takes a very talented author to write visual. Hard to believe, but Mary Balogh can write funny – I love her Lady with a Black Umbrella. I also love Ms. Gracie’s The Perfect Rake. I’m a big fan of most kinds of humor in books.

    Reply
  52. I love humor in books, and I will also say humor is very subjective. Also, sometimes ones mood just isn’t into the humor. For me humor is a very “visual” thing, and it takes a very talented author to write visual. Hard to believe, but Mary Balogh can write funny – I love her Lady with a Black Umbrella. I also love Ms. Gracie’s The Perfect Rake. I’m a big fan of most kinds of humor in books.

    Reply
  53. I love humor in books, and I will also say humor is very subjective. Also, sometimes ones mood just isn’t into the humor. For me humor is a very “visual” thing, and it takes a very talented author to write visual. Hard to believe, but Mary Balogh can write funny – I love her Lady with a Black Umbrella. I also love Ms. Gracie’s The Perfect Rake. I’m a big fan of most kinds of humor in books.

    Reply
  54. I love humor in books, and I will also say humor is very subjective. Also, sometimes ones mood just isn’t into the humor. For me humor is a very “visual” thing, and it takes a very talented author to write visual. Hard to believe, but Mary Balogh can write funny – I love her Lady with a Black Umbrella. I also love Ms. Gracie’s The Perfect Rake. I’m a big fan of most kinds of humor in books.

    Reply
  55. I love humor in books, and I will also say humor is very subjective. Also, sometimes ones mood just isn’t into the humor. For me humor is a very “visual” thing, and it takes a very talented author to write visual. Hard to believe, but Mary Balogh can write funny – I love her Lady with a Black Umbrella. I also love Ms. Gracie’s The Perfect Rake. I’m a big fan of most kinds of humor in books.

    Reply
  56. Some of my best summer memories are of curling up on our screened-in back porch, me on my rocker, Mom on her chaise lounge. We’d each be reading a book. Suddenly one of us would burst out laughing. The other would look up and wait until the other read the passage again aloud, then we’d share the laugh together. In her later years, my husband and I moved in and the reading and laughter commenced anew. My husband would just shake his head at us as we cackled over some hero’s remark, or the heroine’s scathing repost. I miss that emencely.

    Reply
  57. Some of my best summer memories are of curling up on our screened-in back porch, me on my rocker, Mom on her chaise lounge. We’d each be reading a book. Suddenly one of us would burst out laughing. The other would look up and wait until the other read the passage again aloud, then we’d share the laugh together. In her later years, my husband and I moved in and the reading and laughter commenced anew. My husband would just shake his head at us as we cackled over some hero’s remark, or the heroine’s scathing repost. I miss that emencely.

    Reply
  58. Some of my best summer memories are of curling up on our screened-in back porch, me on my rocker, Mom on her chaise lounge. We’d each be reading a book. Suddenly one of us would burst out laughing. The other would look up and wait until the other read the passage again aloud, then we’d share the laugh together. In her later years, my husband and I moved in and the reading and laughter commenced anew. My husband would just shake his head at us as we cackled over some hero’s remark, or the heroine’s scathing repost. I miss that emencely.

    Reply
  59. Some of my best summer memories are of curling up on our screened-in back porch, me on my rocker, Mom on her chaise lounge. We’d each be reading a book. Suddenly one of us would burst out laughing. The other would look up and wait until the other read the passage again aloud, then we’d share the laugh together. In her later years, my husband and I moved in and the reading and laughter commenced anew. My husband would just shake his head at us as we cackled over some hero’s remark, or the heroine’s scathing repost. I miss that emencely.

    Reply
  60. Some of my best summer memories are of curling up on our screened-in back porch, me on my rocker, Mom on her chaise lounge. We’d each be reading a book. Suddenly one of us would burst out laughing. The other would look up and wait until the other read the passage again aloud, then we’d share the laugh together. In her later years, my husband and I moved in and the reading and laughter commenced anew. My husband would just shake his head at us as we cackled over some hero’s remark, or the heroine’s scathing repost. I miss that emencely.

    Reply
  61. I love this post. I personally want books with humor. It is important to me to read a book which provides me with characters who are humans. And from what I can gather, most humans are funny. At times because they try to be funny at other times they have no idea how funny they are.
    And has already been said, I am a sucker for a guy who makes me laugh….Mr Wonderful made me laugh and look how that turned out.
    Again, Thanks for this post, and I hope everyone is safe and sound.

    Reply
  62. I love this post. I personally want books with humor. It is important to me to read a book which provides me with characters who are humans. And from what I can gather, most humans are funny. At times because they try to be funny at other times they have no idea how funny they are.
    And has already been said, I am a sucker for a guy who makes me laugh….Mr Wonderful made me laugh and look how that turned out.
    Again, Thanks for this post, and I hope everyone is safe and sound.

    Reply
  63. I love this post. I personally want books with humor. It is important to me to read a book which provides me with characters who are humans. And from what I can gather, most humans are funny. At times because they try to be funny at other times they have no idea how funny they are.
    And has already been said, I am a sucker for a guy who makes me laugh….Mr Wonderful made me laugh and look how that turned out.
    Again, Thanks for this post, and I hope everyone is safe and sound.

    Reply
  64. I love this post. I personally want books with humor. It is important to me to read a book which provides me with characters who are humans. And from what I can gather, most humans are funny. At times because they try to be funny at other times they have no idea how funny they are.
    And has already been said, I am a sucker for a guy who makes me laugh….Mr Wonderful made me laugh and look how that turned out.
    Again, Thanks for this post, and I hope everyone is safe and sound.

    Reply
  65. I love this post. I personally want books with humor. It is important to me to read a book which provides me with characters who are humans. And from what I can gather, most humans are funny. At times because they try to be funny at other times they have no idea how funny they are.
    And has already been said, I am a sucker for a guy who makes me laugh….Mr Wonderful made me laugh and look how that turned out.
    Again, Thanks for this post, and I hope everyone is safe and sound.

    Reply
  66. Thanks for these recommendations, Binnie. Yes, dogs can often be a lovely source of humor. I’m thinking now of Heyer’s Arabella, and the hero’s adopted stray dog Ulysses, and the conversations the Hero had with the dog. Just gorgeous.
    I also believe that dogs are a mental health tonic. When I was in a very busy day job, I’d get home late, really tired and not wanting to do anything, there would be a bouncing dog, all ready for her evening walk. And guilt would prompt me to take her down to dog park. And walking along by the peaceful creek, and watching the dogs on the oval interacting with each other and various people, and fetching balls and leaping for frisbees and sniffing and chasing — there were so many smiles and chuckles that by the time we reached home again, my mood had completely flipped and the tiredness was gone.

    Reply
  67. Thanks for these recommendations, Binnie. Yes, dogs can often be a lovely source of humor. I’m thinking now of Heyer’s Arabella, and the hero’s adopted stray dog Ulysses, and the conversations the Hero had with the dog. Just gorgeous.
    I also believe that dogs are a mental health tonic. When I was in a very busy day job, I’d get home late, really tired and not wanting to do anything, there would be a bouncing dog, all ready for her evening walk. And guilt would prompt me to take her down to dog park. And walking along by the peaceful creek, and watching the dogs on the oval interacting with each other and various people, and fetching balls and leaping for frisbees and sniffing and chasing — there were so many smiles and chuckles that by the time we reached home again, my mood had completely flipped and the tiredness was gone.

    Reply
  68. Thanks for these recommendations, Binnie. Yes, dogs can often be a lovely source of humor. I’m thinking now of Heyer’s Arabella, and the hero’s adopted stray dog Ulysses, and the conversations the Hero had with the dog. Just gorgeous.
    I also believe that dogs are a mental health tonic. When I was in a very busy day job, I’d get home late, really tired and not wanting to do anything, there would be a bouncing dog, all ready for her evening walk. And guilt would prompt me to take her down to dog park. And walking along by the peaceful creek, and watching the dogs on the oval interacting with each other and various people, and fetching balls and leaping for frisbees and sniffing and chasing — there were so many smiles and chuckles that by the time we reached home again, my mood had completely flipped and the tiredness was gone.

    Reply
  69. Thanks for these recommendations, Binnie. Yes, dogs can often be a lovely source of humor. I’m thinking now of Heyer’s Arabella, and the hero’s adopted stray dog Ulysses, and the conversations the Hero had with the dog. Just gorgeous.
    I also believe that dogs are a mental health tonic. When I was in a very busy day job, I’d get home late, really tired and not wanting to do anything, there would be a bouncing dog, all ready for her evening walk. And guilt would prompt me to take her down to dog park. And walking along by the peaceful creek, and watching the dogs on the oval interacting with each other and various people, and fetching balls and leaping for frisbees and sniffing and chasing — there were so many smiles and chuckles that by the time we reached home again, my mood had completely flipped and the tiredness was gone.

    Reply
  70. Thanks for these recommendations, Binnie. Yes, dogs can often be a lovely source of humor. I’m thinking now of Heyer’s Arabella, and the hero’s adopted stray dog Ulysses, and the conversations the Hero had with the dog. Just gorgeous.
    I also believe that dogs are a mental health tonic. When I was in a very busy day job, I’d get home late, really tired and not wanting to do anything, there would be a bouncing dog, all ready for her evening walk. And guilt would prompt me to take her down to dog park. And walking along by the peaceful creek, and watching the dogs on the oval interacting with each other and various people, and fetching balls and leaping for frisbees and sniffing and chasing — there were so many smiles and chuckles that by the time we reached home again, my mood had completely flipped and the tiredness was gone.

    Reply
  71. Oh, Theo, that scene in Perfect Rake was one of those that just “came” — a gift from the muse, if you will. And you know, I completely forgot about that scene with Sebastian and Hope. Thank you. And yes, so many of the problems in life are leavened by a good laugh. Or even a small chuckle.

    Reply
  72. Oh, Theo, that scene in Perfect Rake was one of those that just “came” — a gift from the muse, if you will. And you know, I completely forgot about that scene with Sebastian and Hope. Thank you. And yes, so many of the problems in life are leavened by a good laugh. Or even a small chuckle.

    Reply
  73. Oh, Theo, that scene in Perfect Rake was one of those that just “came” — a gift from the muse, if you will. And you know, I completely forgot about that scene with Sebastian and Hope. Thank you. And yes, so many of the problems in life are leavened by a good laugh. Or even a small chuckle.

    Reply
  74. Oh, Theo, that scene in Perfect Rake was one of those that just “came” — a gift from the muse, if you will. And you know, I completely forgot about that scene with Sebastian and Hope. Thank you. And yes, so many of the problems in life are leavened by a good laugh. Or even a small chuckle.

    Reply
  75. Oh, Theo, that scene in Perfect Rake was one of those that just “came” — a gift from the muse, if you will. And you know, I completely forgot about that scene with Sebastian and Hope. Thank you. And yes, so many of the problems in life are leavened by a good laugh. Or even a small chuckle.

    Reply
  76. Mary, I’m the same. I’ll often reread or rewatch something that’s so familiar to me that I’ll anticipate a lot of the dialogue, but it always cheers me up. I haven’t read much of these authors — their books were rarely seen here, but isn’t the republishing of old favorite books as e-books a blessing?

    Reply
  77. Mary, I’m the same. I’ll often reread or rewatch something that’s so familiar to me that I’ll anticipate a lot of the dialogue, but it always cheers me up. I haven’t read much of these authors — their books were rarely seen here, but isn’t the republishing of old favorite books as e-books a blessing?

    Reply
  78. Mary, I’m the same. I’ll often reread or rewatch something that’s so familiar to me that I’ll anticipate a lot of the dialogue, but it always cheers me up. I haven’t read much of these authors — their books were rarely seen here, but isn’t the republishing of old favorite books as e-books a blessing?

    Reply
  79. Mary, I’m the same. I’ll often reread or rewatch something that’s so familiar to me that I’ll anticipate a lot of the dialogue, but it always cheers me up. I haven’t read much of these authors — their books were rarely seen here, but isn’t the republishing of old favorite books as e-books a blessing?

    Reply
  80. Mary, I’m the same. I’ll often reread or rewatch something that’s so familiar to me that I’ll anticipate a lot of the dialogue, but it always cheers me up. I haven’t read much of these authors — their books were rarely seen here, but isn’t the republishing of old favorite books as e-books a blessing?

    Reply
  81. LOL– thanks Mary, I’m very flattered to be included in your list. And I’m very grateful to Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer, for many reasons, but not least for creating a humorous Regency era, such that in all the various historical periods that are favored in historical romance, only the Regency-era is firmly associated with humor. Which is why I love it.

    Reply
  82. LOL– thanks Mary, I’m very flattered to be included in your list. And I’m very grateful to Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer, for many reasons, but not least for creating a humorous Regency era, such that in all the various historical periods that are favored in historical romance, only the Regency-era is firmly associated with humor. Which is why I love it.

    Reply
  83. LOL– thanks Mary, I’m very flattered to be included in your list. And I’m very grateful to Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer, for many reasons, but not least for creating a humorous Regency era, such that in all the various historical periods that are favored in historical romance, only the Regency-era is firmly associated with humor. Which is why I love it.

    Reply
  84. LOL– thanks Mary, I’m very flattered to be included in your list. And I’m very grateful to Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer, for many reasons, but not least for creating a humorous Regency era, such that in all the various historical periods that are favored in historical romance, only the Regency-era is firmly associated with humor. Which is why I love it.

    Reply
  85. LOL– thanks Mary, I’m very flattered to be included in your list. And I’m very grateful to Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer, for many reasons, but not least for creating a humorous Regency era, such that in all the various historical periods that are favored in historical romance, only the Regency-era is firmly associated with humor. Which is why I love it.

    Reply
  86. LOL, Maria — thank you. And thank you for those suggestions — I’m sure quite a few readers (me included) will be picking up some new-to-them authors as a result of some of the suggestions here. And thank you for loving Freddy — he’s a favorite of mine as well.

    Reply
  87. LOL, Maria — thank you. And thank you for those suggestions — I’m sure quite a few readers (me included) will be picking up some new-to-them authors as a result of some of the suggestions here. And thank you for loving Freddy — he’s a favorite of mine as well.

    Reply
  88. LOL, Maria — thank you. And thank you for those suggestions — I’m sure quite a few readers (me included) will be picking up some new-to-them authors as a result of some of the suggestions here. And thank you for loving Freddy — he’s a favorite of mine as well.

    Reply
  89. LOL, Maria — thank you. And thank you for those suggestions — I’m sure quite a few readers (me included) will be picking up some new-to-them authors as a result of some of the suggestions here. And thank you for loving Freddy — he’s a favorite of mine as well.

    Reply
  90. LOL, Maria — thank you. And thank you for those suggestions — I’m sure quite a few readers (me included) will be picking up some new-to-them authors as a result of some of the suggestions here. And thank you for loving Freddy — he’s a favorite of mine as well.

    Reply
  91. Misti, The Switch is a fun book, isn’t it? And yes, anyone who’s been walked by a dog will get it. When I take my Milly out, it’s a ddebate as to who is walking whom — I think we start out with her walking me, but on the way home the “proper” balance is achieved.

    Reply
  92. Misti, The Switch is a fun book, isn’t it? And yes, anyone who’s been walked by a dog will get it. When I take my Milly out, it’s a ddebate as to who is walking whom — I think we start out with her walking me, but on the way home the “proper” balance is achieved.

    Reply
  93. Misti, The Switch is a fun book, isn’t it? And yes, anyone who’s been walked by a dog will get it. When I take my Milly out, it’s a ddebate as to who is walking whom — I think we start out with her walking me, but on the way home the “proper” balance is achieved.

    Reply
  94. Misti, The Switch is a fun book, isn’t it? And yes, anyone who’s been walked by a dog will get it. When I take my Milly out, it’s a ddebate as to who is walking whom — I think we start out with her walking me, but on the way home the “proper” balance is achieved.

    Reply
  95. Misti, The Switch is a fun book, isn’t it? And yes, anyone who’s been walked by a dog will get it. When I take my Milly out, it’s a ddebate as to who is walking whom — I think we start out with her walking me, but on the way home the “proper” balance is achieved.

    Reply
  96. During this time, I have needed to reread beloved books that have made me laugh. Oscar Wilde was whispering in your ear when you wrote “The Perfect Rake.” When I went to bed, fearful of this pandemic and perhaps its economic aftermath, your book made laugh out loud and be able to sleep soundly. Years after you die, people will be laughing at you. Uh. Laughing at your talent. Oh, wait. You know what I mean.
    You are a gift.

    Reply
  97. During this time, I have needed to reread beloved books that have made me laugh. Oscar Wilde was whispering in your ear when you wrote “The Perfect Rake.” When I went to bed, fearful of this pandemic and perhaps its economic aftermath, your book made laugh out loud and be able to sleep soundly. Years after you die, people will be laughing at you. Uh. Laughing at your talent. Oh, wait. You know what I mean.
    You are a gift.

    Reply
  98. During this time, I have needed to reread beloved books that have made me laugh. Oscar Wilde was whispering in your ear when you wrote “The Perfect Rake.” When I went to bed, fearful of this pandemic and perhaps its economic aftermath, your book made laugh out loud and be able to sleep soundly. Years after you die, people will be laughing at you. Uh. Laughing at your talent. Oh, wait. You know what I mean.
    You are a gift.

    Reply
  99. During this time, I have needed to reread beloved books that have made me laugh. Oscar Wilde was whispering in your ear when you wrote “The Perfect Rake.” When I went to bed, fearful of this pandemic and perhaps its economic aftermath, your book made laugh out loud and be able to sleep soundly. Years after you die, people will be laughing at you. Uh. Laughing at your talent. Oh, wait. You know what I mean.
    You are a gift.

    Reply
  100. During this time, I have needed to reread beloved books that have made me laugh. Oscar Wilde was whispering in your ear when you wrote “The Perfect Rake.” When I went to bed, fearful of this pandemic and perhaps its economic aftermath, your book made laugh out loud and be able to sleep soundly. Years after you die, people will be laughing at you. Uh. Laughing at your talent. Oh, wait. You know what I mean.
    You are a gift.

    Reply
  101. Pamela this reminded me so much of me and my mother, when I’d be reading some Georgette Heyer book and giggling away and she’d ask me which bit, and I’d read it out to her. Such fun to be able to share that kind of thing.
    And I remember when I was up in Queensland for a RWA committee meeting, and staying with my sister. I had Kelly Hunter’s first book — Wife for a Week — she was on the committee and had given me a copy. My sister picked it up and started reading it.
    Next morning, as my brother-in-law was driving me to the meeting place, he kept grumbling about “that blasted book.” Apparently my sister kept reading it in bed, and laughing, and waking him up, so then she’d read him the funny bit. “And the worst thing was,” he added grumpily, “it really was funny so then it was even harder to go back to sleep.”

    Reply
  102. Pamela this reminded me so much of me and my mother, when I’d be reading some Georgette Heyer book and giggling away and she’d ask me which bit, and I’d read it out to her. Such fun to be able to share that kind of thing.
    And I remember when I was up in Queensland for a RWA committee meeting, and staying with my sister. I had Kelly Hunter’s first book — Wife for a Week — she was on the committee and had given me a copy. My sister picked it up and started reading it.
    Next morning, as my brother-in-law was driving me to the meeting place, he kept grumbling about “that blasted book.” Apparently my sister kept reading it in bed, and laughing, and waking him up, so then she’d read him the funny bit. “And the worst thing was,” he added grumpily, “it really was funny so then it was even harder to go back to sleep.”

    Reply
  103. Pamela this reminded me so much of me and my mother, when I’d be reading some Georgette Heyer book and giggling away and she’d ask me which bit, and I’d read it out to her. Such fun to be able to share that kind of thing.
    And I remember when I was up in Queensland for a RWA committee meeting, and staying with my sister. I had Kelly Hunter’s first book — Wife for a Week — she was on the committee and had given me a copy. My sister picked it up and started reading it.
    Next morning, as my brother-in-law was driving me to the meeting place, he kept grumbling about “that blasted book.” Apparently my sister kept reading it in bed, and laughing, and waking him up, so then she’d read him the funny bit. “And the worst thing was,” he added grumpily, “it really was funny so then it was even harder to go back to sleep.”

    Reply
  104. Pamela this reminded me so much of me and my mother, when I’d be reading some Georgette Heyer book and giggling away and she’d ask me which bit, and I’d read it out to her. Such fun to be able to share that kind of thing.
    And I remember when I was up in Queensland for a RWA committee meeting, and staying with my sister. I had Kelly Hunter’s first book — Wife for a Week — she was on the committee and had given me a copy. My sister picked it up and started reading it.
    Next morning, as my brother-in-law was driving me to the meeting place, he kept grumbling about “that blasted book.” Apparently my sister kept reading it in bed, and laughing, and waking him up, so then she’d read him the funny bit. “And the worst thing was,” he added grumpily, “it really was funny so then it was even harder to go back to sleep.”

    Reply
  105. Pamela this reminded me so much of me and my mother, when I’d be reading some Georgette Heyer book and giggling away and she’d ask me which bit, and I’d read it out to her. Such fun to be able to share that kind of thing.
    And I remember when I was up in Queensland for a RWA committee meeting, and staying with my sister. I had Kelly Hunter’s first book — Wife for a Week — she was on the committee and had given me a copy. My sister picked it up and started reading it.
    Next morning, as my brother-in-law was driving me to the meeting place, he kept grumbling about “that blasted book.” Apparently my sister kept reading it in bed, and laughing, and waking him up, so then she’d read him the funny bit. “And the worst thing was,” he added grumpily, “it really was funny so then it was even harder to go back to sleep.”

    Reply
  106. Thanks, Annette, I agree with you that most people are funny in some way — even though, or maybe especially when they’re unaware of it. And I don’t mean laughing at people, but laughing with them or laughing at the human condition.
    Ans yes, a man (real or fictional) who can make me laugh is enormously appealing.

    Reply
  107. Thanks, Annette, I agree with you that most people are funny in some way — even though, or maybe especially when they’re unaware of it. And I don’t mean laughing at people, but laughing with them or laughing at the human condition.
    Ans yes, a man (real or fictional) who can make me laugh is enormously appealing.

    Reply
  108. Thanks, Annette, I agree with you that most people are funny in some way — even though, or maybe especially when they’re unaware of it. And I don’t mean laughing at people, but laughing with them or laughing at the human condition.
    Ans yes, a man (real or fictional) who can make me laugh is enormously appealing.

    Reply
  109. Thanks, Annette, I agree with you that most people are funny in some way — even though, or maybe especially when they’re unaware of it. And I don’t mean laughing at people, but laughing with them or laughing at the human condition.
    Ans yes, a man (real or fictional) who can make me laugh is enormously appealing.

    Reply
  110. Thanks, Annette, I agree with you that most people are funny in some way — even though, or maybe especially when they’re unaware of it. And I don’t mean laughing at people, but laughing with them or laughing at the human condition.
    Ans yes, a man (real or fictional) who can make me laugh is enormously appealing.

    Reply
  111. Thanks for those lovely words, Linda. I do hope my books keep getting read long after I’m gone. And oh, Oscar Wilde. . . I used to work in an office shared with half a dozen people, and one of them was always looking for her handbag. And one of the guys and I invariably used to say in unison “A handbag?” in a Lady Bracknell sort of voice, and we’d crack up laughing. The owner of the missing handbag, and indeed some of the others in the office used to eye us bemusedly. But it was a regular laugh.

    Reply
  112. Thanks for those lovely words, Linda. I do hope my books keep getting read long after I’m gone. And oh, Oscar Wilde. . . I used to work in an office shared with half a dozen people, and one of them was always looking for her handbag. And one of the guys and I invariably used to say in unison “A handbag?” in a Lady Bracknell sort of voice, and we’d crack up laughing. The owner of the missing handbag, and indeed some of the others in the office used to eye us bemusedly. But it was a regular laugh.

    Reply
  113. Thanks for those lovely words, Linda. I do hope my books keep getting read long after I’m gone. And oh, Oscar Wilde. . . I used to work in an office shared with half a dozen people, and one of them was always looking for her handbag. And one of the guys and I invariably used to say in unison “A handbag?” in a Lady Bracknell sort of voice, and we’d crack up laughing. The owner of the missing handbag, and indeed some of the others in the office used to eye us bemusedly. But it was a regular laugh.

    Reply
  114. Thanks for those lovely words, Linda. I do hope my books keep getting read long after I’m gone. And oh, Oscar Wilde. . . I used to work in an office shared with half a dozen people, and one of them was always looking for her handbag. And one of the guys and I invariably used to say in unison “A handbag?” in a Lady Bracknell sort of voice, and we’d crack up laughing. The owner of the missing handbag, and indeed some of the others in the office used to eye us bemusedly. But it was a regular laugh.

    Reply
  115. Thanks for those lovely words, Linda. I do hope my books keep getting read long after I’m gone. And oh, Oscar Wilde. . . I used to work in an office shared with half a dozen people, and one of them was always looking for her handbag. And one of the guys and I invariably used to say in unison “A handbag?” in a Lady Bracknell sort of voice, and we’d crack up laughing. The owner of the missing handbag, and indeed some of the others in the office used to eye us bemusedly. But it was a regular laugh.

    Reply
  116. Anne,
    I loved all of your Chance Sisters audiobooks and found humor in all of them. One author’s books used to make me laugh out loud all the time – it was Kieran Kramer and her Impossible Bachelors series, which was first released in 2010. But I haven’t seen her write any historical romances lately.

    Reply
  117. Anne,
    I loved all of your Chance Sisters audiobooks and found humor in all of them. One author’s books used to make me laugh out loud all the time – it was Kieran Kramer and her Impossible Bachelors series, which was first released in 2010. But I haven’t seen her write any historical romances lately.

    Reply
  118. Anne,
    I loved all of your Chance Sisters audiobooks and found humor in all of them. One author’s books used to make me laugh out loud all the time – it was Kieran Kramer and her Impossible Bachelors series, which was first released in 2010. But I haven’t seen her write any historical romances lately.

    Reply
  119. Anne,
    I loved all of your Chance Sisters audiobooks and found humor in all of them. One author’s books used to make me laugh out loud all the time – it was Kieran Kramer and her Impossible Bachelors series, which was first released in 2010. But I haven’t seen her write any historical romances lately.

    Reply
  120. Anne,
    I loved all of your Chance Sisters audiobooks and found humor in all of them. One author’s books used to make me laugh out loud all the time – it was Kieran Kramer and her Impossible Bachelors series, which was first released in 2010. But I haven’t seen her write any historical romances lately.

    Reply
  121. How wonderful to have asked the question that prompted this terrific post – and all the comments that just confirm the importance of humor! I adored Freddy and hoped from the beginning that he would “graduate” to hero status- very happy when he did! I think the dry humor of Jane Austen was my introduction, at the age of 10 or so, to irony. Hard to think of a Heyer or Chesney hero who did not have that dry, witty bent as well. While Regency is my preferred period, I must admit that Jennifer Crusie’s modern day characters can also make me laugh out loud. Thanks, Anne, for a post we all needed right now!

    Reply
  122. How wonderful to have asked the question that prompted this terrific post – and all the comments that just confirm the importance of humor! I adored Freddy and hoped from the beginning that he would “graduate” to hero status- very happy when he did! I think the dry humor of Jane Austen was my introduction, at the age of 10 or so, to irony. Hard to think of a Heyer or Chesney hero who did not have that dry, witty bent as well. While Regency is my preferred period, I must admit that Jennifer Crusie’s modern day characters can also make me laugh out loud. Thanks, Anne, for a post we all needed right now!

    Reply
  123. How wonderful to have asked the question that prompted this terrific post – and all the comments that just confirm the importance of humor! I adored Freddy and hoped from the beginning that he would “graduate” to hero status- very happy when he did! I think the dry humor of Jane Austen was my introduction, at the age of 10 or so, to irony. Hard to think of a Heyer or Chesney hero who did not have that dry, witty bent as well. While Regency is my preferred period, I must admit that Jennifer Crusie’s modern day characters can also make me laugh out loud. Thanks, Anne, for a post we all needed right now!

    Reply
  124. How wonderful to have asked the question that prompted this terrific post – and all the comments that just confirm the importance of humor! I adored Freddy and hoped from the beginning that he would “graduate” to hero status- very happy when he did! I think the dry humor of Jane Austen was my introduction, at the age of 10 or so, to irony. Hard to think of a Heyer or Chesney hero who did not have that dry, witty bent as well. While Regency is my preferred period, I must admit that Jennifer Crusie’s modern day characters can also make me laugh out loud. Thanks, Anne, for a post we all needed right now!

    Reply
  125. How wonderful to have asked the question that prompted this terrific post – and all the comments that just confirm the importance of humor! I adored Freddy and hoped from the beginning that he would “graduate” to hero status- very happy when he did! I think the dry humor of Jane Austen was my introduction, at the age of 10 or so, to irony. Hard to think of a Heyer or Chesney hero who did not have that dry, witty bent as well. While Regency is my preferred period, I must admit that Jennifer Crusie’s modern day characters can also make me laugh out loud. Thanks, Anne, for a post we all needed right now!

    Reply
  126. Thanks for your question, Constance. It’s been a question a lot of wenchly readers seem to feel strongly about, perhaps even more so in the current times.
    As for Jennifer Crusie’s books, I love them, especially her earliest books, written for Harlequin. Before they were reprinted I lent my copies to a friend of mine — one at a time, on pain of ghastly revenge if she failed to return them! She did.

    Reply
  127. Thanks for your question, Constance. It’s been a question a lot of wenchly readers seem to feel strongly about, perhaps even more so in the current times.
    As for Jennifer Crusie’s books, I love them, especially her earliest books, written for Harlequin. Before they were reprinted I lent my copies to a friend of mine — one at a time, on pain of ghastly revenge if she failed to return them! She did.

    Reply
  128. Thanks for your question, Constance. It’s been a question a lot of wenchly readers seem to feel strongly about, perhaps even more so in the current times.
    As for Jennifer Crusie’s books, I love them, especially her earliest books, written for Harlequin. Before they were reprinted I lent my copies to a friend of mine — one at a time, on pain of ghastly revenge if she failed to return them! She did.

    Reply
  129. Thanks for your question, Constance. It’s been a question a lot of wenchly readers seem to feel strongly about, perhaps even more so in the current times.
    As for Jennifer Crusie’s books, I love them, especially her earliest books, written for Harlequin. Before they were reprinted I lent my copies to a friend of mine — one at a time, on pain of ghastly revenge if she failed to return them! She did.

    Reply
  130. Thanks for your question, Constance. It’s been a question a lot of wenchly readers seem to feel strongly about, perhaps even more so in the current times.
    As for Jennifer Crusie’s books, I love them, especially her earliest books, written for Harlequin. Before they were reprinted I lent my copies to a friend of mine — one at a time, on pain of ghastly revenge if she failed to return them! She did.

    Reply
  131. I love humor in books. Georgette Heyer was amazing that way.
    I just finished an ARC of Octavius and the Perfect Governess by Emily Larkin and it was very funny in spots.

    Reply
  132. I love humor in books. Georgette Heyer was amazing that way.
    I just finished an ARC of Octavius and the Perfect Governess by Emily Larkin and it was very funny in spots.

    Reply
  133. I love humor in books. Georgette Heyer was amazing that way.
    I just finished an ARC of Octavius and the Perfect Governess by Emily Larkin and it was very funny in spots.

    Reply
  134. I love humor in books. Georgette Heyer was amazing that way.
    I just finished an ARC of Octavius and the Perfect Governess by Emily Larkin and it was very funny in spots.

    Reply
  135. I love humor in books. Georgette Heyer was amazing that way.
    I just finished an ARC of Octavius and the Perfect Governess by Emily Larkin and it was very funny in spots.

    Reply
  136. I love humor in books – any kind of humor. Thanks for this posting and I have enjoyed reading all the comments and suggestions of books and authors new to me.

    Reply
  137. I love humor in books – any kind of humor. Thanks for this posting and I have enjoyed reading all the comments and suggestions of books and authors new to me.

    Reply
  138. I love humor in books – any kind of humor. Thanks for this posting and I have enjoyed reading all the comments and suggestions of books and authors new to me.

    Reply
  139. I love humor in books – any kind of humor. Thanks for this posting and I have enjoyed reading all the comments and suggestions of books and authors new to me.

    Reply
  140. I love humor in books – any kind of humor. Thanks for this posting and I have enjoyed reading all the comments and suggestions of books and authors new to me.

    Reply
  141. I love humour in romance! I love witty banter and delicious to-and-fro between the hero and heroine. You do it beautifully, Anne, as does Georgette Heyer. Amanda Quick is also terrific for wonderful humour in her earlier Regencies. Humour, to me, gives a book spirit and warmth and utter charm. Keep it up!

    Reply
  142. I love humour in romance! I love witty banter and delicious to-and-fro between the hero and heroine. You do it beautifully, Anne, as does Georgette Heyer. Amanda Quick is also terrific for wonderful humour in her earlier Regencies. Humour, to me, gives a book spirit and warmth and utter charm. Keep it up!

    Reply
  143. I love humour in romance! I love witty banter and delicious to-and-fro between the hero and heroine. You do it beautifully, Anne, as does Georgette Heyer. Amanda Quick is also terrific for wonderful humour in her earlier Regencies. Humour, to me, gives a book spirit and warmth and utter charm. Keep it up!

    Reply
  144. I love humour in romance! I love witty banter and delicious to-and-fro between the hero and heroine. You do it beautifully, Anne, as does Georgette Heyer. Amanda Quick is also terrific for wonderful humour in her earlier Regencies. Humour, to me, gives a book spirit and warmth and utter charm. Keep it up!

    Reply
  145. I love humour in romance! I love witty banter and delicious to-and-fro between the hero and heroine. You do it beautifully, Anne, as does Georgette Heyer. Amanda Quick is also terrific for wonderful humour in her earlier Regencies. Humour, to me, gives a book spirit and warmth and utter charm. Keep it up!

    Reply
  146. Thanks, Margot. The book suggestions are great, aren’t they? I also love our end-of-the-month posts where the wenches share what they’ve read and heaps of readers chime in with their reading recommendations. But be warned — it’s very hard on the credit card.

    Reply
  147. Thanks, Margot. The book suggestions are great, aren’t they? I also love our end-of-the-month posts where the wenches share what they’ve read and heaps of readers chime in with their reading recommendations. But be warned — it’s very hard on the credit card.

    Reply
  148. Thanks, Margot. The book suggestions are great, aren’t they? I also love our end-of-the-month posts where the wenches share what they’ve read and heaps of readers chime in with their reading recommendations. But be warned — it’s very hard on the credit card.

    Reply
  149. Thanks, Margot. The book suggestions are great, aren’t they? I also love our end-of-the-month posts where the wenches share what they’ve read and heaps of readers chime in with their reading recommendations. But be warned — it’s very hard on the credit card.

    Reply
  150. Thanks, Margot. The book suggestions are great, aren’t they? I also love our end-of-the-month posts where the wenches share what they’ve read and heaps of readers chime in with their reading recommendations. But be warned — it’s very hard on the credit card.

    Reply
  151. Thanks so much for that very kind comment, Malvina. Heyer is the queen, but Amanda Quick/Jayne Ann Krentz is also wonderful. Both of them have written books I read over and over.

    Reply
  152. Thanks so much for that very kind comment, Malvina. Heyer is the queen, but Amanda Quick/Jayne Ann Krentz is also wonderful. Both of them have written books I read over and over.

    Reply
  153. Thanks so much for that very kind comment, Malvina. Heyer is the queen, but Amanda Quick/Jayne Ann Krentz is also wonderful. Both of them have written books I read over and over.

    Reply
  154. Thanks so much for that very kind comment, Malvina. Heyer is the queen, but Amanda Quick/Jayne Ann Krentz is also wonderful. Both of them have written books I read over and over.

    Reply
  155. Thanks so much for that very kind comment, Malvina. Heyer is the queen, but Amanda Quick/Jayne Ann Krentz is also wonderful. Both of them have written books I read over and over.

    Reply
  156. Sorry to be a bit late with this comment but I loved the humour in ‘Marry in Scarlet’! I felt as though you’d had lots of fun writing those characters, Anne, and they made me laugh. My favourite Georgette Heyer book is ‘Cotillion’ both the scenes with the daft cousin but also Freddy’s father – he is so surprised at finding hidden depths in his son and his comments about it are hilarious! The worst thing ever is being told that something is funny though – like “you must read this rom com because you’ll laugh the whole time” – that puts my back up and I rarely find it funny at all. It has to be spontaneous, as you say!

    Reply
  157. Sorry to be a bit late with this comment but I loved the humour in ‘Marry in Scarlet’! I felt as though you’d had lots of fun writing those characters, Anne, and they made me laugh. My favourite Georgette Heyer book is ‘Cotillion’ both the scenes with the daft cousin but also Freddy’s father – he is so surprised at finding hidden depths in his son and his comments about it are hilarious! The worst thing ever is being told that something is funny though – like “you must read this rom com because you’ll laugh the whole time” – that puts my back up and I rarely find it funny at all. It has to be spontaneous, as you say!

    Reply
  158. Sorry to be a bit late with this comment but I loved the humour in ‘Marry in Scarlet’! I felt as though you’d had lots of fun writing those characters, Anne, and they made me laugh. My favourite Georgette Heyer book is ‘Cotillion’ both the scenes with the daft cousin but also Freddy’s father – he is so surprised at finding hidden depths in his son and his comments about it are hilarious! The worst thing ever is being told that something is funny though – like “you must read this rom com because you’ll laugh the whole time” – that puts my back up and I rarely find it funny at all. It has to be spontaneous, as you say!

    Reply
  159. Sorry to be a bit late with this comment but I loved the humour in ‘Marry in Scarlet’! I felt as though you’d had lots of fun writing those characters, Anne, and they made me laugh. My favourite Georgette Heyer book is ‘Cotillion’ both the scenes with the daft cousin but also Freddy’s father – he is so surprised at finding hidden depths in his son and his comments about it are hilarious! The worst thing ever is being told that something is funny though – like “you must read this rom com because you’ll laugh the whole time” – that puts my back up and I rarely find it funny at all. It has to be spontaneous, as you say!

    Reply
  160. Sorry to be a bit late with this comment but I loved the humour in ‘Marry in Scarlet’! I felt as though you’d had lots of fun writing those characters, Anne, and they made me laugh. My favourite Georgette Heyer book is ‘Cotillion’ both the scenes with the daft cousin but also Freddy’s father – he is so surprised at finding hidden depths in his son and his comments about it are hilarious! The worst thing ever is being told that something is funny though – like “you must read this rom com because you’ll laugh the whole time” – that puts my back up and I rarely find it funny at all. It has to be spontaneous, as you say!

    Reply
  161. Thanks so much, Christina — yes, I had fun with some of those scenes. As for Freddy’s father, Lord Ledgerwood, in Cotillion, he was such a treat, with his dry comments. I suspect if Heyer were writing these days she would be inundated with requests for his story.
    I do agree with you at being told something is funny. Even worse is when someone is more or less standing over you, waiting for you to laugh. So often funny bits in books have been built up to, but it’s just the punchline you get told about, not the whole effect.

    Reply
  162. Thanks so much, Christina — yes, I had fun with some of those scenes. As for Freddy’s father, Lord Ledgerwood, in Cotillion, he was such a treat, with his dry comments. I suspect if Heyer were writing these days she would be inundated with requests for his story.
    I do agree with you at being told something is funny. Even worse is when someone is more or less standing over you, waiting for you to laugh. So often funny bits in books have been built up to, but it’s just the punchline you get told about, not the whole effect.

    Reply
  163. Thanks so much, Christina — yes, I had fun with some of those scenes. As for Freddy’s father, Lord Ledgerwood, in Cotillion, he was such a treat, with his dry comments. I suspect if Heyer were writing these days she would be inundated with requests for his story.
    I do agree with you at being told something is funny. Even worse is when someone is more or less standing over you, waiting for you to laugh. So often funny bits in books have been built up to, but it’s just the punchline you get told about, not the whole effect.

    Reply
  164. Thanks so much, Christina — yes, I had fun with some of those scenes. As for Freddy’s father, Lord Ledgerwood, in Cotillion, he was such a treat, with his dry comments. I suspect if Heyer were writing these days she would be inundated with requests for his story.
    I do agree with you at being told something is funny. Even worse is when someone is more or less standing over you, waiting for you to laugh. So often funny bits in books have been built up to, but it’s just the punchline you get told about, not the whole effect.

    Reply
  165. Thanks so much, Christina — yes, I had fun with some of those scenes. As for Freddy’s father, Lord Ledgerwood, in Cotillion, he was such a treat, with his dry comments. I suspect if Heyer were writing these days she would be inundated with requests for his story.
    I do agree with you at being told something is funny. Even worse is when someone is more or less standing over you, waiting for you to laugh. So often funny bits in books have been built up to, but it’s just the punchline you get told about, not the whole effect.

    Reply
  166. Exactly! Same with movie trailers – why do they always have to show the best scenes beforehand? It makes their impact so much less when you’re watching the film!

    Reply
  167. Exactly! Same with movie trailers – why do they always have to show the best scenes beforehand? It makes their impact so much less when you’re watching the film!

    Reply
  168. Exactly! Same with movie trailers – why do they always have to show the best scenes beforehand? It makes their impact so much less when you’re watching the film!

    Reply
  169. Exactly! Same with movie trailers – why do they always have to show the best scenes beforehand? It makes their impact so much less when you’re watching the film!

    Reply
  170. Exactly! Same with movie trailers – why do they always have to show the best scenes beforehand? It makes their impact so much less when you’re watching the film!

    Reply
  171. I love funny romances, especially with witty back-and-forth banter between the H and h. Two of my very favorite funny books (and favorite books overall) are Connie Brockway’s “The Bridal Season” ( I LOVED Letty) and “A Week to be Wicked” by Tessa Dare. I agree with you, Anne. It is very challenging to make people laugh.

    Reply
  172. I love funny romances, especially with witty back-and-forth banter between the H and h. Two of my very favorite funny books (and favorite books overall) are Connie Brockway’s “The Bridal Season” ( I LOVED Letty) and “A Week to be Wicked” by Tessa Dare. I agree with you, Anne. It is very challenging to make people laugh.

    Reply
  173. I love funny romances, especially with witty back-and-forth banter between the H and h. Two of my very favorite funny books (and favorite books overall) are Connie Brockway’s “The Bridal Season” ( I LOVED Letty) and “A Week to be Wicked” by Tessa Dare. I agree with you, Anne. It is very challenging to make people laugh.

    Reply
  174. I love funny romances, especially with witty back-and-forth banter between the H and h. Two of my very favorite funny books (and favorite books overall) are Connie Brockway’s “The Bridal Season” ( I LOVED Letty) and “A Week to be Wicked” by Tessa Dare. I agree with you, Anne. It is very challenging to make people laugh.

    Reply
  175. I love funny romances, especially with witty back-and-forth banter between the H and h. Two of my very favorite funny books (and favorite books overall) are Connie Brockway’s “The Bridal Season” ( I LOVED Letty) and “A Week to be Wicked” by Tessa Dare. I agree with you, Anne. It is very challenging to make people laugh.

    Reply

Leave a Comment